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Book
xxxiii, 600 pages : color illustrations, music ; 29 cm
  • PrefacePart I Elements1. Sound: Pitch, Dynamics, and Tone Color2. Performing Media: Voices and Instruments3. Rhythm4. Music Notation5. Melody6. Harmony7. Key8. Musical Texture9. Musical Form10. Performance 11. Musical StylePart II The Middle Ages1. Music In The Middle Ages (450-1450)2. Gregorian Chant3. Secular Music in the Midde Ages4. The Development of Polyphony: Organum5. Fourteenth -Century Music: The "New Art" in Italy and FrancePart III The Renaissance 1. Music in the Renaissance (1450 - 1600) 2. Sacred Music in the Renaissance 3. Secular Music in the Renaissance 4. The Venetian School: From Renaissance to BaroquePart IV The Baroque Period1. Baroque Music (1600-1750)2. Music In Baroque Society3. The Concerto Grosso And Ritornello Form4. The Fugue5. The Elements Of Opera6. Opera In The Baroque Era7. Claudio Monteverdi8. Henry Purcell9. The Baroque Sonata10. Arcangelo Corelli11. Antonio Vivaldi12. Johann Sebastian Bach13. The Baroque Suite14. The Chorale And Church Cantata15. The Oratorio16. George Frideric HandelPart V The Classical Period1. The Classical Style (1750-1820)2. Composer, Patron, And Public In The Classical Period3. Sonata Form4. Theme And Variations5. Minuet And Trio6. Rondo7. The Classical Symphony8. The Classical Concerto9. Classical Chamber Music10. Joseph Hadyn11. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart12. Ludwig Van BeethovenPart VI The Romantic Period1. Romanticism In Music (1820-1900)2. Romantic Composers And Their Public3. The Art Song4. Franz Schubert5. Robert Schumann 6. Clara Wieck Schumann7. Frederic Chopin8. Franz Liszt9. Felix Mendelssohn10. Program Music11. Hector Berlioz12. Nationalism In Nineteenth-Century Music13. Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky14. Bed rich Smetana15. Antonin Dvorak16. Johannes Brahms 17. Georges Bizet18. Giuseppe Verdi19. Giacomo Puccini20. Richard Wagner 21. Gustav MahlerPart VII The Twentieth Century1. Musical Styles: 1900-19452. Music and Musicians in Society since 19003. Impressionism and Symbolism4. Claude Debussy5. Maurice Ravel6. Neoclassicism7. Igor Stravinsky8. Expressionism9. Arnold Schoenberg10. Alban Berg11. Anton Webern12. Bela Bartok13. Dmitri Shostakovich14. Music in America15. Charles Ives16. George Gershwin17. William Grant Still18. Aaron Copland19. Albert Ginestera20. Musical Styles Since 194521. Music Since 1945: Five Representative PiecesPart VIII Jazz1. Jazz Styles 2. Ragtime 3. Blue 4. New Orleans Style 5. Swing 6. Bebop 7. Jazz Styles since 1950Part IX Music for Stage and Screen1. Musical Theater 2. Leonard Bernstein 3. Music in Film Part X Rock1. Rock Styles 2. Rock in American Society 3. The BeatlesPart XI Nonwestern Music1. Music in Nonwestern Cultures2. Music In Sub-Saharan Africa3. Classical Music Of India 4. Koto Music of Japan AppendixesGlossaryAcknowledgmentsPhoto CreditsIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781259892707 20170410
McGraw-Hill is revolutionizing the Music Appreciation course by introducing its first personalized digital learning experience with Roger Kamien's Music: An Appreciation. Using this market-leading instrument that brings great music to the course in more ways than ever before, students are now transformed into active participants in the Music Appreciation space. The result is active listening, active reading, and active learning. Connect is the only integrated learning system that empowers students by continuously adapting to deliver precisely what they need, when they need it, so that your class time is more engaging and effective. It provides tools that make assessment easier, learning more engaging, and studying more efficient.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781259892707 20170410
Music Library
Music score
1 score (11 pages) ; 31 cm.
Music Library
Book
xvii, 150 pages ; 22 cm
  • 1. Entrance: The Spies of Jericho 2. Discipline and Listen Before the Wiretap Overhearing and Diaphony, A Small History of Big Ears (Toward the Panacousticon) Mastery and Metrics in Figaro The Ages of Fear Telelistening and Telesurveillance A Secret Conversation 3. Underground Passage: The Mole in Its Burrow 4. In the Footsteps of Orpheus The Trackers, with Hidden Noise The Mortal Ear, or Orpheus Turns Around On the Phone: Papageno at Mabuse's The Phantom of the Opera Wozzeck at the Moment of His Death Adorno, the Informer 5. Exit: J.D.'s Dream Notes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823273966 20170213
The world of international politics has recently been rocked by a seemingly endless series of scandals involving auditory surveillance: the NSA's warrantless wiretapping is merely the most sensational example of what appears to be a universal practice today. What is the source of this generalized principle of eavesdropping? All Ears: The Aesthetics of Espionage traces the long history of moles from the Bible, through Jeremy Bentham's "panacoustic" project, all the way to the intelligence-gathering network called "Echelon." Together with this archeology of auditory surveillance, Szendy offers an engaging account of spycraft's representations in literature (Sophocles, Shakespeare, Joyce, Kafka, Borges), opera (Monteverdi, Mozart, Berg), and film (Lang, Hitchcock, Coppola, De Palma). Following in the footsteps of Orpheus, the book proposes a new concept of "overhearing" that connects the act of spying to an excessive intensification of listening. At the heart of listening Szendy locates the ear of the Other that manifests itself as the originary division of a "split-hearing" that turns the drive for mastery and surveillance into the death drive.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823273966 20170213
Green Library

4. Almost There [2015]

Video
1 online resource (streaming video file) (94 minutes) : digital, .flv file, sound
For many, Peter Anton’s house embodies an end-of-life nightmare: the utility companies long ago shut off the heat and electricity, the floorboards are rotting, and the detritus of a chaotic life is precariously stacked to the ceiling. But for the filmmakers Dan Rybicky and Aaron Wickenden, Anton’s home is a treasure trove, a startling collection of unseen and fascinating paintings, drawings, and notebooks, not to mention Anton himself, a character worthy of his own reality TV show. Though aging, infirm, cranky, and solitary, Anton also is funny and utterly resilient. the film's remarkable journey follows a gifted artist through startling twists and turns. By its quietly satisfying ending, Almost There has provided enough human drama for a season of soap operas, plus insights into mental illness, aging in America, and the redemptive power of art.
Book
262 pages ; 21 cm
"Sen-nen ? prénom japonais dont la signification ne se révélera que tardivement ? est marié à Mathilde, une Française. Ancien professeur de littérature française dans une université à Tokyo, Sen-nen vit désormais à Paris avec sa femme, atteinte d'une grave maladie qui l'oblige à garder la chambre. Tous deux mélomanes, ils se sont connus lors d'un stage de musique en France. Bien avant cela, à Paris, Sen-nen avait fait la rencontre capitale d'une cantatrice, Clémence, qui chantait Suzanne dans Les Noces de Figaro. Ébloui, il avait assisté à toutes les représentations et s'était lié d'amitié avec elle. Des années plus tard, alors qu'il l'a perdue de vue, il reçoit un message de Clémence : Les Noces sont redonnées à l'Opéra, dans la mise en scène originelle qu'elle est chargée de superviser. Mathilde laisse son mari aller à la rencontre du passé, pour une longue conversation dans laquelle la musique et l'amour tiendront une place centrale."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library

6. Armida [2015]

Video
2 DVD-Videos (162 min) + 1 Begleitheft.
Music Library
Book
247 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 28 cm
  • L'état-nation et la ville-capitale "néoclassique" -- Ville-capitale et néoclassicisme -- La ville-capitale de l'État-nation -- La capitale : "un gouffre", "un animal vorace" -- La ville ex nihilo -- Le "néoclassicisme" : penser la technique autrement -- L'Europe, savoirs et pratiques en voyage -- Figures d'architectes en France et en Allemagne -- L'Académie royale d'architecture : entre le Panthéon et les machines -- La formation de l'architecte en Allemagne -- Une instruction politique et civique : Fichte et Schinkel -- Les architectes Karl Friedrich Schinkel et Leo von Klenze -- La Bauakademie, le voyage, le regard, le dessin -- L'Athènes imaginaire -- Berlin et Munich : mutations de deux villes européennes -- Schinkel et Berlin -- Klenze et Munich -- L'Antiquité entre histoire et poésie -- La France et l'Allemagne à travers la Grèce -- Fonder l'état grec moderne -- Repères chronologiques -- Violence envers l'espace -- Mobilité dans le temps et l'espace au début du XIXe siècle -- La Foire, la caravane et la rupture inachevée -- La Grèce, un pays plat selon le décret du 29 avril 1834 -- La colonisation, les villes nouvelles et l'industrie -- De la rupture en architecture -- Violence envers les hommes -- Les Lumières en Grèce -- Morale et formation des agents de l'État -- Hétérochtones, étrangers, autochtones : conflits -- L'antiquité pacificatrice -- Athènes 1833 -- Athènes - chronologie -- Un bourg sec -- La guerre pour une capitale -- Athènes avant 1830 -- Le plan de la nouvelle Athènes -- Les architectes du plan, Stamatios Kleanthis et Eduard Schaubert -- L'histoire d'un projet -- "Explication du plan de la nouvelle Athènes" -- Entre l'écrit et le dessin -- Le temps zéro -- Le tracé géométrique -- Places, édifices publics et équipements -- Le temps de l'histoire -- La spéculation à l'oeuvre -- L'éviction de Kleanthis et Schaubert -- Leo von Klenze à Athènes -- Missions et enquêtes -- Nouveau programme et nouveau plan -- Critique du plan Kleanthis-Schaubert -- Kleanthis-Schaubert et Klenze : deux approches -- Une histoire de décalages -- Dernier acte : le palais errant -- Trois places pour un palais -- Le projet de Schinkel : "rêve", "acte poétique" et acte politique -- Le palais sur l'Acropole, un opéra "néoclassique" -- Conclusion : Athènes à soi-même étrangère -- L'architecture, ou comment tromper le temps... -- Athènes : de la ville à la métropole -- Utopie ou atopie ? -- Le "néoclassicisme" : une technologie -- Épilogue.
"Étrange destinée que celle de ce petit bourg chargé d'histoire mais oublié durant des siècles qui devient le coeur d'un État-nation moderne. Ici plus qu'ailleurs, le choix d'une capitale est un acte décisif, puisqu'il s'agit de rompre avec la longue occupation ottomane ; le renouveau et la création de ses monuments, de son plan urbain, de ses axes et de ses perspectives en expriment les ambitions, au croisement du politique, de l'idéologie et d'esthétique. Au lendemain de l'indépendance grecque en 1830, Athènes fut importée sur les lieux mêmes de sa naissance : elle était là et il fallut l'inventer. La cité antique en ruine et enfouie, élevée au titre de ville-centre du nouvel État par les Bavarois et sous l'égide d'une Europe animée par de formidables circulations d'idées, d'arts et de sciences connaît alors l'aube de sa renaissance et de son entrée dans la modernité. Confiée à des architectes et ingénieurs français, allemands et grecs formés à Paris, Munich et Berlin, dont l'inspiration puise aux oeuvres des grandes figures du classicisme dont Durand ou Schinkel, Athènes s'offre à partir de 1833 comme un terrain d'expériences qui incarnera, in fine, l'essence de la capitale moderne et où s'exaltera à travers l'urbanisme un mouvement qui deviendra mondial : le néoclassicisme. Riche d'un large corpus iconographique hérité des principaux artisans de ce nouveau lieu de pouvoir dont Leo von Klenze, Eduard Schaubert et Stamatios Kleanthis cet ouvrage retrace bien plus qu'une épopée urbaine ; y apparaît, en filigrane, le portrait vivant d'un continent irrigué d'échanges culturels et d'incertitudes géopolitiques qui trouva en l'exemplarité athénienne l'opportunité d'une "affaire artistique européenne"."--Page 4 of cover.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
502 pages : illustrations, charts ; 23 cm
  • Introduction -- Des traditions maintenues -- De nouveaux statuts individuels et collectifs -- Au service de la régénération -- Politiques du répertoire -- Trois voies pour une même pédagogie ? -- Du théâtre historique au théâtre politique (1748-179o) -- La vraisemblance historique -- Rendre sensible la violence des temps -- Naissance de la "tragédie patriotique": le Charles IX de Chénier -- Le comique est-il au rendez-vous de l'Histoire -- Violence du rire, rire de la violence -- Rire par-dessus les temps -- Le théâtre sous la Terreur, nouvelle École du peuple ? -- Les attentes du pouvoir -- Un monde professionnel déstabilisé -- Le répertoire patriotique -- Trois thèmes de propagande -- Les apothéoses théâtrales des héros de la Révolution (1791-1794) -- L'Olympe de Mirabeau -- L'élévation républicaine de Beaurepaire -- Le Paradis des sans-culottes -- Adultérins et orphelins : les joies de l'adoption selon le théâtre de la Révolution -- Le temps de l'émancipation et de la mixité sociale -- La nation, mère de tous les orphelins -- Le Directoire ou la confusion des moeurs et des passions -- Le brigand, de Schiller à Hoffman -- Les Brigands de Schiller ou la matrice de toute oeuvre -- L'argument du drame premier -- Désobéissance et autocensure -- Robert, chef de brigands ou la captation d'héritage -- Une adaptation d succès -- Une intrigue retravaillée et appauvrie -- La diffusion, des professionnels aux amateurs -- L'entrée dans la postérité -- Les brigands contrefaits -- À la recherche d'une improbable suite -- Les "brigands" royalistes -- Les "brigands" jacobins -- Trois auteurs patriotes -- La carrière révolutionnaire de Louis-Benoît Picard -- Philippe Antoine Dorfeuille, propagandiste patriote -- Les feux d'une carrière -- Les héros de l'histoire immédiate -- La sainte omelette du père Polycarpe -- Le chien aristocrate -- Madame Liberté et Mademoiselle Constitution -- Annexe 1: Miracle de la Sainte Omelette -- Annexe 2 : Lettre d'un chien aristocrate à son maître, aristocrate aussi, et fugitif de Toulouse -- Annexe 3 : La lanterne magique patriotique ou le coup de grâce de l'aristocratie -- Briois, ou les infortunes de la vertu politique -- Trois manières de servir l'art scénique -- La part des amateurs -- Les émotions -- Le spectateur éclairé -- Le comédien amateur -- Annexe : Règlement de la Société des amateurs du théâtre de Riom -- Les directeurs de troupes -- L'Opéra du Directoire -- L'ombre des vedettes -- Le délabrement de l'institution -- La rareté des nouveautés -- L'interventionnisme de l'État -- La Grèce au répertoire -- Un public averti -- Critiques et mise au pas du théâtre patriotique -- Fabien Pilet et la critique du goût bourgeois -- Seul le vent tourne -- Le contempteur des arts révolutionnaires -- Des costumes et de la mise en scène -- La réorganisation des théâtres, du Directoire à l'Empire -- Le contrôle des salles -- Les genres et le "bon goût" -- Les déclinaisons provinciales du modèle national -- Les limites d'un impérialisme culturel: le théâtre français dans l'Europe de Napoléon -- Le poids des héritages
  • Pérégrinations françaises dans l'Europe impériale -- Langue dissonante, oreilles dissidentes -- La soumission française à l'opéra italien -- Hybridation et acculturation.
"L'union des arts, leur ouverture au plus grand nombre sont au coeur du projet de régénération porté par les révolutionnaires français. Le théâtre connaît alors un véritable âge d'or, comme en témoignent la multiplication des salles et l'émergence de quantité de nouveaux talents, chez les auteurs comme chez les comédiens, chez les professionnels comme chez les amateurs. Au nom du projet émancipateur de la République, les conventionnels élèvent le théâtre au rang d'"école primaire pour adultes". Des débats sur son utilité pédagogique animent les Assemblées, le Comité de salut public, les clubs, les sociétés, les journaux, au risque d'une censure qui échappe aux seuls critiques, et dont sont volontiers partie prenante les spectateurs C'est ce foisonnement sans précédent que fait revivre Philippe Bourdin dans cette fresque captivante consacrée aux arts de la scène sous la Révolution. Un rayonnement notamment associé aux noms d'André Chénier, Chamfort, Fabre d'Églantine, Olympe de Gouges. L'incarnation des gloires républicaines se fait certes par le geste mais tout autant par le verbe. Minoritaire mais conquérant, le théâtre patriotique met en scène des personnages-orateurs: représentants du peuple, maires, officiers, instituteurs, curés patriotes ou, plus simplement, pères et mères de famille anonymes. Ils usent d'un discours de justification, de l'éloge, de la célébration, pour construire sur le vif de l'événement une légende nationale immédiate, un héroïsme à partager."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
220 pages : illustrations, music ; 22 cm.
  • Baldassare Galuppi, personaggio di chiave ed aspetti poco studiati -- Les manuscrits opératiques de Baldassare Galuppi dans les bibliothèques belges et une étude de cas, l'opéra londonien Enrico -- "Les extravagances que l'on appelle des règles dans le drame musical". Gustavo I, re di Svezia ou le début de la collaboration entre Galuppi et Goldoni -- Le rappresentazioni delle opere bulle di Galuppi a Vienna -- La lingua dei libretti d'opera nell'età di Galuppi -- Galuppi, Bertati e L'inimico delle donne -- Rousseau e Galuppi. L'aria Voi che languite (Venezia, 1743) e la Lettre sur la musique française (Parigi, 1753) -- Le cantate di Galuppi per la famiglia Pisani. Musica, poesia, letteratura e politica -- Nello specchio della China. Bertati, Goldoni, Gozzi -- Baldassare Galuppi, i Concerti a Quattro.
"Compositeur d'un grand nombre d'opere serie, d'oratorios et d'oeuvres de musique sacrée, Balsassare Galuppi est peu à peu tombé dans l'oubli. Si son nom est néanmoins connu aujourd'hui encore, c'est principalement grâce à son oeuvre pour clavier. La réédition récente de la partition d'un opera buffa L'Inimico delle donne ainsi que la première mondiale de cette production par l'Opéra royal de Wallonie, ont suscité l'organisation d'un colloque international dont cet ouvrage est le fruit. Il s'articule autour de trois thèmes principaux : Galuppi le "Buranello" (du nom de son île natale, Burano, au nord de la lagune de Venise), Galuppi et l'opéra, et Galuppi et la musique instrumentale et religieuse."--Page 4 of cover.
Music Library
Music score
1 vocal score (234 pages) ; 30 cm.
Music Library
Book
volumes ; 28 cm
  • Volume 1. Popular music
  • Volume 2. World music
  • Volume 3. Classical music.
Prepared by the Music Library Association, with thousands of records selected by experts in dozens of specialised and popular areas of music, "A Basic Music Library" constitutes the most authoritative music collection resource available. Completely revised and reorganised, this essential reference is divided into three sections: classical music (organised by genre, composer, and title); popular music (organised by genre and artist); and, world music (organised by geographic area, genre, and artist). The expanded coverage not only includes new music published since the last edition, but also CDs, DVDs, and songbooks combined with printed music. Printed scores cover performance of all music genres by all instruments, voices, and ensembles and include anthologies, study scores, performing renditions, vocal scores, and instrumental methods of studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780838910399 20170424
Intended to offer suggestions for anyone, regardless of musical training or experience, who is seeking to develop music collections in libraries of all kinds, this essential reference work remains a benchmark of its kind. Prepared by the Music Library Association, Volume 2 concentrates on:* Folk and Traditional Music of North America* Traditional and Popular Music of the Americas and the Caribbean* Music of Asia and Oceania* Music of Northern Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia* Music of Sub-Saharan Africa* Music of Europe* International Anthologies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780838915301 20170424
The new fourth edition of A Basic Music Library, relying on the expertise of the Music Library Association, is unmatched in scope and authority. Covering classical music, Volume 3 is organized into these categories:* Orchestral Music* Film Music* Band Music* Woodwinds* Brass* Strings* Percussion* Keyboard* Opera* Musical Theater* Solo Voice* Choral Music* Classical Music Anthologies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780838915318 20170424
Music Library
Book
xxii, 232 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Simon Callow plunges headlong into Wagner's world to discover what it was like to be Wagner, and to be around one of music's most influential figures. The perfect introduction to the Master. A hundred and thirty-five years after his death, Richard Wagner's music dramas stand at the centre of the culture of classical music. They have never been more popular, nor so violently controversial and divisive. His music is still banned in Israel - the only classical composer whose music is banned in the western world. His ten great mature masterpieces constitute an unmatched body of work, created against a backdrop of poverty, revolution, violent controversy, critical contempt and hysterical hero-worship. As a man, he was a walking contradiction, aggressive, flirtatious, disciplined, capricious, heroic, visionary and poisonously anti-Semitic. At one point, he had four lengthy operas written with no hope of being performed when, as if in a fairy-tale, he was rescued by a beautiful young king with limitless wealth which he bestowed on the composer. When one of those works, Tristan and Isolde, was at last performed, it revolutionised classical music at a stroke. Finally he fulfilled his lifelong dream of creating a vast epic to rival the work of the great Greek playwrights, a music drama in four massive segments, ushering gods and dwarves, heroes and thugs, dragons and rainbows onto the stage, the apotheosis of German art as he saw it, so extreme in its demands that he had to train a generation of singers and players to perform it, and erect a custom-built theatre to house it. Wagner died, exhausted, after creating one final piece - Parsifal - that seems to point to an even more radical new future for music. Simon Callow recalls the intellectual and artistic climate in which Wagner worked, recording the almost superhuman effort required to create his work, and evoking the extraordinary effect he had on people - this composer like no other who ever lived, extreme in everything, creator of the most sublime and most troubling body of work ever known.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780008105693 20170321
Music Library

13. Berg: Wozzeck [2016]

Video
1 online resource (streaming video file) (45 minutes) : digital, .flv file, sound
In assessing Berg’s operatic masterwork, investigate the aftermath of World War I in Germany and its imprint on the opera—a psychological climate of rage, disillusion, and alienation in the wake of the war’s barbarity and hypocrisy. Observe how Berg’s own wartime experience linked him with the life of Franz Wozzeck, the opera’s protagonist. In excerpts from the opera’s first and third acts, hear how Berg achieves a searing musical portrayal of Wozzeck’s disordered mind.
Book
xiv, 317 pages : illustrations, music ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgements Note on Transcription List of Abbreviations and Library Sigla Introduction: Re-Thinking Boundaries in Musical Practice and Circulation / Linda Phyllis Austern, Candace Bailey, and Amanda Eubanks Winkler 1. Tudor Musical Theater: Sounds of Religious Change in Ralph Roister Doister / Katherine Steele Brokaw 2. English Jesuit Missionaries, Music Education, and the Musical Participation of Women in Devotional Life in Recusant Households from ca. 1580 to ca. 1630 / Jane Flynn 3. The Transmission of Lute Music and the Culture of Aurality in Early Modern England / Graham Freeman 4. Thomas Campion's "superfluous blossomes of his deeper studies": the Public Realm of His English Ayres / Christopher R. Wilson 5. Oyez! Fresh Thoughts About the "Cries of London" Repertory / John Milsom 6. "Locks, bolts, barres, and barricados": Song Performance and Spatial Production in Richard Brome's The Northern Lass / Katherine R. Larson 7. "Lasting-Pasted Monuments": Memory, Music, Theatre, and the Seventeenth-Century English Broadside Ballad / Sarah F. Williams 8. The Challenge of Domesticity in Men's Manuscripts in Restoration England / Candace Bailey 9. A Mid-Century Musical Friendship: Silas Taylor and Matthew Locke / Alan Howard 10. Music and Merchants in Restoration London / Bryan White 11. Daniel Henstridge and the Aural Transmission of Music in Restoration England / Rebecca Herissone 12. Courtly Connections: Queen Anne, Music, and the Public Stage / Amanda Eubanks Winkler 13. Disseminating and Domesticating Handel in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain / Suzanne Aspden 14. From London's Opera House to the Salon? The Favourite (and not so "Favourite") Songs from the King's Theatre / Michael Burden 15. Education, Entertainment, Embellishment: Music Publication in the Lady's Magazine / Bonny H. Miller Selected Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253024824 20170418
English music studies often apply rigid classifications to musical materials, their uses, their consumers, and performers. The contributors to this volume argue that some performers and manuscripts from the early modern era defy conventional categorization as "amateur" or "professional, " "native" or "foreign." These leading scholars explore the circulation of music and performers in early modern England, reconsidering previously held ideas about the boundaries between locations of musical performance and practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253024824 20170418
Music Library
Book
xvi, 529 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface Prologue: Beyond Autonomy The Uncanny Grace: A Gloss on Kleist's Marionettes Reason Beyond Reason History Nation Will Religion, the Enlightenment, the Counter-Enlightenment: The New Configuration part one 1. The Secret of Music-Dramatic Form: Music Drama as Opera 2. Der Ring des Nibelungen: The Anarchist Utopia Das Rheingold: The Fall Die Walkure: How One Becomes Human Act 1: Becoming Wagner Act 2: Becoming Brunnhilde Act 3: Waiting for the Hero Siegfried: How One Becomes a Hero Act 1: Getting the Sword Act 2: Using It Act 3: The Awakening Gotterdammerung: The Apocalypse Prologue: The Past and the Future Act 1: The Entrapment 1 Act 2: The Entrapment 2 Act 3: Death and Transfiguration The Myth of Revolution part two 3. Tristan und Isolde: The Erotic Utopia The Lyrical Axis The Narrative Axis The Orchestral Strand The Music-Dramatic Form The Myth of Will Postscript 4. Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg: Politics after Tristan Act 1: The Knight's Failure Act 2: The Clerk's Failure Act 3, Part 1: A Lesson in Poetics Act 3, Part 2: The Shoemaker's Triumph The Myth of Nation 5. Parsifal: Ethics after Tristan The Communion Sequences of Acts 1 and 3 The Monologues of Acts 1 and 3 Act 2: The Kiss of Self-Knowledge The Music-Dramatic Form Eros and Agape The Myth of Redemption Epilogue: Wagner contra Nietzsche Wagner and Nietzsche: A History of the Relationship Becoming Nietzsche Nietzsche contra Wagner, Wagner contra Nietzsche Appendix 1. Das Rheingold: The Music-Dramatic Plan Appendix 2. Die Walkure: The Music-Dramatic Plan Appendix 3. Siegfried: The Music-Dramatic Plan Appendix 4. Gotterdammerung: The Music-Dramatic Plan Appendix 5. Tristan und Isolde: The Music-Dramatic Plan Appendix 6. Die Meistersinger: The Music-Dramatic Plan Appendix 7. Parsifal: The Music-Dramatic Plan Acknowledgments Abbreviations Used in Notes Notes Works Consulted Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520292758 20170123
Beyond Reason relates Wagner's works to the philosophical and cultural ideas of his time, centering on the four music dramas he created in the second half of his career: Der Ring des Nibelungen, Tristan und Isolde, Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg, and Parsifal. Karol Berger seeks to penetrate the "secret" of large-scale form in Wagner's music dramas and to answer those critics, most prominently Nietzsche, who condemned Wagner for his putative inability to weld small expressive gestures into larger wholes. Organized by individual opera, this is essential reading for both musicologists and Wagner experts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520292758 20170123
Music Library

16. Bizet's Dream [1994]

Video
1 online resource (streaming video file) (53 minutes) : digital, .flv file, sound
Set in 1875, and featuring music from "Carmen Suites, " "L'Arlesienne" and "The Pearl Divers, " this historical drama tells the compelling and bittersweet story of the friendship shared by a young Parisian girl named Michelle Marin, and the great composer Georges Bizet, her piano teacher... Michelle (Brittany Madgett) is a talented twelve year-old whose intelligence and resourcefulness are matched only by her extremely active imagination. Bizet (Maurice Godin) is a man of many passions for his family, his artist friends and, most of all, for his music. But each of them is prey to doubts. Michelle wonders if her soldier father will ever return from Spain. Bizet hopes he can rise to the challenge of finishing Carmen, the opera that haunts him. Together, Michelle and Bizet learn that dreams come true only when the time is right and even then in the most surprising ways... **"Best Drama" -ACTA . "Best Children's Program" -Parenting Magazine . "Monitor Award"**
Music score
1 vocal score (90 pages) ; 30 cm.
Music Library
Book
xiii, 594 pages ; 25 cm.
"Brill's Companion to the Reception of Sophocles offers a comprehensive account of the influence, reception and appropriation of all extant Sophoclean plays, as well as the fragmentary Satyr play The Trackers, from Antiquity to Modernity, across cultures and civilizations, encompassing multiple perspectives and within a broad range of cultural trends and manifestations: literature, intellectual history, visual arts, music, opera and dance, stage and cinematography. A concerted work by an international team of specialists in the field, the volume is addressed to a wide and multidisciplinary readership of classical reception studies, from experts to non-experts. Contributors engage in a vividly and lively interactive dialogue with the Ancient and the Modern, which, while illuminating aspects of ancient drama and highlighting their ever-lasting relevance, offers a thoughtful and layered guide of the human condition. Contributors are: Simone Beta, Eric Dugdale, Patrick Finglass, Rosanna Lauriola, Enrico Magnelli, Sophie Mills, Elizabeth Scharffenberger, Maria De Fátima Silva and Martina Treu."-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 220 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Dedication Acknowledgments Preface Section A. - Getting Started Write a Brilliant Script! ***Poem: On Strike Umm, What to Write? Adapt or Die You're No Genius You're in Good Company Playing Around with George Clooney's Happy Ending Books are Just Screenplays with Adjectives. Develop Relationship with Original Author Use Their Experience to Your Benefit Connect with the Material Don't Call it "Opening Up" Location, Location, Location. Editing-- Macro and Micro. Putting the "Move" in "Movies" Use Your Source Material's Pedigree Don't Apologize for Your Source Material Try This On For Size: Improvise! Buying a Script on the Open Market Choose a Castable Script Lawyer Up! Chain of Title Isn't Just an R&B Song Mining for Gold: Discovering the Lost Jules Feiffer Script ***NameDropper Sidebar: Robert Altman There's No Business Like a Show Business Plan Project Summary Project History Key Production Team Synopsis Director's Statement Casting Why Support Independent Film? Product Integration & Branded Sponsorship Financing Options Budget Considerations/Options Distribution Potential Distribution Scenarios Contact Info Disclaimer Remember, It's a Visual Medium Storyboard Lookbook Pitch Cinema Subtitles *** Sidebar: Famous Director Kickstarter Campaigns Takin' Care of Business Rin-TIN-TIN Putting the Love in LLC! Wonderful Waterfalls Making Sure You're Not a Flimmaker Registering with the State The New Pizza King of Omaha EDGAR, EDGAR, Give Me Your Answer Do Boiler Rooms and Shriners Casting Your Banker Hey Buddy, Can You Paradigm? ***Poem: Crowdfund This Staff Up: Your First Round of Collaborators Producing a Producer Interns and a Clean Garage Terrorist Filmmaking The One-Armed Executioner Section B. - Shooting the Movie Casting Your Movie With A-List Actors Assemble a Team Aim High Go to New York Be Bi-Coastally Curious Don't Have a List! Develop Relationships with Agents Yourself Play the Agency Game Bait and Switch Set a Start Date Make it Real Magnetic Balls of Iron Take Advantage of Others' Misfortune Oh, and What if You Don't Have Famous Actors? ***Poem: Call Backs Directing Famous Actors in a Microbudget Film Cast Well Rehearse ***Namedropper sidebar: Harold Ramis Use Rehearsal Wisely Overlapping Dialogue ***Sidebar: The Sound of Music *** What's My Motivation? Trust Your Scripty Encourage "Chemistry" Among Your Cast Behave Like a Big Budget Production Block Scenes On Set Use Multiple Takes as Your Coverage Have Faith in Editing Say Something to the Actors Methods to their Madness Lights, Camera, Cinematographer! Good vs. Nice ***NameDroppers Sidebar - Rian Johnson They're Like Actors with Cameras It's Who They Know Putting the "DP" in iDentity Politics Are They Still Called Films if They're Digital? Film's Zombie Resurgence ***NameDroppers Sidebar - Christopher Nolan & Emma Thomas Deconstructing the Cult of Galileo Frankenlens and Mir (vishscopes) Walt Disney's Secret Optics Bunker Time to Shoot! Does It Take a Video Village to Raise a Film? Bump Up the Credits Finding a Crew with Donut Group Therapy Dress the Part Group Hug, Safety and Prayer to the Film Gods Your First-Day Disasters Hello, My Name is Josh Find the Goat Ready, Aim, Fire! Be Prepared Two Takes Ahead ***NameDropper Sidebar - Alexander Payne Arrive Early, Bring Donuts, Wear Tape Making Your 12-Hour Day Feeding the Beast Making an Epic EPK ***NameDropper Sidebar - John Carpenter Devious Use of the EPKorner Still the One Getting Your Kill Shots Point and Shoot To Infinity and Behind-the-Scenes Making Product Placement Work for You Cash and Carry Break Down, Go Ahead and Give it To Me A Clear and Present Necessity Selling Out, Even if You Don't Get Paid for It Killing Two Birds with One Stone ***Poem: The Locavore Filmmaker Livin' La Vida Locavore Keep Your Homebase at Home Cast Locally (sort of) Find Locations Close to Home Drag Your Actors out of Bed No, Seriously, Keep it Really Close to Home If You Travel, Hire Locally Editing, One Pant Leg at a Time Screw the Environment, Do It for Yourself ***Poem - Hack Attack Section C. - Post-Production Editing Like an ACE Editors Are Like Bass Players Finding Fresh Eyes Cut Yourself ***Poem: The Artisanal Filmmaker Start Strong-- Stick Your Landing Don't Let Your Post Supervisor Escape To Madagascar Teasing Out Your Assistants ***NameDropper Sidebar - Jon Bokenkamp Getting a Little Testy It's Not Easy Being Green Screened Sound and Fury The Breakfast (Nook) Club Temp Decomposing Song Sung Blue Section D. - Festivals Toronto, Toschmonto: Time for a Festival Plan "B" It's Just as Well. Your Film Wasn't Finished! It's All About Sundance Anyway! To Get Distribution! ***SideBar: Producer's Reps vs. Foreign Sales Agents Don't Buy Into the Premiere Arms Race Play Them Off Against Each Other Volume, Volume, Volume Get Reviews Meet Your Audience See the World! They're "Romantic" Meet New Money Get DVD Extras Meet Other Filmmakers ***Poem: Putting the Festiv Back Into Festival How to Avoid Going Broke Applying to Film Festivals Be Selective Make a Personal Connection to the Festival Programmer Offer Your Premiere Status Offer Up Talent Ask for a Waiver Don't Ask for a Waiver Aim Foreign Mail Smart Submit Vimeo Links Hand-Deliver Your DVD Meet Festival Directors at Other Festivals Bribes and Blackmail ***SideBar: Top 24 Sundance/Slamdance Rejection Rationalizations ***Poem: We Are Slamdance How to Start Your Own Film Festival: The Birth of Slamdance Sundance or Bust Anarchy in Utah Prospecting for Screening Rooms The Birth of IndieWood ***NameDropper Sidebar: Steven Soderbergh Our Napolean Complex ***NameDropper Sidebar: Marc Forster Billions and Billions ***Poem: Slamdance at 15 Section E. - Distribution Sexy Things You Get to Do When You Think Your Film is Finished Deliverables E&O Insurance Repair Relationships Promote Your Friggin' Movie DVD Extras Crowd-Funding Perks Taxes Accounting K-1s Write Checks Residuals Archiving Escaping Your Distributor Dissolving Your Entity Rinse, Repeat ***Poem: Don't Get Distribution Aarghh! How to Beat Film Pirates at their Own Game The Whack-a-Mole Takedowns! Make Money From the Pirates The Fakeout! Using the Pirates to Screw Your Distributor! Embracing the Pirates! Slut-Shaming the Advertisers Make Piracy an Essential Element of your Release Strategy Use the Pirates to Pimp Your Merch Use Piracy to Charge for Product Placement What Operas and Sharknado Can Teach Indie Films ***Poem: Analytic Black Hole When In Doubt, Create Your Own Oscar Go Team America! Big in Germany A Tree in the Forest Race to the Academy! We Wuz Robbed ***Poem: Transmedia Verse How to Make Money From an Oscar Nomination The Accountant How to Become a TV Director and Make it in Hollywood Recut Your Reel. Redo Website Update Your IMDb and Wikipedia Pages Make a List Whom to Meet With? How to Get the Meetings ***NameDroppers Sidebar: Joe and Anthony Russo Research Their Shows Research The People Go Early The Pre-Meeting Meeting Check for Breaking News Do You Take The Water? Choose Wisely Where to Sit Wear or Do Something Memorable Tell Funny Stories About Yourself ***NameDroppers Sidebar - Lynn Shelton Ask Them Personal Questions Get Something Out of Each Meeting The Parking Garage Meeting After the Meeting ***SideBar: The Eight Stages of Success for an Indie Filmmaker Epilogue Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138185135 20161018
In The Cheerful Subversive's Guide to Independent Filmmaking, celebrated Slamdance Film Festival co-founder Dan Mirvish offers a rich exploration of the process and culture of making low-budget, independent films. Once labelled a "cheerful subversive" by The New York Times, Mirvish shares his unfiltered pragmatic approach to scriptwriting, casting, directing, producing, managing a crew, post-production, navigating the film festival circuit, distributing your film, dealing with piracy and building a career. Readers will learn how to game the Hollywood system to their advantage, get their films accepted by respected festivals without going broke, and utilize a broad range of media and tactics to promote and distribute their work. A companion website features behind-the-scenes interviews and footage from Dan's films, and much more. * Learn everything you need to know to make, promote, and distribute your independent films, with time-tested lessons and practical advice on scriptwriting, casting and directing A-list actors, financing, producing, managing a crew, editing in post, creating visual effects on a budget, and successuflly navigating the film festival circuit * Find out what it takes to become a true "cheerful subversive" and adopt new and innovative approaches to producing your films, discover hidden loopholes in the Hollywood system and festival scene, take advantage of a broad range of media formats to promote and distribute your indie films, and generally make bold moves in service of your creative work, all while staying flexible enough to pivot at a moment's notice * An extensive companion website features in-depth interviews with filmmakers, more than an hour of behind-the-scenes footage from Dan Mirvish's films, festival resources, and much more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138185135 20161018
Green Library
Book
xiv, 328 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Western music reached China nearly four centuries ago, with the arrival of Christian missionaries, yet only within the last century has Chinese music absorbed its influence. As China and the West demonstrates, the emergence of "Westernized" music from China-concurrent with the technological advances that have made global culture widely accessible-has not established a prominent presence in the West. China and the West brings together essays on centuries of Sino-Western musical exchange by musicologists, ethnomusicologists, and music theorists from around the world. It opens with a look at theoretical approaches of prior studies of musical encounters and a comprehensive survey of the intercultural and cross-cultural theoretical frameworks-exoticism, orientalism, globalization, transculturation, and hybridization-that inform these essays. Part I focuses on the actual encounters between Chinese and European musicians, their instruments and institutions, and the compositions inspired by these encounters, while Part II examines theatricalized and mediated East-West cultural exchanges, which often drew on stereotypical tropes, resulting in performances more inventive than accurate. Part III looks at the musical language, sonority, and subject matters of "intercultural" compositions by Eastern and Western composers. Essays in Part IV address reception studies and consider the ways in which differences are articulated in musical discourse by actors serving different purposes, whether self-promotion, commercial marketing, or modes of nationalistic-even propagandistic-expression. Individual essays cover topics including the 17th-century introduction in China of the Western organ; the influence of "model opera" on composers such as Tan Dun and Guo Wenjing, whose works blend Eastern and Western musical source materials; and the "poetics and politics" of Silk Road nostalgia, an increasingly significant form of cultural tourism. The volume's extensive bibliography of secondary sources will be invaluable to scholars of music, contemporary Chinese culture, and the globalization of culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472130313 20170502
Music Library