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Book
xii, 347 p. : ill.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface, vii Foreword, ix Contributors, x INTRODUCTION, 1 1 Biodiversity and insect pests, 3 Geoff M. Gurr, Steve D. Wratten and William E. Snyder FUNDAMENTALS, 21 2 The ecology of biodiversity--biocontrol relationships, 23 William E. Snyder and Jason M. Tylianakis 3 The role of generalist predators in terrestrial food webs: lessons for agricultural pest management, 41 K.D. Welch, R.S. Pfannenstiel and J.D. Harwood 4 Ecological economics of biodiversity use for pest management, 57 Mark Gillespie and Steve D. Wratten 5 Soil fertility, biodiversity and pest management, 72 Miguel A. Altieri, Luigi Ponti and Clara I. Nicholls 6 Plant biodiversity as a resource for natural products for insect pest management, 85 Opender Koul 7 The ecology and utility of local and landscape scale effects in pest management, 106 Sagrario Gamez-Virues, Mattias Jonsson and Barbara Ekbom METHODS, 121 8 Scale effects in biodiversity and biological control: methods and statistical analysis, 123 Christoph Scherber, Blas Lavandero, Katrin M. Meyer, David Perovic, Ute Visser, Kerstin Wiegand and Teja Tscharntke 9 Pick and mix: selecting flowering plants to meet the requirements of target biological control insects, 139 Felix L. Wackers and Paul C.J. van Rijn 10 The molecular revolution: using polymerase chain reaction based methods to explore the role of predators in terrestrial food webs, 166 William O.C. Symondson 11 Employing chemical ecology to understand and exploit biodiversity for pest management, 185 David G. James, Sofia Orre-Gordon, Olivia L. Reynolds (nee Kvedaras) and Marja Simpson APPLICATION, 197 12 Using decision theory and sociological tools to facilitate adoption of biodiversity-based pest management strategies, 199 M.M. Escalada and K.L. Heong 13 Ecological engineering strategies to manage insect pests in rice, 214 Geoff M. Gurr, K.L. Heong, J.A. Cheng and J. Catindig 14 China's 'Green Plant Protection' initiative: coordinated promotion of biodiversity-related technologies, 230 Lu Zhongxian, Yang Yajun, Yang Puyun and Zhao Zhonghua 15 Diversity and defence: plant--herbivore interactions at multiple scales and trophic levels, 241 Finbarr G. Horgan 16 'Push--pull' revisited: the process of successful deployment of a chemical ecology based pest management tool, 259 Zeyaur R. Khan, Charles A.O. Midega, Jimmy Pittchar, Toby J.A. Bruce and John A. Pickett 17 Using native plant species to diversify agriculture, 276 Douglas A. Landis, Mary M. Gardiner and Jean Tompkins 18 Using biodiversity for pest suppression in urban landscapes, 293 Paula M. Shrewsbury and Simon R. Leather 19 Cover crops and related methods for enhancing agricultural biodiversity and conservation biocontrol: successful case studies, 309 P.G. Tillman, H.A. Smith and J.M. Holland SYNTHESIS, 329 20 Conclusion: biodiversity as an asset rather than a burden, 331 Geoff M. Gurr, William E. Snyder, Steve D. Wratten and Donna M.Y. Read Index, 340 Colour plates fall between pages 84 and 85.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470656860 20160612
Biodiversity offers great potential for managing insect pests. It provides resistance genes and anti-insect compounds; a huge range of predatory and parasitic natural enemies of pests; and community ecology-level effects operating at the local and landscape scales to check pest build-up. This book brings together world leaders in theoretical, methodological and applied aspects to provide a comprehensive treatment of this fast-moving field. Chapter authors from Europe, Asia, Africa, Australasia and the Americas ensure a truly international scope. Topics range from scientific principles, innovative research methods, ecological economics and effective communication to farmers, as well as case studies of successful use of biodiversity-based pest management some of which extend over millions of hectares or are enshrined as government policy. Written to be accessible to advanced undergraduates whilst also stimulating the seasoned researcher, this work will help unlock the power of biodiversity to deliver sustainable insect pest management. Visit www.wiley.com/go/gurr/biodiversity to access the artwork from the book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470656860 20160612
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library

3. Ecolenteja [2012]

Book
1 online resource (24 pages)
Book
xii, 459 p. : ill.
  • Contributors vii Preface xi 1 Biofuel Crop Sustainability Paradigm 3 B.P. Singh 2 Sustainable Production of Grain Crops for Biofuels 31 A.A. Jaradat 3 Sugarcane as an Energy Crop: Its Role in Biomass Economy 53 R. van Antwerpen, S.D. Berry, T. van Antwerpen, J. Smithers, S. Joshi, and M. van der Laan 4 Sustainable Cellulosic Grass Crop Production 109 J.H. Fike, D.J. Parrish, and W.B. Fike 5 Sustainable Oil Crops Production 165 C. Eynck, D. Shrestha, J. Vollmann, K.C. Falk, W. Friedt, H.P. Singh, and E. Obeng 6 Short-rotation Woody Crop Biomass Production for Bioenergy 205 L.C. Kiser and T.R. Fox 7 Biomass Feedstock Production Impact on Water Resource Availability 239 K.C. Stone, P.G. Hunt, K.B. Cantrell, and K.S. Ro 8 Biofuel Crops and Soil Quality and Erosion 261 D. Chatskikh, A. Ovchinnikova, B. Seshadri, and N. Bolan 9 Nutrient Management in Biofuel Crop Production 301 R. Lemus 10 Food, Farming, and Biofuels 325 J. Popp 11 Biofuel Crops, Ecosystem Services, and Biodiversity 357 A. Fieldsend and H.P. Singh 12 Biofuel Crops and Greenhouse Gases 383 A. Hastings, J. Yeluripati, J. Hillier, and P. Smith 13 Economics of Biomass Feedstocks and Biofuels 407 T.A. Maung, C. Gustafson, B. McCarl, D. Ripplinger, and D. Saxowsky 14 Geospatial Modeling Applications for Biofuel Sustainability Assessment 431 S.S. Panda Appendix I: Botanical Names 449 Index 451.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470963043 20160612
Biofuel Crop Sustainability brings together the basic principles of agricultural sustainability and special stipulations for biofuels, from the economic and ecological opportunities and challenges of sustainable biofuel crop production to the unique characteristics of particular crops which make them ideal for biofuel applications. This book will be a valuable resource for researchers and professionals involved in biofuels development and production as well as agriculture industry personnel. Chapters focus the broad principles of resource management for ecological, environmental and societal welfare, the sustainability issues pertaining to several broad categories of biofuel crops , as well as the economics and profitability of biofuels on both a local and international scale. Coverage includes topics such as utilizing waste water for field crop irrigation and algae production, reliability of feedstock supply, marginal lands, and identifying crops with traits of significance for survival and growth on low fertility soils. The development of production practices with low external inputs of fertilizer, irrigation, and pesticides is also covered. Biofuel Crop Sustainability will be a valuable, up-to-date reference for all those involved in the rapidly expanding biofuels industry and sustainable agriculture research fields.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470963043 20160612
Book
1 online resource.
  • Climate Change and Abiotic Stress Factors. Climate Change and Food Security / R B Singh
  • Improving Crop Productivity under Changing Environment / Navjot K Dhillon, Satbir S Gosal, Manjit S Kang
  • Genetic Engineering for Acid Soil Tolerance in Plants / Sagarika Mishra, Lingaraj Sahoo, Sanjib K Panda
  • Evaluation of Tropospheric O Effects on Global Agriculture: A New Insight / Richa Rai, Abhijit Sarkar, S B Agrawal, Madhoolika Agrawal
  • Methods to Improve Crop Productivity. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants: "Omics" Approaches / Monika Jaggi, Meetu Gupta, Narendra Tuteja, Alok Krishna Sinha
  • Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria-Mediated Amelioration of Abiotic and Biotic Stresses for Increasing Crop Productivity / Vasvi Chaudhry, Suchi Srivastava, Puneet Singh Chauhan, Poonam C Singh, Aradhana Mishra, Chandra Shekhar Nautiyal
  • Are Viruses Always Villains? The Roles Plant Viruses May Play in Improving Plant Responses to Stress / Stephen J Wylie, Michael G K Jones
  • Risk Assessment of Abiotic Stress Tolerant GM Crops / Paul Howles, Joe Smith
  • Biofertilizers: Potential for Crop Improvement under Stressed Conditions / Alok Adholeya, Manab Das
  • Species-Specific Case Studies. Rice: Genetic Engineering Approaches for Abiotic Stress Tolerance : Retrospects and Prospects / Salvinder Singh, M K Modi, Sarvajeet Singh Gill, Narendra Tuteja
  • Rice: Genetic Engineering Approaches to Enhance Grain Iron Content / Salvinder Singh, D Sudhakar, M K Modi
  • Pearl Millet: Genetic Improvement in Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses / O P Yadav, K N Rai, S K Gupta
  • Bamboo: Application of Plant Tissue Culture Techniques for Genetic Improvement of Nees / C K John, V A Parasharami
  • Groundnut: Genetic Approaches to Enhance Adaptation of Groundnut (Arachis Hypogaea, L.) to Drought / R C Nageswara Rao, M S Sheshshayee, N Nataraja Karaba, Rohini Sreevathsa, N Rama, S Kumaraswamy, T G Prasad, M Udayakumar
  • Chickpea: Crop Improvement under Changing Environment Conditions / B K Sarmah, S Acharjee, H C Sharma
  • Grain Legumes: Biotechnological Interventions in Crop Improvement for Adverse Environments / Pooja Bhatnagar-Mathur, Paramita Palit, Ch Sridhar Kumar, D Srinivas Reddy, Kiran K Sharma
  • Pulse Crops: Biotechnological Strategies to Enhance Abiotic Stress Tolerance / S Ganeshan, P M Gaur, R N Chibbar
  • Improving Crop Productivity and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Cultivated Using Omics and Systems Biology Approach / Jens Rohloff, Pankaj Barah, Atle M Bones
  • Rose: Improvement for Crop Productivity / Madhu Sharma, Kiran Kaul, Navtej Kaur, Markandey Singh, Devendra Dhayani, Paramvir Singh Ahuja.
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
xx, 533 p., [2] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 27cm.
  • The Use of Omics Databases for Plants Ayako Suzuki, Keita Suwabe, and Kentaro Yano High-Throughput Approaches for Characterization and Efficient Use of Plant Genetic Resources Jaroslava Ovesna, Anna Janska, Sylva Zelenkova, and Petr Marsik Breeding for Sustainability: Utilizing High-Throughput Genomics to Design Plants for a New Green Revolution Traci Viinanen Transcription Factors, Gene Regulatory Networks, and Agronomic Traits John Gray and Erich Grotewold Contribution of "Omics" Approaches to Sustainable Herbivore Production Jean-Francois Hocquette, Hamid Boudra, Isabelle Cassar-Malek, Christine Leroux, Brigitte Picard, Isabelle Savary-Auzeloux, Laurence Bernard, Agnes Cornu, Denys Durand, Anne Ferlay, Dominique Gruffat, Diego Morgavi, and Claudia Terlouw Mining Omic Technologies and Their Application to Sustainable Agriculture and Food Production Systems Noureddine Benkeblia Identification of Molecular Processes Underlying Abiotic Stress Plants Adaptation Using "Omics" Technologies Urmila Basu Rhizosphere Metabolomics: A Study of Biochemical Processes Kalyan Chakravarthy Mynampati, Sheela Reuben, and Sanjay Swarup Microbial Functionality and Diversity in Agroecosystems: A Soil Quality Perspective Felipe Bastida, Cesar Nicolas, Jose Luis Moreno, Teresa Hernandez, and Carlos Garcia Survey in Plant Root Proteomics: To Know the Unknown Sophie Alvarez and Leslie M. Hicks Applications of Agricultural and Medicinal Biotechnology in Functional Foods Kandan Aravindaram and Ning-Sun Yang Nutritional Genomics and Sustainable Agriculture Maria Luisa Guillen, Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, and Dolores Corella Metabolomics: Current View on Fruit Quality Relation with Human Health Ilian Badjako, Violeta Kondakova, and Atanas Atanassov New Farm Management Strategy to Enhance Sustainable Rice Production in Japan and Indonesia Masakazu Komatsuzaki and Faiz M. Syuaib Advances in Genetics and Genomics for Sustainable Peanut Production Baozhu Guo, Charles Chen, Ye Chu, C. Corley Holbrook, Peggy Ozias-Akins, and H. Thomas Stalker The Relevance of Compositional and Metabolite Variability in Safety Assessments of Novel Crops George G. Harrigan, Angela Hendrickson Culler, William P. Ridley, and Kevin C. Glenn Gene-Expression Analysis of Cell-Cycle Regulation Genes in Virus-Infected Rice Leaves Shoshi Kikuchi and Kouji Satoh Transcriptomics, Proteomics and Metabolomics: Integration of Latest Technologies for Improving Wheat Productivity in Future Michael G. Francki, Allison C. Crawford, and Klaus Oldach Impact of Climatic Changes on Crop Agriculture: OMICS for Sustainability and Next-Generation Crops Sajad Majeed Zargar, Muslima Nazir, Kyoungwon Cho, Dea-Wook Kim, Oliver Andrzej, Hodgson Jones, Abhijit Sarkar, Shashi Bhushan Agrawal, Junko Shibato, Akihiro Kubo, Nam-Soo Jwa, Ganesh Kumar Agrawal, and Randeep Rakwal Designing Oilseeds for Biomaterial Production Thomas A. McKeon Bioenergy from Agricultural Biowaste: Key Technologies and Concepts Suman Khowala and Swagata Pal Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781439825044 20160606
Taking a broad and innovative informational approach, Sustainable Agriculture and New Biotechnologies is the first book to apply omic technologies to address issues related to understanding and improving agricultural sustainability in the food production process. The transformation from industrial to sustainable agriculture is discussed within the frameworks of new biotechnologies and global environmental changes. While considering this transformation, the book covers: The use of new biotechnologies to help in the creation of more sustainable agricultural practices, including methods in molecular biology, genetic engineering, and the new emerging technologies, such as metabolomics, metagenomics, nutrigenomics, and ionomics The path to reach the goal of the global sustainable agricultural and food production systems in a world of limited natural resources and growing environmental degradation Principles that regulate the new agricultural and food production systems including breeding programs for more sustainable crops, soil management, and environment preservation It is clear that biotechnological approaches will become increasingly important in the future and that a shift from industrial to a sustainable agriculture will be necessary. While many books tend to make "a quick and easy link" between these two different worlds, Sustainable Agriculture and New Biotechnologies describes exactly how omics can contribute to greater food productivity and security, and agricultural sustainability in the future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781439825044 20160606
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource ( xviii, 339 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Foreword; Preface; Contents; About the Author; 1: Agro-Ecological Pest Management - An Overview; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Ecology and Agroecology; 1.2.1 Ecology; 1.2.2 Agroecology; 1.3 Agroecological Pest Management; 1.4 Goals; 1.5 Basis and Principles; 1.6 Key Elements of Agroecological Pest Management; 1.6.1 Crop Management; 1.6.2 Soil Management; 1.6.2.1 Preventive Options; 1.6.2.2 Supplemental Options; 1.6.2.3 Reactive Options; 1.7 Benefits and Limitations; 1.7.1 Benefits; 1.7.1.1 Increasing Species Diversity; 1.7.1.2 Enhancing Longevity; 1.7.1.3 Imposing a Fallow
  • 1.7.1.4 Enhancing Soil Organic Matter1.7.1.5 Increase Landscape Diversity; 1.7.1.6 Saving on Cost of Inputs; 1.7.2 Limitations; 1.8 Conclusions; References; 2: Conservation Tillage; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Weed Management; 2.2.1 Stale Seed Bed + Glyphosate Strategy; 2.2.2 Crop Rotations + Stale Seed Bed; 2.2.3 Integrated Weed Management; 2.3 Insect Pest Management; 2.4 Disease Management; 2.5 Nematode Management; 2.6 Nonpesticidal Management Practices; 2.6.1 Crop Rotation; 2.6.2 Field Sanitation; 2.6.3 Proper Planting Procedures; 2.6.4 Irrigation Management
  • 2.6.5 Variety Selection2.6.6 Scouting and Pest Identification; 2.7 Conclusions; References; 3: Crop Residue Management and Organic Amendments; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Weed Management; 3.3 Insect Pest Management; 3.4 Disease Management; 3.4.1 Biofumigation; 3.5 Nematode Management; 3.6 Conclusions; References; 4: Biofumigation; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Biofumigation; 4.3 Benefits; 4.4 Modes of Utilization; 4.4.1 Crop Rotation/Intercropping; 4.4.2 Incorporation of Biofumigants; 4.4.3 Green Manuring Cover Crops and Trap Crops; 4.4.4 Processed Plant Products; 4.5 Biofumigation Crops
  • 4.5.1 Brassica Plant Species4.5.1.1 Rapeseed (Fig. 4.4); 4.5.1.2 Mustard (Fig. 4.5); 4.5.1.3 Radish (Fig. 4.6); 4.5.1.4 Turnips (Fig. 4.7); 4.5.1.5 Rocket; 4.5.1.6 Processed Brassica Amendments; 4.5.2 Non-Brassica Plant Species; 4.5.2.1 Grasses; 4.5.2.2 Garlic and Onions; 4.6 Pest Management; 4.6.1 Diseases; 4.6.2 Nematode Pests; 4.6.3 Weeds; 4.7 Integration of Biofumigation and Solarization; 4.8 Conclusions; References; 5: Fertilizer Management; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Macronutrients; 5.2.1 Nitrogen; 5.2.1.1 Insect Pests; 5.2.1.2 Diseases; 5.2.2 Potassium
  • 5.2.2.1 Diseases5.2.2.2 Nematodes; 5.2.3 Phosphorus; 5.2.3.1 Diseases; 5.2.3.2 Insect Pests; 5.2.4 Calcium; 5.2.4.1 Diseases; 5.2.4.2 Nematodes; 5.2.5 Sulfur; 5.2.5.1 Insect Pests; 5.2.5.2 Mites; 5.3 Micronutrients; 5.3.1 Manganese; 5.3.1.1 Diseases; 5.3.2 Zinc; 5.3.2.1 Diseases; 5.3.2.2 Insect Pests; 5.3.3 Boron; 5.3.3.1 Diseases; 5.3.4 Iron; 5.3.4.1 Diseases; 5.3.5 Chlorine; 5.3.5.1 Diseases; 5.3.6 Silicon; 5.3.6.1 Diseases; 5.4 Conclusions; References; 6: Agro-Forestry; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Effect on Pests and Natural Enemies; 6.2.1 Insect Pests and Diseases
Book
xiv, 411 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • History.- Historical Examples of Allelopathy and Ethnobotany from the Mediterranean Region.- Allelopathy: Advances, Challenges and Opportunities.- Allelopathy in Chinese Ancient and Modern Agriculture.- Allelochemicals and Allelopathic Mechanisms.- Allelochemicals in Plants.- Allelopathy: Full Circle from Phytotoxicity to Mechanisms of Resistance.- Allelopathic Mechanisms and Experimental Methodology.- Indirect Effects of Phenolics on Plant Performance by Altering Nitrogen Cycling: Another Mechanism of Plant-Plant Negative Interactions.- Genomic Approaches to Understanding Allelochemical Effects on Plants.- Allelopathy from a Mathematical Modeling Perspective.- Application of Allelopathy in Agriculture and Forestry.- Progress and Prospect of Rice Allelopathy Research.- Rice Allelopathy Research in China.- Recent Advances in Wheat Allelopathy.- Sorghum Allelopathy for Weed Management in Wheat.- Allelochemicals in Pre-cowing Soils of Continuous Soybean Cropping and Their Autointoxication.- Autotoxicity in Agriculture and Forestry.- Black Walnut Allelopathy: Implications for Intercropping.- Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and Mycorrhizal Fungi in Sustainable Agriculture and Forestry.- Utilization of Stress Tolerant, Weed Suppressive Groundcovers for Low Maintenance Landscape Settings.- Allelopathy in Forested Ecosystems.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780387773360 20160605
This is the first comprehensive and up-to-date reference on the science, mechanism, methodology, and application of allelopathy. The objective of this practical reference is to report on the latest advances by inviting leading scientists to contribute in specific fields. The volume is organized under three major subsections: History of allelopathy, Allelochemicals, allelopathic mechanisms, and bioassays, and Application of allelopathy in agriculture and forestry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780387773360 20160605
Book
1 online resource ( xx, 450 pages).
  • Part 1 Maize cultivation techniques1.Modelling crop growth and grain yield in maize cultivation: Alam Sher, Xiaoli Liu and Jincai Li, Anhui Agricultural University, China-- and Youhong Song, Anhui Agricultural University, China and The University of Queensland, Australia-- 2.Optimizing maize-based cropping systems: sustainability, good agricultural practices (GAP) and yield goals: Charles Wortmann, Patricio Grassini and Roger W. Elmore, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, USA-- 3.Maize seed variety selection and seed system development: the case of southern Africa: Peter S. Setimela, Global Maize Program, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Zimbabwe-- 4.Good agricultural practices for maize cultivation: the case of West Africa: Alpha Kamara, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 5.Zero-tillage cultivation of maize: Wade E. Thomason, Bee Khim Chim and Mark S. Reiter, Virginia Tech University, USA-- 6.Conservation agriculture for sustainable intensification of maize and other cereal systems: the case of Latin America: Bram Govaerts, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico-- Isabelle Francois, Consultant, USA-- and Nele Verhulst, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico-- 7.Precision maize cultivation techniques: Louis Longchamps, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada-- and Raj Khosla, Colorado State University, USA-- 8.Improving nutrient management for sustainable intensification of maize: Kaushik Majumdar, International Plant Nutrition Institute - South Asia, India-- Shamie Zingore, International Plant Nutrition Institute - sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya-- Fernando Garcia and Adrian Correndo, International Plant Nutrition Institute - Latin America - Southern Cone, Argentina-- Jagadish Timsina, University of Melbourne, Australia-- Adrian M. Johnston, International Plant Nutrition Institute, Canada--9.Crop rotation: a sustainable system for maize production: Bao-Luo Ma, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada-- and Zhigang Wang, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, China-- 10.Intercropping in sustainable maize cultivation: Abeya Temesgen, Shu Fukai and Daniel Rodriguez, The University of Queensland, Australia-- 11.Climate risk management in maize cropping systems: Daniel Rodriguez, Caspar Roxburgh, Claire Farnsworth, Ariel Ferrante, Joseph Eyre, Stuart Irvine-Brown, James McLean, Martin Bielich, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), The University of Queensland, Australia-- 12.Advances in maize post-harvest management: Tadele Tefera, International Center of Insect Physiology & Ecology (ICIPE), Ethiopia-- Part 2 Maize pests, diseases and weeds13.Economically important insect pests of maize: William D. Hutchison and Theresa M. Cira, University of Minnesota, USA-- 14.Nematodes associated with maize: T. L. Niblack, The Ohio State University, USA-- 15.Control of rodent pests in maize cultivation: the case of Africa: Loth S. Mulungu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania--16.Rapid response to disease outbreaks in maize cultivation: the case of maize lethal necrosis: George Mahuku, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania and P. Lava Kumar, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 17.Controlling aflatoxins in maize in Africa: strategies, challenges and opportunities for improvement: Amare Ayalew and Martin Kimanya, Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, Ethiopia-- Limbikani Matumba, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Malawi-- Ranajit Bandyopadhayay and Abebe Menkir, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Nigeria-- Peter Cotty, USDA-ARS, USA--18.Integrated weed management in maize cultivation: an overview: Khawar Jabran, Duzce University, Turkey, Mubshar Hussain, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan, The University of Queensland, Australia-- 19.Weed management of maize grown under temperate conditions: the case of Europe and the United States: Vasileios P. Vasileiadis and Maurizio Sattin, National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, Italy and Per Kudsk, Aarhus University, Denmark--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760128 20170829
Maize is one of the most important and widely grown cereal crops in the world and is a staple food for almost a billion people, particularly in the developing world. It has been estimated that maize yields need to increase by 60% by 2050. There is an urgent need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable. Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of maize at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. Volume 2 reviews research on improvements in cultivation techniques such as nutrient management, crop rotation, intercropping and other aspects of conservation agriculture. It also discusses developments in methods for combatting pests and diseases. Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 2: Cultivation techniques, pest and disease control will be a standard reference for cereal scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in maize cultivation. It is accompanied by Volume 1 which reviews developments in breeding and ways research can be translated into effective outcomes for smallholders in the developing world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760128 20170829
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
xviii, 198 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 25 cm.
  • From the contents Acknowledgements.- Preface.- 1. Introduction.- 2. The Physical Environment.- 3. People and the Economy.- 4. Agriculture and Sustainability.- 5. The Wildcard of Climate Change.- 6. A Role for the Plains in Combating Climate Change.- 7. Outlook.- Section containing coloured figures.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402056000 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 129 pages : ill. ; 26 cm
This guide is the first on the practical application of FAO's "Save and Grow" model of agriculture to specific smallholder crops and farming systems. It comes as cassava production intensifies worldwide, and growers shift from traditional cultivation practices to monocropping, higher-yielding genotypes, and greater use of agrochemicals. Intensification carries great risks, including soils nutrient depletion and upsurges in pests and diseases. The guide shows how ecosystem-based "Save and Grow" approaches and practices can help tropical developing countries to avoid the risks of unsustainable intensification, while realizing cassava's potential for producing higher yields, alleviating hunger and rural poverty, and contributing to national economic development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789251076415 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 electronic text (ix, 187 p., [8] p. of plates) : ill. (some col.), map.
  • Design ; Structural design ; Waterproofing ; The dirt on green roof soil ; Construction ; Plants ; Maintenance ; Realistic expectations ; The environment ; Return on investment ; Quantifying the benefits of green roofs.
A Complete Guide to Building and Maintaining Green Roofs Written by an industry expert in green roof design and installation, this GreenSource book presents all of the information you need to skillfully design, construct, and maintain green roofs. You will find a wealth of practical details gathered through real-world implementations and independent research. Green Roof Construction and Maintenance explains how to design a green roof, plan for irrigation and drainage, select and place soil and plants, and maintain the entire setup. The book also discusses return on investment, LEED design specifications, and the myriad short- and long-term environmental benefits of green roofs. Filled with step-by-step illustrations and full-color photographs, this is a valuable, hands-on guide to a rapidly emerging trend in the sustainability movement. Green Roof Construction and Maintenance includes: Key questions to ask at each stage of the green building process Tested tips and techniques for successful structural design Construction methods for new and existing buildings Information on insulation, drainage, detailing, irrigation, and plant selection Details on optimal soil formulation Illustrations featuring various stages of construction Best practices for green roof maintenance A survey of environmental benefits, including evapo-transpiration, storm-water management, habitat restoration, and improvement of air quality Tips on the LEED design and certification process Considerations for assessing return on investment Color photographs of successfully installed green roofs Useful checklists, tables, and charts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780071608800 20160614
Video
1 streaming video file (57 min.) : digital, sd., col. with b&w sequences
Filmmaker Guy Evans looks at the plight of apple farmers in his hometown of Wenatchee, Washington. Using his father Danny's business as an example, he describes how apple farming used to be, what it has become and what changes are needed for it to succeed in the future.
Book
1 online resource (xii, 388 pages, 2 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations, charts
  • Part One: Botanicals in Fungal Pest Management-- 1. Recent advances in management of fungal pathogens of fruit crops-- 2. Botanicals in agricultural pest management-- 3. Deleterious effects of fungi on post-harvest crops and their management strategies-- 4. Exploitation of botanicals in the management of phytopathogenic and storage fungi-- 5. Use of plant extracts as natural fungicides in the management of seed borne diseases-- Part Two: Disease Control through Resistance-- 6. Resistance to Septoria leaf blotch in wheat-- 7. Barley and wheat resistance genes for Fusarium head blight-- 8. Sustainable management of rice blast [Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr]: 50 years of research progress in molecular biology-- Part Three: Biological Control Mechanisms-- 9. Post-harvest technology- yeast as bio-control agents: Progress, problems and prospects-- 10. Biological control of plant diseases: An overview and the Trichoderma system as bio-control agent-- 11. Physiological specialization of Ustilaginales (smut) of Geheros Bromus, Zea and Triticum in Argentina.-- Part Four: Endophytes in Plant Disease Control-- 12. Status and progress of research in endophytes from agricultural crops in Argentina-- 13. Effect of tillage systems on the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) propagule bank in soils-- 14. Mechanism of action in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbionts to control diseases caused by various fungal pathogens-- 15. Role of fungal endophytes in plant protection-- Part Five: Managing Fungal Pathogens causing Leaf damage-- 16. The rust fungi: Systematics, diseases and their management-- 17. Etiology, epidemiology and management of fungal diseases of sugarcane-- 18. New and emerging fungal pathogens associated with leaf blight symptoms on wheat (Triticum aestivum) in Argentina.-- 19. A review of the fungal diseases of the annual legume crop of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.)-- 20. Fungal diseases of oilseed crops and their management-- 21. Occurrence of Pyrenophora tritici- repentis causing tan spot in Argentina.-- 22. Epidemiological studies on Septoria leaf blotch of wheat in Argentina-- Part Six: Alternative Control Strategies-- 23. Review of Thecaphora amaranthicola M. Piepenbr causal agent of Smut on Amaranthus mantegazzianus Pass.-- 24. Population biology and management Strategies of Phytophthora sojae causing Phytophthora root and stem rots of Soybean-- 25. Management of fungal pathogens - a pre requisite for maintenance of seed quality during storage-- 26. Controlling root and butt rot diseases in alpine European forests-- 27. Some important fungal diseases and their impact on wheat production.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845936037 20160618
Microbes, including fungi, are always adapting to different environmental conditions and phytopathologists are continually faced with the management of new diseases and the resurgence of old ones. Amidst growing concerns about the environment and food security, the development of management strategies that minimize crop losses and promote sustainable agriculture is increasingly more important. "Management of Fungal Plant Pathogens" presents a review of research into pathogenic fungi in a diverse selection of economically important crops, including fruits and cereals. The establishment and management of fungal plant disease using conventional and ecofriendly methods is discussed with an emphasis on the use of microorganisms and biotechnology. Chapters also examine the role of microbes in growth promotion, bioprotectors and bioremediators and presents practical strategies for using microbes as well as botanicals in sustainable agriculture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845936037 20160618
Book
1 online resource (405 pages) : illustrations, photographs
Urban tree management is the key basis for greener cities of the future. It is a practical discipline which includes tree selection, planting, care and protection and the overall management of trees as a collective resource. Urban Tree Management aims to raise awareness for the positive impacts and benefits of city trees and for their importance to city dwellers. It describes their advantages and details their effects on quality of urban life and well-being aspects that are increasingly important in these times of progressing urbanisation. With this book you will learn: * fundamentals, methods and tools of urban tree management * state of the art in the fields of urban forestry and tree biology * positive effects and uses of urban trees * features, requirements and selection criteria for urban trees * conditions and problems of urban trees * governance and management aspects * environmental education programs. Edited by the leading expert Dr Andreas Roloff, Urban Tree Management is an excellent resource for plant scientists, horticulturists, dendrologists, arborists and arboriculturists, forestry scientists, city planners, parks department specialists and landscape architects. It will be an essential addition to all students and libraries where such subjects are taught.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118954584 20170502
Book
xviii, 510 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.), col. ports.
  • Preamble Sustainable Energy Landscapes: An Introduction Sven Stremke and Andy van den Dobbelsteen Reading the Changing Energy Landscape Martin J. Pasqualetti Strong Feelings: Emotional Landscape of Wind Turbines Dirk Sijmons and Machiel van Dorst Methods Energy Potential Mapping and Heat Mapping: Prerequisite for Energy-Conscious Planning and Design Andy van den Dobbelsteen, Siebe Broersma, and Michiel Fremouw Five-Step Approach to the Design of Sustainable Energy Landscapes Sven Stremke Multicriteria Decision Analysis for the Planning and Design of Sustainable Energy Landscapes Adrienne Gret-Regamey and Ulrike Wissen Hayek Energy Landscape Visualization: Scientific Quality and Social Responsibility of a Powerful Tool Soren Schobel, Andreas R. Dittrich, and Daniel Czechowski Developing a Planning Theory for Wicked Problems: Swarm Planning Rob Roggema Planning Sustainable Energy Landscapes: From Collaborative Approaches to Individuals' Active Planning Claudia Basta, Wim van der Knaap, and Gerrit J. Carsjens Integrated Optimization of Spatial Structures and Energy Systems Gernot Stoeglehner and Michael Narodoslawsky Employing Exergy and Carbon Models to Determine the Sustainability of Alternative Energy Landscapes Sven E. Jorgensen Case studies Energy-Conscious Design Practice in Asia: Smart City Chengdu and the Taiwan Strait Smart Region Raoul Bunschoten Conduit Urbanism: Rethinking Infrastructural Ecologies in the Great Lakes Megaregion, North America Geoffrey Thun and Kathy Velikov Bi-Productive Urban Landscapes: Urban Resilience through a Redevelopment of Postindustrial Space in the United Kingdom Greg Keeffe Spatial Modeling for Community Renewable Energy Planning: Case Studies in British Columbia, Canada Olaf Schroth, Ellen Pond, Rory Tooke, David Flanders, and Stephen Sheppard Initiating and Analyzing Renewable Energy Transitions in Germany: The District, Village, and Farm Scale Peter Schmuck, Marianne Karpenstein-Machan, and Andre Wuste Energy-Conscious Planning Practice in Austria: Strategic Planning for Energy-Optimized Urban Structures Gernot Stoeglehner and Michael Narodoslawsky Assessment of Sustainability for the Danish Island of Samso by Application of a Work Energy (Exergy) Balance: A Preliminary Assessment Sven E. Jorgensen and Soren N. Nielsen Carbon Emission Intensity and Areal Empower Density: Combining Two Systemic Indicators to Inform the Design and Planning of Sustainable Energy Landscapes Riccardo M. Pulselli, Pietro Romano, Michela Marchi, and Simone Bastianoni Education Designing Sustainable Energy Islands: Applying the Five-Step Approach in a Graduate Student's Studio in the Netherlands Renee de Waal, Sven Stremke, Rudi van Etteger, and Adri van den Brink Toward the Zero+ Campus: Multidisciplinary Design Pedagogy in the United States Barry Lehrman, Loren Abraham, Mary Guzowski, Lance Neckar, Derek Schilling, and Elizabeth Turner "Resources": An Educational Approach to Address Future Urban Uncertainties Henrietta Palmer and Michael Dudley Epilogue Conclusion Andy van den Dobbelsteen and Sven Stremke Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781439894385 20160610
In the near future the appearance and spatial organization of urban and rural landscapes will be strongly influenced by the generation of renewable energy. One of the critical tasks will be the re-integration of these sustainable energy landscapes into the existing environment-which people value and want to preserve-in a socially fair, environmentally sound, and economically feasible manner. Accordingly, Sustainable Energy Landscapes: Designing, Planning, and Development focuses on the municipal and regional scale, where energy-conscious interventions are effective, and stakeholders can participate actively in the transition process. This book presents state-of-the-art knowledge in the exciting new field of sustainable energy landscapes. It bridges the gap between theory and fundamental research on the one hand, and practice and education on the other. The chapters-written by experts in their fields-present a selection of interdisciplinary, cutting-edge projects from across the world, illustrating the inspiring challenge of developing sustainable energy landscapes. They include unique case studies from Germany, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Canada, Denmark, Austria, Italy, and the United States. The editors and team of contributing authors aim to inspire readers, providing a comprehensive overview of sustainable energy landscapes, including principles, concepts, theories, and examples. The book describes various methods, such as energy potential mapping and heat mapping, multicriteria decision analysis, energy landscape visualization, and employing exergy and carbon models. It addresses how to quantify the impact of energy transition both on landscape quality and energy economy, issues of growing importance. The text infuses readers with enthusiasm to promote further research and action toward the important goal of building energy landscapes for a sustainable future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781439894385 20160610
Book
258 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations vii Chapter 1 Repaying Darwin's Debt to Agriculture 1 Chapter 2 What Do We Need from Agriculture? 9 Chapter 3 Evolution 101 28 The Power of Natural Selection Chapter 4 Darwinian Agriculture's Three Core Principles 43 Chapter 5 What Won't Work 54 Tradeoff-blind Biotechnology Chapter 6 Selfish Genes, Sophisticated Plants, and Haphazard Ecosystems 76 Chapter 7 What Won't Work 95 Misguided Mimicry of Natural Ecosystems Chapter 8 What Has Worked 120 Improving Cooperation within Species Chapter 9 What Could Work Better 145 Cooperation between Two Species Chapter 10 Stop Evolution Now! 164 Chapter 11 Learning from Plants, Ants, and Ecosystems 177 Chapter 12 Diversity, Bet-hedging, and Selection among Ideas 190 Acknowledgments 217 Glossary 219 References 227 Index 249.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691139500 20160608
As human populations grow and resources are depleted, agriculture will need to use land, water, and other resources more efficiently and without sacrificing long-term sustainability. "Darwinian Agriculture" presents an entirely new approach to these challenges, one that draws on the principles of evolution and natural selection. R. Ford Denison shows how both biotechnology and traditional plant breeding can use Darwinian insights to identify promising routes for crop genetic improvement and avoid costly dead ends. Denison explains why plant traits that have been genetically optimized by individual selection - such as photosynthesis and drought tolerance - are bad candidates for genetic improvement. Traits like plant height and leaf angle, which determine the collective performance of plant communities, offer more room for improvement. Agriculturalists can also benefit from more sophisticated comparisons among natural communities and from the study of wild species in the landscapes where they evolved. "Darwinian Agriculture" reveals why it is sometimes better to slow or even reverse evolutionary trends when they are inconsistent with our present goals, and how we can glean new ideas from natural selection's marvelous innovations in wild species.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691139500 20160608
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
ix, 254 p. : ill.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Contributors vii Preface xi 1 Biofuel Crop Sustainability Paradigm 3 B.P. Singh 2 Sustainable Production of Grain Crops for Biofuels 31 A.A. Jaradat 3 Sugarcane as an Energy Crop: Its Role in Biomass Economy 53 R. van Antwerpen, S.D. Berry, T. van Antwerpen, J. Smithers, S. Joshi, and M. van der Laan 4 Sustainable Cellulosic Grass Crop Production 109 J.H. Fike, D.J. Parrish, and W.B. Fike 5 Sustainable Oil Crops Production 165 C. Eynck, D. Shrestha, J. Vollmann, K.C. Falk, W. Friedt, H.P. Singh, and E. Obeng 6 Short-rotation Woody Crop Biomass Production for Bioenergy 205 L.C. Kiser and T.R. Fox 7 Biomass Feedstock Production Impact on Water Resource Availability 239 K.C. Stone, P.G. Hunt, K.B. Cantrell, and K.S. Ro 8 Biofuel Crops and Soil Quality and Erosion 261 D. Chatskikh, A. Ovchinnikova, B. Seshadri, and N. Bolan 9 Nutrient Management in Biofuel Crop Production 301 R. Lemus 10 Food, Farming, and Biofuels 325 J. Popp 11 Biofuel Crops, Ecosystem Services, and Biodiversity 357 A. Fieldsend and H.P. Singh 12 Biofuel Crops and Greenhouse Gases 383 A. Hastings, J. Yeluripati, J. Hillier, and P. Smith 13 Economics of Biomass Feedstocks and Biofuels 407 T.A. Maung, C. Gustafson, B. McCarl, D. Ripplinger, and D. Saxowsky 14 Geospatial Modeling Applications for Biofuel Sustainability Assessment 431 S.S. Panda Appendix I: Botanical Names 449 Index 451.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470963043 20160612
Biofuel Crop Sustainability brings together the basic principles of agricultural sustainability and special stipulations for biofuels, from the economic and ecological opportunities and challenges of sustainable biofuel crop production to the unique characteristics of particular crops which make them ideal for biofuel applications. This book will be a valuable resource for researchers and professionals involved in biofuels development and production as well as agriculture industry personnel. Chapters focus the broad principles of resource management for ecological, environmental and societal welfare, the sustainability issues pertaining to several broad categories of biofuel crops , as well as the economics and profitability of biofuels on both a local and international scale. Coverage includes topics such as utilizing waste water for field crop irrigation and algae production, reliability of feedstock supply, marginal lands, and identifying crops with traits of significance for survival and growth on low fertility soils. The development of production practices with low external inputs of fertilizer, irrigation, and pesticides is also covered. Biofuel Crop Sustainability will be a valuable, up-to-date reference for all those involved in the rapidly expanding biofuels industry and sustainable agriculture research fields.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470963043 20160612
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 539 p.) : maps.
dx.doi.org SpringerLink

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