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Scientific authority & twentieth-century America / edited by Ronald G. Walters.

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Language:
English.
Publication date:
1997
Imprint:
Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
Format:
  • Book
  • vi, 271 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Title Variation:
Scientific authority and twentieth-century America
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-259) and index.
Publisher's Summary:
Turn-of-the-century Americans strongly believed that science - "disinterested" and authoritative - could help them to organize society and understand the natural world. Yet today, even scientists themselves are raising disturbing questions about the nature and practice of science. In this study Ronald G. Walters brings together a distinguished group of contributors to reflect, often critically, on scientific and medical claims to moral, social, and political authority. Writing from a variety of perspectives - intellectual history, social history, feminist theory, philosophy, medical history, political theory, and visual analysis - the authors demonstrate that science no longer belongs exclusively to its practitioners or to any particular discipline.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Contributor:
Walters, Ronald G.
Subjects:
ISBN:
0801853893
0801853907
9780801853890
9780801853906

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