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Book
112 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Bob Dylan bucked executives at his record label and surprised his fans when he came to Nashville in 1966 to record his classic album Blonde on Blonde. Working with the city's unmatched session musicians, Dylan produced a rock and roll masterpiece and went on to record two more albums there. Dylan's embrace of Nashville and its musicians-the Nashville Cats-inspired many other artists, among them Neil Young, Joan Baez, and Leonard Cohen, to follow him to Music City. Around the same time, Johnny Cash was recruiting folk and rock musicians-including Dylan-to appear on his groundbreaking network television show, The Johnny Cash Show, shot at the Ryman Auditorium, home of the Grand Ole Opry. This companion book to the exhibit Dylan, Cash, and the Nashville Cats: A New Music City looks at the Nashville music scene in the late 1960s and early 1970s, a time of great cultural vitality for Music City.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Bob Dylan bucked executives at his record label and surprised his fans when he came to Nashville in 1966 to record his classic album Blonde on Blonde. Working with the city's unmatched session musicians, Dylan produced a rock and roll masterpiece and went on to record two more albums there. Dylan's embrace of Nashville and its musicians-the Nashville Cats-inspired many other artists, among them Neil Young, Joan Baez, and Leonard Cohen, to follow him to Music City. Around the same time, Johnny Cash was recruiting folk and rock musicians-including Dylan-to appear on his groundbreaking network television show, The Johnny Cash Show, shot at the Ryman Auditorium, home of the Grand Ole Opry. This companion book to the exhibit Dylan, Cash, and the Nashville Cats: A New Music City looks at the Nashville music scene in the late 1960s and early 1970s, a time of great cultural vitality for Music City.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ML3524 .D95 2015 Unknown

2. Eco-sonic media [2015]

Book
vii, 254 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Green Discs 2. Birdland Melodies 3. Subterranean Signals 4. Radio's Dark Ecology The Run-Out Groove Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The negative environmental effects of media culture are not often acknowledged: the fuel required to keep huge server farms in operation, landfills full of high tech junk, and the extraction of rare minerals for devices reliant on them are just some of the hidden costs of the contemporary mediascape. Eco-Sonic Media brings an ecological critique to the history of sound media technologies in order to amplify the environmental undertones in sound studies and turn up the audio in discussions of greening the media. By looking at early and neglected forms of sound technology, Jacob Smith seeks to create a revisionist, ecologically aware history of sound media. Delving into the history of pre-electronic media like hand-cranked gramophones, comparatively eco-friendly media artifacts such as the shellac discs that preceded the use of petroleum-based vinyl, early forms of portable technology like divining rods, and even the use of songbirds as domestic music machines, Smith builds a scaffolding of historical case studies to demonstrate how green media archaeology" can make sound studies vibrate at an ecological frequency while opening the ears of eco-criticism. Throughout this eye-opening and timely book he makes readers more aware of the costs and consequences of their personal media consumption by prompting comparisons with non-digital, non-electronic technologies and by offering different ways in which sound media can become eco-sonic media. In the process, he forges interdisciplinary connections, opens new avenues of research, and poses fresh theoretical questions for scholars and students of media, sound studies, and contemporary environmental history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Green Discs 2. Birdland Melodies 3. Subterranean Signals 4. Radio's Dark Ecology The Run-Out Groove Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The negative environmental effects of media culture are not often acknowledged: the fuel required to keep huge server farms in operation, landfills full of high tech junk, and the extraction of rare minerals for devices reliant on them are just some of the hidden costs of the contemporary mediascape. Eco-Sonic Media brings an ecological critique to the history of sound media technologies in order to amplify the environmental undertones in sound studies and turn up the audio in discussions of greening the media. By looking at early and neglected forms of sound technology, Jacob Smith seeks to create a revisionist, ecologically aware history of sound media. Delving into the history of pre-electronic media like hand-cranked gramophones, comparatively eco-friendly media artifacts such as the shellac discs that preceded the use of petroleum-based vinyl, early forms of portable technology like divining rods, and even the use of songbirds as domestic music machines, Smith builds a scaffolding of historical case studies to demonstrate how green media archaeology" can make sound studies vibrate at an ecological frequency while opening the ears of eco-criticism. Throughout this eye-opening and timely book he makes readers more aware of the costs and consequences of their personal media consumption by prompting comparisons with non-digital, non-electronic technologies and by offering different ways in which sound media can become eco-sonic media. In the process, he forges interdisciplinary connections, opens new avenues of research, and poses fresh theoretical questions for scholars and students of media, sound studies, and contemporary environmental history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
P96 .S66 S64 2015 Unavailable In process Request
Book
296 pages ; 24 cm
A riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. It's about the greatest pirate in history, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet. Through these interwoven narratives, Witt has written a thrilling book that depicts the moment in history when ordinary life became forever entwined with the world online--when, suddenly, all the music ever recorded was available for free. Witt introduces the unforgettable characters--inventors, executives, factory workers, and smugglers--who revolutionized an entire artform, and reveals for the first time the secret underworld of media pirates that transformed our digital lives.--From publisher description.
A riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. It's about the greatest pirate in history, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet. Through these interwoven narratives, Witt has written a thrilling book that depicts the moment in history when ordinary life became forever entwined with the world online--when, suddenly, all the music ever recorded was available for free. Witt introduces the unforgettable characters--inventors, executives, factory workers, and smugglers--who revolutionized an entire artform, and reveals for the first time the secret underworld of media pirates that transformed our digital lives.--From publisher description.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .W59 2015 Unknown
Book
296 pages ; 24 cm
Business Library
Status of items at Business Library
Business Library Status
Popular Business Books
ML3790 .W59 2015 Unknown
Book
xxix, 167 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures and Tables Acknowledgments Preface Part I: Introduction Part II: Transformations in the Recording Industry Chapter 1Recording Industry in Transition Chapter 2The Expansion of Consumption in the Recording Industry Part III: The State in Music Chapter 3Copyright: A Critical Exploration Chapter 4Critical Junctures Part IV: The Recording Industry and Labor Chapter 5Musician Labor Chapter 6Victims, Musicians and Metallica Part V: Digital Distribution and Surveillance Chapter 7Distribution Then and Now Chapter 8Watching Music Consumption Part VI: Conclusion Bibliography Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
iTake-Over: The Recording Industry in the Digital Era sheds light on the way large corporations appropriate new technologies related to recording and distribution of audio material to maintain their market dominance in a capitalist system. All too commonly, scholars have asserted too confidently, how the rise and reign of digital music has diminished the power of major record labels. In iTake-Over, music scholar David Arditi argues otherwise, adopting a broader perspective by examining how the recording industry has strengthened copyright laws for their corporate ends at the expense of the broader public good, which has traditionally depended on the safe harbor of fair use. Arditi also challenges the dominant discourse over digital music distribution, which has largely adopted the position that the recording industry has a legitimate claim to profitability at the detriment of a shared culture. iTake-Over more specifically surveys the actual material effects that digital distribution has had on the industry. Most notable among these is how major record labels find themselves in a stronger financial position today in the music industry than they were before the launch of Napster. Arditi contends that this is largely because of reduced production and distribution costs and the steady gain in digital music sales. Moreover, instead of merely trying to counteract the phenomenon of digital distribution, the RIAA and the major record labels embraced, and then altered, the distribution system. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the RIAA lobbied for legislation, built technologies, and waged war in the courts in order to shape the digital environment for music distribution. From mp3s to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), from the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) to iTunes, the major record labels and the RIAA, instead of trying to torpedo the switch to digital distribution, engineered it to their benefit-often at the expense of the public interest. Throughout, Arditi boldly asserts that the sea change to digital music did not destroy the recording industry. Rather, it stands as a testament to the recording industry's successful management of this migration to digital production and distribution. As such, this work should appeal to musicians and music scholars, political scientists and sociologists, technologists and audio professionals seeking to grasp this remarkable change in music production and consumption.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures and Tables Acknowledgments Preface Part I: Introduction Part II: Transformations in the Recording Industry Chapter 1Recording Industry in Transition Chapter 2The Expansion of Consumption in the Recording Industry Part III: The State in Music Chapter 3Copyright: A Critical Exploration Chapter 4Critical Junctures Part IV: The Recording Industry and Labor Chapter 5Musician Labor Chapter 6Victims, Musicians and Metallica Part V: Digital Distribution and Surveillance Chapter 7Distribution Then and Now Chapter 8Watching Music Consumption Part VI: Conclusion Bibliography Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
iTake-Over: The Recording Industry in the Digital Era sheds light on the way large corporations appropriate new technologies related to recording and distribution of audio material to maintain their market dominance in a capitalist system. All too commonly, scholars have asserted too confidently, how the rise and reign of digital music has diminished the power of major record labels. In iTake-Over, music scholar David Arditi argues otherwise, adopting a broader perspective by examining how the recording industry has strengthened copyright laws for their corporate ends at the expense of the broader public good, which has traditionally depended on the safe harbor of fair use. Arditi also challenges the dominant discourse over digital music distribution, which has largely adopted the position that the recording industry has a legitimate claim to profitability at the detriment of a shared culture. iTake-Over more specifically surveys the actual material effects that digital distribution has had on the industry. Most notable among these is how major record labels find themselves in a stronger financial position today in the music industry than they were before the launch of Napster. Arditi contends that this is largely because of reduced production and distribution costs and the steady gain in digital music sales. Moreover, instead of merely trying to counteract the phenomenon of digital distribution, the RIAA and the major record labels embraced, and then altered, the distribution system. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the RIAA lobbied for legislation, built technologies, and waged war in the courts in order to shape the digital environment for music distribution. From mp3s to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), from the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) to iTunes, the major record labels and the RIAA, instead of trying to torpedo the switch to digital distribution, engineered it to their benefit-often at the expense of the public interest. Throughout, Arditi boldly asserts that the sea change to digital music did not destroy the recording industry. Rather, it stands as a testament to the recording industry's successful management of this migration to digital production and distribution. As such, this work should appeal to musicians and music scholars, political scientists and sociologists, technologists and audio professionals seeking to grasp this remarkable change in music production and consumption.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML3790 .A76 2015 Unknown
Book
vi, 289 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Table of Contents List of Illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Living Stereo (Paul Th berge, Kyle Devine and Tom Everrett) (AUDIO) POSITIONS 1. The "Sweet Spot": The Technology of Stereo and the Field of Auditorship (Tony Grajeda) 2. The Stereophonic Spaces of Soundscape (Jonathan Sterne) 3. Sonar and the Channelization of the Ocean (John Shiga) LISTENING CULTURES 4. Training the Listener: Stereo Demonstration Discs in an Emerging Consumer Market (Tim J. Anderson) 5. Mono in the Stereo Age (Eric Barry) 6. Looking Past the Stereo Loudspeakers: From the Home to the Amplified Concert Hall (Jonathan Tee) 7. Recorded British Folk Song (Allan F. Moore) MULTICHANNEL SOUND and SCREEN MEDIA 8. Television: Now with Two Channels of Audio (David Sedman) 9. The Grandeur(s) of CinemaScope (Matthew Malsky) 10. Atmos Now: Dolby Laboratories, Mixing Ideology and Hollywood Sound Production (Benjamin Wright) 11. A Symphony of Sound: Surround Sound in Formula One Racing Games (Ruth Dockwray and Karen Collins) List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Stereo is everywhere. The whole culture and industry of music and sound became organized around the principle of stereophony during the twentieth century. But nothing about this-not the invention or acceptance or ubiquity of stereo-was inevitable. Nor did the aesthetic conventions, technological objects, and listening practices required to make sense of stereo emerge fully formed, out of the blue. This groundbreaking book uncovers the vast amount of work that has been required to make stereo seem natural, and which has been necessary to maintain stereo's place as a dominant mode of sound reproduction for over half a century. The essays contained within this book are thematically grouped under (Audio) Positions, Listening Cultures, and Multichannel Sound and Screen Media; the cumulative effect is to advance research in music, sound, and media studies and to build new bridges between the fields. With contributions from leading scholars across several disciplines, Living Stereo re-tells the history of twentieth-century aural and musical culture through the lens of stereophonic sound.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Table of Contents List of Illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Living Stereo (Paul Th berge, Kyle Devine and Tom Everrett) (AUDIO) POSITIONS 1. The "Sweet Spot": The Technology of Stereo and the Field of Auditorship (Tony Grajeda) 2. The Stereophonic Spaces of Soundscape (Jonathan Sterne) 3. Sonar and the Channelization of the Ocean (John Shiga) LISTENING CULTURES 4. Training the Listener: Stereo Demonstration Discs in an Emerging Consumer Market (Tim J. Anderson) 5. Mono in the Stereo Age (Eric Barry) 6. Looking Past the Stereo Loudspeakers: From the Home to the Amplified Concert Hall (Jonathan Tee) 7. Recorded British Folk Song (Allan F. Moore) MULTICHANNEL SOUND and SCREEN MEDIA 8. Television: Now with Two Channels of Audio (David Sedman) 9. The Grandeur(s) of CinemaScope (Matthew Malsky) 10. Atmos Now: Dolby Laboratories, Mixing Ideology and Hollywood Sound Production (Benjamin Wright) 11. A Symphony of Sound: Surround Sound in Formula One Racing Games (Ruth Dockwray and Karen Collins) List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Stereo is everywhere. The whole culture and industry of music and sound became organized around the principle of stereophony during the twentieth century. But nothing about this-not the invention or acceptance or ubiquity of stereo-was inevitable. Nor did the aesthetic conventions, technological objects, and listening practices required to make sense of stereo emerge fully formed, out of the blue. This groundbreaking book uncovers the vast amount of work that has been required to make stereo seem natural, and which has been necessary to maintain stereo's place as a dominant mode of sound reproduction for over half a century. The essays contained within this book are thematically grouped under (Audio) Positions, Listening Cultures, and Multichannel Sound and Screen Media; the cumulative effect is to advance research in music, sound, and media studies and to build new bridges between the fields. With contributions from leading scholars across several disciplines, Living Stereo re-tells the history of twentieth-century aural and musical culture through the lens of stereophonic sound.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
TK7881.4 .L57 2015 In-library use
Book
316 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction. "Something new-built along the same lines"
  • Starting out : Independence, 1892-1919
  • Getting the music : Okeh, records, and roots, 1919-1926
  • To victor, on to Bristol, and the making of giants, 1926-1927
  • Reaching out from the roots : southern music, 1927-1933
  • Breaking loose, branching out, starting over, 1933-1940
  • Crossing borders : the war, Latin music, and the media, 1940-1945
  • Going global : expanding, 1946-1951
  • Locking a legacy, 1952-1960
  • The roots and pop aftermath
  • Appendix. key recordings and published songs of Ralph Peer, 1920-1960.
  • Introduction. "Something new-built along the same lines"
  • Starting out : Independence, 1892-1919
  • Getting the music : Okeh, records, and roots, 1919-1926
  • To victor, on to Bristol, and the making of giants, 1926-1927
  • Reaching out from the roots : southern music, 1927-1933
  • Breaking loose, branching out, starting over, 1933-1940
  • Crossing borders : the war, Latin music, and the media, 1940-1945
  • Going global : expanding, 1946-1951
  • Locking a legacy, 1952-1960
  • The roots and pop aftermath
  • Appendix. key recordings and published songs of Ralph Peer, 1920-1960.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML429 .P37 M39 2015 Unknown
Book
223 pages : ill. ; 26 x 26 cm
In 2011, Mike Spitz began photographing more than 40 record stores in and around the greater Los Angeles area, rich with old and new record shops, to capture the lively experience of going to the used record store, discovering that rare vinyl record, cassette or 8-track tape, memorabilia, vintage concert posters, turntables, nostalgia and other music-related gems. Colorful imagery shot on film and in-depth interviews with store owners illustrate how each American independent record store has a unique and vibrant culture that cultivates a communal gathering place for human interaction, exploration and discovery. In chronological order from the oldest existing stores, such as Canterbury Records that opened in 1956 in Pasadena or Music Man Murray Records that opened in 1962, to the most recently opened stores, The Record Store Book respectfully marks the "changing of the guard" from the older to the newer generation of stores as each owner shares facts, store history, and distinctive points of view regarding how people search for, find and appreciate music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In 2011, Mike Spitz began photographing more than 40 record stores in and around the greater Los Angeles area, rich with old and new record shops, to capture the lively experience of going to the used record store, discovering that rare vinyl record, cassette or 8-track tape, memorabilia, vintage concert posters, turntables, nostalgia and other music-related gems. Colorful imagery shot on film and in-depth interviews with store owners illustrate how each American independent record store has a unique and vibrant culture that cultivates a communal gathering place for human interaction, exploration and discovery. In chronological order from the oldest existing stores, such as Canterbury Records that opened in 1956 in Pasadena or Music Man Murray Records that opened in 1962, to the most recently opened stores, The Record Store Book respectfully marks the "changing of the guard" from the older to the newer generation of stores as each owner shares facts, store history, and distinctive points of view regarding how people search for, find and appreciate music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML3790 .S725 2015 Unknown
Book
xvi, 647 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction - Andy Bennett and Steve Waksman SECTION 1: Theory and Method - Introduction by Andy Bennett The Many Worlds of Popular Music: Ethnomusicological - Kevin Dawe Notes on Sociological Theory and Popular Music Studies - Motti Regev Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards: Mixing Pop, Politics - Gilbert B. Rodman (Re)Generations of Popular Musicology - Serge Lacasse Archival Research and the Expansion of Popular Music - Christine Feldman-Barratt SECTION 2: The Business of Popular Music - Introduction by Steve Waksman Power, Production and the Pop Process - Reebee Garofalo Intermediaries and Intermediation - Devon Powers Popular Musical Labor in North America - Matt Stahl Music in Advertising in the U.S.: History and Issues - Timothy D. Taylor SECTION 3: Popular Music History - Introduction by Steve Waksman Grinding out Hits at the Song Factory - Keir Keightley Popular Music Genres: Aesthetics, Commerce and Identity - David Brackett Live Music History - Matt Brennan SECTION 4: The Global and the Local - Introduction by Andy Bennett Observations on African, African-American, Middle Eastern - Tony Mitchell Electronic Dance Music Cultures, Ritualization and the Case - Graham St. John "Everything Louder than Everyone Else': The Origins and Persistence of Heavy Metal and Its Global Cultural Impact - Andy Brown Punk Rock Globalization - Ross Haenfler SECTION 5: The Star System - Introduction by Steve Waksman Rock Stars as Icons - David Shumway Everybody's in Show Biz: Performing Star Identity in Popular Music - Philip Auslander Midnight Ramblers and Material Girls: Gender and Stardom in Rock and Pop - Jacqueline Warwick Dark Cosmos: Making Race, Shaping Stardom - C. Riley Snorton SECTION 6: Body and Identity - Introduction by Andy Bennett Blurred lines, gender and Popular Music - Sheila Whiteley Popular Music, Race and Identity - Jon Stratton Dancing the Popular: The Expressive Interface of Bodies, Sound and Motion - Sherril Dodds Shaping the Past of Popular music: Memory, Forgetting and Documenting - Catherine Strong SECTION 7: Media - Introduction by Andy Bennett In Print and On Screen: The Changing Character of Popular Music Journalism - Simon Warner Sight and Sound in Concert? The Interrelationship Between Music and Television - Tim Wall and Paul Long Viewing with Your Ears, Listening With Your Eyes: Synching Popular Music and Cinema - Scott Henderson Beyond Napster: Popular Music and the 'Normal' Internet - Nick Prior SECTION 8: Technology - Introduction by Steve Waksman Phonography and the 'Recording' in Popular Music - Patrick Feaster Ghosts of Electricity: Amplification - Peter Doyle Ubiquitous Musics: Technology, Listening, and Subjectivity - Anahid Kassabian SECTION 9: Digital Economies - Introduction by Steve Waksman Modes of Production: The Value of Modal Analysis for Popular Music Studies - Tim Anderson Music, Copies and Essences - Joanna Demers Authorship, Ownership, and Musical Appropriation - Kembrew McLeod Music Cartels and the Dematerialization of Power - Aram Sinnreich.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"The SAGE Handbook of Popular Music is a comprehensive, smartly-conceived volume that can take its place as the new standard reference in popular music. The editors have shown great care in covering classic debates while moving the field into new, exciting areas of scholarship. International in its focus and pleasantly wide-ranging across historical periods, the Handbook is accessible to students but full of material of interest to those teaching and researching in the field." (Will Straw, McGill University). "Celebrating the maturation of popular music studies and recognizing the immense changes that have recently taken place in the conditions of popular music production, The SAGE Handbook of Popular Music features contributions from many of the leading scholars in the field. Every chapter is well defined and to the point, with bibliographies that capture the history of the field. Authoritative, expertly organized and absolutely up-to-date, this collection will instantly become the backbone of teaching and research across the Anglophone world and is certain to be cited for years to come." (Barry Shank, author of 'The Political Force of Musical Beauty' (2014)). The SAGE Handbook of Popular Music provides a highly comprehensive and accessible summary of the key aspects of popular music studies. The text is divided into 9 sections: Theory and Method; The Business of Popular Music; Popular Music History; The Global and the Local; The Star System; Body and Identity; Media; Technology and Digital Economies. Each section has been chosen to reflect both established aspects of popular music studies as well as more recently emerging sub-fields. The handbook constitutes a timely and important contribution to popular music studies during a significant period of theoretical and empirical growth and innovation in the field. This is a benchmark work which will be essential reading for educators and students in popular music studies, musicology, cultural studies, media studies and cultural sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction - Andy Bennett and Steve Waksman SECTION 1: Theory and Method - Introduction by Andy Bennett The Many Worlds of Popular Music: Ethnomusicological - Kevin Dawe Notes on Sociological Theory and Popular Music Studies - Motti Regev Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards: Mixing Pop, Politics - Gilbert B. Rodman (Re)Generations of Popular Musicology - Serge Lacasse Archival Research and the Expansion of Popular Music - Christine Feldman-Barratt SECTION 2: The Business of Popular Music - Introduction by Steve Waksman Power, Production and the Pop Process - Reebee Garofalo Intermediaries and Intermediation - Devon Powers Popular Musical Labor in North America - Matt Stahl Music in Advertising in the U.S.: History and Issues - Timothy D. Taylor SECTION 3: Popular Music History - Introduction by Steve Waksman Grinding out Hits at the Song Factory - Keir Keightley Popular Music Genres: Aesthetics, Commerce and Identity - David Brackett Live Music History - Matt Brennan SECTION 4: The Global and the Local - Introduction by Andy Bennett Observations on African, African-American, Middle Eastern - Tony Mitchell Electronic Dance Music Cultures, Ritualization and the Case - Graham St. John "Everything Louder than Everyone Else': The Origins and Persistence of Heavy Metal and Its Global Cultural Impact - Andy Brown Punk Rock Globalization - Ross Haenfler SECTION 5: The Star System - Introduction by Steve Waksman Rock Stars as Icons - David Shumway Everybody's in Show Biz: Performing Star Identity in Popular Music - Philip Auslander Midnight Ramblers and Material Girls: Gender and Stardom in Rock and Pop - Jacqueline Warwick Dark Cosmos: Making Race, Shaping Stardom - C. Riley Snorton SECTION 6: Body and Identity - Introduction by Andy Bennett Blurred lines, gender and Popular Music - Sheila Whiteley Popular Music, Race and Identity - Jon Stratton Dancing the Popular: The Expressive Interface of Bodies, Sound and Motion - Sherril Dodds Shaping the Past of Popular music: Memory, Forgetting and Documenting - Catherine Strong SECTION 7: Media - Introduction by Andy Bennett In Print and On Screen: The Changing Character of Popular Music Journalism - Simon Warner Sight and Sound in Concert? The Interrelationship Between Music and Television - Tim Wall and Paul Long Viewing with Your Ears, Listening With Your Eyes: Synching Popular Music and Cinema - Scott Henderson Beyond Napster: Popular Music and the 'Normal' Internet - Nick Prior SECTION 8: Technology - Introduction by Steve Waksman Phonography and the 'Recording' in Popular Music - Patrick Feaster Ghosts of Electricity: Amplification - Peter Doyle Ubiquitous Musics: Technology, Listening, and Subjectivity - Anahid Kassabian SECTION 9: Digital Economies - Introduction by Steve Waksman Modes of Production: The Value of Modal Analysis for Popular Music Studies - Tim Anderson Music, Copies and Essences - Joanna Demers Authorship, Ownership, and Musical Appropriation - Kembrew McLeod Music Cartels and the Dematerialization of Power - Aram Sinnreich.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"The SAGE Handbook of Popular Music is a comprehensive, smartly-conceived volume that can take its place as the new standard reference in popular music. The editors have shown great care in covering classic debates while moving the field into new, exciting areas of scholarship. International in its focus and pleasantly wide-ranging across historical periods, the Handbook is accessible to students but full of material of interest to those teaching and researching in the field." (Will Straw, McGill University). "Celebrating the maturation of popular music studies and recognizing the immense changes that have recently taken place in the conditions of popular music production, The SAGE Handbook of Popular Music features contributions from many of the leading scholars in the field. Every chapter is well defined and to the point, with bibliographies that capture the history of the field. Authoritative, expertly organized and absolutely up-to-date, this collection will instantly become the backbone of teaching and research across the Anglophone world and is certain to be cited for years to come." (Barry Shank, author of 'The Political Force of Musical Beauty' (2014)). The SAGE Handbook of Popular Music provides a highly comprehensive and accessible summary of the key aspects of popular music studies. The text is divided into 9 sections: Theory and Method; The Business of Popular Music; Popular Music History; The Global and the Local; The Star System; Body and Identity; Media; Technology and Digital Economies. Each section has been chosen to reflect both established aspects of popular music studies as well as more recently emerging sub-fields. The handbook constitutes a timely and important contribution to popular music studies during a significant period of theoretical and empirical growth and innovation in the field. This is a benchmark work which will be essential reading for educators and students in popular music studies, musicology, cultural studies, media studies and cultural sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3470 .S35 2015 Unknown
Book
xxiii, 203 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgements Preface 1. Vinyl as Record: Several Lives of the 'King Format' 2. Medium: Handling and Hearing 3. Thing: Qualities and Entanglements 4. Commodity: Value and Markets 5. Totem: Scene-Making in Urban Spaces Epilogue: Modern Icon Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Recent years have seen not just a revival, but a rebirth of the analogue record. More than merely a nostalgic craze, vinyl has become a cultural icon. As music consumption migrated to digital and online, this seemingly obsolete medium became the fastest-growing format in music sales. Whilst vinyl never ceased to be the favorite amongst many music lovers and DJs, from the late 1980s the recording industry regarded it as an outdated relic, consigned to dusty domestic corners and obscure record shops. So why is vinyl now experiencing a 'rebirth of its cool'? Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward explore this question by combining a cultural sociological approach with insights from material culture studies. Presenting vinyl as a multifaceted cultural object, they investigate the reasons behind its persistence within our technologically accelerated culture. Informed by media analysis, urban ethnography and the authors' interviews with musicians, DJs, sound engineers, record store owners, collectors and cutting-edge label chiefs from a range of metropolitan centres renowned for thriving music scenes including London, New York, Tokyo, Melbourne, and especially Berlin, what emerges is a story of a modern icon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgements Preface 1. Vinyl as Record: Several Lives of the 'King Format' 2. Medium: Handling and Hearing 3. Thing: Qualities and Entanglements 4. Commodity: Value and Markets 5. Totem: Scene-Making in Urban Spaces Epilogue: Modern Icon Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Recent years have seen not just a revival, but a rebirth of the analogue record. More than merely a nostalgic craze, vinyl has become a cultural icon. As music consumption migrated to digital and online, this seemingly obsolete medium became the fastest-growing format in music sales. Whilst vinyl never ceased to be the favorite amongst many music lovers and DJs, from the late 1980s the recording industry regarded it as an outdated relic, consigned to dusty domestic corners and obscure record shops. So why is vinyl now experiencing a 'rebirth of its cool'? Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward explore this question by combining a cultural sociological approach with insights from material culture studies. Presenting vinyl as a multifaceted cultural object, they investigate the reasons behind its persistence within our technologically accelerated culture. Informed by media analysis, urban ethnography and the authors' interviews with musicians, DJs, sound engineers, record store owners, collectors and cutting-edge label chiefs from a range of metropolitan centres renowned for thriving music scenes including London, New York, Tokyo, Melbourne, and especially Berlin, what emerges is a story of a modern icon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML1055 .B19 2015 Unknown
Book
399 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm
Released to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the coolest and best- known label in jazz, this book celebrates over seven decades of extraordinary music from a company that has stayed true to its founders commitment to Uncompromising Expression. Tracing the evolution of jazz from the boogie- woogie and swing of the 1930s, through bebop, funk and fusion, to the eclectic mix Blue Note releases today, the book also narrates a complex social history from the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany to the developments in music and technology in the late 20th century. Blue Note is not only known as the purveyor of extraordinary jazz but is also famous as an arbiter of cool. The photography of co-founder Francis Wolff and the cover designs of Reid Miles were integral to the labels success and this highly illustrated, landmark publication featuring the very best photographs, covers, and ephemera from the archives, including never-before-published material commemorates Blue Notes momentous contribution to jazz, to art and design as well as to revolutionizing the music business.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Released to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the coolest and best- known label in jazz, this book celebrates over seven decades of extraordinary music from a company that has stayed true to its founders commitment to Uncompromising Expression. Tracing the evolution of jazz from the boogie- woogie and swing of the 1930s, through bebop, funk and fusion, to the eclectic mix Blue Note releases today, the book also narrates a complex social history from the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany to the developments in music and technology in the late 20th century. Blue Note is not only known as the purveyor of extraordinary jazz but is also famous as an arbiter of cool. The photography of co-founder Francis Wolff and the cover designs of Reid Miles were integral to the labels success and this highly illustrated, landmark publication featuring the very best photographs, covers, and ephemera from the archives, including never-before-published material commemorates Blue Notes momentous contribution to jazz, to art and design as well as to revolutionizing the music business.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML3506 .H38 2014 In-library use In process
Book
xiii, 382 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Talking machines
  • Judgments
  • His master's voice
  • Exodus
  • The invisible wave
  • Survivors
  • Dead Sea crossing
  • Homesick medicine
  • Sunrise
  • Lucky children
  • Numbers
  • The invasion
  • Acts
  • A slow eclipse
  • Terra nova
  • On black canvas
  • Forbidden fruit
  • Taurus
  • Kings
  • Psalms
  • The island
  • High tide
  • Sources
  • Sodom & Gomorrah
  • Shadows
  • Cyclops
  • Legends
  • Romans
  • Lamentations
  • Bubblegum forest
  • Revelations.
Cowboys and Indies is the definitive record business bible, chronicling the pioneers who set the stylus on the most important labels and musical discoveries of the last century. The narrative follows all the musical trends and developments, from the phonograph to the internet age, as it delves behind the big business of corporate hit machines and the diligent industry of small, curated labels. Drawing from memoirs, archives, and over one hundred exclusive interviews with the legends of the record industry including the founders and CEOs of Virgin Records, United Artists, Atlantic Records, and A&M, this book reveals the secrets behind the hit making craft. Cowboys and Indies focuses on the game changers - the indie founders, talent scouts, the legendary A&R men - believers who understood the music business was two distinct parts; first music, then business. An industry insider himself, Gareth Murphy culls numerous behind-the-scenes anecdotes to bring together a clear genealogical map of the record industry's international 130 year history. Among its revelations, Cowboys and Indies highlights the remarkable similarities between the industry crash in the 1920s and 30s and the recent CD crash. Witty and evocative, Cowboys and Indies offers a fresh panoramic view of the cycles and grooves of pop music and is sure to top the charts with music industry classics like Hitmaker and The Mansion on the Hill.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Talking machines
  • Judgments
  • His master's voice
  • Exodus
  • The invisible wave
  • Survivors
  • Dead Sea crossing
  • Homesick medicine
  • Sunrise
  • Lucky children
  • Numbers
  • The invasion
  • Acts
  • A slow eclipse
  • Terra nova
  • On black canvas
  • Forbidden fruit
  • Taurus
  • Kings
  • Psalms
  • The island
  • High tide
  • Sources
  • Sodom & Gomorrah
  • Shadows
  • Cyclops
  • Legends
  • Romans
  • Lamentations
  • Bubblegum forest
  • Revelations.
Cowboys and Indies is the definitive record business bible, chronicling the pioneers who set the stylus on the most important labels and musical discoveries of the last century. The narrative follows all the musical trends and developments, from the phonograph to the internet age, as it delves behind the big business of corporate hit machines and the diligent industry of small, curated labels. Drawing from memoirs, archives, and over one hundred exclusive interviews with the legends of the record industry including the founders and CEOs of Virgin Records, United Artists, Atlantic Records, and A&M, this book reveals the secrets behind the hit making craft. Cowboys and Indies focuses on the game changers - the indie founders, talent scouts, the legendary A&R men - believers who understood the music business was two distinct parts; first music, then business. An industry insider himself, Gareth Murphy culls numerous behind-the-scenes anecdotes to bring together a clear genealogical map of the record industry's international 130 year history. Among its revelations, Cowboys and Indies highlights the remarkable similarities between the industry crash in the 1920s and 30s and the recent CD crash. Witty and evocative, Cowboys and Indies offers a fresh panoramic view of the cycles and grooves of pop music and is sure to top the charts with music industry classics like Hitmaker and The Mansion on the Hill.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML3790 .M665 2014 In-library use
Book
336 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ML3535.5 .T32 2014 Unknown
Book
427 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm
  • Vorwort
  • Einleitung
  • Einführung : das Label
  • Definition
  • Aufgaben eines Labels
  • Struktur eines Labels
  • Unterschiede Indie vs. Majors : Spezialisten vs. Allrounder
  • Über die Notwendigkeit von Labels
  • Die Musikindustrie
  • Die Entstehung und Entwicklung der Musikindustrie
  • Der Musikmarkt in Deutschland
  • Orientierungsinstrumente der Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre
  • Die Marke
  • Genres und Marken in der Musikindustrie
  • Zwischenbilanz : die Beziehungen zwischen Genres und Marken in der Musik
  • Die Bedeutung des Medienumbruchs für die Musikb6ranche
  • Die Time-Konvergenz
  • Das Tsunami-Modell
  • Merkmale und Eigenschaften der Neuen Medien
  • Auswirkungen auf die Musikbranche
  • Genres und Marken in der digitalen Musikwelt
  • Orientierungsinstrumente in der heutigen Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Markenführungsansätze bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Labels und die Orientierungsinstrumente Genre und Marke
  • Ausblick
  • Quellen und Literatur.
  • Vorwort
  • Einleitung
  • Einführung : das Label
  • Definition
  • Aufgaben eines Labels
  • Struktur eines Labels
  • Unterschiede Indie vs. Majors : Spezialisten vs. Allrounder
  • Über die Notwendigkeit von Labels
  • Die Musikindustrie
  • Die Entstehung und Entwicklung der Musikindustrie
  • Der Musikmarkt in Deutschland
  • Orientierungsinstrumente der Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre
  • Die Marke
  • Genres und Marken in der Musikindustrie
  • Zwischenbilanz : die Beziehungen zwischen Genres und Marken in der Musik
  • Die Bedeutung des Medienumbruchs für die Musikb6ranche
  • Die Time-Konvergenz
  • Das Tsunami-Modell
  • Merkmale und Eigenschaften der Neuen Medien
  • Auswirkungen auf die Musikbranche
  • Genres und Marken in der digitalen Musikwelt
  • Orientierungsinstrumente in der heutigen Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Markenführungsansätze bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Labels und die Orientierungsinstrumente Genre und Marke
  • Ausblick
  • Quellen und Literatur.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .S561 2014 Unknown
Book
xiv, 245 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • CONTENTS -- PREFACE -- INTRODUCTION -- CHAPTER ONE -- Beginnings: -- Understanding Sound -- Toward Recording -- The Phonograph -- The First Producers -- CHAPTER TWO -- The acoustic period: -- Acoustic Recording -- International Expansion -- The Third Major Label -- The Sooys -- Documentation of Cultural Expression -- The End of an Era -- CHAPTER THREE -- The Electric period: -- Toward Electric Recording -- Better Sound -- Country Music -- Further Technological Foundations -- The Calm before the Storm -- The Thirties and Forties -- Radio, Film, and Tape Innovations -- CHAPTER FOUR -- Economic and Societal Overlay: -- Cyclical Decline -- One Thing after Another: The Thirties through the War -- Recovery -- CHAPTER FIVE -- The Studio is Interactive -- Toward Greater Control -- Magnetic Tape Recording -- Defining Some Terms -- Mastering -- Editing -- Sound on Sound -- Overdubbing -- Summing up of Tape's Impact -- The Microgroove LP -- CHAPTER SIX -- The Post World War II Reconstruction of the Recording Industry -- After the War -- The Boom in Independent Labels -- The Fifties -- Radio DJs -- CHAPTER SEVEN -- Mobile Music -- More Music for More People -- Music Anywhere: Radio on the Move -- My Music on the Move -- My Music Anywhere -- CHAPTER EIGHT -- Expanding the Palette -- Electric Instruments and Amplifiers -- Synthesizers -- Genre Hybridization -- CHAPTER NINE -- Some Key Producers -- The Objective -- Review of Early Producers -- Mitch Miller -- Leiber and Stoller -- Phil Spector -- Sam Phillips -- Steve Sholes -- Norrie Paramor -- Joe Meek -- Brian Wilson -- George Martin -- Holland, Dozier and Holland -- Teo Macero -- King Tubby -- Prince -- Rick Rubin -- Quincy Jones -- Robert John "Mutt" Lange -- Dr Dre -- Max Martin -- CHAPTER TEN -- The Sixties and Seventies -- Cultural and Creative Revolution -- The Sixties -- Mix Automation -- The Seventies -- CHAPTER ELEVEN -- Toward the Digital Age -- Digital Recording: -- Hip Hop: -- The State of the Eighties: -- The Sound of the Eighties: -- The Look of the Eighties: -- Shiny Silver Discs: -- Singles: -- Mixing: -- Dance Music: -- Remixes: -- Further Eighties Developments -- Mergers and Acquisitions -- The Internet and the World Wide Web -- CHAPTER TWELVE -- The Nineties -- The Corporate State -- The Charts and SoundScan -- Alternative Rock -- Toward Music Online -- Progress with Digitized Data -- Digital Radio -- Millennials -- Preparing the way for Napster -- CHAPTER THIRTEEN -- Periods of standards and stability -- Proprietary versus Open Systems -- Standards -- CHAPTER FOURTEEN -- Deconstructing the Studio -- Democratizing Technologies -- Improvised Environments -- When is a Home not a Home? -- Freedom -- CHAPTER FIFTEEN -- Random Access Recording Technology -- Why Random Access? -- The Beginnings of Random Access for Producers -- Drum Machines, Next Generation Sequencers and MIDI -- The Beginnings of Random Access Digital Recording -- Convergence and Integration -- CHAPTER SIXTEEN -- Transformative/Disruptive Technologies and the Value of Music -- Definitions of Terms -- The Industry at the Turn of the 21st Century -- Missed Opportunity -- Oh wait. -- No Big Surprises -- What a Great Idea -- What Happened to Vertical Integration? -- An Idea Whose Time Had Come -- Denial and Inaction -- The Consequences -- The Digital Disruption and Producer Income -- Performance Royalties -- Direct versus Statutory Licenses -- CHAPTER SEVENTEEN -- Post-Millennial Business Models -- American Idol -- Downloads -- Streaming Audio -- Non interactive streams -- Streaming on demand -- Web 2.0, Social Networking and Social Media -- Commonalities -- CHAPTER EIGHTEEN -- The Unfinished Work -- Sampling, Mash-ups and Remixes -- Using Records as Raw Material -- Disco -- Hip hop -- Adapting compositions -- Adapting Recordings -- The Question of Creativity -- The Question of Legality -- CONCLUSION -- ABOUT THE AUTHOR.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Richard James Burgess draws on his experience as a producer, a musician, and an author in this history of recorded music, which focuses on the development of music production as both art form and profession. This comprehensive narrative begins in 1860 with the first known recording of an acoustic sound and moves chronologically through the twentieth century, examining the creation of the market for recorded sound, the development of payment structures, the origins of the recording studio and those who work there, and, ultimately, the evolution of the recording industry itself. Burgess charts the highs and lows of the industry through the decades, ending with a discussion of how Web 2.0 has affected music production. The focus remains throughout the book on the role of the music producer, and Burgess offers biographical information on key figures in the history of the industry, including Fred Gaisberg, Phil Spector, and Dr. Dre. Undergirding Burgess's narrative is the argument that while technology has historically defined the nature of music production, the drive toward greater control over the process, end result, and overall artistry came from producers. In keeping with this unique argument, The History of Music Production incorporates clear yet in-depth discussion of the developmental engagement of technology, business, and art with music production. Burgess builds this history of music production upon the strongest possible foundation: the key transitions, trends, people, and innovations that have been most important in the course of its development over the past 136 years. The result is a deeply knowledgeable book that sketches a critical path in the evolution of music production, and describes and analyzes the impact recording, playback, and disseminative technologies have had on recorded music and music production. Central to the field and a key reference book for students and scholars alike, it will stand as a companion volume to Burgess's noted, multi-edition book The Art of Music Production.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • CONTENTS -- PREFACE -- INTRODUCTION -- CHAPTER ONE -- Beginnings: -- Understanding Sound -- Toward Recording -- The Phonograph -- The First Producers -- CHAPTER TWO -- The acoustic period: -- Acoustic Recording -- International Expansion -- The Third Major Label -- The Sooys -- Documentation of Cultural Expression -- The End of an Era -- CHAPTER THREE -- The Electric period: -- Toward Electric Recording -- Better Sound -- Country Music -- Further Technological Foundations -- The Calm before the Storm -- The Thirties and Forties -- Radio, Film, and Tape Innovations -- CHAPTER FOUR -- Economic and Societal Overlay: -- Cyclical Decline -- One Thing after Another: The Thirties through the War -- Recovery -- CHAPTER FIVE -- The Studio is Interactive -- Toward Greater Control -- Magnetic Tape Recording -- Defining Some Terms -- Mastering -- Editing -- Sound on Sound -- Overdubbing -- Summing up of Tape's Impact -- The Microgroove LP -- CHAPTER SIX -- The Post World War II Reconstruction of the Recording Industry -- After the War -- The Boom in Independent Labels -- The Fifties -- Radio DJs -- CHAPTER SEVEN -- Mobile Music -- More Music for More People -- Music Anywhere: Radio on the Move -- My Music on the Move -- My Music Anywhere -- CHAPTER EIGHT -- Expanding the Palette -- Electric Instruments and Amplifiers -- Synthesizers -- Genre Hybridization -- CHAPTER NINE -- Some Key Producers -- The Objective -- Review of Early Producers -- Mitch Miller -- Leiber and Stoller -- Phil Spector -- Sam Phillips -- Steve Sholes -- Norrie Paramor -- Joe Meek -- Brian Wilson -- George Martin -- Holland, Dozier and Holland -- Teo Macero -- King Tubby -- Prince -- Rick Rubin -- Quincy Jones -- Robert John "Mutt" Lange -- Dr Dre -- Max Martin -- CHAPTER TEN -- The Sixties and Seventies -- Cultural and Creative Revolution -- The Sixties -- Mix Automation -- The Seventies -- CHAPTER ELEVEN -- Toward the Digital Age -- Digital Recording: -- Hip Hop: -- The State of the Eighties: -- The Sound of the Eighties: -- The Look of the Eighties: -- Shiny Silver Discs: -- Singles: -- Mixing: -- Dance Music: -- Remixes: -- Further Eighties Developments -- Mergers and Acquisitions -- The Internet and the World Wide Web -- CHAPTER TWELVE -- The Nineties -- The Corporate State -- The Charts and SoundScan -- Alternative Rock -- Toward Music Online -- Progress with Digitized Data -- Digital Radio -- Millennials -- Preparing the way for Napster -- CHAPTER THIRTEEN -- Periods of standards and stability -- Proprietary versus Open Systems -- Standards -- CHAPTER FOURTEEN -- Deconstructing the Studio -- Democratizing Technologies -- Improvised Environments -- When is a Home not a Home? -- Freedom -- CHAPTER FIFTEEN -- Random Access Recording Technology -- Why Random Access? -- The Beginnings of Random Access for Producers -- Drum Machines, Next Generation Sequencers and MIDI -- The Beginnings of Random Access Digital Recording -- Convergence and Integration -- CHAPTER SIXTEEN -- Transformative/Disruptive Technologies and the Value of Music -- Definitions of Terms -- The Industry at the Turn of the 21st Century -- Missed Opportunity -- Oh wait. -- No Big Surprises -- What a Great Idea -- What Happened to Vertical Integration? -- An Idea Whose Time Had Come -- Denial and Inaction -- The Consequences -- The Digital Disruption and Producer Income -- Performance Royalties -- Direct versus Statutory Licenses -- CHAPTER SEVENTEEN -- Post-Millennial Business Models -- American Idol -- Downloads -- Streaming Audio -- Non interactive streams -- Streaming on demand -- Web 2.0, Social Networking and Social Media -- Commonalities -- CHAPTER EIGHTEEN -- The Unfinished Work -- Sampling, Mash-ups and Remixes -- Using Records as Raw Material -- Disco -- Hip hop -- Adapting compositions -- Adapting Recordings -- The Question of Creativity -- The Question of Legality -- CONCLUSION -- ABOUT THE AUTHOR.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Richard James Burgess draws on his experience as a producer, a musician, and an author in this history of recorded music, which focuses on the development of music production as both art form and profession. This comprehensive narrative begins in 1860 with the first known recording of an acoustic sound and moves chronologically through the twentieth century, examining the creation of the market for recorded sound, the development of payment structures, the origins of the recording studio and those who work there, and, ultimately, the evolution of the recording industry itself. Burgess charts the highs and lows of the industry through the decades, ending with a discussion of how Web 2.0 has affected music production. The focus remains throughout the book on the role of the music producer, and Burgess offers biographical information on key figures in the history of the industry, including Fred Gaisberg, Phil Spector, and Dr. Dre. Undergirding Burgess's narrative is the argument that while technology has historically defined the nature of music production, the drive toward greater control over the process, end result, and overall artistry came from producers. In keeping with this unique argument, The History of Music Production incorporates clear yet in-depth discussion of the developmental engagement of technology, business, and art with music production. Burgess builds this history of music production upon the strongest possible foundation: the key transitions, trends, people, and innovations that have been most important in the course of its development over the past 136 years. The result is a deeply knowledgeable book that sketches a critical path in the evolution of music production, and describes and analyzes the impact recording, playback, and disseminative technologies have had on recorded music and music production. Central to the field and a key reference book for students and scholars alike, it will stand as a companion volume to Burgess's noted, multi-edition book The Art of Music Production.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML3790 .B842 2014 In-library use
Book
158 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • The sound of Muscle Shoals
  • Becoming famous
  • The Swampers
  • The singing river
  • A slow start
  • The Rolling Stones
  • Time to kill
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • The Staple Singers
  • Where black and white meet
  • The hit parade
  • Continued success
  • Alabama Avenue
  • Noel Webster
  • The Black Keys
  • A memorial to music
  • Documenting the sound
  • Marching to a new beat
  • Onward.
  • The sound of Muscle Shoals
  • Becoming famous
  • The Swampers
  • The singing river
  • A slow start
  • The Rolling Stones
  • Time to kill
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • The Staple Singers
  • Where black and white meet
  • The hit parade
  • Continued success
  • Alabama Avenue
  • Noel Webster
  • The Black Keys
  • A memorial to music
  • Documenting the sound
  • Marching to a new beat
  • Onward.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .W495 2014 Unknown
Book
306 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Musikwirtschaft 2.0. Bestandsaufnahmen und Perspektiven : eine Einführung / Steffen Höhne und Wolf-Georg Zaddach
  • Musikpolitik : Voraussetzungen, Aufgaben und Ziele der öffentlichen Musikförderung / Martin Pfleiderer
  • Wandel vor der Digitalisierung : die Schallplatte als Perspektive für die Musikwirtschaft der 1950er und 1960er Jahre / Christian A. Müller
  • The British music industry : challenges and adaption in the Twenty-first century / Stuart Moss
  • Der deutsche Klassikmarkt : eine wirtschaftliche Betrachtung / Martin Lücke
  • Unbestimmtheiten der Musikindustrie 2.0 : eine Prozessperspektive / Matthias Maier und Nancy Richter
  • Perspektive Kreativunternehmer? Rollenbilder und -modelle zwischen künsderischem Anspruch und Realität, zwischen Zuschreibung und Erwartung / Steffen Höhne
  • Erfolgreiche Handlungskompetenz : Musiker zwischen Kreativität und Entrepreneurship / Elmar D. Konrad
  • Die Rolle des Konsumenten, neue Erlösmodelle und Property-Rights-Ausgestaltung in der digitalen Musikindustrie / Jutta Emes und Christin Friedemann
  • Musik & Recht im digitalen Zeitalter : zwischen Ohnmacht und Aufbruch / Pascal Charles Amann
  • "Music is an enginge of the digitale world" : Musik und Musikwirtschaft im Zeitalter des Social Web / Wolf-Georg Zaddach
  • #Fusionfestival : Tribal-Tagging bei Twitter am Beispiel des Fusion Festivals in Lärz 2013 / Ekkehard Knopke und Carsten Wernicke
  • Automatic retrieval of rhythmic patterns for the global music database, a joint-project between musicologists and audio engineers / Nina Graeff, Philip Küppers, Felix Pfeifer und Tiago de Oliveira Pinto
  • Charakterisierung des Konsumenten von Musik im Internet / Ian Pascal Volz
  • Zukunftsperspektive Musikfestival? Musikfestivals im Wandel / Uwe Wagner
  • Freiberuflich als Komponist / Ludger Vollmer
  • Autoren.
  • Musikwirtschaft 2.0. Bestandsaufnahmen und Perspektiven : eine Einführung / Steffen Höhne und Wolf-Georg Zaddach
  • Musikpolitik : Voraussetzungen, Aufgaben und Ziele der öffentlichen Musikförderung / Martin Pfleiderer
  • Wandel vor der Digitalisierung : die Schallplatte als Perspektive für die Musikwirtschaft der 1950er und 1960er Jahre / Christian A. Müller
  • The British music industry : challenges and adaption in the Twenty-first century / Stuart Moss
  • Der deutsche Klassikmarkt : eine wirtschaftliche Betrachtung / Martin Lücke
  • Unbestimmtheiten der Musikindustrie 2.0 : eine Prozessperspektive / Matthias Maier und Nancy Richter
  • Perspektive Kreativunternehmer? Rollenbilder und -modelle zwischen künsderischem Anspruch und Realität, zwischen Zuschreibung und Erwartung / Steffen Höhne
  • Erfolgreiche Handlungskompetenz : Musiker zwischen Kreativität und Entrepreneurship / Elmar D. Konrad
  • Die Rolle des Konsumenten, neue Erlösmodelle und Property-Rights-Ausgestaltung in der digitalen Musikindustrie / Jutta Emes und Christin Friedemann
  • Musik & Recht im digitalen Zeitalter : zwischen Ohnmacht und Aufbruch / Pascal Charles Amann
  • "Music is an enginge of the digitale world" : Musik und Musikwirtschaft im Zeitalter des Social Web / Wolf-Georg Zaddach
  • #Fusionfestival : Tribal-Tagging bei Twitter am Beispiel des Fusion Festivals in Lärz 2013 / Ekkehard Knopke und Carsten Wernicke
  • Automatic retrieval of rhythmic patterns for the global music database, a joint-project between musicologists and audio engineers / Nina Graeff, Philip Küppers, Felix Pfeifer und Tiago de Oliveira Pinto
  • Charakterisierung des Konsumenten von Musik im Internet / Ian Pascal Volz
  • Zukunftsperspektive Musikfestival? Musikfestivals im Wandel / Uwe Wagner
  • Freiberuflich als Komponist / Ludger Vollmer
  • Autoren.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
ML3790 .M865 2014 Available
Book
xiii, 197 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML429 .S57 A3 2014 Unknown
Book
140 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
TK7881.4 .A73 2014 Unknown
Book
121 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
"Discover the history of Austin's Sonobeat Records and the important role the studio played in the development of Austin music during the '60s"-- Provided by publisher.
"Discover the history of Austin's Sonobeat Records and the important role the studio played in the development of Austin music during the '60s"-- Provided by publisher.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML3792 .S68 S74 2014 Unknown

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