E185.97.K5 A25 1987 - E185.97 .K5 B353 1992
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Book
[2], 122 p. : ill., ports. ; 21 cm.
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E185.97.K5 A25 1987 Unknown
Book
210 p.
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E185.97 .K5 A25 1992 Unknown
Book
xiii, 108 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Quotations by the civil rights leader cover such issues as race, justice, and human dignity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Quotations by the civil rights leader cover such issues as race, justice, and human dignity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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E185.97 .K5 A25 1993B Unknown
Book
xxii, 246 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Presents nineteen of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s most important writings and speeches, carefully selected by educators across a variety of disciplines.
Presents nineteen of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s most important writings and speeches, carefully selected by educators across a variety of disciplines.
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E185.97 .K5 A25 2013 Unknown
Book
xii, 78 p. 22 cm.
Hoover Library
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E185.97.K5 A3 Unknown
Book
225 p., 12 l. of illus. 20 cm.
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E185.97.K5 A47 Unknown
Book
xi, 225 p. ; 20 cm.
  • Address to the First Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) mass meeting
  • The birth of a new nation
  • Give us the ballot
  • Address at the freedom rally in Cobo Hall
  • I have a dream
  • Eulogy for the young victims of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing
  • Acceptance for the Nobel Peace Prize
  • Address at the conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery march
  • Beyond Vietnam
  • Where do we go from here?
  • I've been to the mountaintop.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is known for being one of the greatest orators of the 20th Century, and perhaps in all of American history. In the 1950s and 1960s, his words led the Civil Rights movement and helped change a society. Although he is best known for helping achieve civil equality for African-Americans, these speeches -- selected because they were each presented at a turning point in the Civil Rights movement -- show that his true goal was much larger than that: he hoped to achieve acceptance for all people, regardless of race or nationality. This companion volume to A Knock At Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. includes the text of his most well-known oration, I Have a Dream, to his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize to Beyond Vietnam, a powerful plea to end the ongoing conflict. Though the speeches refer to the conditions of the 1960s, his assertions that nonviolent protest is the key to democracy, and that all humans are equal, are as timeless and powerful today as they were thirty years ago. Also featured in this text are introductions from world-renowned defenders of civil rights. Reflecting on their own experiences (many of them knew Dr. King and even saw the speech itself), they explain how they believe Dr. King's words can be used for the 21st Century. Writers include Ambassador Andrew Young, Rosa Parks, and Senator Edward Kennedy, among others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Address to the First Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) mass meeting
  • The birth of a new nation
  • Give us the ballot
  • Address at the freedom rally in Cobo Hall
  • I have a dream
  • Eulogy for the young victims of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing
  • Acceptance for the Nobel Peace Prize
  • Address at the conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery march
  • Beyond Vietnam
  • Where do we go from here?
  • I've been to the mountaintop.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is known for being one of the greatest orators of the 20th Century, and perhaps in all of American history. In the 1950s and 1960s, his words led the Civil Rights movement and helped change a society. Although he is best known for helping achieve civil equality for African-Americans, these speeches -- selected because they were each presented at a turning point in the Civil Rights movement -- show that his true goal was much larger than that: he hoped to achieve acceptance for all people, regardless of race or nationality. This companion volume to A Knock At Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. includes the text of his most well-known oration, I Have a Dream, to his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize to Beyond Vietnam, a powerful plea to end the ongoing conflict. Though the speeches refer to the conditions of the 1960s, his assertions that nonviolent protest is the key to democracy, and that all humans are equal, are as timeless and powerful today as they were thirty years ago. Also featured in this text are introductions from world-renowned defenders of civil rights. Reflecting on their own experiences (many of them knew Dr. King and even saw the speech itself), they explain how they believe Dr. King's words can be used for the 21st Century. Writers include Ambassador Andrew Young, Rosa Parks, and Senator Edward Kennedy, among others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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E185.97 .K5 A5 2001 Unknown
Book
xiv, 80 p. ; 23 cm. + 1 sound disc (digital ; 4 3/4 in.)
  • Impasse in race relations
  • Conscience and the Vietnam War
  • Youth and social action
  • Nonviolence and social change
  • A Christmas sermon on peace.
From the Dust Jacket: In November and December 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered five lectures for the renowned Massey Lecture Series of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The collection was immediately released as a book under the title Conscience for Change, but after King's assassination in 1968, it was republished as The Trumpet of Conscience. The collection sums up his lasting creed and is his final testament on racism, poverty, and war. Each oration in this volume encompasses a distinct theme and speaks prophetically to today's perils, addressing issues of equality, conscience and war, the mobilization of young people, and nonviolence. Collectively, they reveal some of King's most introspective reflections and final impressions of the movement while illustrating how he never lost sight of our shared goals for justice. The book concludes with "A Christmas Sermon on Peace"-a powerful lecture that was broadcast live from Ebenezer Baptist Church on Christmas Eve in 1967. In it King articulates his long-term vision of nonviolence as a path to world peace.
  • Impasse in race relations
  • Conscience and the Vietnam War
  • Youth and social action
  • Nonviolence and social change
  • A Christmas sermon on peace.
From the Dust Jacket: In November and December 1967, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered five lectures for the renowned Massey Lecture Series of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The collection was immediately released as a book under the title Conscience for Change, but after King's assassination in 1968, it was republished as The Trumpet of Conscience. The collection sums up his lasting creed and is his final testament on racism, poverty, and war. Each oration in this volume encompasses a distinct theme and speaks prophetically to today's perils, addressing issues of equality, conscience and war, the mobilization of young people, and nonviolence. Collectively, they reveal some of King's most introspective reflections and final impressions of the movement while illustrating how he never lost sight of our shared goals for justice. The book concludes with "A Christmas Sermon on Peace"-a powerful lecture that was broadcast live from Ebenezer Baptist Church on Christmas Eve in 1967. In it King articulates his long-term vision of nonviolence as a path to world peace.
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E185.97 .K5 A5 2010 Unknown
Book
xxviii, 226 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Foreword / Charlayne Hunter-Gault
  • PART I. All of God's Children: Toward a Global Vision of Human Liberation. "The vision of a world made new" / speech by MLK, annual meeting of the Women's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convention, St. Louis, MO 1954
  • "The World House" / statement by MLK from "Where do we go from here: chaos or community?" 1967
  • "Revolution and redemption" / address by MLK, European Baptist Assembly, Amsterdam, Holland, 1964
  • PART II. Confronting the Color Bar: Overcoming Racism as a World Problem. "Declaration of Conscience" / joint statement on South African Apartheid by MLK, Bishop James A. Pike, and Eleanor Roosevelt, under the auspices of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA), New York City 1957
  • "Appeal for Action Against Apartheid" / joint statement on South African Apartheid by MLK and Chief Albert John Luthuli, under the auspices of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA), New York City 1962
  • "South African Independence" / speech by MLK London England, 1964
  • "Let my people go" / South Africa benefit speech by MLK, Hunter College NYC, 1965
  • "Invitation to South Africa" / letter from MLK to the South African Embassy, 1966
  • "On the world taking a stand on Rhodesia" / comment by MLK, Paris, France, 1965
  • "Racism and the World House" / statement by MLK from "Where do we go from here: chaos or community?" 1967
  • PART III. Breaking the Chains of Colonialism: the Rise of Peoples of Color in the Third World. "Invitation to Ghana" / statement by MLK, Montgomery, AL 1957
  • "The birth of a new nation" / sermon by MLK, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Montgomery, AL 1957
  • "Introduction to SW Africa: the U.N.'s Stepchild" / statement by MLK, published by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) 1959
  • "My talk with Ben Bella" / statement by MLK, New York Amsterdam News, NYC 1962
  • "The negro looks at Africa" / statement by MLK, New York Amsterdam News, NYC 1962
  • "Palm Sunday sermon on Mohandas K. Gandhi" / sermon by MLK, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Montgomery, AL 1959
  • "My trip to the land of Gandhi" / article by MLK, Ebony, 1959
  • "Jawaharlal Nehru, a leader in the long anti-Colonial struggle" / article by MLK from Legacy of Nehru, Atlanta, GA 1965
  • PART IV. For the Least of These: Launching the Global War on Poverty. "The Octopus of poverty" / statement by MLK "The Mennonite, 1965
  • "Poverty and the World House" / statement by MLK from Where do we go from here" Chaos or community? 1967
  • "Nonviolence and Social Change" / statement by MLK from The trumpet of conscience, 1968
  • PART V. To Study War no More: an Affirmation of World Peace and Human Coexistence. "Address at the 36th annual dinner of the War Resisters League" / address by MLK, NYC 1959
  • "The greatest hope for world peace" / statements by MLK prepared for Redbook Magazine, 1964
  • "The Casualties of the War in Vietnam" / speech by MLK, The Nation Institute, Beverly-Hilton Hotel, Los Angeles, 1967
  • "Beyond Vietnam: a time to break silence" / speech by MLK, clergy and laity concerned about Vietnam (CALC) Riverside Church, NYC 1967
  • "The Middle East Question" / statement by MLK and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Chicago, 1967
  • "War and the World House" / statement by MLK from Where do we go from here... 1967
  • PART VI. Toward a positive pluralism: Interfaith Dialogue and the Global Community. "Christianity and African Religions" / statement by MLK from Ebony, 1958
  • "I have never been a religious bigot" / letter from MLK to Mr. M. Bernard Resnikoff, Fairlawn, NJ 1961
  • "A narrow sectarianism that causes me real concern" / letter from MLK to Dr. Harold E. Fey, editor of The Christian Century, 1962
  • "All the great religions of thw world" / statement by MLK prepared for Redbook Magazine, 1964
  • "My Jewish brother!" / article by MLK, New York Amsterdam News, NYC 1966
  • "Buddhists and martyrs of the Civil Rights Movement" / joint statement by Martin Luther King, Jr., and Thich Nhat Han.
An unprecedented and timely collection that captures the global vision of Dr. King--in his own words. Too many people continue to think of Dr. King only as "a southern civil rights leader" or "an American Gandhi, " thus ignoring his impact on poor and oppressed people around the world. ""In a Single Garment of Destiny"" is the first book to treat King's positions on global liberation struggles through the prism of his own words and activities. From the pages of this extraordinary collection, King emerges not only as an advocate for global human rights but also as a towering figure who collaborated with Eleanor Roosevelt, Albert J. Luthuli, Thich Nhat Hanh, and other national and international figures in addressing a multitude of issues we still struggle with today--from racism, poverty, and war to religious bigotry and intolerance. Introduced and edited by distinguished King scholar Lewis Baldwin, this volume breaks new ground in our understanding of King.
  • Foreword / Charlayne Hunter-Gault
  • PART I. All of God's Children: Toward a Global Vision of Human Liberation. "The vision of a world made new" / speech by MLK, annual meeting of the Women's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convention, St. Louis, MO 1954
  • "The World House" / statement by MLK from "Where do we go from here: chaos or community?" 1967
  • "Revolution and redemption" / address by MLK, European Baptist Assembly, Amsterdam, Holland, 1964
  • PART II. Confronting the Color Bar: Overcoming Racism as a World Problem. "Declaration of Conscience" / joint statement on South African Apartheid by MLK, Bishop James A. Pike, and Eleanor Roosevelt, under the auspices of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA), New York City 1957
  • "Appeal for Action Against Apartheid" / joint statement on South African Apartheid by MLK and Chief Albert John Luthuli, under the auspices of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA), New York City 1962
  • "South African Independence" / speech by MLK London England, 1964
  • "Let my people go" / South Africa benefit speech by MLK, Hunter College NYC, 1965
  • "Invitation to South Africa" / letter from MLK to the South African Embassy, 1966
  • "On the world taking a stand on Rhodesia" / comment by MLK, Paris, France, 1965
  • "Racism and the World House" / statement by MLK from "Where do we go from here: chaos or community?" 1967
  • PART III. Breaking the Chains of Colonialism: the Rise of Peoples of Color in the Third World. "Invitation to Ghana" / statement by MLK, Montgomery, AL 1957
  • "The birth of a new nation" / sermon by MLK, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Montgomery, AL 1957
  • "Introduction to SW Africa: the U.N.'s Stepchild" / statement by MLK, published by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) 1959
  • "My talk with Ben Bella" / statement by MLK, New York Amsterdam News, NYC 1962
  • "The negro looks at Africa" / statement by MLK, New York Amsterdam News, NYC 1962
  • "Palm Sunday sermon on Mohandas K. Gandhi" / sermon by MLK, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Montgomery, AL 1959
  • "My trip to the land of Gandhi" / article by MLK, Ebony, 1959
  • "Jawaharlal Nehru, a leader in the long anti-Colonial struggle" / article by MLK from Legacy of Nehru, Atlanta, GA 1965
  • PART IV. For the Least of These: Launching the Global War on Poverty. "The Octopus of poverty" / statement by MLK "The Mennonite, 1965
  • "Poverty and the World House" / statement by MLK from Where do we go from here" Chaos or community? 1967
  • "Nonviolence and Social Change" / statement by MLK from The trumpet of conscience, 1968
  • PART V. To Study War no More: an Affirmation of World Peace and Human Coexistence. "Address at the 36th annual dinner of the War Resisters League" / address by MLK, NYC 1959
  • "The greatest hope for world peace" / statements by MLK prepared for Redbook Magazine, 1964
  • "The Casualties of the War in Vietnam" / speech by MLK, The Nation Institute, Beverly-Hilton Hotel, Los Angeles, 1967
  • "Beyond Vietnam: a time to break silence" / speech by MLK, clergy and laity concerned about Vietnam (CALC) Riverside Church, NYC 1967
  • "The Middle East Question" / statement by MLK and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Chicago, 1967
  • "War and the World House" / statement by MLK from Where do we go from here... 1967
  • PART VI. Toward a positive pluralism: Interfaith Dialogue and the Global Community. "Christianity and African Religions" / statement by MLK from Ebony, 1958
  • "I have never been a religious bigot" / letter from MLK to Mr. M. Bernard Resnikoff, Fairlawn, NJ 1961
  • "A narrow sectarianism that causes me real concern" / letter from MLK to Dr. Harold E. Fey, editor of The Christian Century, 1962
  • "All the great religions of thw world" / statement by MLK prepared for Redbook Magazine, 1964
  • "My Jewish brother!" / article by MLK, New York Amsterdam News, NYC 1966
  • "Buddhists and martyrs of the Civil Rights Movement" / joint statement by Martin Luther King, Jr., and Thich Nhat Han.
An unprecedented and timely collection that captures the global vision of Dr. King--in his own words. Too many people continue to think of Dr. King only as "a southern civil rights leader" or "an American Gandhi, " thus ignoring his impact on poor and oppressed people around the world. ""In a Single Garment of Destiny"" is the first book to treat King's positions on global liberation struggles through the prism of his own words and activities. From the pages of this extraordinary collection, King emerges not only as an advocate for global human rights but also as a towering figure who collaborated with Eleanor Roosevelt, Albert J. Luthuli, Thich Nhat Hanh, and other national and international figures in addressing a multitude of issues we still struggle with today--from racism, poverty, and war to religious bigotry and intolerance. Introduced and edited by distinguished King scholar Lewis Baldwin, this volume breaks new ground in our understanding of King.
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E185.97 .K5 A5 2012 Unknown
Book
xi, 400 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
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Basement
E185.97 .K5 A52 1998 Unknown
Book
xi, 400 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
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E185.97 .K5 A52 1998 In-library use
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E185.97 .K5 A52 1998 Unavailable Assumed lost Request
Book
228 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
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E185.97 .K5 A53 2005 Unknown
Book
48 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Young Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Martin's father
  • Montgomery bus boycott
  • Powerful man of peace
  • Free at last.
Tells the story of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his life, accomplishments in the civil rights movement, and his impact on American history.
  • Young Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Martin's father
  • Montgomery bus boycott
  • Powerful man of peace
  • Free at last.
Tells the story of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his life, accomplishments in the civil rights movement, and his impact on American history.
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E185.97 .K5 A627 2001 Unknown
Book
[32] p. : col. ill. ; 21 x 25 cm.
A brief, illustrated, biography of the Baptist minister and civil rights leader whose philosophy and practice of nonviolent civil disobedience helped American blacks win many battles for equal rights.
A brief, illustrated, biography of the Baptist minister and civil rights leader whose philosophy and practice of nonviolent civil disobedience helped American blacks win many battles for equal rights.
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E185.97 .K5 A63 1989 Unknown
Book
xvi, 352 p. ; 24 cm.
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E185.97.K5 A79 Unknown
Book
xxxix, 352 p. ; 23 cm.
Examines his contribution as a philosopher and theologian to issues of racial and social justice and his drive to eradicate oppression through the doctrine of nonviolence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Examines his contribution as a philosopher and theologian to issues of racial and social justice and his drive to eradicate oppression through the doctrine of nonviolence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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E185.97 .K5 A79 2000 Unknown
Book
30 p. : ill., port. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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E185.97 .K5 A87 1970 Available
Book
104 p. : ill., ports. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
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E185.97.K5 A87 1987 Unknown
Book
224 p. ; 18 cm.
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E185.97.K5 B35 Unknown
Book
xii, 348 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
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E185.97 .K5 B35 1991 Unknown
Book
324 p.
Green Library
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E185.97 .K5 B353 1992 Unknown