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Book
xiv, 786 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
  • Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Materials Chapter 3 Design of Concrete Structures and Fundamental Assumptions Chapter 4 Flexural Analysis and Design of Beams Chapter 5 Shear and Diagonal Tension in Beams Chapter 6 Bond, Anchorage, and Development Length Chapter 7 Serviceability Chapter 8 Analysis and Design for Torsion Chapter 9 Short Columns Chapter 10 Slender Columns Chapter 11 Analysis of Indeterminate Beams and Frames Chapter 12 Analysis and Design of One-Way Slabs Chapter 13 Analysis and Design of Two-Way Slabs Chapter 14 Walls Chapter 15 Footings and Foundations Chapter 16 Retaining Walls Chapter 17 Strut-and-Tie Models Chapter 18 Design of Reinforcement at Joints Chapter 19 Concrete Building Systems Chapter 20 Seismic Design Chapter 21 Anchoring to Concrete Chapter 22 Prestressed Concrete Chapter 23 Yield Line Analysis for Slabs - Online Chapter Chapter 24 Strip Method for Slabs - Online Chapter Appendix A Design Aids Appendix B SI Conversion FactorsInch-Pound Units to SI Units Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The fifteenth edition of the classic text, Design of Concrete Structures, is completely revised using the newly released 2014 American Concrete Institute (ACI) Building Code. This new edition has the same dual objectives as the previous editions: first to establish a firm understanding of the behavior of structural concrete, then to develop proficiency in the methods used in current design practice. Notable new features include: every chapter has been updated to account for the reorganization of the 2014 American Concrete institute Building Code; a new chapter on anchoring to concrete is included; a chapter on walls has been added, doubling the coverage and adding design examples; and, diaphragms are included for the first time. The process of developing building design and the connection between the chapters in the text and the ACI Code is added. Coverage of seismic design is updated. Also included is the modified compression field theory method of shear design presented in the 2012 edition of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials LRFD Bridge Design Specifications. Chapters on yield line and strip methods for slabs are moved to the text website.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Materials Chapter 3 Design of Concrete Structures and Fundamental Assumptions Chapter 4 Flexural Analysis and Design of Beams Chapter 5 Shear and Diagonal Tension in Beams Chapter 6 Bond, Anchorage, and Development Length Chapter 7 Serviceability Chapter 8 Analysis and Design for Torsion Chapter 9 Short Columns Chapter 10 Slender Columns Chapter 11 Analysis of Indeterminate Beams and Frames Chapter 12 Analysis and Design of One-Way Slabs Chapter 13 Analysis and Design of Two-Way Slabs Chapter 14 Walls Chapter 15 Footings and Foundations Chapter 16 Retaining Walls Chapter 17 Strut-and-Tie Models Chapter 18 Design of Reinforcement at Joints Chapter 19 Concrete Building Systems Chapter 20 Seismic Design Chapter 21 Anchoring to Concrete Chapter 22 Prestressed Concrete Chapter 23 Yield Line Analysis for Slabs - Online Chapter Chapter 24 Strip Method for Slabs - Online Chapter Appendix A Design Aids Appendix B SI Conversion FactorsInch-Pound Units to SI Units Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The fifteenth edition of the classic text, Design of Concrete Structures, is completely revised using the newly released 2014 American Concrete Institute (ACI) Building Code. This new edition has the same dual objectives as the previous editions: first to establish a firm understanding of the behavior of structural concrete, then to develop proficiency in the methods used in current design practice. Notable new features include: every chapter has been updated to account for the reorganization of the 2014 American Concrete institute Building Code; a new chapter on anchoring to concrete is included; a chapter on walls has been added, doubling the coverage and adding design examples; and, diaphragms are included for the first time. The process of developing building design and the connection between the chapters in the text and the ACI Code is added. Coverage of seismic design is updated. Also included is the modified compression field theory method of shear design presented in the 2012 edition of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials LRFD Bridge Design Specifications. Chapters on yield line and strip methods for slabs are moved to the text website.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Engineering Library (Terman)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Stacks
TA683.2 .N55 2016 Unknown
Book
1 online resource
Cement production is known to be a polluting and energy-intensive industry. Cement plants account for 5 percent of global emissions of carbon dioxide and one of the main causes of global warming. However, cement it is literally the glue of progress. Designing Green Cement Plants provides the tools and techniques for designing new large cement plants that would promote sustainable growth, preserve natural resources to the maximum possible extent and make least possible additions to the Greenhouse Gases that cause global warming. Brief and but authoritative, this title embraces new technologies and methods such as Carbon Capture and Sequestration, as well as methods for harnessing renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. The author also discusses the efficient use of energy and materials through the use recycling. In addition, this book also examines thepossibilities of developing green cement substitutes such as Calera, Caliix, Novacem, Aether and Geopolymer cements. Includes the tools and methods for reducing the emissions of greenhouse GasesExplores technologies such as: carbon capture and storage and substitute cementsProvides essential data to determining the unique factors involved in designing large new green cement plants Includes interactive excel spreadsheetsMethods for preforming a cost benefits analysis for the production of green cements as opposed to conventional OPC .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Cement production is known to be a polluting and energy-intensive industry. Cement plants account for 5 percent of global emissions of carbon dioxide and one of the main causes of global warming. However, cement it is literally the glue of progress. Designing Green Cement Plants provides the tools and techniques for designing new large cement plants that would promote sustainable growth, preserve natural resources to the maximum possible extent and make least possible additions to the Greenhouse Gases that cause global warming. Brief and but authoritative, this title embraces new technologies and methods such as Carbon Capture and Sequestration, as well as methods for harnessing renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. The author also discusses the efficient use of energy and materials through the use recycling. In addition, this book also examines thepossibilities of developing green cement substitutes such as Calera, Caliix, Novacem, Aether and Geopolymer cements. Includes the tools and methods for reducing the emissions of greenhouse GasesExplores technologies such as: carbon capture and storage and substitute cementsProvides essential data to determining the unique factors involved in designing large new green cement plants Includes interactive excel spreadsheetsMethods for preforming a cost benefits analysis for the production of green cements as opposed to conventional OPC .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
Book
2 volumes : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 32 cm
The charm of concrete architecture today. Who has not heard of concrete? It is that ugly stuff they make highway bridges and crumbling walls out of, right? Well, yes, and no. Concrete is actually a name applied to a remarkably wide range of substances used in construction, and, when it is properly handled, it is actually one of the noble materials of contemporary architecture. A kind of "liquid stone" at the outset, it is malleable, durable, and, in the right hands, capable of prodigious feats of engineering. This two-volume book highlights the best work done in recent years with concrete. Included are "stars" like Zaha Hadid. Herzog & de Meuron, and Steven Holl, but also surprising new architects like the Russians SPEECH, rising stars of the international scene like Rudy Ricciotti from France, and even artists such as James Turrell, who turned the famous concrete spiral of Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim in New York into the setting of one of his most remarkable pieces.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The charm of concrete architecture today. Who has not heard of concrete? It is that ugly stuff they make highway bridges and crumbling walls out of, right? Well, yes, and no. Concrete is actually a name applied to a remarkably wide range of substances used in construction, and, when it is properly handled, it is actually one of the noble materials of contemporary architecture. A kind of "liquid stone" at the outset, it is malleable, durable, and, in the right hands, capable of prodigious feats of engineering. This two-volume book highlights the best work done in recent years with concrete. Included are "stars" like Zaha Hadid. Herzog & de Meuron, and Steven Holl, but also surprising new architects like the Russians SPEECH, rising stars of the international scene like Rudy Ricciotti from France, and even artists such as James Turrell, who turned the famous concrete spiral of Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim in New York into the setting of one of his most remarkable pieces.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes) Status
Stacks
NA4125 .J63 2015 F V.1 Unknown
NA4125 .J63 2015 F V.2 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (48 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some are unknown, a sensitivity analysis must be carried out to provide lower and upper bounds of the material behaviour. Finally, the model can be used as a basis to formulate a macroscopic material model for concrete subject to irradiation, which later can be used in structural analyses to estimate the structural impact of irradiation on nuclear power plants.
In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some are unknown, a sensitivity analysis must be carried out to provide lower and upper bounds of the material behaviour. Finally, the model can be used as a basis to formulate a macroscopic material model for concrete subject to irradiation, which later can be used in structural analyses to estimate the structural impact of irradiation on nuclear power plants.

8. Angel azul [2014]

Video
1 streaming video file (72 min.) : digital, sound, color
Explores the artistic journey of Jason deCaires Taylor, an innovative artist who combines creativity with an important environmental solution; the creation of artificial coral reefs from statues he's cast from live models. Experts are on hand to provide facts about the perilous situation coral reefs currently face and solutions necessary to save them.
Explores the artistic journey of Jason deCaires Taylor, an innovative artist who combines creativity with an important environmental solution; the creation of artificial coral reefs from statues he's cast from live models. Experts are on hand to provide facts about the perilous situation coral reefs currently face and solutions necessary to save them.
Book
182 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
  • L'alchimie du béton -- Destins croisés -- Le "louise-catherine" entre louvre et institut -- Remise à flot d'une ville flottante.
"Parmi les oeuvres les plus abouties et les plus inspirées de Le Corbusier trône en bonne place le "Louise-Catherine", péniche aujourd'hui amarrée quai d'Austerlitz, à Paris. Présentant la rare particularité d'être construit en béton, cet immense chaland signe le triomphe d'une vision de l'architecture avant-gardiste, aux lignes simples et dépouillées. Longtemps propriété de l'Armée du Salut, qui en fit un refuge pour sans-abri, ce lieu d'histoire et de mémoire illustre la formule chère à Le Corbusier, "pleine main j'ai reçu, pleine main je donne". Depuis les années 1960, il est un motif de fascination et d'inspiration pour l'urbaniste Michel Cantal-Dupart, qui a choisi de mener l'enquête sur le "Louise-Catherine". Jalouse de ses secrets, la péniche corbuséenne raconte une histoire à énigmes, digne d'une intrigue à la Simenon. Elle tisse une incroyable trame entre un monde disparu et les rencontres qui ont jalonné la vie de Le Corbusier, fait naître des amitiés, suscite projets et passions toujours recommencées. Voici le récit de cette enquête à rebondissements."--P. [4] of cover.
  • L'alchimie du béton -- Destins croisés -- Le "louise-catherine" entre louvre et institut -- Remise à flot d'une ville flottante.
"Parmi les oeuvres les plus abouties et les plus inspirées de Le Corbusier trône en bonne place le "Louise-Catherine", péniche aujourd'hui amarrée quai d'Austerlitz, à Paris. Présentant la rare particularité d'être construit en béton, cet immense chaland signe le triomphe d'une vision de l'architecture avant-gardiste, aux lignes simples et dépouillées. Longtemps propriété de l'Armée du Salut, qui en fit un refuge pour sans-abri, ce lieu d'histoire et de mémoire illustre la formule chère à Le Corbusier, "pleine main j'ai reçu, pleine main je donne". Depuis les années 1960, il est un motif de fascination et d'inspiration pour l'urbaniste Michel Cantal-Dupart, qui a choisi de mener l'enquête sur le "Louise-Catherine". Jalouse de ses secrets, la péniche corbuséenne raconte une histoire à énigmes, digne d'une intrigue à la Simenon. Elle tisse une incroyable trame entre un monde disparu et les rencontres qui ont jalonné la vie de Le Corbusier, fait naître des amitiés, suscite projets et passions toujours recommencées. Voici le récit de cette enquête à rebondissements."--P. [4] of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
VM323 .C36 2015 Available
Book
1 online resource.
Book
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations ; 20 cm
I would love to say that you make me weak at the knees, but to be quite upfront and completely truthful, you make my body forget it has knees at all. One day, while browsing an antique store in Helena, Montana, photographer Tyler Knott Gregson stumbled upon a vintage Remington typewriter for sale. Standing up and using a page from a broken book he was buying for $2, he typed a poem without thinking, without planning, and without the ability to revise anything. He fell in love. Three years and almost one thousand poems later, Tyler is now known as the creator of the Typewriter Series: a striking collection of poems typed onto found scraps of paper or created via blackout method. Chasers of the Light features some of his most insightful and beautifully worded pieces of work-poems that illuminate grand gestures and small glimpses, poems that celebrate the beauty of a life spent chasing the light.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
I would love to say that you make me weak at the knees, but to be quite upfront and completely truthful, you make my body forget it has knees at all. One day, while browsing an antique store in Helena, Montana, photographer Tyler Knott Gregson stumbled upon a vintage Remington typewriter for sale. Standing up and using a page from a broken book he was buying for $2, he typed a poem without thinking, without planning, and without the ability to revise anything. He fell in love. Three years and almost one thousand poems later, Tyler is now known as the creator of the Typewriter Series: a striking collection of poems typed onto found scraps of paper or created via blackout method. Chasers of the Light features some of his most insightful and beautifully worded pieces of work-poems that illuminate grand gestures and small glimpses, poems that celebrate the beauty of a life spent chasing the light.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
In process Request
PS3607 .R4965 A6 2015 Available
Book
1 online resource (356 pages) : illustrations.
  • 1 FINITE ELEMENTS OVERVIEW Modeling Basics Discretization Outline Elements Material Behavior Weak Equilibrium and Spatial Discretization Numerical Integration and Solution Methods for Algebraic Systems Convergence 2 UNIAXIAL STRUCTURAL CONCRETE BEHAVIOR Scales and Short-Term Stress-Strain Behavior of Homogenized Concrete Long-Term Behavior - Creep and Imposed Strains Reinforcing Steel Stress-Strain Behavior Bond between Concrete and Reinforcing Steel The Smeared Crack Model The Reinforced Tension Bar Tension Stiffening of Reinforced Tension Bar 3 STRUCTURAL BEAMS AND FRAMES Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Cracked Reinforced Concrete Behavior - 4 Compressive Zone and Internal Forces - 5 Linear Concrete Compressive Behavior with Reinforcement - 6 Nonlinear Behavior of Concrete and Reinforcement Equilibrium of Beams Finite Element Types for Plane Beams 1 Basics - 2 Finite Elements for the Bernoulli Beam - 3 Finite Elements for the Timoshenko Beam - 4 System Building and Solution Methods - 5 Elementwise Integration - 6 Transformation and Assemblage - 7 Kinematic Boundary Conditions and Solution Further Aspects of Reinforced Concrete 1 Creep - 2 Temperature and Shrinkage - 3 Tension Stiffening - 4 Shear Stiffness for Reinforced Cracked Concrete Sections Prestressing Large Deformations and Second-Order Analysis Dynamics of Beams 4 STRUT-AND-TIE MODELS Elastic Plate Solutions Modeling Solution Methods for Trusses Rigid-Plastic Truss Models More Application Aspects 5 MULTIAXIAL CONCRETE MATERIAL BEHAVIOR Basics 1 Continua and Scales - 2 Characteristics of Concrete Behavior Continuum Mechanics 1 Displacements and Strains - 2 Stresses and Material Laws - 3 Coordinate Transformations and Principal States Isotropy, Linearity, and Orthotropy 1 Isotropy and Linear Elasticity - 2 Orthotropy - 3 Plane Stress and Strain Nonlinear Material Behavior 1 Tangential Stiffness - 2 Principal Stress Space and Isotropic Strength - 3 Strength of Concrete - 4 Phenomenological Approach for the Biaxial Anisotropic Stress-Strain Behavior Isotropic Plasticity 1 A Framework for Multiaxial Elastoplasticity - 2 Pressure-Dependent Yield Functions Isotropic Damage Multiaxial Crack Modeling 1 Basic Concepts of Crack Modeling - 2 Multiaxial Smeared Crack Model The Microplane Model Localization and Regularization 1 Mesh Dependency - 2 Regularization - 3 Gradient Damage General Requirements for Material Laws 6 PLATES Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 The General Approach - 2 Reinforced Concrete Contributions - 3 A Design Approach Crack Modeling Linear Stress-Strain Relations with Cracking 2D Modeling of Reinforcement and Bond Embedded Reinforcement 7 SLABS A Placement Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematic and Kinetic Basics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Reinforced Cracked Sections Equilibrium of Slabs 1 Strong Equilibrium - 2 Weak Equilibrium - 3 Decoupling Structural Slab Elements 1 Area Coordinates - 2 A Triangular Kirchhoff Slab Element System Building and Solution Methods Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 General Approach and Principal Moments - 2 Design Approach for Bending - 3 Design Approach for Shear Kirchhof Slabs with Nonlinear Material Behavior 8 SHELLS Approximation of Geometry and Displacements Approximation of Deformations Shell Stresses and Material Laws System Building Slabs and Beams as a Special Case Locking Reinforced Concrete Shells 1 The Layer Model - 2 Slabs as Special Case - 3 The Plastic Approach 9 RANDOMNESS AND RELIABILITY Basics of Uncertainty and Randomness Failure Probability Design and Safety Factors 10 APPENDICES A Solution of Nonlinear Algebraic Equation Systems B Crack Width Estimation C Transformations of Coordinate Systems D Regression Analysis E Reliability with Multivariate Random Variables F Programs and Example Data.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the application of numerical methods to reinforced concrete structures. To analyze reinforced concrete structures linear elastic theories are inadequate because of cracking, bond and the nonlinear and time dependent behavior of both concrete and reinforcement. These effects have to be considered for a realistic assessment of the behavior of reinforced concrete structures with respect to ultimate limit states and serviceability limit states. The book gives a compact review of finite element and other numerical methods. The key to these methods is through a proper description of material behavior. Thus, the book summarizes the essential material properties of concrete and reinforcement and their interaction through bond. These basics are applied to different structural types such as bars, beams, strut and tie models, plates, slabs and shells. This includes prestressing of structures, cracking, nonlinear stress?strain relations, creeping, shrinkage and temperature changes. Appropriate methods are developed for each structural type. Large displacement and dynamic problems are treated as well as short-term quasi-static problems and long-term transient problems like creep and shrinkage. Most problems are illustrated by examples which are solved by the program package ConFem, based on the freely available Python programming language. The ConFem source code together with the problem data is available under open source rules at concrete-fem.com. The author aims to demonstrate the potential and the limitations of numerical methods for simulation of reinforced concrete structures, addressing students, teachers, researchers and designing and checking engineers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1 FINITE ELEMENTS OVERVIEW Modeling Basics Discretization Outline Elements Material Behavior Weak Equilibrium and Spatial Discretization Numerical Integration and Solution Methods for Algebraic Systems Convergence 2 UNIAXIAL STRUCTURAL CONCRETE BEHAVIOR Scales and Short-Term Stress-Strain Behavior of Homogenized Concrete Long-Term Behavior - Creep and Imposed Strains Reinforcing Steel Stress-Strain Behavior Bond between Concrete and Reinforcing Steel The Smeared Crack Model The Reinforced Tension Bar Tension Stiffening of Reinforced Tension Bar 3 STRUCTURAL BEAMS AND FRAMES Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Cracked Reinforced Concrete Behavior - 4 Compressive Zone and Internal Forces - 5 Linear Concrete Compressive Behavior with Reinforcement - 6 Nonlinear Behavior of Concrete and Reinforcement Equilibrium of Beams Finite Element Types for Plane Beams 1 Basics - 2 Finite Elements for the Bernoulli Beam - 3 Finite Elements for the Timoshenko Beam - 4 System Building and Solution Methods - 5 Elementwise Integration - 6 Transformation and Assemblage - 7 Kinematic Boundary Conditions and Solution Further Aspects of Reinforced Concrete 1 Creep - 2 Temperature and Shrinkage - 3 Tension Stiffening - 4 Shear Stiffness for Reinforced Cracked Concrete Sections Prestressing Large Deformations and Second-Order Analysis Dynamics of Beams 4 STRUT-AND-TIE MODELS Elastic Plate Solutions Modeling Solution Methods for Trusses Rigid-Plastic Truss Models More Application Aspects 5 MULTIAXIAL CONCRETE MATERIAL BEHAVIOR Basics 1 Continua and Scales - 2 Characteristics of Concrete Behavior Continuum Mechanics 1 Displacements and Strains - 2 Stresses and Material Laws - 3 Coordinate Transformations and Principal States Isotropy, Linearity, and Orthotropy 1 Isotropy and Linear Elasticity - 2 Orthotropy - 3 Plane Stress and Strain Nonlinear Material Behavior 1 Tangential Stiffness - 2 Principal Stress Space and Isotropic Strength - 3 Strength of Concrete - 4 Phenomenological Approach for the Biaxial Anisotropic Stress-Strain Behavior Isotropic Plasticity 1 A Framework for Multiaxial Elastoplasticity - 2 Pressure-Dependent Yield Functions Isotropic Damage Multiaxial Crack Modeling 1 Basic Concepts of Crack Modeling - 2 Multiaxial Smeared Crack Model The Microplane Model Localization and Regularization 1 Mesh Dependency - 2 Regularization - 3 Gradient Damage General Requirements for Material Laws 6 PLATES Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 The General Approach - 2 Reinforced Concrete Contributions - 3 A Design Approach Crack Modeling Linear Stress-Strain Relations with Cracking 2D Modeling of Reinforcement and Bond Embedded Reinforcement 7 SLABS A Placement Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematic and Kinetic Basics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Reinforced Cracked Sections Equilibrium of Slabs 1 Strong Equilibrium - 2 Weak Equilibrium - 3 Decoupling Structural Slab Elements 1 Area Coordinates - 2 A Triangular Kirchhoff Slab Element System Building and Solution Methods Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 General Approach and Principal Moments - 2 Design Approach for Bending - 3 Design Approach for Shear Kirchhof Slabs with Nonlinear Material Behavior 8 SHELLS Approximation of Geometry and Displacements Approximation of Deformations Shell Stresses and Material Laws System Building Slabs and Beams as a Special Case Locking Reinforced Concrete Shells 1 The Layer Model - 2 Slabs as Special Case - 3 The Plastic Approach 9 RANDOMNESS AND RELIABILITY Basics of Uncertainty and Randomness Failure Probability Design and Safety Factors 10 APPENDICES A Solution of Nonlinear Algebraic Equation Systems B Crack Width Estimation C Transformations of Coordinate Systems D Regression Analysis E Reliability with Multivariate Random Variables F Programs and Example Data.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the application of numerical methods to reinforced concrete structures. To analyze reinforced concrete structures linear elastic theories are inadequate because of cracking, bond and the nonlinear and time dependent behavior of both concrete and reinforcement. These effects have to be considered for a realistic assessment of the behavior of reinforced concrete structures with respect to ultimate limit states and serviceability limit states. The book gives a compact review of finite element and other numerical methods. The key to these methods is through a proper description of material behavior. Thus, the book summarizes the essential material properties of concrete and reinforcement and their interaction through bond. These basics are applied to different structural types such as bars, beams, strut and tie models, plates, slabs and shells. This includes prestressing of structures, cracking, nonlinear stress?strain relations, creeping, shrinkage and temperature changes. Appropriate methods are developed for each structural type. Large displacement and dynamic problems are treated as well as short-term quasi-static problems and long-term transient problems like creep and shrinkage. Most problems are illustrated by examples which are solved by the program package ConFem, based on the freely available Python programming language. The ConFem source code together with the problem data is available under open source rules at concrete-fem.com. The author aims to demonstrate the potential and the limitations of numerical methods for simulation of reinforced concrete structures, addressing students, teachers, researchers and designing and checking engineers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (88 unnumbered pages) : color illustrations, maps
Collection
John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center Technical Report Series
This document was developed to assist practicing engineers in the design of Composite Special Moment Frame (C-SMF) systems utilizing reinforced concrete columns and steel beams (known as Composite RCS frames). These systems utilize the intrinsic advantages of each material which are optimized in resisting the applied loads. Seismic design requirements for C-SMF systems are included in ASCE 7 (2010) and AISC 341 (2010). These system-level requirements are supported by research and other documents on the design and detailing of beam-column connections between the steel beams and concrete (or encased composite) columns. In 1994, the ASCE Task Committee on Design Criteria for Composite Structures in Steel and Concrete issued guidelines for the Design of Joints between Steel Beams and Reinforced Concrete Columns in 1994 (ASCE 1994). Based on research at the time, it was recommended to limit the use of Composite RCS systems to regions of low seismicity. Since then, further research has been performed which has demonstrated that Composite RCS systems can be designed to have reliable ductile performance, making them an attractive design alternative for high seismic areas. Based on this research, a draft Pre-Standard for the Design of Moment Connections between Steel Beams and Concrete Columns (ASCE 2015 draft) has been prepared as an update to the 1994 ASCE connection design guidelines. This draft is utilized for the design studies presented herein.
This document was developed to assist practicing engineers in the design of Composite Special Moment Frame (C-SMF) systems utilizing reinforced concrete columns and steel beams (known as Composite RCS frames). These systems utilize the intrinsic advantages of each material which are optimized in resisting the applied loads. Seismic design requirements for C-SMF systems are included in ASCE 7 (2010) and AISC 341 (2010). These system-level requirements are supported by research and other documents on the design and detailing of beam-column connections between the steel beams and concrete (or encased composite) columns. In 1994, the ASCE Task Committee on Design Criteria for Composite Structures in Steel and Concrete issued guidelines for the Design of Joints between Steel Beams and Reinforced Concrete Columns in 1994 (ASCE 1994). Based on research at the time, it was recommended to limit the use of Composite RCS systems to regions of low seismicity. Since then, further research has been performed which has demonstrated that Composite RCS systems can be designed to have reliable ductile performance, making them an attractive design alternative for high seismic areas. Based on this research, a draft Pre-Standard for the Design of Moment Connections between Steel Beams and Concrete Columns (ASCE 2015 draft) has been prepared as an update to the 1994 ASCE connection design guidelines. This draft is utilized for the design studies presented herein.
Book
1 online resource (194 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.
After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.
Book
1 online resource.
In recent years, bridge engineers and researchers are increasingly turning to the finite element method for the design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges. However, the complexity of the method has made the transition slow. Based on twenty years of experience, Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges provides structural engineers and researchers with detailed modeling techniques for creating robust design models. The book's seven chapters begin with an overview of the various forms of modern steel and steel-concrete composite bridges as well as current design codes. This is followed by self-contained chapters concerning: nonlinear material behavior of the bridge components, applied loads and stability of steel and steel-concrete composite bridges, and design of steel and steel-concrete composite bridge components. Constitutive models for construction materials including material non-linearity and geometric non-linearity. The mechanical approach including problem setup, strain energy, external energy and potential energy), mathematics behind the method Commonly available finite elements codes for the design of steel bridges. Explains how the design information from Finite Element Analysis is incorporated into Building information models to obtain quantity information, cost analysis, .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In recent years, bridge engineers and researchers are increasingly turning to the finite element method for the design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges. However, the complexity of the method has made the transition slow. Based on twenty years of experience, Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges provides structural engineers and researchers with detailed modeling techniques for creating robust design models. The book's seven chapters begin with an overview of the various forms of modern steel and steel-concrete composite bridges as well as current design codes. This is followed by self-contained chapters concerning: nonlinear material behavior of the bridge components, applied loads and stability of steel and steel-concrete composite bridges, and design of steel and steel-concrete composite bridge components. Constitutive models for construction materials including material non-linearity and geometric non-linearity. The mechanical approach including problem setup, strain energy, external energy and potential energy), mathematics behind the method Commonly available finite elements codes for the design of steel bridges. Explains how the design information from Finite Element Analysis is incorporated into Building information models to obtain quantity information, cost analysis, .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Front Cover; Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; Copyright; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1. General Remarks; 1.2. Types of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.3. Literature Review of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.3.1. General Remarks; 1.3.2. Recent Investigations on Steel Bridges; 1.3.3. Recent Investigations on Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.4. Finite Element Modeling of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.5. Current Design Codes of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; References.
  • Chapter 2: Nonlinear Material Behavior of the Bridge Components2.1. General Remarks; 2.2. Nonlinear Material Properties of Structural Steel; 2.2.1. General; 2.2.2. Steel Stresses; 2.2.3. Ductility; 2.2.4. Fracture Toughness; 2.2.5. Weldability; 2.2.6. Weather Resistance; 2.2.7. Residual Stresses; 2.3. Nonlinear Material Properties of Concrete; 2.3.1. General; 2.3.2. Concrete Stresses; 2.3.3. Creep and Shrinkage; 2.3.4. Stress-Strain Relation of Concrete for Nonlinear Structural Analysis; 2.3.5. Stress-Strain Relations for the Design of Cross Sections; 2.3.6. Flexural Tensile Strength.
  • 2.3.7. Confined Concrete2.4. Nonlinear Material Properties of Reinforcement Bars; 2.4.1. General; 2.4.2. Properties; 2.5. Nonlinear Material Properties of Prestressing Tendons; 2.5.1. General; 2.5.2. Properties; 2.6. Nonlinear Behavior of Shear Connection; 2.6.1. General; 2.6.2. Shear Connectors; 2.6.3. Complete and Partial Shear Concoction; 2.6.4. Main Investigations on Shear Connection in Composite Beams with Solid Slabs; 2.6.5. Main Investigations on Shear Connection in Composite Beams with Profiled Steel Decking.
  • 2.6.6. Main Investigations on Shear Connection in Composite Beams with Prestressed Hollow Core Concrete Slabs2.6.7. Main Investigations on Numerical Modeling of Shear Connection; 2.6.8. Main Investigations on Numerical Modeling of Composite Girders; References; Chapter 3: Applied Loads and Stability of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.1. General Remarks; 3.2. Dead Loads of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.2.1. Dead Loads of Railway Steel Bridges; 3.2.2. Dead Loads of Highway Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges.
  • 3.3. Live Loads on Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges3.3.1. Live Loads for Railway Steel Bridges; 3.3.2. Live Loads for Highway Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.4. Horizontal Forces on Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.4.1. General; 3.4.2. Horizontal Forces on Railway Steel Bridges; 3.4.2.1. Centrifugal Forces; 3.4.2.2. Nosing Force; 3.4.2.3. Traction and Braking Forces; 3.4.2.4. Wind Forces; 3.4.3. Horizontal Forces on Highway Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.4.3.1. Braking and Acceleration Forces; 3.4.3.2. Centrifugal Forces.
In recent years, bridge engineers and researchers are increasingly turning to the finite element method for the design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges. However, the complexity of the method has made the transition slow. Based on twenty years of experience, Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges provides structural engineers and researchers with detailed modeling techniques for creating robust design models. The book's seven chapters begin with an overview of the various forms of modern steel and steel-concrete composite bridges as well as current design codes. This is followed by self-contained chapters concerning: nonlinear material behavior of the bridge components, applied loads and stability of steel and steel-concrete composite bridges, and design of steel and steel-concrete composite bridge components. Constitutive models for construction materials including material non-linearity and geometric non-linearity. The mechanical approach including problem setup, strain energy, external energy and potential energy), mathematics behind the method Commonly available finite elements codes for the design of steel bridges. Explains how the design information from Finite Element Analysis is incorporated into Building information models to obtain quantity information, cost analysis, .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Front Cover; Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; Copyright; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1. General Remarks; 1.2. Types of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.3. Literature Review of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.3.1. General Remarks; 1.3.2. Recent Investigations on Steel Bridges; 1.3.3. Recent Investigations on Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.4. Finite Element Modeling of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 1.5. Current Design Codes of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; References.
  • Chapter 2: Nonlinear Material Behavior of the Bridge Components2.1. General Remarks; 2.2. Nonlinear Material Properties of Structural Steel; 2.2.1. General; 2.2.2. Steel Stresses; 2.2.3. Ductility; 2.2.4. Fracture Toughness; 2.2.5. Weldability; 2.2.6. Weather Resistance; 2.2.7. Residual Stresses; 2.3. Nonlinear Material Properties of Concrete; 2.3.1. General; 2.3.2. Concrete Stresses; 2.3.3. Creep and Shrinkage; 2.3.4. Stress-Strain Relation of Concrete for Nonlinear Structural Analysis; 2.3.5. Stress-Strain Relations for the Design of Cross Sections; 2.3.6. Flexural Tensile Strength.
  • 2.3.7. Confined Concrete2.4. Nonlinear Material Properties of Reinforcement Bars; 2.4.1. General; 2.4.2. Properties; 2.5. Nonlinear Material Properties of Prestressing Tendons; 2.5.1. General; 2.5.2. Properties; 2.6. Nonlinear Behavior of Shear Connection; 2.6.1. General; 2.6.2. Shear Connectors; 2.6.3. Complete and Partial Shear Concoction; 2.6.4. Main Investigations on Shear Connection in Composite Beams with Solid Slabs; 2.6.5. Main Investigations on Shear Connection in Composite Beams with Profiled Steel Decking.
  • 2.6.6. Main Investigations on Shear Connection in Composite Beams with Prestressed Hollow Core Concrete Slabs2.6.7. Main Investigations on Numerical Modeling of Shear Connection; 2.6.8. Main Investigations on Numerical Modeling of Composite Girders; References; Chapter 3: Applied Loads and Stability of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.1. General Remarks; 3.2. Dead Loads of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.2.1. Dead Loads of Railway Steel Bridges; 3.2.2. Dead Loads of Highway Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges.
  • 3.3. Live Loads on Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges3.3.1. Live Loads for Railway Steel Bridges; 3.3.2. Live Loads for Highway Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.4. Horizontal Forces on Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.4.1. General; 3.4.2. Horizontal Forces on Railway Steel Bridges; 3.4.2.1. Centrifugal Forces; 3.4.2.2. Nosing Force; 3.4.2.3. Traction and Braking Forces; 3.4.2.4. Wind Forces; 3.4.3. Horizontal Forces on Highway Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges; 3.4.3.1. Braking and Acceleration Forces; 3.4.3.2. Centrifugal Forces.
In recent years, bridge engineers and researchers are increasingly turning to the finite element method for the design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges. However, the complexity of the method has made the transition slow. Based on twenty years of experience, Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges provides structural engineers and researchers with detailed modeling techniques for creating robust design models. The book's seven chapters begin with an overview of the various forms of modern steel and steel-concrete composite bridges as well as current design codes. This is followed by self-contained chapters concerning: nonlinear material behavior of the bridge components, applied loads and stability of steel and steel-concrete composite bridges, and design of steel and steel-concrete composite bridge components. Constitutive models for construction materials including material non-linearity and geometric non-linearity. The mechanical approach including problem setup, strain energy, external energy and potential energy), mathematics behind the method Commonly available finite elements codes for the design of steel bridges. Explains how the design information from Finite Element Analysis is incorporated into Building information models to obtain quantity information, cost analysis, .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
  • Overview.- History of Geopolymers.- Portland Cement (OPC) and Concrete.- Geopolymer Applications.- Precursors and Additives for Geopolymer Synthesis.- Geopolymer Chemistry.- Fibres: Technical Benefits.- Thermal Properties of Geopolymers.- Fire Resistance of OPC and geopolymer.- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the topic of geopolymers, in particular it highlights the relationship between structural differences as a result of variations during the geopolymer synthesis and its physical and chemical properties. In particular, the book describes the optimization of the thermal properties of geopolymers by adding micro-structural modifiers such as fibres and/or fillers into the geopolymer matrix. The range of fibres and fillers used in geopolymers, their impact on the microstructure and thermal properties is described in great detail. The book content will appeal to researchers, scientists, or engineers who are interested in geopolymer science and technology and its industrial applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Overview.- History of Geopolymers.- Portland Cement (OPC) and Concrete.- Geopolymer Applications.- Precursors and Additives for Geopolymer Synthesis.- Geopolymer Chemistry.- Fibres: Technical Benefits.- Thermal Properties of Geopolymers.- Fire Resistance of OPC and geopolymer.- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the topic of geopolymers, in particular it highlights the relationship between structural differences as a result of variations during the geopolymer synthesis and its physical and chemical properties. In particular, the book describes the optimization of the thermal properties of geopolymers by adding micro-structural modifiers such as fibres and/or fillers into the geopolymer matrix. The range of fibres and fillers used in geopolymers, their impact on the microstructure and thermal properties is described in great detail. The book content will appeal to researchers, scientists, or engineers who are interested in geopolymer science and technology and its industrial applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)