%{search_type} search results

76 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
ix, 572 pages ; 24 cm
"Beginning on the 5th of June and ending six days later, the 1967 war was brief. During these few days, Israel gained control over the West Bank of the Jordan River, the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula and the Golan Heights. Within pre-1967 Israel, East Jerusalem (located in the West Bank) has been subsumed into Jerusalem. Jewish settlements began to be built in the OPT already in 1967. Half a century later, there are approximately 2.7 million Palestinians and over 586,000 Israelis living in the West Bank including East Jerusalem. Most Palestinians and Israelis know no other reality. Law has played a significant role in the making and maintaining of this reality. This role is the focus of The ABC of the OPT"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 310 pages ; 24 cm
  • The all-white primary
  • After the Voting Rights Act
  • From discrimination to affirmative action
  • Railroads
  • Oil
  • School finance
  • Immigration
  • Freedom of speech and the press
  • Freedom of and from religion
  • Abortion
  • Prosecuting consensual adult sex
  • Capital punishment
  • Tom DeLay's mid-decade redistricting.
"Texas has created more constitutional law than any other state. In any classroom nationwide, any basic constitutional law course can be taught using nothing but Texas cases. That, however, understates the history and politics behind the cases. Beyond representing all doctrinal areas of constitutional law, Texas cases deal with the major issues of the nation. Leading legal scholar and Supreme Court historian Lucas A. Powe, Jr. charts the rich and pervasive development of Texas-inspired constitutional law. From voting rights to railroad regulations, or school finance to capital punishment, poverty to civil liberties, this wide-ranging and eminently readable book provides a window into the relationship between constitutional litigation and ordinary politics at the Supreme Court, illuminating how all of the fiercest national divides over what the Constitution means took shape in Texas"--Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages cm.
  • People's courts and legal philosophy
  • Spotlight on people's courts
  • Law
  • Judging
  • Punishment.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages cm.
  • Law and property in colonial New York
  • Confronting disorder
  • A bonanza of Tory goods
  • The enemies of the state.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 278 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 177 pages ; 23 cm
  • On the usefulness of economics for understanding law
  • Property rights and the Coase Theorem
  • The choice between property rules and liability rules
  • Does the law evolve toward efficiency?
  • Threshold rules in law
  • Simultaneous versus sequential care accidents and strategic negligence
  • The tort-crime boundary
  • Some difficulties with the economic theory of crime
  • Escalating penalties for repeat offenders
  • The problem with plea bargaining
  • The (real) puzzle of blackmail
  • Group punishment
  • When is a contract enforceable?
  • Efficient breach theory
  • A question of title : rules for protecting the ownership of land
  • Holdups and holdouts
  • Eminent domain and the paradox of public use
  • Regulatory takings and the compensation question
  • Fair use : fair or foul?
  • Lawsuits for sale?
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiv, 312 pages : illustration ; 25 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 279 pages ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 536 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction to China's legal system
  • China's legislative system
  • Law system with Chinese characteristics
  • China's constitutional law system
  • China's administrative legal system
  • China's civil and commercial legal system
  • China's economic legal system
  • China's social legal system
  • China's criminal legal system
  • Chinese legal system in litigation and non-litigation procedure
  • "One country, two systems" and legal system in the special administrative region
  • International law and China's law system.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages cm
  • Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Contextualising Sharia Discourse in Lebanon: 1. Court, community and state
  • a legal genealogy; 2. The consequences for civility; 3. Becoming a shaykh; 4. Lessons in the mosque; Part II. Sharia within the State: 5. Introducing the sharia courts; 6. Marriage before God and the state; 7. Bringing a case; 8. Rulings and reconciliation; 9. The judge as tragic hero; 10. The wider world of the sharia; 11. Reform and rebellion; Part III. Sharia outside the State: 12. Becoming an ayatollah; 13. Making law from the bottom up; 14. The limits of authority; Conclusion.
"The modern state of Lebanon, created after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, is home to eighteen officially recognised different religious communities (or sects). Crucially, political office and representation came to be formally shared along confessional lines, and the privileges of power are distributed accordingly. One such key prerogative is exclusivity when it comes to personal status laws: the family legal affairs of each community. In this book, Morgan Clarke offers an authoritative and dynamic account of how the sharia is invoked both with Lebanon's state legal system, as Muslim family law, and outside it, as a framework for an Islamic life and society. By bringing together an in-depth analysis of Lebanon's state-sponsored sharia courts with a look at the wider world of religious instruction, this book highlights the breadth of the sharia and the complexity of the contexts within which it is embedded"-- Provided by publisher.
"The modern state of Lebanon, created after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, is home to eighteen officially recognised different religious communities (or sects). Crucially, political office and representation came to be formally shared along confessional lines, and the privileges of power are distributed accordingly. One such key prerogative is exclusivity when it comes to personal status laws: the family legal affairs of each community. In this book, Morgan Clarke offers an authoritative and dynamic account of how the sharia is invoked both with Lebanon's state legal system, as Muslim family law, and outside of it, as a framework for an Islamic life and society. By bringing together an in-depth analysis of Lebanon's state-sponsored sharia courts with a look at the wider world of religious instruction, this book highlights the breadth of the sharia and the complexity of the contexts within which it is embedded"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages cm
  • Part one. What we are. The state on trial
  • Subjects of the law : a repressive theory of power
  • From law to critique
  • Part two. The state and violence. Civilization and its lies
  • See the state for what it is
  • The double reality of violence
  • Part three. The system of judgement. Beyond responsibility
  • The politics of perceptions
  • An individualizing narrative
  • React differently
  • Part four. The system of punishment. Accuse and punish
  • The logic of punishment
  • What is a crime? : the fictional frameworks of penality
  • Penality, sovereignty, and democracy
  • Part five. See the world : rethinking sociology.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 176 pages ; 24 cm
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. The idea of law-like law; 2. Argument in a legal system; 3. Practice of legality; 3.1. Instituted discourse; 3.2. Entrenched pursuit; 3.3. Self-conception; 4. Pursuit of the rule of law; 5. Aspiration and impulse; 5.1. Nomological legality; 5.2. Liberal commitment; 5.3. Failure of legality; 5.4. Dual impulse; 6. Deep duality
  • formal law; 6.1. Rawls' first view of law; 6.2. A contrary view; 6.3. Law-like formality: Weber; 6.4. Half-right views; 7. Deep duality
  • law's ideals; 7.1. A contrary view; 7.2. Law-like ideals: Dworkin; 7.3. Halves of a whole; 7.4. Rawls' second view of law; 8. Two perils for law; 8.1. Liberal law's fears; 8.2. Overcoming peril; 8.3. Deeper danger; 8.4. What follows; 9. Fear of free ideals; 9.1. Warring creeds; 9.2. Moral skepticism; 9.3. What's feared; 10. Fear of open form: 10.1. Unsure concepts; 10.2. Linguistic skepticism; 10.3. What's feared; 11. Modern liberal practice; 11.1. Practice's view of law; 11.2. Two views of disorder; 11.3. Implications of disorder; 12. Legality recapitulated.
"In his new book, Lewis D. Sargentich shows how two different kinds of legal argument - rule-based reasoning and reasoning based on principles and policies - share a surprising kinship and serve the same aspiration. He starts with the study of the rule of law in life, a condition of law that serves liberty - here called liberal legality. In pursuit of liberal legality, courts work to uphold people's legal entitlements and to confer evenhanded legal justice. Judges try to achieve the control of reason in law, which is manifest in law's coherence, and to avoid forms of arbitrariness, such as personal moral judgment. Sargentich offers a unified theory of the diverse ways of doing law, and shows that they all arise from the same root, which is a commitment to liberal legality"-- Provided by publisher.
"Legality is our topic. According to the vocabulary I use in this essay, legality is law's aspiration. It is law's excellence, a sought condition of law. When legality is realized, a regime of law exists in social life. What I am calling liberal legality, in particular, is a regime of law that helps to secure liberty. In this essay, liberal law is so called because it aspires to achieve a condition of lawfulness that is prized by a political position that prizes equal liberty"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
133 pages ; 22 cm.
  • - L'enjeu de la loi naturelle -- La grande contradiction, ou le noeud indémêlable -- L'état de nature et la nature nue -- Naturalisation et dénaturalisation -- Le "mariage pour tous" -- Les conseils de la peur -- Le point de vue théorique et le déclassement du politique -- Machiavel, l'idéalisme et le réalisme -- Condition humaine et condition chrétienne -- L'ordre étatique sans droit ni loi -- L'homme est l'être qui a des droits -- La question chrétienne -- La signification de l'État -- La question pratique -- La loi esclave des droits -- Le sujet "autonome" -- La loi contre elle-même -- La loi politique dans l'histoire moderne -- Le droit d'être tout ce que nous voulons être -- Le droit à un revenu universel -- L'individu et l'agent -- Laissez-faire, laissez-passer -- L'obstacle de la mort -- L'État et le gouvernement -- La loi naturelle et les motifs, humains -- La question des motifs humains -- La question de la loi naturelle -- L'explicite et l'implicite -- Primauté du commandement.
"La doctrine des droits de l'homme est devenue l'unique référence légitime pour ordonner le monde humain et orienter la vie sociale et individuelle. Dès lors, la loi politique n'a plus d'autre raison d'être que de garantir les droits humains, toujours plus étendus. La loi ne commande plus, ne dirige plus, n'oriente plus : elle autorise. Elle ne protège plus la vie des institutions qu'il s'agisse de la nation, de la famille, de l'université, mais donne à tout individu l'autorisation inconditionnelle d'y accéder. L'institution n'est donc plus protégée ni réglée par une loi opposable à l'individu ; celui-ci jouit en revanche d'un droit inconditionnellement opposable à l'institution. Pierre Manent montre que cette perspective livre les éléments constituants de la vie humaine à une critique arbitraire et illimitée, privant la vie individuelle comme la vie sociale de tout critère d'évaluation. Une fois que sont garantis les droits égaux de faire telle action ou de conduire telle démarche, il reste à déterminer positivement les règles qui rendent cette action juste ou cette démarche salutaire pour le bien commun. La loi naturelle se confond avec la recherche des réponses à la question : comment orienter ou diriger l'action que j'ai le droit de faire ?"--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
pages cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxvi, 360 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
As non-state actors proliferate both in number and variety, the time is ripe for an explication of what obligations armed groups are under. Ground-breaking in examining humanitarian, human rights, and criminal law, Rodenhauser analyses groups ranging from gangs to cyber criminals to ask when organisations become culpable under international law.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xx, 224 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Buying into the roadmap
  • Your timeline for the roadmap process and your roadmap template
  • Developing your strongest competencies
  • Available resources to navigate your roadmap.
"[This book] is a guide to sharpen your awareness of the characteristics most valued in the workplace-whether it is in a law firm, a company, or a government entity. The map encourages you to use your time in law school to develop the competencies important to your future. The book helps the reader form a conscious plan to demonstrate these self-development experiences."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 259 pages ; 23 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 364 pages ; 23 cm
  • War crimes, justice and the politics of memory / Bina D'Costa
  • The limits of "doing" justice : compensation as reparation in post-war Sri Lanka / Neloufer de Mel and Chulani Kodikara
  • Justice after the event : Sri Lanka's civil wars, memory, life and reconciliation / Pradeep Jeganathan
  • The right to life and compensation in Pakistan's tribal areas / Saba Gul Khattak
  • Seeking justice and keeping the memory alive / Leki Thungon
  • Stand up and be counted : elections, democracy and the pursuit of justice in Jammu and Kashmir / Sanjay Kak
  • The Adivasi undertrial, a prisoner of war : a study of undertrial detainees in South Chhattisgarh / Vrinda Grover
  • The Ayodhya dispute : law's imagination and the functions of the status quo / Deepak Mehta
  • Constitutional nationalism and structural violence : a study of the Muluki Ain and the constitutions of Nepal / Sanjeev Uprety and Bal Bahadur Thapa.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 532 pages ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction to the legal system and legal writing
  • Analyzing legal authority : case law
  • Analyzing legal authority : statutes
  • Organization of a legal discussion : large-scale organization
  • Organization of a legal discussion : small-scale organization
  • The thesis paragraph
  • Writing a legal document : the legal memorandum
  • The writing process
  • Effective paragraphs
  • Sentence structure
  • Types of legal arguments in resolving questions of law
  • Interviewing the client
  • Counseling the client
  • Letter writing
  • The trial brief : memorandum of law in support of or in opposition to a motion
  • Writing the appellate brief
  • Oral argument
  • Law school exams.
Law Library (Crown)