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Crafting your research future [electronic resource] : a guide to successful master's and Ph.D. degrees in science & engineering / Charles X. Ling, Qiang Yang.

Availability

Online

Other libraries

Author/Creator:
Ling, Charles X.
Language:
English.
Publication date:
2012
Imprint:
San Rafael, Calif. (1537 Fourth Street, San Rafael, CA 94901 USA) : Morgan & Claypool, c2012.
Format:
  • Book
  • 1 electronic text (xiii, 156 p.).
Note:
Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science. Series from website.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 153).
Contents:
  • 1. Basics of research
  • 1.1 What is research?.
  • 1.2 Who are researchers and who are not?
  • 1.3 What do researchers do?
  • 1.4 What skills and abilities are the most important for researchers?
  • 1.5 What are some pros and cons of being researchers?
  • 1.6 So, how do I become a researcher?
  • 1.7 What are the differences between a master's and Ph.D. thesis?
  • 1.8 How to find a suitable supervisor for Ph.D. study
  • 1.9 How long does it take to get my Ph.D. degree?
  • 1.10 Three representative graduate students
  • 2. Goals of Ph.D. research
  • 2.1 Goal #1: be the best in the field
  • 2.2 Goal #2: be independent
  • 2.3 Three key tasks for getting a Ph.D. (and master's) degree
  • 2.4 The milestones of getting a Ph.D. degree
  • 2.5 Distractions to the goals
  • 3. Getting started: finding new ideas and organizing your plans
  • 3.1 Your first year
  • 3.2 How to find relevant papers (literature search)
  • 3.3 How to read papers
  • 3.4 Where to get new ideas
  • 3.5 From ideas to research and thesis topic
  • 3.6 How do I know if I am on the right track?
  • 3.7 Setting up a plan for Ph.D. thesis early
  • 3.8 Learning to organize papers and ideas well
  • 4. Conducting solid research
  • 4.1 An overview of a research process
  • 4.2 Jim Gray's criteria
  • 4.3 The research matrix method
  • 4.4 Carrying out your research
  • 4.5 Brand yourself
  • 4.6 Empirical vs. theoretical research
  • 4.7 Team work and multi-disciplinary research
  • 5. Writing and publishing papers
  • 5.1 "Publish or perish"
  • 5.2 Why publishing top-quality papers is hard
  • 5.3 What makes a great paper?
  • 5.4 A few untold truths about research papers
  • 5.5 The roles of you, your supervisor, and proofreader
  • 5.6 Supervisors: how to improve your students' writing most effectively
  • 5.7 Where to submit: conference or journals?
  • 5.8 How are full-length conference papers reviewed?
  • 5.9 How are journal papers reviewed?
  • 6. Misconceptions and tips for paper writing
  • 6.1 "It's so obvious that our paper is great"
  • 6.2 "It is your responsibility to understand my paper"
  • 6.3 The 10/30 test
  • 6.4 Top-down refinement of papers
  • 6.5 Create a hierarchy of subsections and choose section titles carefully
  • 6.6 Tips for paper writing
  • 6.6.1 Use certain words to signal readers
  • 6.6.2 Use simple sentences, but not simpler
  • 6.6.3 Use a small set of terms throughout the paper
  • 6.6.4 Use examples early and use them throughout the paper
  • 6.6.5 Use figures, diagrams, charts, photos, tables
  • 6.6.6 Write about your motivations and justifications
  • 6.6.7 Pose potential questions and answer them yourself
  • 6.6.8 Emphasize and reiterate key points in your paper
  • 6.6.9 Make connections throughout the paper
  • 6.6.10 Format papers for easy reading
  • 6.7 Other misconceptions and flaws
  • 6.8 Summary
  • 7. Writing and defending a Ph.D. thesis
  • 7.1 Thesis and dissertation
  • 7.2 Thesis organization: top down or bottom up
  • 7.3 Defending your thesis
  • 8. Life after Ph.D.
  • 8.1 A day in the life of a typical professor
  • 8.2 Applying for research grants
  • 8.3 Technology transfer
  • Summary
  • References
  • Author biographies.
Access:
Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers.
Citation:
Compendex INSPEC Google scholar Google book search
Summary:
What is it like to be a researcher or a scientist? For young people, including graduate students and junior faculty members in universities, how can they identify good ideas for research? How do they conduct solid research to verify and realize their new ideas? How can they formulate their ideas and research results into high-quality articles, and publish them in highly competitive journals and conferences? What are effective ways to supervise graduate students so that they can establish themselves quickly in their research careers? In this book, Ling and Yang answer these questions in a step-by-step manner with specific and concrete examples from their first-hand research experience.
Note:
Also available in print.
Format:
Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Contributor:
Yang, Qiang, 1961-
Available in another form:
Print version: 9781608458103
Series:
Synthesis lectures on engineering, 1939-523X ; #18
Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Synthesis lectures on engineering ; #18. 1939-523X
Subjects:
ISBN:
9781608458110
9781608458653
1608458652

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