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Law touched our hearts : a generation remembers Brown v. Board of Education / Mildred Wigfall Robinson and Richard J. Bonnie, editors.

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Language:
English.
Publication date:
2009
Imprint:
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, c2009.
Format:
  • Book
  • xi, 249 p. ; 27 cm.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Contents:
  • INTRODUCTION-- I. The Context - Skin Color and Walls-- 1. "Learning About Skin Color" Marina Angel-- 2. "Segregated Proms in 2003" Alfred Mathewson-- 3. "The Wall" Kate Nace Day-- 4. "And the Walls Came Tumblin' Down" Harvey Feldman-- 5. "The Commutative Property of Arithmetic" Robert Laurence-- II. De Jure States and the District of Columbia-- Alabama-- 6. "Training in Alabama" Paulette J. Delk-- 7. "Loss of Innocence" Angela Mae Kupenda-- 8. "Toto, I Have A Feeling We Are Still In Kansas" Sharon Rush-- Florida-- 9. "Becoming a Legal Troublemaker" Michael Allan Wolf-- Georgia-- 10. "Colorblind in Georgia" Otis Stephens-- Louisiana-- 11. "Taking a Stand" Alex Hurder-- Maryland-- 12. "Seeing the Hollow" Robert A. Burt-- 13. "A Glen Echo Passage" Robert Keiter-- Mississippi-- 14. "I Can't Play with You Anymore" Edward C. Brewer-- 15. "A White Boy from Mississippi" W. Lewis Burke-- 16. "A Journey of Conscience" Samuel M. Davis-- North Carolina-- 17. "Promise and Paradox" Charles E. Daye-- 18. "A Different Kind of Education" Davison M. Douglas-- South Carolina-- 19. "Sacrifice, Opportunity and the New South" Mildred Wigfall Robinson-- Tennessee-- 20. "Crossing Invisible Lines" Linda Malone-- 21. "Segregation in Memphis" Phoebe Weaver Williams-- Virginia-- 22. "What I Learned When Massive Resistance Closed My School" Richard J. Bonnie-- 23. "Standing Up for Brown in Danville" Richard Bourne-- 24. "Urgent Conversations" Earl C. Dudley, Jr.-- 25. "Virginia Confronts 'A Statesmanlike Decision'" David Miller-- 26. "Brown as Catalyst" Blake Morant-- Washington, D.C.-- 27. "Equality and Sorority During the Decade After Brown" Taunya Lovell Banks-- 28. "An Autobiographical Fragment: What Are You Doing Here" Louis Michael Seidman-- III. De Facto States-- California-- 29. "Brown's Ambiguous Legacy" Alex M. Johnson, Jr.-- 30. "Public Education in Los Angeles: Past and Present" Paul Marcus-- Illinois-- 31. "The Discrete and Insular Majority" Craig Bradley-- 32. "Princess in the Tower" Elaine Shoben-- Kansas-- 33. "Shades of Brown" Charles Marvin-- Massachusetts-- 34. "Brown Comes to Boston: A Courtside View" Terry Jean Seligmann-- Missouri-- 35. "Checkerboard Segregation in the 1950s" Larry I. Palmer-- New Jersey-- 36. "With One Hand Waving Free" Michael Perlin-- New York-- 37. "Segregation in South Jamaica" Anthony R. Baldwin-- Ohio-- 38. "Brown Goes North" Michael H. Hoffheimer-- Washington-- 39. "The Virtues of Public Education" Susan L. Delarnatt-- Wisconsin-- 40. "Entering Another's Circle" Kathryn R. Urbonya-- APPENDIX I. The Contributors-- APPENDIX II. Description of the Project.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Publisher's Summary:
In February 1954, President Eisenhower invited Chief Justice Warren to dinner at the White House. Among the guests were well-known opponents of school desegregation. During that evening, Eisenhower commented to Warren that 'law and force cannot change a man's heart.' Three months later, however, the Supreme Court handed down its unanimous decision in Brown, and the contributors to this book, like people across the country, were profoundly changed by it, even though many saw almost nothing change in their communities.What Brown did was to elevate race from the country's dirty secret to its most urgent topic of conversation. This book stands alone in presenting, in one source, stories of black and white Americans, men and women, from all parts of the nation, who were public school students during the years immediately after Brown. All shared an epiphany. Some became aware of race and the burden of racial separation. Others dared to hope that the yoke of racial oppression would at last be lifted.The editors surveyed 4750 law professors born between 1936 and 1954, received 1000 responses, and derived these forty essays from those willing to write personal accounts of their childhood experiences in the classroom and in their communities. Their moving stories of how Brown affected them say much about race relations then and now. They also provide a picture of how social change can shape the careers of an entire generation in one profession.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Contributor:
Robinson, Mildred Wigfall.
Bonnie, Richard J.
Subjects:
ISBN:
9780826516190
082651619X

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