%{search_type} search results

750 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Preface.- Earthquakes as events of inter- and intra-disciplinary character - with special reference to the Gorkha 2015 Earthquake in Nepal.- Part 1 - Earthquakes and related hazards.- Should all of Nepal be treated as having the same earthquake hazard?- Analysis of landslides triggered by the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake, Nepal.- The 1985 (M8.1) Michoacan Earthquake and its effects in Mexico City.- Part 2 - Damage, prevention, restoration.- Lessons from building damage patterns during April 25, 2015 Gorkha Earthquake in Nepal.- Nepal cultural heritage earthquake rehabilitation.- Heritage and reconstruction: different perspectives.- Can we prevent structural failure under earthquakes?- A critical appraisal on Turkey's neoliberal quest of urban renewal in historic urban landscapes.- Traditional buildings and preliminary report in construction methods to combat earthquake.- Part 3 - Disaster management and economics.- Medical aspects of the Gorkha Earthquake 2015: disaster preparedness and response.- Meaningfulness of OR models and solution strategies for emergency planning.- Economic loss from earthquake in Nepal and strategies for recovery and resilience building.- Social capital and good governance - a nexus for disaster management: lessons learned from Bangladesh.- Directions and avenues of geotourism - with a particular view to Nepal.- Part 4 - Living with earthquake risk.- Women and children in the 2015 earthquake in Nepal.- Emotional care in social work.- Earthquake and earth justice: emergence of the environmental justice movement and its relevance in addressing unanticipated events.- Assessing policies of responding to the risk and impacts of earthquakes from a justice perspective.- Earthquake preparedness policy in Nepal.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319680439 20180213
This book addresses earthquakes, with a special focus on the Ghorka earthquake, which struck parts of central Nepal in April 2015. Drawing on this disastrous event, it closely examines various aspects of earthquakes in contributions prepared by international experts. The topics covered include: the geological and geophysical background of seismicity; a detailed inventory of the damage done by the earthquake; effective damage prevention through earthquake-safe buildings and settlements; restoration options for world-heritage buildings; strategies for providing technical and medical relief and, lastly, questions associated with public life and economy in a high-risk seismic zone. Combining perspectives from various fields, the book presents the state of the art in all earthquake-related fields and outlines future approaches to risk identification, damage prevention, and disaster management in all parts of society, administration, and politics in Nepal. Beyond the specific disaster in Nepal, the findings presented here will have broader implications for how societies can best deal with disasters.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319680439 20180213
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
ix, 295 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 29 cm.
  • Contributors vii Preface ix 1 Neotectonics and Earthquake Potential of the Eastern Mediterranean Region: Introduction 1 Ibrahim Cemen and Yucel Y lmaz Part I: Morphotectonic Characteristics of Neotectonics in Anatolia and Its Surroundings 9 2 Morphotectonic Development of Anatolia and the Surrounding Regions 11 Yucel Y lmaz 3 Diversion of River Courses Across Major Strike Slip Faults and Keirogens 93 A. M. Celal S engor Part II: Neotectonics of the Aegean-Western Anatolian Region 103 4 Effect of Slab Tear on Crustal Structure in Southwestern Anatolia: Insight From Gravity Data Modeling 105 Rezene Mahatsente, Suleyman Alemdar, and Ibrahim Cemen 5 Geodynamical Models for Continental Delamination and Ocean Lithosphere Peel Away in an Orogenic Setting 121 Og uz H. Gog us , Russell N. Pysklywec, and Claudio Faccenna 6 Major Problems of Western Anatolian Geology 141 Yucel Yilmaz 7 The Cataldag Plutonic Complex in Western Anatolia: Roles of Different Granites on the Crustal Buildup in Connection With the Core Complex Development 189 Omer Kamac , Alp Unal, S afak Altunkaynak, Stoyan Georgiev, and Zeki M. Billor Part III: Seismotectonics in the Eastern Mediterranean Region 223 8 Fault Structures in Marmara Sea (Turkey) and Their Connection to Earthquake Generation Processes 225 Mustafa Aktar 9 North Aegean Active Fault Pattern and the 24 May 2014, Mw 6.9 Earthquake 239 Sotiris Sboras, Alex Chatzipetros, and Spyros B. Pavlides 10 Seismic Intensity Maps for the Eastern Part of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (Turkey) Based on Recorded and Simulated Ground Motion Data 273 Aysegul Askan, Shaghayegh Karimzadeh, and Mustafa Bilal Index 289.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118944981 20170522
Neotectonics involves the study of the motions and deformations of the Earth's crust that are current or recent in geologic time. The Mediterranean region is one of the most important regions for neotectonics and related natural hazards. This volume focuses on the neotectonics of the Eastern Mediterranean region, which has experienced many major extensive earthquakes, including the devastating Izmit, Turkey earthquake on August 17, 1999. The event lasted for 37 seconds, killing around 17,000 people, injuring 44,000 people, and leaving approximately half a million people homeless. Since then, several North American, European, and Turkish research groups have studied the neotectonics and earthquake potential of the region using different geological and geophysical methods, including GPS studies, geodesy, and passive source seismology. Some results from their studies were presented in major North American and European geological meetings. This volume highlights the work involving the Eastern Mediterranean region, which has one of the world's longest and best studied active strike-slip (horizontal motion) faults: the east-west trending North Anatolian fault zone, which is very similar to the San Andreas fault in California. This volume features discussions of: Widespread applications in measuring plate motion that have strong implications in predicting natural disasters like earthquakes, both on a regional and a global scale Recent motions, particularly those produced by earthquakes, that provide insights on the physics of earthquake recurrence, the growth of mountains, orogenic movements, and seismic hazards Unique methodical approaches in collecting tectonophysical data, including field, seismic, experimental, computer-based, and theoretical approaches. Active Global Seismology is a valuable resource for geoscientists, particularly in the field of tectonophysics, geophysics, geodynamics, seismology, structural geology, environmental geology, and geoengineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118944981 20170522
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Contributors vii Preface ix 1 Neotectonics and Earthquake Potential of the Eastern Mediterranean Region: Introduction 1 Ibrahim Cemen and Yucel Y lmaz Part I: Morphotectonic Characteristics of Neotectonics in Anatolia and Its Surroundings 9 2 Morphotectonic Development of Anatolia and the Surrounding Regions 11 Yucel Y lmaz 3 Diversion of River Courses Across Major Strike Slip Faults and Keirogens 93 A. M. Celal S engor Part II: Neotectonics of the Aegean-Western Anatolian Region 103 4 Effect of Slab Tear on Crustal Structure in Southwestern Anatolia: Insight From Gravity Data Modeling 105 Rezene Mahatsente, Suleyman Alemdar, and Ibrahim Cemen 5 Geodynamical Models for Continental Delamination and Ocean Lithosphere Peel Away in an Orogenic Setting 121 Og uz H. Gog us , Russell N. Pysklywec, and Claudio Faccenna 6 Major Problems of Western Anatolian Geology 141 Yucel Yilmaz 7 The Cataldag Plutonic Complex in Western Anatolia: Roles of Different Granites on the Crustal Buildup in Connection With the Core Complex Development 189 Omer Kamac , Alp Unal, S afak Altunkaynak, Stoyan Georgiev, and Zeki M. Billor Part III: Seismotectonics in the Eastern Mediterranean Region 223 8 Fault Structures in Marmara Sea (Turkey) and Their Connection to Earthquake Generation Processes 225 Mustafa Aktar 9 North Aegean Active Fault Pattern and the 24 May 2014, Mw 6.9 Earthquake 239 Sotiris Sboras, Alex Chatzipetros, and Spyros B. Pavlides 10 Seismic Intensity Maps for the Eastern Part of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (Turkey) Based on Recorded and Simulated Ground Motion Data 273 Aysegul Askan, Shaghayegh Karimzadeh, and Mustafa Bilal Index 289.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118944981 20170522
Neotectonics involves the study of the motions and deformations of the Earth's crust that are current or recent in geologic time. The Mediterranean region is one of the most important regions for neotectonics and related natural hazards. This volume focuses on the neotectonics of the Eastern Mediterranean region, which has experienced many major extensive earthquakes, including the devastating Izmit, Turkey earthquake on August 17, 1999. The event lasted for 37 seconds, killing around 17,000 people, injuring 44,000 people, and leaving approximately half a million people homeless. Since then, several North American, European, and Turkish research groups have studied the neotectonics and earthquake potential of the region using different geological and geophysical methods, including GPS studies, geodesy, and passive source seismology. Some results from their studies were presented in major North American and European geological meetings. This volume highlights the work involving the Eastern Mediterranean region, which has one of the world's longest and best studied active strike-slip (horizontal motion) faults: the east-west trending North Anatolian fault zone, which is very similar to the San Andreas fault in California. This volume features discussions of: Widespread applications in measuring plate motion that have strong implications in predicting natural disasters like earthquakes, both on a regional and a global scale Recent motions, particularly those produced by earthquakes, that provide insights on the physics of earthquake recurrence, the growth of mountains, orogenic movements, and seismic hazards Unique methodical approaches in collecting tectonophysical data, including field, seismic, experimental, computer-based, and theoretical approaches. Active Global Seismology is a valuable resource for geoscientists, particularly in the field of tectonophysics, geophysics, geodynamics, seismology, structural geology, environmental geology, and geoengineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118944981 20170522
Book
237 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 31 cm.
  • Introduction and history of mapping and research / P.C. Bandopadhyay-- Introduction to the geography and geomorphology of the Andaman-Nicobar Islands / P.C. Bandopadhyay & A. Carter
  • Regional context of the geology of the Andaman-Nicobar accretionary ridge / P.D. Clift
  • Cenozoic rifting, passive margin development and strike-slip faulting in the Andaman Sea: a discussion of established v. new tectonic models / C.K. Morley
  • Regional tectonics, structure and evolution of the Andaman-Nicobar Islands from ophiolite formation and obduction to collision and back-arc spreading / C.K. Morley & M. Searle
  • Geological framework of the Andaman-Nicobar Islands / P.C. Bandopadhyay & A. Carter
  • Andaman-Nicobar Ophiolites, India: origin, evolution and emplacement / B. Ghosh, D. Bandopadhyay & T. Morishita
  • Mithakhari deposits / P.C. Bandopadhyay & A. Carter
  • Submarine fan deposits: petrography and geochemistry of the Andaman Flysch / P.C. Bandopadhyay & A. Carter
  • Provenance of Oligocene Andaman sandstones (Andaman-Nicobar Islands): Ganga-Brahmaputra or Irrawaddy derived? / M. Limonta, A. Resentini, A. Carter, P.C. Bandopadhyay & E. Garzanti
  • The Archipelago Group: current understanding / P.C. Bandopadhyay & A. Carter
  • Inner-arc volcanism: Barren and Narcondam islands / P.C. Bandopadhyay
  • Anatomy of the Andaman-Nicobar subduction system from seismic reflection data / S.C. Singh & R. Moeremans
  • Seismicity of the Andaman-Nicobar Islands and Andaman Sea / A. Carter & P.C. Bandopadhyay
  • The 26 December 2004 earthquake and tsunami / A. Carter & P.C. Bandopadhyay
  • Natural resources / P.C. Bandopadhyay, B. Ghosh & A. Carter
  • Index.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (some color)
  • * Introduction of Bridge Engineering* Bridge Planning and Design* Materials for Bridge Constructions* Loads and Load Distribution* Bridge Deck Systems* Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Bridges* Steel Bridges* Truss Bridges* Arch Bridges* Cable-Stayed Bridges* Suspension Bridges* Bridge Bearings and Substructures* Inspection, Monitoring, and Assessment* Repair, Strengthening, and Replacement.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128044322 20170612
Bridge Engineering: Classifications, Design Loading, and Analysis Methods begins with a clear and concise exposition of theory and practice of bridge engineering, design and planning, materials and construction, loads and load distribution, and deck systems. This is followed by chapters concerning applications for bridges, such as: Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Bridges, Steel Bridges, Truss Bridges, Arch Bridges, Cable Stayed Bridges, Suspension Bridges, Bridge Piers, and Bridge Substructures. In addition, the book addresses issues commonly found in inspection, monitoring, repair, strengthening, and replacement of bridge structures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128044322 20170612
Book
xvi, 451 pages, 88 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 29 cm
  • List of contributors, xi About the companion websites, xvii 1 Introduction, 1 Tom Gleeson and Steven Ingebritsen 2 DigitalCrust a 4D data system of material properties for transforming research on crustal fluid flow, 6 Ying Fan, Stephen Richard, R. Sky Bristol, Shanan E. Peters, Steven E. Ingebritsen, Nils Moosdorf, Aaron Packman, Tom Gleeson, I. Zaslavsky, S. Peckham, Lawrence Murdoch, Michael Fienen, Michael Cardiff, David Tarboton, Norman Jones, Richard Hooper, Jennifer Arrigo, D. Gochis, J. Olson and David Wolock Part I: The physics of permeability, 13 3 The physics of permeability, 15 Tom Gleeson and Steven E. Ingebritsen 4 A pore-scale investigation of the dynamic response of saturated porous media to transient stresses, 16 Christian Huber and Yanqing Su 5 Flow of concentrated suspensions through fractures: small variations in solid concentration cause significant in-plane velocity variations, 27 Ricardo Medina, Jean E. Elkhoury, Joseph P. Morris, Romain Prioul, Jean Desroches and Russell L. Detwiler 6 Normal stress-induced permeability hysteresis of a fracture in a granite cylinder, 39 A. P. S. Selvadurai 7 Linking microearthquakes to fracture permeability evolution, 49 Takuya Ishibashi, Noriaki Watanabe, Hiroshi Asanuma and Noriyoshi Tsuchiya 8 Fractured rock stress permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical mechanical couplings, 65 Jonny Rutqvist Part II: Static permeability, 83 9 Static permeability, 85 Tom Gleeson and Steven E. Ingebritsen Part II(A): Sediments and sedimentary rocks 10 How well can we predict permeability in sedimentary basins? Deriving and evaluating porosity permeability equations for noncemented sand and clay mixtures, 89 Elco Luijendijk and Tom Gleeson 11 Evolution of sediment permeability during burial and subduction, 104 Hugh Daigle and Elizabeth J. Screaton Part II(B): Igneous and metamorphic rocks 12 Is the permeability of crystalline rock in the shallow crust related to depth, lithology, or tectonic setting?, 125 Mark Ranjram, Tom Gleeson and Elco Luijendijk 13 Understanding heat and groundwater flow through continental flood basalt provinces: Insights gained from alternative models of permeability/depth relationships for the Columbia Plateau, United States, 137 Erick R. Burns, Colin F. Williams, Steven E. Ingebritsen, Clifford I. Voss, Frank A. Spane and Jacob DeAngelo 14 Deep fluid circulation within crystalline basement rocks and the role of hydrologic windows in the formation of the Truth or Consequences, New Mexico low-temperature geothermal system, 155 Jeffrey Pepin, Mark Person, Fred Phillips, Shari Kelley, Stacy Timmons, Lara Owens, James Witcher and Carl W. Gable 15 Hydraulic conductivity of fractured upper crust: insights from hydraulic tests in boreholes and fluid rock interaction in crystalline basement rocks, 174 Ingrid Stober and Kurt Bucher Part III: Dynamic permeability, 189 16 Dynamic permeability, 191 Tom Gleeson and Steven E. Ingebritsen Part III(A): Oceanic crust 17 Rapid generation of reaction permeability in the roots of black smoker systems, Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus, 195 Johnson R. Cann, Andrew M. Mccaig and Bruce W. D. Yardley Part III(B): Fault zones 18 The permeability of active subduction plate boundary faults, 209 Demian M. Saffer 19 Changes in hot spring temperature and hydrogeology of the Alpine Fault hanging wall, New Zealand, induced by distal South Island earthquakes, 228 Simon C. Cox, Catriona D. Menzies, Rupert Sutherland, Paul H. Denys, Calum Chamberlain and Damon A. H. Teagle 20 Transient permeability in fault stepovers and rapid rates of orogenic gold deposit formation, 249 Steven Micklethwaite, Arianne Ford, Walter Witt and Heather A. Sheldon 21 Evidence for long-timescale (>103 years) changes in hydrothermal activity induced by seismic events, 260 Trevor Howald, Mark Person, Andrew Campbell, Virgil Lueth, Albert Hofstra, Donald Sweetkind, Carl W. Gable, Amlan Banerjee, Elco Luijendijk, Laura Crossey, Karl Karlstrom, Shari Kelley and Fred M. Phillips Part III(C): Crustal-scale behavior 22 The permeability of crustal rocks through the metamorphic cycle: an overview, 277 Bruce Yardley 23 An analytical solution for solitary porosity waves: dynamic permeability and fluidization of nonlinear viscous and viscoplastic rock, 285 James A. D. Connolly and Y. Y. Podladchikov 24 Hypocenter migration and crustal seismic velocity distribution observed for the inland earthquake swarms induced by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in NE Japan: implications for crustal fluid distribution and crustal permeability, 307 T. Okada, T. Matsuzawa, N. Umino, K. Yoshida, A. Hasegawa, H. Takahashi, T. Yamada, M. Kosuga, Tetsuya Takeda, A. Kato, T. Igarashi, K. Obara, S. Sakai, A. Saiga, T. Iidaka, T. Iwasaki, N. Hirata, N. Tsumura, Y. Yamanaka, T. Terakawa, H. Nakamichi, T. Okuda, S. Horikawa, H. Katao, T. Miura, A. Kubo, T. Matsushima, K. Goto and H. Miyamachi 25 Continental-scale water-level response to a large earthquake, 324 Zheming Shi, Guang-Cai Wang, Michael Manga and Chi-Yuen Wang Part III(D): Effects of fluid injection at the scale of a reservoir or ore-deposit 26 Development of connected permeability in massive crystalline rocks through hydraulic fracture propagation and shearing accompanying fluid injection, 337 Giona Preisig, Erik Eberhardt, Valentin Gischig, Vincent Roche, Mirko van der Baan, Benoit Valley, Peter K. Kaiser, Damien Duff and Robert Lowther 27 Modeling enhanced geothermal systems and the essential nature of large-scale changes in permeability at the onset of slip, 353 Stephen A. Miller 28 Dynamics of permeability evolution in stimulated geothermal reservoirs, 363 Joshua Taron, Steve E. Ingebritsen, Stephen Hickman and Colin F. Williams 29 The dynamic interplay between saline fluid flow and rock permeability in magmatic hydrothermal systems, 373 Philipp Weis Part IV: Conclusion, 393 30 Toward systematic characterization, 395 Tom Gleeson and Steven E. Ingebritsen References, 398 Index, 447.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119166566 20170117
Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures. The practical importance of permeability and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production ( fracking ), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment. This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119166566 20170117
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Seismicity and earthquake catalogues described as point processes. 2. The likelihood of a hypothesis. 3. The likelihood for a model of continuous rate density distribution. 4. Forecast verification procedures. 5. Applications of epidemic models. 6. Computer programs and examples of their use. 1. Seismicity and Earthquake Catalogues Described as Point Processes. 2. The Likelihood of a Hypothesis. 3. The Likelihood for a Model of Continuous Rate Density Distribution. 4. Forecast Verification Procedures. 5. Applications of Epidemic Models. 6. Long-term Earthquake Occurrence Models. 7. Computer Programs and Examples of their Use.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119372219 20170807
This book gives a detailed analysis of earthquake clustering as the realization of a point process modelled by a generalized Poisson distribution. No hypothesis is inferred on the physical model of such a process. The occurrence of a seismic event within an infinitesimal volume of the space of its characterizing parameters is supposed to be completely random; while the behavior in a reasonably large volume of the same space may exhibit some average non-random features. The description of seismicity as a point process in space, time and magnitude is suitable for the application of statistical tools for comparing the performance of different models. Examples of application of such algorithms to real seismicity are included.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119372219 20170807
Book
1 online resource.
Lifeline infrastructure network functionality is key for community operation and safety, especially after natural disasters, such as earthquakes. Thus, this dissertation discusses seismic risk analysis of distributed lifeline infrastructure networks and mitigation strategies informed by this risk analysis to limit the impacts of future earthquakes. First, this thesis proposes an end-to-end framework that encompasses seismic hazard characterization, network performance estimation, and network component retrofit selection. This thesis proceeds to analyze and propose methods within each of these modules to maximize fidelity while maintaining computational palatability for application to large complex networks. A comparative analysis of techniques for the simulation of ground motion amplitude fields is performed to determine the optimal method. The results designate Circulant Embedding to be a computationally superior method and identify trade-offs in terms of computational efficiency and applicability with other techniques. Then, risk informed heuristics for network component retrofit selection are proposed and evaluated against existing methods. The findings demonstrate that the proposed risk informed metrics combined with existing heuristics---specifically, the Tempered Pipe Participation Factor combined with the Risk Achievement Worth---yield superior retrofit selection, indicating the value of the integration of risk analysis to pipe importance estimation. Finally, statistical learning techniques are applied to the estimation of network performance, and their potential to be a computationally efficient supplement or replacement of physics based models is evaluated. This work identifies a strategy that may adequately estimate network performance at a fraction of the computational expense compared to full physical models. Ultimately, this dissertation contributes to the large body of research regarding the reliability of lifeline infrastructure networks exposed to natural hazards. The framework established here provides a foundation for risk informed mitigation strategies for real life complex networks in pursuit of resilient communities.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Impedances, sources and environments.- Impedances and tippers from one equation.- Modeling of Deep Soundings Study.- Results of deep soundings in Europe.- Electromagnetic monitoring.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319537948 20171127
At the heart of this book is the generalized theoretical approach that is applied to investigate the geoelectrical structure of the Earth's mantle. It also analyzes the results of regional and global induction sounding of the Earth's mantle and compares them with the results obtained by other geophysical methods. The generalized theoretical approach employs the Induction Law as a basis for identifying extended relations between magnetic field components, including their plane divergence, impedances and spatial derivatives. The estimations of impedance values and spatial derivatives are performed using the theory of stochastic processes. The book also considers the external sources of magnetic fields used for sounding the Earths mantle from the modern theory perspective, as well as the problem of coincidence of magneto-variation and magnetotelluric methods. Further, it discusses secular variations in the Earth's resistance caused by non-induction sources, factors that are correlated with the number of earthquakes in the region and shifted in time with global indexes. It is a valuable resource for scientists applying deep induction soundings or interested in the structures of and processes in the Earth's interior.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319537948 20171127
Book
1 online resource (640 pages) : 325 illustrations.
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • About the Authors
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Illustrations
  • Tables
  • Preface
  • Notice of Use of Copyrighted Material
  • 1 Basic Structural Behavior and Design of Low-Rise, Bearing Wall Buildings
  • 1.1 Basic Structural Behavior of Low-Rise, Bearing Wall Buildings
  • 1.2 Basic Structural Design of Low-Rise, Masonry Buildings
  • 2 Materials Used in Masonry Construction
  • 2.1 Basic Components of Masonry
  • 2.2 Masonry Mortar
  • 2.3 Masonry Grout
  • 2.4 General Information on ASTM Specifications for Masonry Units
  • 2.5 Clay Masonry Units
  • 2.6 Concrete Masonry Units
  • 2.7 Properties of Masonry Assemblages
  • 2.8 Masonry Accessory Materials
  • 2.9 Design of Masonry Structures Requiring Little Structural Calculation
  • 2.10 How to Increase Resistance of Masonry to Water Penetration
  • 3 Code Basis for Structural Design of Masonry Buildings
  • 3.1 Introduction to Building Codes in the United States
  • 3.2 Introduction to the Calculation of Design Loading Using the 2015 IBC
  • 3.3 Gravity Loads according to the 2015 IBC
  • 3.4 Wind Loading according to the 2015 IBC
  • 3.5 Earthquake Loading
  • 3.6 Loading Combinations of the 2015 IBC
  • 3.7 Summary of Strength Design Provisions of TMS 402-13
  • 3.8 Summary of Allowable-Stress Design Provisions of TMS 402-13
  • 3.9 Additional Information on Code Basis for Structural Design of Masonry Buildings
  • 4 Introduction to MSJC Treatment of Structural Design
  • 4.1 Basic Mechanical Behavior of Masonry
  • 4.2 Classification of Masonry Elements
  • 4.3 Classification of Masonry Elements by Structural Function
  • 4.4 Classification of Masonry Elements by Design Intent
  • 4.5 Design Approaches for Masonry Elements
  • 4.6 How Reinforcement Is Used in Masonry Elements
  • 4.7 How This Book Classifies Masonry Elements
  • 5 Strength Design of Unreinforced Masonry Elements
  • 5.1 Strength Design of Unreinforced Panel Walls
  • 5.2 Strength Design of Unreinforced Bearing Walls
  • 5.3 Strength Design of Unreinforced Shear Walls
  • 5.4 Strength Design of Anchor Bolts
  • 5.5 Required Details for Unreinforced Bearing Walls and Shear Walls
  • 5.6 Problems
  • 6 Strength Design of Reinforced Masonry Elements
  • 6.1 Strength Design of Reinforced Beams and Lintels
  • 6.2 Strength Design of Reinforced Curtain Walls
  • 6.3 Strength Design of Reinforced Bearing Walls
  • 6.4 Strength Design of Reinforced Shear Walls
  • 6.5 Required Details for Reinforced Bearing Walls and Shear Walls
  • 6.6 Problems
  • 7 Allowable-Stress Design of Unreinforced Masonry Elements
  • 7.1 Allowable-Stress Design of Unreinforced Panel Walls
  • 7.2 Allowable-Stress Design of Unreinforced Bearing Walls
  • 7.3 Allowable-Stress Design of Unreinforced Shear Walls.
  • 7.4 Allowable-Stress Design of Anchor Bolts
  • 7.5 Required Details for Unreinforced Bearing Walls and Shear Walls
  • 7.6 Problems
  • 8 Allowable-Stress Design of Reinforced Masonry Elements
  • 8.1 Review: Behavior of Cracked, Transformed Sections
  • 8.2 Allowable-Stress Design of Reinforced Beams and Lintels
  • 8.3 Allowable-Stress Design of Curtain Walls
  • 8.4 Allowable-Stress Design of Reinforced Bearing Walls
  • 8.5 Allowable-Stress Design of Reinforced Shear Walls
  • 8.6 Required Details for Reinforced Bearing Walls and Shear Walls
  • 8.7 Problems
  • 9 Comparison of Design by the Allowable-Stress Approach Versus the Strength Approach
  • 9.1 Comparison of Allowable-Stress and Strength Design of Unreinforced Panel Walls
  • 9.2 Comparison of Allowable-Stress Design and Strength Design of Unreinforced Bearing Walls
  • 9.3 Comparison of Allowable-Stress Design and Strength Design of Unreinforced Shear Walls
  • 9.4 Comparison of Allowable-Stress and Strength Designs for Anchor Bolts
  • 9.5 Comparison of Allowable-Stress and Strength Designs for Reinforced Beams and Lintels
  • 9.6 Comparison of Allowable-Stress and Strength Designs for Reinforced Curtain Walls
  • 9.7 Comparison of Allowable-Stress and Strength Designs for Reinforced Bearing Walls
  • 9.8 Comparison of Allowable-Stress and Strength Designs for Reinforced Shear Walls
  • 10 Lateral Load Analysis of Shear-Wall Structures
  • 10.1 Introduction to Lateral Load Analysis of Shear-Wall Structures
  • 10.2 Classification of Horizontal Diaphragms as Rigid or Flexible
  • 10.3 Lateral Load Analysis of Shear-Wall Structures with Rigid Floor Diaphragms
  • 10.4 Lateral Load Analysis and Design of Shear-Wall Structures with Flexible Floor Diaphragms
  • 10.5 The Simplest of All Possible Analytical Worlds
  • 10.6 Problems
  • 11 Design and Detailing of Floor and Roof Diaphragms
  • 11.1 Introduction to Design of Diaphragms
  • 11.2 Typical Connection Details for Roof and Floor Diaphragms
  • 12 Strength Design Example: Low-Rise Building with Reinforced Concrete Masonry
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Design Steps for One-Story Building
  • 12.3 Step 1: Choose Design Criteria
  • 12.4 Propose Structural Systems for Gravity and Lateral Load
  • 12.5 Step 2: Design Walls for Gravity plus Out-of-Plane Loads
  • 12.6 Step 3: Design Lintels
  • 12.7 Summary So Far
  • 12.8 Step 4: Conduct Lateral Force Analysis, Design Roof Diaphragm
  • 12.9 Step 5: Design Wall Segments
  • 12.10 Step 6: Design and Detail Connections
  • 13 Strength Design Example: Four-Story Building with Clay Masonry
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Design Steps for Four-Story Example
  • 13.3 Step 1: Choose Design Criteria, Specify Materials
  • 13.4 Step 2: Design Transverse Shear Walls for Gravity Plus Earthquake Loads.
  • 13.5 Step 3: Design Exterior Walls for Gravity Plus Out-of-Plane Wind
  • 13.6 Overall Comments on Four-Story Building Example
  • 14 Structural Design of AAC Masonry
  • 14.1 Introduction to Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC)
  • 14.2 Applications of AAC
  • 14.3 Structural Design of AAC Elements
  • 14.4 Design of Unreinforced Panel Walls of AAC Masonry
  • 14.5 Design of Unreinforced Bearing Walls of AAC Masonry
  • 14.6 Design of Unreinforced Shear Walls of AAC Masonry
  • 14.7 Design of Reinforced Beams and Lintels of AAC Masonry
  • 14.8 Design of Reinforced Curtain Walls of AAC Masonry
  • 14.9 Design of Reinforced Bearing Walls of AAC Masonry
  • 14.10 Design of Reinforced Shear Walls of AAC Masonry
  • 14.11 Seismic Design of AAC Structures
  • 14.12 Design Example: Three-Story AAC Shear Wall Hotel
  • 14.13 References on AAC
  • References
  • General References
  • ASTM Standards
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W.
Thoroughly Updated Coverage of Masonry Codes, Materials, and Structural Design This fully revised resource covers the design of masonry structures using the 2015 International Building Code, the ASCE 7-10 loading standard, and the TMS 402-13 and TMS 602-13 design and construction standards. The book emphasizes the strength design of masonry and includes allowable-stress provisions. The latest advances, materials, and techniques are clearly explained. Chapter-long case studies featuring a low-rise building with reinforced concrete masonry and a four-story building with clay masonry illustrate the topics presented. Masonry Structural Design, Second Edition, covers: * Structural behavior and design of low-rise, bearing wall buildings * Materials used in masonry construction * Code basis for structural design of masonry buildings * Basics of seismic design in masonry buildings * Introduction to MSJC treatment of structural design * Strength design of reinforced and unreinforced masonry elements * Allowable-stress design of reinforced and unreinforced masonry elements * Comparison of design by the allowable-stress approach versus the strength approach * Lateral load analysis of shear wall structure * Design and detailing of floor and roof diaphragms * Structural design of AAC masonry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781259641756 20171002
Book
1 online resource (33 p.) : digital, PDF file.
Multi-hazard Analysis for STOchastic time-DOmaiN phenomena (MASTODON) is a finite element application that aims at analyzing the response of 3-D soil-structure systems to natural and man-made hazards such as earthquakes, floods and fire. MASTODON currently focuses on the simulation of seismic events and has the capability to perform extensive ‘source-to-site’ simulations including earthquake fault rupture, nonlinear wave propagation and nonlinear soil-structure interaction (NLSSI) analysis. MASTODON is being developed to be a dynamic probabilistic risk assessment framework that enables analysts to not only perform deterministic analyses, but also easily perform probabilistic or stochastic simulations for the purpose of risk assessment.
Book
1 online resource (345 p.) : digital, PDF file.
systems the concrete shall not only provide shielding but insures stability of the upright canister, facilitates anchoring, allows ventilation, and provides physical protection against theft, severe weather and natural (seismic) as well as man-made events (blast incidences). Given the need to remain functional for 40 years or even longer in case of interim storage, the concrete outerpack and the internal canister components need to be evaluated with regard to their long-term ability to perform their intended design functions. Just as evidenced by deteriorating concrete bridges, there are reported visible degradation mechanisms of dry storage systems especially when high corrosive environments are considered in maritime locations. The degradation of reinforced concrete is caused by multiple physical and chemical mechanisms, which may be summarized under the heading of environmental aging. The underlying hygro-thermal transport processes are accelerated by irradiation effects, hence creep and shrinkage need to include the effect of chloride penetration, alkali aggregate reaction as well as corrosion of the reinforcing steel. In light of the above, the two main objectives of this project are to (1) develop a probabilistic multi-hazard assessment framework, and (2) through experimental and numerical research perform a comprehensive assessment under combined earthquake loads and aging induced deterioration, which will also provide data for the development and validation of the probabilistic framework.
Book
1 online resource.
We describe a Bayesian change-point model to estimate time-varying seismicity rates, develop a mixture of mixtures model to associate wastewater injection volumes with seismicity, propose a regional ground-motion prediction equation and describe a framework to quantify temporally-varying seismic hazard and regional risk, with application to induced seismicity in Oklahoma. We describe a Bayesian change-point model that detects if the seismicity rate has changed using a time series of observed earthquake occurrences. We show that for steep changes in seismicity rates, such as those that have been observed for induced seismicity in Oklahoma, change can be detected within 3 months of its occurrence. The Bayesian model yields posterior probability distributions for the date of change, and the rates before and after the change. We compile a database of ground motions from the central and eastern United States for magnitude ≥ 3 earthquakes from 2001 through 2016. We observe that ground motions from tectonic earthquakes attenuate faster within the first 20 km. This results in slightly higher ground shaking from induced earthquakes. We propose a ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) for induced earthquakes in the central US, by scaling an existing GMPE. We use a logistic regression model to show that high wastewater injection volumes are correlated with regions of seismicity change. We propose a statistical model to establish functional relationships between injection volumes and seismicity. We use a mixture of mixtures model to find these functional relationships. We also describe a generalized mixture of mixtures model that can be used to find temporal or spatial trends in the mixing proportions and parameters of mixture distributions. We extend the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) framework to account for temporally-changing seismicity rates due to induced seismicity. Seismicity rates can be obtained from multiple methods, like the change-point model or the mixture of mixtures model. For the latter model, injection volumes can be used directly for hazard estimation without first obtaining the seismicity rates. We implement a stochastic Monte-Carlo approach using OpenQuake to estimate temporally-varying induced seismicity hazard in Oklahoma City and estimate the regional risk for the complete portfolio of buildings in Oklahoma obtained using HAZUS. Our goal with this dissertation is to provide stakeholders, regulators and community members with the necessary tools to quantify impacts from induced seismicity. We believe that the tools developed in this dissertation will result in developing effective risk mitigation strategies for regions of induced seismicity.
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction to Scientificâ ¨Reading and Writing and to Technical Modalities of Augmentation. 2. Ecrilecture and the Constructionof Knowledge within Professional Communities. 3. "Critical Spaces": A Study ofâ ¨the Necessary Conditions for Scholarlyand Multimedia Reading. 4. "Annotate the World, and â ¨Improve Humanity": Material Imageries in aWeb Annotation Program. 5. Construction of Ecrilecture Standards for Collaborative Transcription of Digitized Heritage. 6. The Challenge of Platform Interoperability in Constructing Augmented Knowledge in the Humanities and Social Sciences. 7. The XML Portal for the symogih.org Project. 8. Issues of "Hypermediating Journals" for Scientific Publishing. 8. Construction of lecture standards for collaborative transcription of digitized heritage between algorithm, transmission and community development 1. The scientific ecrilecture: conceptual aspects and socio-technical issues 2. ecrilecture: a revealing practice of the construction of knowledge within the scientific community 3. " spaces for critics, " a study of the conditions of possibility of a scholar and multimedia reading 4. "Annotate the world and improve humanity": imaginary and the making of an annotation software 5. XML Portal of the symogih.org project: experiences and reflections on the digital edition of sources and historical information 6. The challenge of interoperability for the circulation of augmented knowledge in social sciences and humanities 7. Issues of "hypermediatisees journals" for scientific publishing 8. Construction of ecrilecture standards for collaborative transcription of digitized heritage between algorithm, transmission and community development1. The scientific ecrilecture: conceptual aspects and socio-technical issues 2. ecrilecture: a revealing practice of the construction of knowledge within the scientific community 3. " spaces for critics, " a study of the conditions of possibility of a scholar and multimedia reading 4. "Annotate the world and improve humanity": imaginary and the making of an annotation software 5. XML Portal of the symogih.org project: experiences and reflections on the digital edition of sources and historical information 6. The challenge of interoperability for the circulation of augmented knowledge in social sciences and humanities 7. Issues of "hypermediatisees journals" for scientific publishing 8. Construction of ecrilecture standards for collaborative transcription of digitized heritage between algorithm, transmission and community development.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119384373 20170807
Practices associated with the culture of "scholarly" reading have been developed over many centuries and annotations themselves have become the subject of study, either as additional elements in connection with the original texts or as documents in their own right. The first "scholarly" reading techniques, seen historically from the 12th Century onwards, combine reading and writing in a process known as lettrure, involving both attentive reading and commentary. The Internet has transformed this activity, adding technical layers that relate both to the reading and writing process as well as to the circulation of texts; their potential and effective augmentation, diffusion, and reception. This book examines digitized reading and writing by focusing primarily on the conditions for the co-construction of scientific knowledge and its augmentation. The authors present numerous examples of studies and personal feedback concerning the intellectual process, open critical spaces, collaborative scholarly publishing, methods for the circulation and mediatization of knowledge, as well as the techniques and tools employed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119384373 20170807
Collection
John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center Technical Report Series
Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) is a class of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement based Composite (HPFRCC) materials that has been developed and tailored over the last several decades. A composite material made from mortar and short, randomly disbursed fibers, ECC has enhanced tensile and compressive properties, in particular ductility, when compared to typical concrete. These improved material properties lend ECC to multiple uses in the built environment with the potential to increase structural performance and durability, and limit infrastructure maintenance and life-cycle cost. When reinforced with deformed steel bars, reinforced ECC and other reinforced HPFRCC components have enhanced seismic performance of structural components and systems such as coupling beams, steel moment frames with infill panels, joints, columns, and beams. But assessing seismic performance is complex, in part, because the deformations the next earthquake will induce on a structure are unknown. Based on the abundance of recorded ground motions from past earthquakes, it is clear that all ground motions do not induce the same deformation in structures. This dissertation provides the first insights of steel reinforced ECC flexural member response under different deformation histories through a variety of quasi-static laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Because a large pulse in a deformation history may cause fiber failure within the ECC material and alter the response on a material level, deformation histories that contain initial pulses are of particular interest. Being able to assess the structural response of reinforced ECC components due to a range of possible deformation histories is important if the material is to become widely adopted.
Book
1 online resource.
Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) is a class of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement-based Composite (HPFRCC) materials that has been developed and tailored over the last several decades. A composite material made from mortar and short, randomly disbursed fibers, ECC has enhanced tensile and compressive properties, in particular ductility, when compared to typical concrete. These improved material properties lend ECC to multiple uses in the built environment with the potential to increase structural performance and durability, and limit infrastructure maintenance and life-cycle cost. When reinforced with deformed steel bars, reinforced ECC and other reinforced HPFRCC components have enhanced seismic performance of structural components and systems such as coupling beams, steel moment frames with infill panels, joints, columns, and beams. But assessing seismic performance is complex, in part, because the deformations the next earthquake will induce on a structure are unknown. Based on the abundance of recorded ground motions from past earthquakes, it is clear that all ground motions do not induce the same deformation in structures. This dissertation provides the first insights of steel reinforced ECC flexural member response under different deformation histories through a variety of quasi-static laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Because a large pulse in a deformation history may cause fiber failure within the ECC material and alter the response on a material level, deformation histories that contain initial pulses are of particular interest. Being able to assess the structural response of reinforced ECC components due to a range of possible deformation histories is important if the material is to become widely adopted. The first portion of this dissertation presents the results of six physical experiments of flexural elements subjected to different deformation histories, three cast with reinforced concrete and three cast with reinforced ECC. The steel reinforcement ratio in flexure was 0.95% for all six specimens. Three different cyclic deformation histories were used throughout the experiments in this dissertation: one consisting of monotonically increasing cycles, one containing relatively small initial pulses followed by a series of monotonically increasing cycles, and one containing relatively large initial pulses followed by the same series of monotonically increasing cycles. Between materials, the reinforced ECC specimens maintained more residual stiffness and dissipated more energy than the reinforced concrete specimens. Small initial pulses did not reduce the ultimate drift of either reinforced concrete or reinforced ECC specimens relative to the drift achieved when no initial pulses were applied. Large initial pulses in the deformation history reduced the ultimate drift of the reinforced concrete specimen by 42%. In contrast, the reinforced ECC specimen was able to undergo the same ultimate drift across all three deformation histories tested. Additional experimental tests of reinforced ECC flexural components of different steel reinforcement ratios and bar sizes subjected to the aforementioned three deformation histories were conducted. On average, specimens subjected to the deformation history containing large initial pulses dissipated the least energy per cycle and had the least reloading stiffness of the three deformation histories used in this dissertation. The presence and size of initial deformation pulses had an impact on several response characteristics including cracking, strain development in the steel reinforcement, reloading stiffness, and energy dissipated depending on the steel reinforcement ratio and reinforcing bar size used. The failure mode of 17 of 18 reinforced ECC flexural members was fracture of the steel reinforcement. Specimen ductility was a function of steel reinforcement ratio, and did not vary significantly with the applied deformation history. It was believed bond degradation at the steel-ECC interface led to strain reductions in the steel reinforcement, which facilitated the indifference to deformation history. The ultimate drift achieved by the three reinforced ECC specimens with the lowest steel reinforcement ratio, 0.73%, however, decreased as initial pulse amplitude increased. At the 0.73% steel reinforcement ratio, the two 10 mm diameter reinforcing bars in flexure provided a relatively high bond capacity relative to the bond demand at the steel-ECC interface, which limited bond degradation during cycling. Limited bond degradation in specimens subjected to initial deformation pulses led to reinforcement strain accumulation, and subsequent reinforcing bar fracture at lower drifts than nominally identical specimens subjected to a deformation history consisting of monotonically increasing cycles. Data from strain gages on the steel reinforcing bars, in conjunction with visual observations of splitting crack formation in the ECC during testing, signaled a trend between bond degradation mechanism and deformation history. Splitting cracks and were the dominant bond degradation mechanisms induced by deformation histories containing large initial deformation pulses and interface crushing was the dominant bond degradation in specimens subjected to small or no initial deformation pulses. Two-dimensional models of reinforced ECC flexural members were then simulated to determine the significance of altering a phenomenological bond-slip model based on the applied deformation history. Varying the post-peak bond-slip softening stiffness had little effect on the hysteretic response of the reinforced ECC flexural models tested, which consisted of two different steel reinforcement ratios subjected to two different deformation histories. The post-peak bond-slip softening stiffness did, however, affect the magnitude of strain and the number of reinforcing bar elements that strain-hardened. Overall, a numerical model with constant bond-slip parameters represented well the cracking patterns, hysteretic response, and reinforcement strain across multiple steel reinforcement ratios and deformation histories. Numerical simulations were carried out in three dimensions to explore the formation of splitting cracks and interface crushing in reinforced ECC flexural members. Six beam-end models with varying thickness and material properties of the cementitious interface zone elements near the steel reinforcing bar elements were developed in order to replicate the bond-slip response of an experiment carried out by others. Reducing compressive strength, compressive fracture energy, and tensile fracture energy of the elements within a 2 mm interface zone, due to physical conditions that may result from casting difficulty or a reduced embedded fiber length, altered the bond-slip response and reduced bond strength by 33% relative to a model with homogeneous ECC material properties. A greater number of finite elements in the interface zone experienced compressive strains exceeding crushing strain when a three-dimensional model was subjected to a cyclic deformation history than when the same model was subjected to a monotonic deformation history. The increased crushing under simulated cyclic loading supported the experimental findings of this dissertation by associating a more crushing-dominant response with a deformation history containing monotonically increasing cyclic amplitudes than a deformation history containing large initial deformation pulses. This dissertation concludes with suggested research extensions in the areas of both experimental testing and numerical simulations.
Book
xvii, 355 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword / Paul S. Sutter Acknowledgments Introduction1. Making Land, Making a City 2. Catastrophe and Its Interpretations 3. Bread Lines and Earthquake Cottages 4. Rebuilding and the Politics of Place 5. Disaster Capitalism in the Streets 6. Plague, Rats, and Undesirable Nature 7. Symbolic Recovery and the Legacies of Disaster Conclusion Notes Manuscript Collections Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295742465 20171211
On April 18, 1906, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake shook the San Francisco region, igniting fires that burned half the city. The disaster in all its elements - earthquake, fires, and recovery - profoundly disrupted the urban order and challenged San Francisco's perceived permanence.The crisis temporarily broke down spatial divisions of class and race and highlighted the contested terrain of urban nature in an era of widespread class conflict, simmering ethnic tensions, and controversial reform efforts. From a proposal to expel Chinatown from the city center to a vision of San Francisco paved with concrete in the name of sanitation, the process of reconstruction involved reenvisioning the places of both people and nature. In their zeal to restore their city, San Franciscans downplayed the role of the earthquake and persisted in choosing patterns of development that exacerbated risk.In this close study of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Joanna L. Dyl examines the decades leading up to the catastrophic event and the city's recovery from it. Combining urban environmental history and disaster studies, Seismic City demonstrates how the crisis and subsequent rebuilding reflect the dynamic interplay of natural and human influences that have shaped San Francisco.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295742465 20171211
Green Library, Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xvii, 355 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Making land, making a city
  • Catastrophe and its interpretations
  • Bread lines and earthquake cottages
  • Rebuilding and the politics of place
  • Disaster capitalism in the streets
  • Plague, rats, and undesirable nature
  • Symbolic recovery and the legacies of disaster
  • Conclusion.
On April 18, 1906, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake shook the San Francisco region, igniting fires that burned half the city. The disaster in all its elements - earthquake, fires, and recovery - profoundly disrupted the urban order and challenged San Francisco's perceived permanence.The crisis temporarily broke down spatial divisions of class and race and highlighted the contested terrain of urban nature in an era of widespread class conflict, simmering ethnic tensions, and controversial reform efforts. From a proposal to expel Chinatown from the city center to a vision of San Francisco paved with concrete in the name of sanitation, the process of reconstruction involved reenvisioning the places of both people and nature. In their zeal to restore their city, San Franciscans downplayed the role of the earthquake and persisted in choosing patterns of development that exacerbated risk.In this close study of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Joanna L. Dyl examines the decades leading up to the catastrophic event and the city's recovery from it. Combining urban environmental history and disaster studies, Seismic City demonstrates how the crisis and subsequent rebuilding reflect the dynamic interplay of natural and human influences that have shaped San Francisco.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295742465 20171211
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • Introduction to Seismic Design and Eurocode 8. Seismic Hazard and Earthquake Actions. Structural Analysis. Basic Seismic Design Principles for Buildings. Design of Concrete Structures. Design of Steel Structures. Design of Composite Steel/Concrete Structures. Design of Masonry Structures. Design of Timber Structures. Base-Isolated Structures. Shallow Foundations. Pile Foundations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498751599 20171218
This book focuses on the seismic design of building structures and their foundations to Eurocode 8. It covers the principles of seismic design in a clear but brief manner and then links these concepts to the provisions of Eurocode 8. It addresses the fundamental concepts related to seismic hazard, ground motion models, basic dynamics, seismic analysis, siting considerations, structural layout, and design philosophies, then leads to the specifics of Eurocode 8. Code procedures are applied with the aid of walk-through design examples which, where possible, deal with a common case study in most chapters. As well as an update throughout, this second edition incorporates three new and topical chapters dedicated to specific seismic design aspects of timber buildings and masonry structures, as well as base-isolation and supplemental damping. There is renewed interest in the use of sustainable timber buildings, and masonry structures still represent a popular choice in many areas. Moreover, seismic isolation and supplemental damping can offer low-damage solutions which are being increasingly considered in practice. The book stems primarily from practical short courses on seismic design which have been run over a number of years and through the development Eurocode 8. The contributors to this book are either specialist academics with significant consulting experience in seismic design, or leading practitioners who are actively engaged in large projects in seismic areas. This experience has provided significant insight into important areas in which guidance is required.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498751599 20171218
Book
1 online resource (xxxiv, 838 pages) : illustrations, portraits
  • Loads on Building Structures Preview Dead Loads Occupancy Loads on Buildings Snow Loads on Buildings Dead Loads Live Loads Construction Loads Lateral Soil Load Snow, Rain, and Ice Loads Thermal and Settlement Loads Self-Straining Forces Dynamic Loads Abnormal Loads Classification of Buildings, Risk Categories, and Importance Factors Wind Loads Preview Description of Wind Forces Types of Wind Storms Wind/Building Interactions Behavior of Tall Buildings Subjected to Wind Scope, Effectiveness, and Limitations of Building Codes ASCE 7-10 Wind Load Provisions, Overview Earthquake Effects on Buildings Preview Inertial Forces and Acceleration Duration, Velocity, and Displacement Acceleration Amplification due to Soft Soil Natural Periods Building Resonance Site Response Spectrum Damping Ductility Earthquakes and Other Geologic Hazards Earthquake Measurements Determination of Local Earthquake Hazards Nonstructural Components Seismic Analysis Procedures System Selection Seismic Issues due to Configuration Irregularities Structural Dynamic Response Spectrum Method Seismic Design Considerations Lessons from Past Earthquakes Seismic Design Wrap-Up Dynamic Analysis, Theory Anatomy of Computer Response Spectrum Analyses Wind Design with Particular Reference to ASCE 7-10 Preview Directional Procedure (Analytical Procedure): Overview Significant Changes in the ASCE - Wind Load Provisions ASCE 7-10 Wind Provisions Update: Summary Overview of ASCE 7-10, Chapter 26 Discussion of ASCE 7-10, Chapter 26 Discussion of ASCE 7-10, Chapter 27 Discussion of ASCE 7-10, Chapter 28 (Envelope Procedure for MWFRS of Low-Rise Buildings) Discussion of ASCE 7-10, Chapter 29 (Wind Loads on Buildings Appurtenances and Other Structures) Discussion of ASCE 7-10, Chapter 30 (Wind Loads on Components and Cladding) Wind Tunnel Procedure Human Response to Wind-Induced Building Motions Building Periods Pedestrian Wind Studies Seismic Design with Particular Reference to ASCE 7-10 Seismic Provisions Preview ASCE 7-10, Chapter 11, Seismic Design Criteria ASCE 7-10, Chapter 12, Seismic Design Requirements for Building Structures Performance-Based Design Preview Definitions of Performance-Based Design Prescriptive Approach to Codes Performance-Based Approach Improving Performance to Reduce Seismic Risk Design and Performance Issues Relating to Commercial Office Buildings Current Specifications for Performance-Based Seismic Design Closing Comments Preliminary Calculations to Ensure Validity of Computer Analysis Preview Characterizing Structural Behavior Advantages and Disadvantages of Indeterminate Structures Preliminary Design: Concrete Estimation of Preliminary Wind Loads, ASCE 7-10 Preliminary Seismic Base Shear, V, as a Percent of Building's Seismic Weight, W Differential Shortening of Steel Columns Guidance for Preparing Conceptual Estimates Concept of Premium for Height Seismic Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings Preview Code-Sponsored Design Alternate Design Philosophy Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings ASCE/SEI Standard 41-06 Common Deficiencies and Upgrade Methods: Concrete Building Concluding Remarks Seismic Strengthening Details Special Topics Preview Serviceability Considerations Damping Devices for Reducing Motion Perception Seismic Isolation Passive Energy Dissipation Blast-Resistant Design Failures and Distresses Buckling of Building under Its Own Weight Foundations Evolution of High-Rise Architecture Posttension Strengthening of Existing Structures Reinforced Concrete Special Moment Frames Torsion Preview Concept of Warping Behavior Sectorial Coordinate omega' Shear Center Evaluation of Produce Integrals Principal Sectorial Coordinate omegas Diagram Calculation of Sectorial Properties: Worked Example General Theory of Warping Torsion Torsion Analysis of Shear Wall Building: Worked Example Warping Torsion Constants for Open Sections Stiffness Method Using Warping-Column Model Seismic Design: A Pictorial Review Preview Figures and Tables Explaining the Fundamentals of Seismic Design Steel Buildings: Bolted and Welded Connections, Gravity, and Lateral Load-Resisting Systems and Details Preview General Considerations for Welds Methods of Welding Inspection Bearing versus Slip-Critical Connections Field Tolerances Brittle Fracture ASTM Specifications for Structural Shapes, Plates and Bars, and Fasteners Thermal Effects on Structural Steel Bolted Connections Bolts Subjected to Shear and Tension Tables and Figures Describing Gravity and Lateral Load-Resisting Systems Typical Details Reinforced Concrete Buildings: Structural System and Details Preview Characteristics of Reinforced Concrete Formwork Considerations Floor Systems Prestressed Concrete Foundations Lateral Load Resisting System Structural Systems Composite Buildings: Structural System and Details Preview Composite Metal Deck Specifications for Metal Deck: Overview ANSI/SDI (C1.0 Standard for Composite Floor Deck): A Brief Review Composite Beams Composite Joists and Trusses Other Types of Composite Floor Construction Continuous Composite Beams Nonprismatic Composite Beams and Girders Moment-Connected Composite Haunch Girders Composite Columns Design Tables and Details Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781466556201 20171218
Addresses the Question Frequently Proposed to the Designer by Architects: "Can We Do This? Offering guidance on how to use code-based procedures while at the same time providing an understanding of why provisions are necessary, Tall Building Design: Steel, Concrete, and Composite Systems methodically explores the structural behavior of steel, concrete, and composite members and systems. This text establishes the notion that design is a creative process, and not just an execution of framing proposals. It cultivates imaginative approaches by presenting examples specifically related to essential building codes and standards. Tying together precision and accuracy-it also bridges the gap between two design approaches-one based on initiative skill and the other based on computer skill. The book explains loads and load combinations typically used in building design, explores methods for determining design wind loads using the provisions of ASCE 7-10, and examines wind tunnel procedures. It defines conceptual seismic design, as the avoidance or minimization of problems created by the effects of seismic excitation. It introduces the concept of performance-based design (PBD). It also addresses serviceability considerations, prediction of tall building motions, damping devices, seismic isolation, blast-resistant design, and progressive collapse. The final chapters explain gravity and lateral systems for steel, concrete, and composite buildings. The Book Also Considers: * Preliminary analysis and design techniques * The structural rehabilitation of seismically vulnerable steel and concrete buildings * Design differences between code-sponsored approaches * The concept of ductility trade-off for strength Tall Building Design: Steel, Concrete, and Composite Systems is a structural design guide and reference for practicing engineers and educators, as well as recent graduates entering the structural engineering profession. This text examines all major concrete, steel, and composite building systems, and uses the most up-to-date building codes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781466556201 20171218