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Pop art and the origins of post-modernism / Sylvia Harrison.

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Author/Creator:
Harrison, Sylvia, 1947-
Language:
English.
Publication date:
2001
Imprint:
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Format:
  • Book
  • vii, 280 p. ; 24 cm.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-273) and index.
Contents:
  • Introduction-- 1. Postmodernist assumptions-- 2. Lawrence Alloway: pop srt and the 'pop art-fine art continuum'-- 3. Harold Rosenberg and the 'de-definition' of both art and self-- 4. Leo Steinberg: pop, 'Post-Modernist' painting and the flatbed picture plane-- 5. Barbara Rose: pop, pragmatism and 'prophetic pragmatism'-- 6. Max Kozloff: a phenomenological solution to 'Warholism' and its disenfranchisement of the critic's interpretive and evaluative roles-- 7. Susan Sontag: the aesthetics of silence and the new sensibility-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Publisher's Summary:
Pop Art and the Origins of Post-Modernism examines the critical reception of Pop Art in America during the 1960s. Comparing the ideas of a group of New York-based critics, including Leo Steinberg, Susan Sontag, and Max Kozloff, among others, Sylvia Harrison demonstrates how their ideas - broadly categorized as either sociological or philosophical - bear a striking similarity to the body of thought and opinion which is now associated with deconstructive post-modernism. Perceived through these disciplinary lenses, Pop Art arises as not only a reflection of the dominance of mass communications and capitalist consumerism in post-war American society, but also a subversive commentary on worldviews and the factors necessary for their formation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Series:
Contemporary artists and their critics.
Subjects:
ISBN:
0521791154
9780521791151

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