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Disability, culture, and development : a case study of Japanese children at school / Misa Kayama, Wendy Haight.

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Author/Creator:
Kayama, Misa.
Language:
English.
Publication date:
2014
Publication:
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, [2014]
Format:
  • Book
  • xviii, 247 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (pages [213]-230) and index.
Contents:
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • CONTENTS
  • 1. Raising children with disabilities, and their peers at a Japanese public elementary school
  • 2. Research program
  • 3. The history and policies of Japanese special education
  • 4. Children's daily lives at Greenleaf Elementary School
  • 5. How educators support the parents of children with developmental disabilities
  • 6. How educators support children with developmental disabilities and their peers
  • 7. Children's and parents' experiences of disability as they transition into special education
  • 8. Implications: A cross cultural conversation.
Summary:
"This book examines Japanese cultural beliefs about disability and related socialization practices as they impact the experiences of elementary school-aged children. Physical and mental conditions which impair children's functioning are universal issues impacting child welfare and educational systems around the world. While the American approach is well understood and represented in the literature, cultures differ in which physical and mental conditions are considered 'disabling'. Currently, the Japanese educational system is in transition as public schools implement formal special education services for children with developmental disabilities. 'Developmental disabilities' is a new term used by Japanese educators to categorize a variety of relatively minor social and cognitive conditions caused by neurologically based deficits: learning disabilities such as dyslexia, ADHD, and Asperger's Syndrome. Children who were once considered 'difficult' or 'slow learners' are now considered to be 'disabled' and in need of special services. This transition created an excellent opportunity to explore Japanese beliefs about disability that might otherwise have remained unexamined by participants, and how these evolving beliefs and new socialization and educational practices impact children's experiences"-- Provided by publisher. "This book examines Japanese cultural beliefs about disability and related socialization practices as they impact the experiences of elementary school-aged children. Physical and mental conditions which impair children's functioning are universal issues impacting child welfare and educational systems around the world"-- Provided by publisher.
Contributor:
Haight, Wendy L., 1958-
Subjects:
ISBN:
9780199970827
0199970823

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