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Antibiotic resistance [electronic resource] : agencies have made limited progress addressing antibiotic use in animals : report to the Ranking Member, Committee on Rules, House of Representatives.

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Corporate Author:
United States. Government Accountability Office.
Language:
English.
Publication date:
2011
Imprint:
[Washington, D.C.] : U.S. Govt. Accountability Office, [2011]
Format:
  • Book
  • 1 online resource (iii, 76 p.) : col. ill.
Title Variation:
Agencies have made limited progress addressing antibiotic use in animals
Note:
Title from cover screen (viewed on Sept. 18, 2011). "September 2011." "GAO-11-801."
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Summary:
Antibiotics have saved millions of lives, but antibiotic use in food animals contributes to the emergence of resistant bacteria that may affect humans. The Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA) are primarily responsible for ensuring food safety. GAO reviewed the issue in 2004 and recommended improved data collection and risk assessment. GAO was asked to examine the (1) extent to which agencies have collected data on antibiotic use and resistance in animals, (2) actions HHS's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took to mitigate the risk of antibiotic resistance in humans as a result of use in animals, (3) extent to which agencies have researched alternatives to current use practices and educated producers and veterinarians about appropriate use, and (4) actions the European Union (EU) and an EU member country, Denmark, have taken to regulate use in animals and lessons that have been learned. GAO analyzed documents, interviewed officials from national organizations, and visited producers in five states and Denmark. GAO recommends that HHS and USDA (1) identify and evaluate approaches to collecting detailed data on antibiotic use in animals and use these data to evaluate FDA's voluntary strategy, (2) collect more representative data on resistance, and (3) assess previous efforts on alternatives to identify where more research is needed.
Format:
Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Adobe Reader.
Contributor:
Shames, Lisa.
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Rules.
Subjects:

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