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Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Introduction.- Introduction and prospects of Marine natural compounds.- Development of Anticancer Drugs from Marine Sources.- Seaweeds.- Bacteria and Cyanobacteria Fungal metabolites.- Sponge derived bioactive compounds Mollusk.- Soft corals.- Algae.- Tunicate.- Other marine organisms derived compounds.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This timely desk reference focuses on marine-derived bioactive substances which have biological, medical and industrial applications. The medicinal value of these marine natural products are assessed and discussed. Their function as a new and important resource in novel, anticancer drug discovery research is also presented in international contributions from several research groups. For example, the potential role of Spongistatin, Apratoxin A, Eribulin mesylate, phlorotannins, fucoidan, as anticancer agents is explained. The mechanism of action of bioactive compounds present in marine algae, bacteria, fungus, sponges, seaweeds and other marine animals and plants are illustrated via several mechanisms. In addition, this handbook lists various compounds that are active candidates in chemoprevention and their target actions. The handbook also places into context the demand for anticancer nutraceuticals and their use as potential anti-cancer pharmaceuticals and medicines. This study of advanced and future types of natural compounds from marine sources is written to facilitate the understanding of Biotechnology and its application to marine natural product drug discovery research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction.- Introduction and prospects of Marine natural compounds.- Development of Anticancer Drugs from Marine Sources.- Seaweeds.- Bacteria and Cyanobacteria Fungal metabolites.- Sponge derived bioactive compounds Mollusk.- Soft corals.- Algae.- Tunicate.- Other marine organisms derived compounds.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This timely desk reference focuses on marine-derived bioactive substances which have biological, medical and industrial applications. The medicinal value of these marine natural products are assessed and discussed. Their function as a new and important resource in novel, anticancer drug discovery research is also presented in international contributions from several research groups. For example, the potential role of Spongistatin, Apratoxin A, Eribulin mesylate, phlorotannins, fucoidan, as anticancer agents is explained. The mechanism of action of bioactive compounds present in marine algae, bacteria, fungus, sponges, seaweeds and other marine animals and plants are illustrated via several mechanisms. In addition, this handbook lists various compounds that are active candidates in chemoprevention and their target actions. The handbook also places into context the demand for anticancer nutraceuticals and their use as potential anti-cancer pharmaceuticals and medicines. This study of advanced and future types of natural compounds from marine sources is written to facilitate the understanding of Biotechnology and its application to marine natural product drug discovery research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of Contributors ix Preface xiii 1 Technological Advances in Studies of Plant Adaptation 1 Jose G. Vallarino and Sonia Osorio Introduction 1 Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies 2 Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing 7 Proteome Analysis in Understanding Plant Adaptation 12 Applications of Proteomics 16 Metabolome Analysis in Plant Adaptation 17 Applications of Metabolic Profiling 18 Concluding Remarks and Future Prospects 21 Acknowledgments 22 References 22 2 Use of Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to Study Adaptation 31 Lisa M. Smith and Roosa A. E. Laitinen Introduction 31 Genetic Natural Variation 33 Epigenetic Natural Variation 37 Natural Variation and Metabolites 42 Use of A. thaliana Hybrids in Understanding Evolution 46 Conclusion 49 Acknowledgments 50 References 50 3 Seed Dormancy, Longevity and Their Adaptation 61 Thu-Phuong Nguyen and Leonie Bentsink Introduction 61 The Induction of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 62 Factors Affecting Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 63 Seed Dry Storage 64 Genetics of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 67 The Relation Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity and its Ecological Significance 70 Ecological Role 70 The Trade-off Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 73 Conclusions 74 References 74 4 The Gatekeeper Concept: Cell-Type Specific Molecular Mechanisms of Plant Adaptation to Abiotic Stress 83 SamW. Henderson and Matthew Gilliham Introduction 83 The Gatekeeper Concept 85 Single Cell TypesWithin Plant Roots 86 Root Hairs Tolerance to Phosphorus Deficiency 88 Epidermal Cells of the Root Apex Aluminum Tolerance 91 Xylem Parenchyma Cells Salinity Tolerance 94 Pericycle Cells Nitrogen Starvation 99 Endodermal Cells ABA Signaling Under Abiotic Stress 102 Beyond Gatekeepers Conclusions and Perspectives 103 References 105 5 Regulatory and Biosynthetic Mechanisms Underlying Plant Chemical Defense Responses to Biotic Stresses 117 William R. Chezem and Nicole K. Clay Introduction 117 Defensive Phenylpropanoids 119 Defense-Related Regulators of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism 124 Defensive Aromatic Alkaloids 126 Defense-Related Regulators of Aromatic Alkaloid Metabolism 131 Conclusion 134 References 135 6 Role of Small RNAs in Regulation of Plant Responses to Stress 147 Luis A.A. Toledo-Filho and Sascha Laubinger Introduction 147 miRNAs Biogenesis and Function 148 Evolution of miRNAs 149 siRNAs Biogenesis and Function 150 sRNA Stress Responses 151 sRNA in Abiotic Stress Responses 157 Conclusions and Future Prospects 162 References 163 7 Adaptation of Flower Form: An Evo-Devo Approach to Study Adaptive Evolution in Flower Morphology 169 Roxana Yockteng, Ana M.R. Almeida, Alma Pi neyro-Nelson, and Chelsea D. Specht Introduction 169 Flower Developmental Genetics: (A)BCs and Beyond 171 Approaches to the Study of Evolution of Floral Morphology 172 Using GRNs to Investigate Adaptive Evolution of Floral Form: SEP3 as a Case Study 176 Conclusions 184 Acknowledgments 185 References 185 8 Computational Approaches to Dissect and Understand Mechanisms of Adaptation 191 Sabrina Kleessen and Zoran Nikoloski Introduction 191 Experimental Set-Ups for Data Acquisition to Reveal Trade-Offs via Correlations 193 Pareto Front Approaches 195 The Triangulation Criterion 195 Ranking of Genotypes 197 From Models to Elements Contributing to Adaptation 199 Cellular Tasks Involved in Adaptation 202 Minimal Network Adjustments Upon Perturbations 202 Investigation of Network Adjustments by Integrating High-Throughput Data 204 Non-Steady State Behavior and Metabolic Network Adjustments 205 Future Challenges and Perspectives 207 References 208 9 From the Greenhouse to the Real World Arabidopsis Field Trials and Applications 215 Karin Kohl and Roosa A.E. Laitinen Introduction 215 Field Experiments in A. thaliana 216 How to do Field Trials? 220 From Arabidopsis to Crops 228 Future Prospects 230 References 230 Index 235.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Plants are forced to adapt for a variety of reasons protection, reproductive viability, and environmental and climatic changes. Computational tools and molecular advances have provided researchers with significant new insights into the molecular basis of plant adaptation. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation provides a comprehensive overview of a wide variety of these different mechanisms underlying adaptation to these challenges to plant survival. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation opens with a chapter that explores the latest technological advances used in plant adaptation research, providing readers with an overview of high-throughput technologies and their applications. The chapters that follow cover the latest developments on using natural variation to dissect genetic, epigenetic and metabolic responses of plant adaptation. Subsequent chapters describe plant responses to biotic and abiotic stressors and adaptive reproductive strategies. Emerging topics such as secondary metabolism, small RNA mediated regulation as well as cell type specific responses to stresses are given special precedence. The book ends with chapters introducing computational approaches to study adaptation and focusing on how to apply laboratory findings to field studies and breeding programs. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation interest plant molecular biologists and physiologists, plant stress biologists, plant geneticists and advanced plant biology students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Contributors ix Preface xiii 1 Technological Advances in Studies of Plant Adaptation 1 Jose G. Vallarino and Sonia Osorio Introduction 1 Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies 2 Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing 7 Proteome Analysis in Understanding Plant Adaptation 12 Applications of Proteomics 16 Metabolome Analysis in Plant Adaptation 17 Applications of Metabolic Profiling 18 Concluding Remarks and Future Prospects 21 Acknowledgments 22 References 22 2 Use of Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to Study Adaptation 31 Lisa M. Smith and Roosa A. E. Laitinen Introduction 31 Genetic Natural Variation 33 Epigenetic Natural Variation 37 Natural Variation and Metabolites 42 Use of A. thaliana Hybrids in Understanding Evolution 46 Conclusion 49 Acknowledgments 50 References 50 3 Seed Dormancy, Longevity and Their Adaptation 61 Thu-Phuong Nguyen and Leonie Bentsink Introduction 61 The Induction of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 62 Factors Affecting Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 63 Seed Dry Storage 64 Genetics of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 67 The Relation Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity and its Ecological Significance 70 Ecological Role 70 The Trade-off Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 73 Conclusions 74 References 74 4 The Gatekeeper Concept: Cell-Type Specific Molecular Mechanisms of Plant Adaptation to Abiotic Stress 83 SamW. Henderson and Matthew Gilliham Introduction 83 The Gatekeeper Concept 85 Single Cell TypesWithin Plant Roots 86 Root Hairs Tolerance to Phosphorus Deficiency 88 Epidermal Cells of the Root Apex Aluminum Tolerance 91 Xylem Parenchyma Cells Salinity Tolerance 94 Pericycle Cells Nitrogen Starvation 99 Endodermal Cells ABA Signaling Under Abiotic Stress 102 Beyond Gatekeepers Conclusions and Perspectives 103 References 105 5 Regulatory and Biosynthetic Mechanisms Underlying Plant Chemical Defense Responses to Biotic Stresses 117 William R. Chezem and Nicole K. Clay Introduction 117 Defensive Phenylpropanoids 119 Defense-Related Regulators of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism 124 Defensive Aromatic Alkaloids 126 Defense-Related Regulators of Aromatic Alkaloid Metabolism 131 Conclusion 134 References 135 6 Role of Small RNAs in Regulation of Plant Responses to Stress 147 Luis A.A. Toledo-Filho and Sascha Laubinger Introduction 147 miRNAs Biogenesis and Function 148 Evolution of miRNAs 149 siRNAs Biogenesis and Function 150 sRNA Stress Responses 151 sRNA in Abiotic Stress Responses 157 Conclusions and Future Prospects 162 References 163 7 Adaptation of Flower Form: An Evo-Devo Approach to Study Adaptive Evolution in Flower Morphology 169 Roxana Yockteng, Ana M.R. Almeida, Alma Pi neyro-Nelson, and Chelsea D. Specht Introduction 169 Flower Developmental Genetics: (A)BCs and Beyond 171 Approaches to the Study of Evolution of Floral Morphology 172 Using GRNs to Investigate Adaptive Evolution of Floral Form: SEP3 as a Case Study 176 Conclusions 184 Acknowledgments 185 References 185 8 Computational Approaches to Dissect and Understand Mechanisms of Adaptation 191 Sabrina Kleessen and Zoran Nikoloski Introduction 191 Experimental Set-Ups for Data Acquisition to Reveal Trade-Offs via Correlations 193 Pareto Front Approaches 195 The Triangulation Criterion 195 Ranking of Genotypes 197 From Models to Elements Contributing to Adaptation 199 Cellular Tasks Involved in Adaptation 202 Minimal Network Adjustments Upon Perturbations 202 Investigation of Network Adjustments by Integrating High-Throughput Data 204 Non-Steady State Behavior and Metabolic Network Adjustments 205 Future Challenges and Perspectives 207 References 208 9 From the Greenhouse to the Real World Arabidopsis Field Trials and Applications 215 Karin Kohl and Roosa A.E. Laitinen Introduction 215 Field Experiments in A. thaliana 216 How to do Field Trials? 220 From Arabidopsis to Crops 228 Future Prospects 230 References 230 Index 235.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Plants are forced to adapt for a variety of reasons protection, reproductive viability, and environmental and climatic changes. Computational tools and molecular advances have provided researchers with significant new insights into the molecular basis of plant adaptation. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation provides a comprehensive overview of a wide variety of these different mechanisms underlying adaptation to these challenges to plant survival. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation opens with a chapter that explores the latest technological advances used in plant adaptation research, providing readers with an overview of high-throughput technologies and their applications. The chapters that follow cover the latest developments on using natural variation to dissect genetic, epigenetic and metabolic responses of plant adaptation. Subsequent chapters describe plant responses to biotic and abiotic stressors and adaptive reproductive strategies. Emerging topics such as secondary metabolism, small RNA mediated regulation as well as cell type specific responses to stresses are given special precedence. The book ends with chapters introducing computational approaches to study adaptation and focusing on how to apply laboratory findings to field studies and breeding programs. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation interest plant molecular biologists and physiologists, plant stress biologists, plant geneticists and advanced plant biology students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (515 p.)
  • Cover image; Title page; Table of Contents; Copyright; Contributors; Preface; Chapter One: The Mechanistic Complexities of Phycotoxins: Toxicology of Azaspiracids and Yessotoxins; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Azaspiracids; 3 Yessotoxins; Acknowledgments; Chapter Two: Advances in the Analysis of Challenging Food Contaminants: Nanoparticles, Bisphenols, Mycotoxins, and Brominated Flame Retardants; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of Nanoparticles; 3 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of Bisphenols; 4 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of Mycotoxins
  • 5 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of BFRs6 Conclusions; Acknowledgments; Chapter Three: Mycotoxins from Alternaria: Toxicological Implications; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Chemical Structures; 3 Acute Toxicity; 4 Toxicokinetics and Metabolism; 5 Genotoxicity and Related Mechanism; 6 Estrogenic Activity and Related Mechanisms; 7 Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity; 8 Gastrointestinal Stability of AOH and ALT Under In Vitro Human Conditions; 9 Conclusions and Outlook; Chapter Four: Food-Borne Topoisomerase Inhibitors: Risk or Benefit; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Catalytic Enzyme Cycle
  • 3 Drug-DNA Interaction: "Inhibitor Versus Poison"4 Topoisomerase Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy; 5 Secondary Plant Constituents as Topoisomerase Inhibitors; 6 Conclusion; Acknowledgments; Chapter Five: Toxicity of Plasmonic Nanomaterials and Their Hybrid Nanocomposites; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Toxicity Testing and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials; 3 Toxicity Evaluation; 4 Animal Testing for Toxicity; 5 Factors Affecting Nanotoxicology; 6 Genotoxicology; 7 The Most Common Genotoxicological Tests; 8 Genotoxicity of Plasmonic Nanomaterials
  • 9 Evaluation of Genotoxicity of Magneto-Plasmonic Hybrid Nanocomposites10 Conclusion; Chapter Six: Aluminum Phytotoxicity: Physiological Approaches and Tolerance; Abstract; 1 General Considerations; 2 Aluminum and Plants' Responses; 3 Aluminum and the Apoplast-Symplast Continuum; 4 Aluminum and Oxidative Stress; 5 Aluminum and Callose Deposition; 6 Aluminum and Photosynthesis; 7 Aluminum Tolerance; 8 Final Remarks; Acknowledgments; Index
Advances in Molecular Toxicology features the latest advances in all of the subspecialties of the broad area of molecular toxicology. Toxicology is the study of poisons, and this series details the study of the molecular basis by which a vast array of agents encountered in the human environment and produced by the human body itself manifest themselves as toxins. Not strictly limited to documenting these examples, the series is also concerned with the complex web of chemical and biological events that give rise to toxin-induced symptoms and disease. The new technologies that are being harnessed to analyze and understand these events will also be reviewed by leading workers in the field. Advances in Molecular Toxicology will report progress in all aspects of these rapidly evolving molecular aspects of toxicology with a view toward detailed elucidation of progress on the molecular level and on advances in technological approaches employed. * Cutting-edge reviews by leading workers in the discipline * In-depth dissection of molecular aspects of interest to a broad range of scientists, physicians and any student in the allied disciplines * Leading edge applications of technological innovations in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Cover image; Title page; Table of Contents; Copyright; Contributors; Preface; Chapter One: The Mechanistic Complexities of Phycotoxins: Toxicology of Azaspiracids and Yessotoxins; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Azaspiracids; 3 Yessotoxins; Acknowledgments; Chapter Two: Advances in the Analysis of Challenging Food Contaminants: Nanoparticles, Bisphenols, Mycotoxins, and Brominated Flame Retardants; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of Nanoparticles; 3 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of Bisphenols; 4 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of Mycotoxins
  • 5 Analytical Methodology for the Analysis of BFRs6 Conclusions; Acknowledgments; Chapter Three: Mycotoxins from Alternaria: Toxicological Implications; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Chemical Structures; 3 Acute Toxicity; 4 Toxicokinetics and Metabolism; 5 Genotoxicity and Related Mechanism; 6 Estrogenic Activity and Related Mechanisms; 7 Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity; 8 Gastrointestinal Stability of AOH and ALT Under In Vitro Human Conditions; 9 Conclusions and Outlook; Chapter Four: Food-Borne Topoisomerase Inhibitors: Risk or Benefit; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Catalytic Enzyme Cycle
  • 3 Drug-DNA Interaction: "Inhibitor Versus Poison"4 Topoisomerase Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy; 5 Secondary Plant Constituents as Topoisomerase Inhibitors; 6 Conclusion; Acknowledgments; Chapter Five: Toxicity of Plasmonic Nanomaterials and Their Hybrid Nanocomposites; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Toxicity Testing and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials; 3 Toxicity Evaluation; 4 Animal Testing for Toxicity; 5 Factors Affecting Nanotoxicology; 6 Genotoxicology; 7 The Most Common Genotoxicological Tests; 8 Genotoxicity of Plasmonic Nanomaterials
  • 9 Evaluation of Genotoxicity of Magneto-Plasmonic Hybrid Nanocomposites10 Conclusion; Chapter Six: Aluminum Phytotoxicity: Physiological Approaches and Tolerance; Abstract; 1 General Considerations; 2 Aluminum and Plants' Responses; 3 Aluminum and the Apoplast-Symplast Continuum; 4 Aluminum and Oxidative Stress; 5 Aluminum and Callose Deposition; 6 Aluminum and Photosynthesis; 7 Aluminum Tolerance; 8 Final Remarks; Acknowledgments; Index
Advances in Molecular Toxicology features the latest advances in all of the subspecialties of the broad area of molecular toxicology. Toxicology is the study of poisons, and this series details the study of the molecular basis by which a vast array of agents encountered in the human environment and produced by the human body itself manifest themselves as toxins. Not strictly limited to documenting these examples, the series is also concerned with the complex web of chemical and biological events that give rise to toxin-induced symptoms and disease. The new technologies that are being harnessed to analyze and understand these events will also be reviewed by leading workers in the field. Advances in Molecular Toxicology will report progress in all aspects of these rapidly evolving molecular aspects of toxicology with a view toward detailed elucidation of progress on the molecular level and on advances in technological approaches employed. * Cutting-edge reviews by leading workers in the discipline * In-depth dissection of molecular aspects of interest to a broad range of scientists, physicians and any student in the allied disciplines * Leading edge applications of technological innovations in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xxviii, 591 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
  • PART 1: BASIC CONCEPTS OF LIFE -- 1. The basic molecular themes of life -- 2. Cells and viruses -- 3. Energy considerations in biochemistry -- PART 2: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PROTEINS AND MEMBRANES -- 4. The structure of proteins -- 5. Methods in protein investigation -- 6. Enzymes -- 7. The cell membrane and membrane proteins -- 8. Muscle contraction, the cytoskeleton, and molecular motors -- PART 3: METABOLISM AND NUTRITION -- 9. General principles of nutrition -- 10. Food digestion, absorption, and distribution to the tissues -- 11. Mechanisms of transport, storage, and mobilization of dietary components -- 12. Principles of energy release from food -- 13. Glycolysis, the TCA cycle, and the electron transport system -- 14. Energy release from fat -- 15. An alternative pathway of glucose oxidation. The pentose phosphate pathway -- 16. Synthesis of glucose (gluconeogenesis) -- 17. Synthesis of fat and related compounds -- 18. Nitrogen metabolism: amino acid metabolism -- 19. Nitrogen metabolism: nucleotide metabolism -- 20. Mechanisms of metabolic control and their applications to metabolic integration -- 21. Raising electrons of water back up the energy scale - photosynthesis -- PART 4: INFORMATION STORAGE AND UTILIZATION -- 22. The genome -- 23. DNA synthesis, repair, and recombination -- 24. Gene transcription -- 25. Protein synthesis and controlled protein breakdown -- 26. Control of gene expression -- 27. Protein sorting and delivery -- 28. Manipulating DNA and genes -- PART 5: CELLS AND TISSUES -- 29. Cell signalling -- 30. The cell cycle, cell division, and cell death -- 31. Cancer -- PART 6: PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS AGAINST DISEASE -- 32. Special topics: blood clotting, xenobiotic metabolism, reactive oxygen species -- 33. The immune system.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Now in its fifth edition Biochemistry and Molecular Biology features a new author team, who have retained the much-praised clarity of previous editions, while adding a more biomedical focus and incorporating a discussion of recent developments in research. A new chapter on the general principles of nutrition emphasises the key principles underlying complex metabolic pathways, enabling students to appreciate an integrated view of human metabolism and nutrition. Also new to the fifth edition, a chapter on the control of gene expression reflects our increasing understanding of the importance and power of gene regulation. With an integrated approach covering both biochemistry and molecular biology, complemented by frequent diagrams and clear explanations, and all presented in a broader cellular context, this text is the perfect introduction for any student new to the subject. Online Resource Centre: The Online Resource Centre features: For registered adopters of the book: * Figures from the book available to download For students: * Further reading organised by chapter, linked to the book via QR codes * An extensive bank of multiple-choice questions for self-directed learning * Links to 3D molecular structures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • PART 1: BASIC CONCEPTS OF LIFE -- 1. The basic molecular themes of life -- 2. Cells and viruses -- 3. Energy considerations in biochemistry -- PART 2: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PROTEINS AND MEMBRANES -- 4. The structure of proteins -- 5. Methods in protein investigation -- 6. Enzymes -- 7. The cell membrane and membrane proteins -- 8. Muscle contraction, the cytoskeleton, and molecular motors -- PART 3: METABOLISM AND NUTRITION -- 9. General principles of nutrition -- 10. Food digestion, absorption, and distribution to the tissues -- 11. Mechanisms of transport, storage, and mobilization of dietary components -- 12. Principles of energy release from food -- 13. Glycolysis, the TCA cycle, and the electron transport system -- 14. Energy release from fat -- 15. An alternative pathway of glucose oxidation. The pentose phosphate pathway -- 16. Synthesis of glucose (gluconeogenesis) -- 17. Synthesis of fat and related compounds -- 18. Nitrogen metabolism: amino acid metabolism -- 19. Nitrogen metabolism: nucleotide metabolism -- 20. Mechanisms of metabolic control and their applications to metabolic integration -- 21. Raising electrons of water back up the energy scale - photosynthesis -- PART 4: INFORMATION STORAGE AND UTILIZATION -- 22. The genome -- 23. DNA synthesis, repair, and recombination -- 24. Gene transcription -- 25. Protein synthesis and controlled protein breakdown -- 26. Control of gene expression -- 27. Protein sorting and delivery -- 28. Manipulating DNA and genes -- PART 5: CELLS AND TISSUES -- 29. Cell signalling -- 30. The cell cycle, cell division, and cell death -- 31. Cancer -- PART 6: PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS AGAINST DISEASE -- 32. Special topics: blood clotting, xenobiotic metabolism, reactive oxygen species -- 33. The immune system.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Now in its fifth edition Biochemistry and Molecular Biology features a new author team, who have retained the much-praised clarity of previous editions, while adding a more biomedical focus and incorporating a discussion of recent developments in research. A new chapter on the general principles of nutrition emphasises the key principles underlying complex metabolic pathways, enabling students to appreciate an integrated view of human metabolism and nutrition. Also new to the fifth edition, a chapter on the control of gene expression reflects our increasing understanding of the importance and power of gene regulation. With an integrated approach covering both biochemistry and molecular biology, complemented by frequent diagrams and clear explanations, and all presented in a broader cellular context, this text is the perfect introduction for any student new to the subject. Online Resource Centre: The Online Resource Centre features: For registered adopters of the book: * Figures from the book available to download For students: * Further reading organised by chapter, linked to the book via QR codes * An extensive bank of multiple-choice questions for self-directed learning * Links to 3D molecular structures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QP514.2 .E36 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource.
  • Coarse-Grained Protein Models in Structure Prediction / Maciej Blaszczyk, Dominik Gront, Sebastian Kmiecik, Katarzyna Ziolkowska, Marta Panek and Andrzej Kolinski
  • Coarse-Grained Modeling of Protein Dynamics / Sebastian Kmiecik, Jacek Wabik, Michal Kolinski, Maksim Kouza and Andrzej Kolinski
  • Physics-Based Modeling of Side Chain - Side Chain Interactions in the UNRES Force Field / Mariusz Makowski
  • Modeling Nucleic Acids at the Residue-Level Resolution / Filip Leonarski and Joanna Trylska
  • Modeling of Electrostatic Effects in Macromolecules / Yury N. Vorobjev
  • Optimizations of Protein Force Fields / Yoshitake Sakae and Yuko Okamoto
  • Enhanced Sampling for Biomolecular Simulations / Workalemahu Berhanu, Ping Jiang and Ulrich H. E. Hansmann
  • Determination of Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Processes with Trajectory Fragments / Alfredo E. Cardenas
  • Mechanostability of Virus Capsids and Their Proteins in Structure-Based Models / Marek Cieplak
  • Computer Modelling of the Lipid Matrix of Biomembranes / Marta Pasenkiewicz-Gierula and Michał Markiewicz
  • Modeling of Membrane Proteins / Dorota Latek, Bartosz Trzaskowski, Szymon Niewieczerzał and Przemysław Miszta [and 5 others]
  • All-Atom Monte Carlo Simulations of Protein Folding and Aggregation / Anders Irbäck and Sandipan Mohanty
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on Amyloidogenic Proteins / Sylwia Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Emilia Sikorska and Justyna Iwaszkiewicz
  • Low-Frequency, Functional, Modes of Proteins: All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Normal Mode Analysis / Adrien Nicolaï, Patrice Delarue and Patrick Senet
  • Bioinformatical Approaches to Unstructured/Disordered Proteins and Their Interactions / Bálint Mészáros, Zsuzsanna Dosztányi, Csaba Magyar and István Simon
  • Theoretical and Computational Aspects of Protein Structural Alignment / Paweł Daniluk and Bogdan Lesyng
  • Simulation of the Protein Folding Process / Roterman Irena, L. Konieczny, M. Banach, D. Marchewka, B. Kalinowska, Z. Baster [and 2 others]
  • 13C Chemical Shifts in Proteins: A Rich Source of Encoded Structural Information / Jorge A. Vila and Yelena A. Arnautova
  • When Water Plays an Active Role in Electronic Structure: Insights from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems / Giovanni La Penna
  • Electronic Properties of Iron Sites and Their Active Forms in Porphyrin-Type Architectures / Mariusz Radón and Ewa Broclawik
  • Bioinorganic Reaction Mechanisms - Quantum Chemistry Approach / Tomasz Borowski and Ewa Broclawik.
Since the second half of the 20th century machine computations have played a critical role in science and engineering. Computer-based techniques have become especially important in molecular biology, since they often represent the only viable way to gain insights into the behavior of a biological system as a whole. The complexity of biological systems, which usually needs to be analyzed on different time- and size-scales and with different levels of accuracy, requires the application of different approaches, ranging from comparative analysis of sequences and structural databases, to the analysis of networks of interdependence between cell components and processes, through coarse-grained modeling to atomically detailed simulations, and finally to molecular quantum mechanics. This book provides a comprehensive overview of modern computer-based techniques for computing the structure, properties and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes. The twenty-two chapters, written by scientists from all over the world, address the theory and practice of computer simulation techniques in the study of biological phenomena. The chapters are grouped into four thematic sections dealing with the following topics: the methodology of molecular simulations; applications of molecular simulations; bioinformatics methods and use of experimental information in molecular simulations; and selected applications of molecular quantum mechanics. The book includes an introductory chapter written by Harold A. Scheraga, one of the true pioneers in simulation studies of biomacromolecules.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Coarse-Grained Protein Models in Structure Prediction / Maciej Blaszczyk, Dominik Gront, Sebastian Kmiecik, Katarzyna Ziolkowska, Marta Panek and Andrzej Kolinski
  • Coarse-Grained Modeling of Protein Dynamics / Sebastian Kmiecik, Jacek Wabik, Michal Kolinski, Maksim Kouza and Andrzej Kolinski
  • Physics-Based Modeling of Side Chain - Side Chain Interactions in the UNRES Force Field / Mariusz Makowski
  • Modeling Nucleic Acids at the Residue-Level Resolution / Filip Leonarski and Joanna Trylska
  • Modeling of Electrostatic Effects in Macromolecules / Yury N. Vorobjev
  • Optimizations of Protein Force Fields / Yoshitake Sakae and Yuko Okamoto
  • Enhanced Sampling for Biomolecular Simulations / Workalemahu Berhanu, Ping Jiang and Ulrich H. E. Hansmann
  • Determination of Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Processes with Trajectory Fragments / Alfredo E. Cardenas
  • Mechanostability of Virus Capsids and Their Proteins in Structure-Based Models / Marek Cieplak
  • Computer Modelling of the Lipid Matrix of Biomembranes / Marta Pasenkiewicz-Gierula and Michał Markiewicz
  • Modeling of Membrane Proteins / Dorota Latek, Bartosz Trzaskowski, Szymon Niewieczerzał and Przemysław Miszta [and 5 others]
  • All-Atom Monte Carlo Simulations of Protein Folding and Aggregation / Anders Irbäck and Sandipan Mohanty
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on Amyloidogenic Proteins / Sylwia Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Emilia Sikorska and Justyna Iwaszkiewicz
  • Low-Frequency, Functional, Modes of Proteins: All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Normal Mode Analysis / Adrien Nicolaï, Patrice Delarue and Patrick Senet
  • Bioinformatical Approaches to Unstructured/Disordered Proteins and Their Interactions / Bálint Mészáros, Zsuzsanna Dosztányi, Csaba Magyar and István Simon
  • Theoretical and Computational Aspects of Protein Structural Alignment / Paweł Daniluk and Bogdan Lesyng
  • Simulation of the Protein Folding Process / Roterman Irena, L. Konieczny, M. Banach, D. Marchewka, B. Kalinowska, Z. Baster [and 2 others]
  • 13C Chemical Shifts in Proteins: A Rich Source of Encoded Structural Information / Jorge A. Vila and Yelena A. Arnautova
  • When Water Plays an Active Role in Electronic Structure: Insights from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems / Giovanni La Penna
  • Electronic Properties of Iron Sites and Their Active Forms in Porphyrin-Type Architectures / Mariusz Radón and Ewa Broclawik
  • Bioinorganic Reaction Mechanisms - Quantum Chemistry Approach / Tomasz Borowski and Ewa Broclawik.
Since the second half of the 20th century machine computations have played a critical role in science and engineering. Computer-based techniques have become especially important in molecular biology, since they often represent the only viable way to gain insights into the behavior of a biological system as a whole. The complexity of biological systems, which usually needs to be analyzed on different time- and size-scales and with different levels of accuracy, requires the application of different approaches, ranging from comparative analysis of sequences and structural databases, to the analysis of networks of interdependence between cell components and processes, through coarse-grained modeling to atomically detailed simulations, and finally to molecular quantum mechanics. This book provides a comprehensive overview of modern computer-based techniques for computing the structure, properties and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes. The twenty-two chapters, written by scientists from all over the world, address the theory and practice of computer simulation techniques in the study of biological phenomena. The chapters are grouped into four thematic sections dealing with the following topics: the methodology of molecular simulations; applications of molecular simulations; bioinformatics methods and use of experimental information in molecular simulations; and selected applications of molecular quantum mechanics. The book includes an introductory chapter written by Harold A. Scheraga, one of the true pioneers in simulation studies of biomacromolecules.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • Peculiarities of Connective Tissue Histophysiology, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology Definitions, Organization Principles, and Classification of Connective Tissue Basic Definitions, Principles and Emphasis of Modern Biochemistry and Molecular Biology General Biochemical Aspects of Connective Tissue Formation and Histogenesis of Connective Tissue Embryology and Histogenesis of Connective Tissue Molecular and Biochemical Regularities of Initial Stages of Connective Tissue Structures Formation Cellular Elements of Connective Tissue Proper Cells of Connective Tissue Fibroblastic Differon Adventitious Cells Adipocytes(Lipocytes, Adipocytes) Cells Associated with Connective Tissue Extracellular Matrix of Connective Tissue: Histophysiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Fibrous Structures Integrating Buffer Metabolic Medium (Ground Substance) of Connective Tissue Extracellular Matrix Basement Membranes Interstitial (Interfibrous and Intercellular) Space of Connective Tissue Structural Peculiarities of Connective Tissue Various Types and its Organ Specificity General Regularities of Molecular and Supramolecular Organization of Connective Tissue Extracellular Matrix. Molecular Mechanisms of Cells and Matrix Interaction Catabolism of Extracellular Matrix Macromolecular Components Regulation of Connective Tissue Metabolic Functions Systemic Factors of Regulation Local Factors of Regulation Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms and Manifestations of Connective Tissue Ageing Bone - An Organ of the Support and Locomotor Apparatus Containing All Types of Connective Tissue Overview of Bone Structure and Function General Structural and Functional Characteristics of Bone Components Cartilage - Cartilaginous Tissue: Structural, Biochemical and Molecular Biological Characteristics Overview of Structure and Composition of Cartilage Tissue Hyaline Cartilages - Cartilaginous Tissues Elastic Cartilages - Cartilaginous Tissues Fibrous Cartilages - Cartilaginous Tissues Bone Tissue: The Structural-Functional, Biochemical and Molecular Biological Characteristics of Its Components General Overview of Bone Tissue Structure and Composition Differons of Bone Cells Extracellular Matrix of Bone Tissue Interstitial Space of Bone Tissue Regulation Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Metabolism and Functions Remodeling of Bone Tissue Tooth Connective Tissue Biochemical Characteristics of Synovial Membrane and Synovia Synovial membrane Synovia (Synovial Fluid) Molecular Biological and Biochemical Regularities of Connective Tissue Structures Ontogenesis Molecular Biological and Biochemical Mechanisms of Mesenchyme Condensation. Regulation Systems of Connective Tissue Structure Morphogenesis Differentiation of Connective Tissue Cells Molecular Biological and Biochemical Regularities of Skeleton Formation and Growth Molecular Biological and Biochemical Mechanisms of Joint Formation References List Abbreviations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Connective tissue is a multicomponent, polyfunctional complex of cells and extracellular matrix that serves as a framework for all organs, combining to form a unified organism. It is a structure responsible for numerous vital functions such as tissue-organ integration, morphogenesis, homeostasis maintenance, biomechanical support, and more. The regeneration potential of connective tissue affects healing of damaged tissue and organs, while trauma, stress, and other factors that cause damage to connective tissue can lead to numerous disorders. Connective Tissue: Histophysiology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology brings together crucial knowledge of mammalian connective tissue (including human) and its components, both cellular and noncellular, in one authoritative reference. The breadth and depth of information has fundamental scientific significance as well as applied relevance in clinical medicine. The first half of the book covers the structure, classification, biochemical aspects, histogenesis, and cellular elements of connective tissue. It presents data from the macro- to nanolevel organization of the extracellular matrix-its structural and functional aspects-and addresses metabolic functions and the biochemistry and molecular biology of connective tissue ageing. The second half of the book reviews current data on the biochemistry and molecular biology of skeletal connective tissue, including bone and cartilage metabolism and regulation. It presents an in-depth analysis of data on the molecular mechanisms of connective tissue ontogenesis, from embryonic development through ageing. It also reports novel findings on bone marrow stroma and describes electron microscopy results of the nanostructure of bone mineral, mineralized cartilage, and teeth compared with coral and seashells. Comprising both classic and modern data on the histopathology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of connective tissue, this book provides a unique resource for clinicians and researchers alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Peculiarities of Connective Tissue Histophysiology, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology Definitions, Organization Principles, and Classification of Connective Tissue Basic Definitions, Principles and Emphasis of Modern Biochemistry and Molecular Biology General Biochemical Aspects of Connective Tissue Formation and Histogenesis of Connective Tissue Embryology and Histogenesis of Connective Tissue Molecular and Biochemical Regularities of Initial Stages of Connective Tissue Structures Formation Cellular Elements of Connective Tissue Proper Cells of Connective Tissue Fibroblastic Differon Adventitious Cells Adipocytes(Lipocytes, Adipocytes) Cells Associated with Connective Tissue Extracellular Matrix of Connective Tissue: Histophysiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Fibrous Structures Integrating Buffer Metabolic Medium (Ground Substance) of Connective Tissue Extracellular Matrix Basement Membranes Interstitial (Interfibrous and Intercellular) Space of Connective Tissue Structural Peculiarities of Connective Tissue Various Types and its Organ Specificity General Regularities of Molecular and Supramolecular Organization of Connective Tissue Extracellular Matrix. Molecular Mechanisms of Cells and Matrix Interaction Catabolism of Extracellular Matrix Macromolecular Components Regulation of Connective Tissue Metabolic Functions Systemic Factors of Regulation Local Factors of Regulation Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms and Manifestations of Connective Tissue Ageing Bone - An Organ of the Support and Locomotor Apparatus Containing All Types of Connective Tissue Overview of Bone Structure and Function General Structural and Functional Characteristics of Bone Components Cartilage - Cartilaginous Tissue: Structural, Biochemical and Molecular Biological Characteristics Overview of Structure and Composition of Cartilage Tissue Hyaline Cartilages - Cartilaginous Tissues Elastic Cartilages - Cartilaginous Tissues Fibrous Cartilages - Cartilaginous Tissues Bone Tissue: The Structural-Functional, Biochemical and Molecular Biological Characteristics of Its Components General Overview of Bone Tissue Structure and Composition Differons of Bone Cells Extracellular Matrix of Bone Tissue Interstitial Space of Bone Tissue Regulation Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Metabolism and Functions Remodeling of Bone Tissue Tooth Connective Tissue Biochemical Characteristics of Synovial Membrane and Synovia Synovial membrane Synovia (Synovial Fluid) Molecular Biological and Biochemical Regularities of Connective Tissue Structures Ontogenesis Molecular Biological and Biochemical Mechanisms of Mesenchyme Condensation. Regulation Systems of Connective Tissue Structure Morphogenesis Differentiation of Connective Tissue Cells Molecular Biological and Biochemical Regularities of Skeleton Formation and Growth Molecular Biological and Biochemical Mechanisms of Joint Formation References List Abbreviations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Connective tissue is a multicomponent, polyfunctional complex of cells and extracellular matrix that serves as a framework for all organs, combining to form a unified organism. It is a structure responsible for numerous vital functions such as tissue-organ integration, morphogenesis, homeostasis maintenance, biomechanical support, and more. The regeneration potential of connective tissue affects healing of damaged tissue and organs, while trauma, stress, and other factors that cause damage to connective tissue can lead to numerous disorders. Connective Tissue: Histophysiology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology brings together crucial knowledge of mammalian connective tissue (including human) and its components, both cellular and noncellular, in one authoritative reference. The breadth and depth of information has fundamental scientific significance as well as applied relevance in clinical medicine. The first half of the book covers the structure, classification, biochemical aspects, histogenesis, and cellular elements of connective tissue. It presents data from the macro- to nanolevel organization of the extracellular matrix-its structural and functional aspects-and addresses metabolic functions and the biochemistry and molecular biology of connective tissue ageing. The second half of the book reviews current data on the biochemistry and molecular biology of skeletal connective tissue, including bone and cartilage metabolism and regulation. It presents an in-depth analysis of data on the molecular mechanisms of connective tissue ontogenesis, from embryonic development through ageing. It also reports novel findings on bone marrow stroma and describes electron microscopy results of the nanostructure of bone mineral, mineralized cartilage, and teeth compared with coral and seashells. Comprising both classic and modern data on the histopathology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of connective tissue, this book provides a unique resource for clinicians and researchers alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (248 pages)
  • Front Cover; Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. The Modern Synthesis of Evolutionary Biology and the Health Sciences; 2. Evolution and Pathology; 2.1 Pathogens and Pathologies May Have Adaptive and/or Evolutionary Importance; 2.2 Evolution vs. Pathology Paradox of Mutations; 3. The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors in Multicellular Organisms; 3.1 Comparative Oncological Data on the Prevalence of Tumors in Different Groups of Multicellular Organisms.
  • 3.2 Ancient Origin and Conservatism of Cellular Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes3.3 The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors Suggests that They May Be Evolutionarily Meaningful; 4. Features of Tumors that Could Be Used in Evolution; 4.1 Unusual Genes and Gene Sets are Activated in Tumors and may Participate in the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.2 Tumor Cells Can Differentiate with the Loss of Malignancy that may Lead to the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.3 Tumors Provide Excessive Cell Masses Functionally Unnecessary to the Organism that Could be used for the Origin of New ...
  • 4.4 Tumors as Atypical Organs/Tissues that may Eventually Evolve into Normal Structures4.4.1 Morphogenetic Potential of Tumors May Be Used in the Origin of Morphological Novelties and Diversity; 5. Tumors Might Participate in the Evolution of Ontogenesis; 5.1 Tumors and Normal Embryogenesis; 5.2 Tumors as Disease of Differentiation; 5.3 The Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Occurs in Normal and Neoplastic Development; 5.4 Tumors, Evo-Devo and Addition of Final Stages in the Evolution of Ontogenesis.
  • 5.5 The Human Brain, as the Most Recently Evolved Organ, Recapitulates Many Features Resembling those of Tumors5.5.1 The Expansion of Brain Size During Mammalian and Primate Evolution Involved Many Protooncogenes and Tumor Suppressor ... ; 5.5.2 Human Cerebral Cortex as a Result of Selection for Tumor Growth; 5.5.3 Brain Enlargement, Microcephaly Genes and Tumors; 5.5.3.1 MCPH1 is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Interrelated with the other Tumor Suppressor, BRCA1; 5.5.3.2 ASPM is a Major Determinant of Human Cerebral Cortical Size, and is Overexpressed in Tumors and Testis.
  • 5.5.4 Long-Term Neural Stem Cell Expansion Leads to Brain Tumors5.6 The Eutherian Placenta is Evolutionary Innovation and Recapitulates Many Tumor Features; 6. Tumors that Might Play a Role in Evolution; 6.1 Hereditary Tumors; 6.2 Fetal, Neonatal and Infantile Tumors; 6.3 Benign Tumors, Carcinomas in situ and Pseudodiseases; 6.4 Tumors at the Early and Intermediate Stages of Progression; 6.5 Tumors that Spontaneously Regress; 6.6 Sustainable Tumor Masses; 7. Tumors that have Played a Role in Evolution; 7.1 The Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules of Legumes.
Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization explores the possibility of the positive role of tumors in evolution of multicellular organisms. This unique perspective goes beyond recent publications on how evolution may influence tumors, to consider the possible role of tumors in evolution. Widespread in nature tumors represent a much broader category than malignant tumors only. The majority of tumors in humans and other animals may never undergo malignant transformation. Tumors may differentiate with the loss of malignancy, and malignant tumors may spontaneously regress. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes play roles in normal development. Many features of tumors could be used in evolution, and there are examples of tumors that have played a role in evolution. This book will stimulate thinking on this topic by specialists in the fields of evolutionary biology, oncology, molecular biology, molecular evolution, embryology, evo-devo, tumor immunology, pathology and clinical oncology. * Covers the role that tumors might play in evolution.* Provides multidisciplinary approach that will appeal to a wide circle of professionals in the fields of evolutionary biology, oncology, molecular biology, and more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Front Cover; Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. The Modern Synthesis of Evolutionary Biology and the Health Sciences; 2. Evolution and Pathology; 2.1 Pathogens and Pathologies May Have Adaptive and/or Evolutionary Importance; 2.2 Evolution vs. Pathology Paradox of Mutations; 3. The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors in Multicellular Organisms; 3.1 Comparative Oncological Data on the Prevalence of Tumors in Different Groups of Multicellular Organisms.
  • 3.2 Ancient Origin and Conservatism of Cellular Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes3.3 The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors Suggests that They May Be Evolutionarily Meaningful; 4. Features of Tumors that Could Be Used in Evolution; 4.1 Unusual Genes and Gene Sets are Activated in Tumors and may Participate in the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.2 Tumor Cells Can Differentiate with the Loss of Malignancy that may Lead to the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.3 Tumors Provide Excessive Cell Masses Functionally Unnecessary to the Organism that Could be used for the Origin of New ...
  • 4.4 Tumors as Atypical Organs/Tissues that may Eventually Evolve into Normal Structures4.4.1 Morphogenetic Potential of Tumors May Be Used in the Origin of Morphological Novelties and Diversity; 5. Tumors Might Participate in the Evolution of Ontogenesis; 5.1 Tumors and Normal Embryogenesis; 5.2 Tumors as Disease of Differentiation; 5.3 The Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Occurs in Normal and Neoplastic Development; 5.4 Tumors, Evo-Devo and Addition of Final Stages in the Evolution of Ontogenesis.
  • 5.5 The Human Brain, as the Most Recently Evolved Organ, Recapitulates Many Features Resembling those of Tumors5.5.1 The Expansion of Brain Size During Mammalian and Primate Evolution Involved Many Protooncogenes and Tumor Suppressor ... ; 5.5.2 Human Cerebral Cortex as a Result of Selection for Tumor Growth; 5.5.3 Brain Enlargement, Microcephaly Genes and Tumors; 5.5.3.1 MCPH1 is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Interrelated with the other Tumor Suppressor, BRCA1; 5.5.3.2 ASPM is a Major Determinant of Human Cerebral Cortical Size, and is Overexpressed in Tumors and Testis.
  • 5.5.4 Long-Term Neural Stem Cell Expansion Leads to Brain Tumors5.6 The Eutherian Placenta is Evolutionary Innovation and Recapitulates Many Tumor Features; 6. Tumors that Might Play a Role in Evolution; 6.1 Hereditary Tumors; 6.2 Fetal, Neonatal and Infantile Tumors; 6.3 Benign Tumors, Carcinomas in situ and Pseudodiseases; 6.4 Tumors at the Early and Intermediate Stages of Progression; 6.5 Tumors that Spontaneously Regress; 6.6 Sustainable Tumor Masses; 7. Tumors that have Played a Role in Evolution; 7.1 The Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules of Legumes.
Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization explores the possibility of the positive role of tumors in evolution of multicellular organisms. This unique perspective goes beyond recent publications on how evolution may influence tumors, to consider the possible role of tumors in evolution. Widespread in nature tumors represent a much broader category than malignant tumors only. The majority of tumors in humans and other animals may never undergo malignant transformation. Tumors may differentiate with the loss of malignancy, and malignant tumors may spontaneously regress. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes play roles in normal development. Many features of tumors could be used in evolution, and there are examples of tumors that have played a role in evolution. This book will stimulate thinking on this topic by specialists in the fields of evolutionary biology, oncology, molecular biology, molecular evolution, embryology, evo-devo, tumor immunology, pathology and clinical oncology. * Covers the role that tumors might play in evolution.* Provides multidisciplinary approach that will appeal to a wide circle of professionals in the fields of evolutionary biology, oncology, molecular biology, and more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (355 pages)
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; Preface to Second Edition; Preface to First Edition; Chapter 1 Introduction: Definitions and Some History; 1.1 Induced Resistance: An Established Phenomenon; 1.2 Terminology and Types of Induced Resistance; 1.2.1 Local and systemic induction of resistance; 1.2.2 Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and induced systemic resistance (ISR); 1.2.3 Protection; 1.2.4 Cross protection; 1.2.5 Priming; 1.3 A Little History; 1.3.1 Early reports; 1.3.2 Developments leading towards today''s state of knowledge; 1.4 It''s All About Interactions.
  • 1.5 AcknowledgementsReferences; Chapter 2 Agents That Can Elicit Induced Resistance; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Compounds Inducing Resistance; 2.2.1 Acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM); 2.2.2 Adipic acid; 2.2.3 Algal extracts; 2.2.4 Alkamides; 2.2.5 Allose; 2.2.6 Antibiotics; 2.2.7 Azelaic acid; 2.2.8 DL-3-Aminobutyric acid (BABA); 2.2.9 Benzothiadiazole (BTH) and other synthetic resistance inducers; 2.2.10 Bestcure®; 2.2.11 Brassinolide; 2.2.12 [beta]-1,4 Cellodextrins; 2.2.13 Chitin; 2.2.14 Chitosan; 2.2.15 Cholic acid; 2.2.16 Curdlan sulfate; 2.2.17 Dehydroabietinal; 2.2.18 3,5-Dichloroanthranilic acid (DCA).
  • 2.2.19 Dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA)2.2.20 Dimethyl disulfide; 2.2.21 Dufulin; 2.2.22 Ergosterol; 2.2.23 Ethylene; 2.2.24 Fatty acids and lipids; 2.2.25 2-(2-Fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanyl)pyridine-4-carbothioamide; 2.2.26 Fructooligosaccharide; 2.2.27 Fungicides; 2.2.28 Galactinol; 2.2.29 Grape marc; 2.2.30 Glucans; 2.2.31 Harpin; 2.2.32 Hexanoic acid; 2.2.33 Imprimatin; 2.2.34 INF1 elicitin; 2.2.35 Jasmonates and related compounds; 2.2.36 Cis-jasmone; 2.2.37 Laminarin; 2.2.38 Lipids/fatty acids; 2.2.39 Lipopolysaccharides (LPS); 2.2.40 Nitric oxide; 2.2.41 Oligo-carrageenans.
  • 2.2.42 Oligogalacturonides (OGAs)2.2.43 Oligoglucuronans; 2.2.44 Oxalate; 2.2.45 Phosphite; 2.2.46 Phytogard®; 2.2.47 Pipecolic acid; 2.2.48 Plant extracts; 2.2.49 Probenazole (PBZ); 2.2.50 Proteins and peptides; 2.2.51 Psicose; 2.2.52 Rhamnolipids; 2.2.53 Saccharin; 2.2.54 Salicylic acid; 2.2.55 Silicon; 2.2.56 Spermine; 2.2.57 Sphingolipids; 2.2.58 Sulfated fucan oligosaccharides; 2.2.59 Tiadinil; 2.2.60 Vitamins; 2.2.61 Volatile organic compounds; 2.3 Redox Regulation; 2.3.1 Factors affecting efficacy; 2.4 Elicitor Combinations and Synergism; 2.5 Assays; 2.6 Conclusions; References.
  • Chapter 3 Transcriptome Analysis of Induced Resistance3.1 Introduction; 3.2 The Impact of Arabidopsis thaliana on Induced Resistance; 3.3 Techniques Used for Studying Gene Expression; 3.3.1 EST sequencing; 3.3.2 Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); 3.3.3 cDNA microarrays and DNA chips; 3.3.4 Novel insights into induced resistance revealed through microarray analysis; 3.3.5 Systems biology and network approaches using microarrays; 3.3.6 Next-generation sequencing; 3.4 How Sequencing Helps Crop Research; 3.4.1 Converting knowledge from model organisms to crop plants; 3.5 Conclusion.
Induced resistance offers the prospect of broad spectrum, long-lasting and potentially environmentally-benign disease and pest control in plants. Induced Resistance for Plant Defense 2e provides a comprehensive account of the subject, encompassing the underlying science and methodology, as well as research on application of the phenomenon in practice. The second edition of this important book includes updated coverage of cellular aspects of induced resistance, including signalling and defenses, costs and trade-offs associated with the expression of induced resistance, research aimed at integrating induced resistance into crop protection practice, and induced resistance from a commercial perspective. Current thinking on how beneficial microbes induce resistance in plants has been included in the second edition. The 14 chapters in this book have been written by internationally-respected researchers and edited by three editors with considerable experience of working on induced resistance. Like its predecessor, the second edition of Induced Resistance for Plant Defense will be of great interest to plant pathologists, plant cell and molecular biologists, agricultural scientists, crop protection specialists, and personnel in the agrochemical industry. All libraries in universities and research establishments where biological, agricultural, horticultural and forest sciences are studied and taught should have copies of this book on their shelves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; Preface to Second Edition; Preface to First Edition; Chapter 1 Introduction: Definitions and Some History; 1.1 Induced Resistance: An Established Phenomenon; 1.2 Terminology and Types of Induced Resistance; 1.2.1 Local and systemic induction of resistance; 1.2.2 Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and induced systemic resistance (ISR); 1.2.3 Protection; 1.2.4 Cross protection; 1.2.5 Priming; 1.3 A Little History; 1.3.1 Early reports; 1.3.2 Developments leading towards today''s state of knowledge; 1.4 It''s All About Interactions.
  • 1.5 AcknowledgementsReferences; Chapter 2 Agents That Can Elicit Induced Resistance; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Compounds Inducing Resistance; 2.2.1 Acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM); 2.2.2 Adipic acid; 2.2.3 Algal extracts; 2.2.4 Alkamides; 2.2.5 Allose; 2.2.6 Antibiotics; 2.2.7 Azelaic acid; 2.2.8 DL-3-Aminobutyric acid (BABA); 2.2.9 Benzothiadiazole (BTH) and other synthetic resistance inducers; 2.2.10 Bestcure®; 2.2.11 Brassinolide; 2.2.12 [beta]-1,4 Cellodextrins; 2.2.13 Chitin; 2.2.14 Chitosan; 2.2.15 Cholic acid; 2.2.16 Curdlan sulfate; 2.2.17 Dehydroabietinal; 2.2.18 3,5-Dichloroanthranilic acid (DCA).
  • 2.2.19 Dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA)2.2.20 Dimethyl disulfide; 2.2.21 Dufulin; 2.2.22 Ergosterol; 2.2.23 Ethylene; 2.2.24 Fatty acids and lipids; 2.2.25 2-(2-Fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanyl)pyridine-4-carbothioamide; 2.2.26 Fructooligosaccharide; 2.2.27 Fungicides; 2.2.28 Galactinol; 2.2.29 Grape marc; 2.2.30 Glucans; 2.2.31 Harpin; 2.2.32 Hexanoic acid; 2.2.33 Imprimatin; 2.2.34 INF1 elicitin; 2.2.35 Jasmonates and related compounds; 2.2.36 Cis-jasmone; 2.2.37 Laminarin; 2.2.38 Lipids/fatty acids; 2.2.39 Lipopolysaccharides (LPS); 2.2.40 Nitric oxide; 2.2.41 Oligo-carrageenans.
  • 2.2.42 Oligogalacturonides (OGAs)2.2.43 Oligoglucuronans; 2.2.44 Oxalate; 2.2.45 Phosphite; 2.2.46 Phytogard®; 2.2.47 Pipecolic acid; 2.2.48 Plant extracts; 2.2.49 Probenazole (PBZ); 2.2.50 Proteins and peptides; 2.2.51 Psicose; 2.2.52 Rhamnolipids; 2.2.53 Saccharin; 2.2.54 Salicylic acid; 2.2.55 Silicon; 2.2.56 Spermine; 2.2.57 Sphingolipids; 2.2.58 Sulfated fucan oligosaccharides; 2.2.59 Tiadinil; 2.2.60 Vitamins; 2.2.61 Volatile organic compounds; 2.3 Redox Regulation; 2.3.1 Factors affecting efficacy; 2.4 Elicitor Combinations and Synergism; 2.5 Assays; 2.6 Conclusions; References.
  • Chapter 3 Transcriptome Analysis of Induced Resistance3.1 Introduction; 3.2 The Impact of Arabidopsis thaliana on Induced Resistance; 3.3 Techniques Used for Studying Gene Expression; 3.3.1 EST sequencing; 3.3.2 Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); 3.3.3 cDNA microarrays and DNA chips; 3.3.4 Novel insights into induced resistance revealed through microarray analysis; 3.3.5 Systems biology and network approaches using microarrays; 3.3.6 Next-generation sequencing; 3.4 How Sequencing Helps Crop Research; 3.4.1 Converting knowledge from model organisms to crop plants; 3.5 Conclusion.
Induced resistance offers the prospect of broad spectrum, long-lasting and potentially environmentally-benign disease and pest control in plants. Induced Resistance for Plant Defense 2e provides a comprehensive account of the subject, encompassing the underlying science and methodology, as well as research on application of the phenomenon in practice. The second edition of this important book includes updated coverage of cellular aspects of induced resistance, including signalling and defenses, costs and trade-offs associated with the expression of induced resistance, research aimed at integrating induced resistance into crop protection practice, and induced resistance from a commercial perspective. Current thinking on how beneficial microbes induce resistance in plants has been included in the second edition. The 14 chapters in this book have been written by internationally-respected researchers and edited by three editors with considerable experience of working on induced resistance. Like its predecessor, the second edition of Induced Resistance for Plant Defense will be of great interest to plant pathologists, plant cell and molecular biologists, agricultural scientists, crop protection specialists, and personnel in the agrochemical industry. All libraries in universities and research establishments where biological, agricultural, horticultural and forest sciences are studied and taught should have copies of this book on their shelves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xii, 139 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • An overview and practical guide to building Markov state models
  • Markov model theory
  • Estimation and Validation of Markov models
  • Uncertainty estimation
  • Analysis of Markov models
  • Transition Path Theory
  • Understanding Protein Folding using Markov state models
  • Understanding Molecular Recognition by Kinetic Network Models Constructed from Molecular Dynamics Simulations
  • Markov State and Diffusive Stochastic Models in Electron Spin Resonance
  • Software for building Markov state models.
The aim of this book volume is to explain the importance of Markov state models to molecular simulation, how they work, and how they can be applied to a range of problems. The Markov state model (MSM) approach aims to address two key challenges of molecular simulation: 1) How to reach long timescales using short simulations of detailed molecular models 2) How to systematically gain insight from the resulting sea of data MSMs do this by providing a compact representation of the vast conformational space available to biomolecules by decomposing it into states sets of rapidly interconverting conformations and the rates of transitioning between states. This kinetic definition allows one to easily vary the temporal and spatial resolution of an MSM from high-resolution models capable of quantitative agreement with (or prediction of) experiment to low-resolution models that facilitate understanding. Additionally, MSMs facilitate the calculation of quantities that are difficult to obtain from more direct MD analyses, such as the ensemble of transition pathways. This book introduces the mathematical foundations of Markov models, how they can be used to analyze simulations and drive efficient simulations, and some of the insights these models have yielded in a variety of applications of molecular simulation.
  • An overview and practical guide to building Markov state models
  • Markov model theory
  • Estimation and Validation of Markov models
  • Uncertainty estimation
  • Analysis of Markov models
  • Transition Path Theory
  • Understanding Protein Folding using Markov state models
  • Understanding Molecular Recognition by Kinetic Network Models Constructed from Molecular Dynamics Simulations
  • Markov State and Diffusive Stochastic Models in Electron Spin Resonance
  • Software for building Markov state models.
The aim of this book volume is to explain the importance of Markov state models to molecular simulation, how they work, and how they can be applied to a range of problems. The Markov state model (MSM) approach aims to address two key challenges of molecular simulation: 1) How to reach long timescales using short simulations of detailed molecular models 2) How to systematically gain insight from the resulting sea of data MSMs do this by providing a compact representation of the vast conformational space available to biomolecules by decomposing it into states sets of rapidly interconverting conformations and the rates of transitioning between states. This kinetic definition allows one to easily vary the temporal and spatial resolution of an MSM from high-resolution models capable of quantitative agreement with (or prediction of) experiment to low-resolution models that facilitate understanding. Additionally, MSMs facilitate the calculation of quantities that are difficult to obtain from more direct MD analyses, such as the ensemble of transition pathways. This book introduces the mathematical foundations of Markov models, how they can be used to analyze simulations and drive efficient simulations, and some of the insights these models have yielded in a variety of applications of molecular simulation.
Book
xii, 139 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
  • An overview and practical guide to building Markov state models
  • Markov model theory
  • Estimation and Validation of Markov models
  • Uncertainty estimation
  • Analysis of Markov models
  • Transition Path Theory
  • Understanding Protein Folding using Markov state models
  • Understanding Molecular Recognition by Kinetic Network Models Constructed from Molecular Dynamics Simulations
  • Markov State and Diffusive Stochastic Models in Electron Spin Resonance
  • Software for building Markov state models.
The aim of this book volume is to explain the importance of Markov state models to molecular simulation, how they work, and how they can be applied to a range of problems. The Markov state model (MSM) approach aims to address two key challenges of molecular simulation: 1) How to reach long timescales using short simulations of detailed molecular models 2) How to systematically gain insight from the resulting sea of data MSMs do this by providing a compact representation of the vast conformational space available to biomolecules by decomposing it into states sets of rapidly interconverting conformations and the rates of transitioning between states.This kinetic definition allows one to easily vary the temporal and spatial resolution of an MSM from high-resolution models capable of quantitative agreement with (or prediction of) experiment to low-resolution models that facilitate understanding. Additionally, MSMs facilitate the calculation of quantities that are difficult to obtain from more direct MD analyses, such as the ensemble of transition pathways. This book introduces the mathematical foundations of Markov models, how they can be used to analyze simulations and drive efficient simulations, and some of the insights these models have yielded in a variety of applications of molecular simulation.
  • An overview and practical guide to building Markov state models
  • Markov model theory
  • Estimation and Validation of Markov models
  • Uncertainty estimation
  • Analysis of Markov models
  • Transition Path Theory
  • Understanding Protein Folding using Markov state models
  • Understanding Molecular Recognition by Kinetic Network Models Constructed from Molecular Dynamics Simulations
  • Markov State and Diffusive Stochastic Models in Electron Spin Resonance
  • Software for building Markov state models.
The aim of this book volume is to explain the importance of Markov state models to molecular simulation, how they work, and how they can be applied to a range of problems. The Markov state model (MSM) approach aims to address two key challenges of molecular simulation: 1) How to reach long timescales using short simulations of detailed molecular models 2) How to systematically gain insight from the resulting sea of data MSMs do this by providing a compact representation of the vast conformational space available to biomolecules by decomposing it into states sets of rapidly interconverting conformations and the rates of transitioning between states.This kinetic definition allows one to easily vary the temporal and spatial resolution of an MSM from high-resolution models capable of quantitative agreement with (or prediction of) experiment to low-resolution models that facilitate understanding. Additionally, MSMs facilitate the calculation of quantities that are difficult to obtain from more direct MD analyses, such as the ensemble of transition pathways. This book introduces the mathematical foundations of Markov models, how they can be used to analyze simulations and drive efficient simulations, and some of the insights these models have yielded in a variety of applications of molecular simulation.
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Book
1 online resource.
  • Replication of the Plant Genom.- Plant Telomeres and Telomerase.- DNA Repair and Recombination in Plants.- Small RNAs in Plants.- Plant Translational Machinery.- Chloroplast Signaling in Plants.- ER Stress Signaling in Plants.- Auxin Signaling in Plants.- Cytokinin Signaling in Plants.- Brassinosteroid Signaling in Plants.- COP9 Signalosome Network.- Plant Circadian Network.- Drought Stress Signaling Network.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In this book, plant biology is considered from the perspective of plants and their surrounding environment, including both biotic and abiotic interactions. The intended audience is undergraduate students in the middle or final phases of their programs of study. Topics are developed to provide a rudimentary understanding of how plant-environment interactions span multiple spatiotemporal scales, and how this rudimentary knowledge can be applied to understand the causes of ecosystem vulnerabilities in the face of global climate change and expansion of natural resource use by human societies. In all chapters connections are made from smaller to larger scales of ecological organization, providing a foundation for understanding plant ecology. Where relevant, environmental threats to ecological systems are identified and future research needs are discussed. As future generations take on the responsibility for managing ecosystem goods and services, one of the most effective resources that can be passed on is accumulated knowledge of how organisms, populations, species, communities and ecosystems function and interact across scales of organization. Molecular Biology is intended to provide some of that knowledge, and hopefully provide those generations with the ability to avoid some of the catastrophic environmental mistakes that prior generations have made.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Replication of the Plant Genom.- Plant Telomeres and Telomerase.- DNA Repair and Recombination in Plants.- Small RNAs in Plants.- Plant Translational Machinery.- Chloroplast Signaling in Plants.- ER Stress Signaling in Plants.- Auxin Signaling in Plants.- Cytokinin Signaling in Plants.- Brassinosteroid Signaling in Plants.- COP9 Signalosome Network.- Plant Circadian Network.- Drought Stress Signaling Network.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In this book, plant biology is considered from the perspective of plants and their surrounding environment, including both biotic and abiotic interactions. The intended audience is undergraduate students in the middle or final phases of their programs of study. Topics are developed to provide a rudimentary understanding of how plant-environment interactions span multiple spatiotemporal scales, and how this rudimentary knowledge can be applied to understand the causes of ecosystem vulnerabilities in the face of global climate change and expansion of natural resource use by human societies. In all chapters connections are made from smaller to larger scales of ecological organization, providing a foundation for understanding plant ecology. Where relevant, environmental threats to ecological systems are identified and future research needs are discussed. As future generations take on the responsibility for managing ecosystem goods and services, one of the most effective resources that can be passed on is accumulated knowledge of how organisms, populations, species, communities and ecosystems function and interact across scales of organization. Molecular Biology is intended to provide some of that knowledge, and hopefully provide those generations with the ability to avoid some of the catastrophic environmental mistakes that prior generations have made.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (some color)
  • Introduction
  • Part I: The Skeleton
  • the Primary Structure that Sets Vertebrates Apart
  • is an Evasive Structure
  • Well-Defined Geometric Patterns Appeared in Animal Evolution Independently of the Skeleton
  • Astonishing Gene Permanence throughout Vertebrates and the Origin of the Skeleton
  • Some of the Most Important External Organs in Mammals have no Skeleton
  • Body Geometry Follows the Skeleton only Partially
  • Part II: The Geometry of the Vertebrate Body Takes the Form of Parallel Stripes and Concentric Circles which are the Products of Molecular Cascades
  • Longitudinal and Transversal Stripes in Vertebrates
  • The Geometric Patterns of Zebras and of Transgenic Mice are Directed by Specific Genes
  • the Geometry of Mammals Becomes Also Molecular
  • The Eye
  • a Main Center of Circularity with Implications for Development and Evolution
  • The Circularity of the Vertebrate Body
  • Concentric Circles are a General Feature of Vertebrates
  • Two Poles of Circularity: Head-Neck and Rump
  • Part III: Geometry
  • an Obsession of the Animal and Human Minds
  • Science from its Onset to the Present has been Pervaded by Geometry
  • Spirals Produced by Inert Matter as well as by Spiders and Humans
  • Hexagons Formed by Molecules and by the Minds of Wasps and Humans
  • Part IV: The Mind Consists of the Same Matter that has Displayed Order and Coherence throughout its Evolution
  • It may Sound Outrageous but the Human Condition Appears to be Anchored in the Organization of Galaxies
  • The Evolution of Matter is Characterized by Geometry and Permanence
  • Self-Assembly
  • the Primary Source of Coherence
  • Part V: The Brain has its Own Geometry and is Able to Change the Body?s Geometry in Seconds
  • The Presence of Chromosomes is not Obligatory for Brain Function Brain, Eye, Blood and Skin Cells Work Efficiently without a Nucleus
  • The Ordered Origin of the Brain
  • The Brain Turns Out to have its Own Geometry
  • Left and Right Side, of the Body and of the Brain, are not Mirror Images and Behave Independently
  • How the Brain Changes the Body Geometry at Will
  • Part VI: The Brain is an Unreliable Magician
  • The Concept of Soul Became Evident Following the Agricultural Revolution 8,000 B.C
  • How it Changed Since Then
  • Brain Imagery
  • Visual Perception of Form, Color and Motion
  • The Dream
  • Another Form of Brain Imagery
  • Plato had no Electron Microscope
  • Molecular Geometry Reverses his Concept of Reality.
  • Introduction
  • Part I: The Skeleton
  • the Primary Structure that Sets Vertebrates Apart
  • is an Evasive Structure
  • Well-Defined Geometric Patterns Appeared in Animal Evolution Independently of the Skeleton
  • Astonishing Gene Permanence throughout Vertebrates and the Origin of the Skeleton
  • Some of the Most Important External Organs in Mammals have no Skeleton
  • Body Geometry Follows the Skeleton only Partially
  • Part II: The Geometry of the Vertebrate Body Takes the Form of Parallel Stripes and Concentric Circles which are the Products of Molecular Cascades
  • Longitudinal and Transversal Stripes in Vertebrates
  • The Geometric Patterns of Zebras and of Transgenic Mice are Directed by Specific Genes
  • the Geometry of Mammals Becomes Also Molecular
  • The Eye
  • a Main Center of Circularity with Implications for Development and Evolution
  • The Circularity of the Vertebrate Body
  • Concentric Circles are a General Feature of Vertebrates
  • Two Poles of Circularity: Head-Neck and Rump
  • Part III: Geometry
  • an Obsession of the Animal and Human Minds
  • Science from its Onset to the Present has been Pervaded by Geometry
  • Spirals Produced by Inert Matter as well as by Spiders and Humans
  • Hexagons Formed by Molecules and by the Minds of Wasps and Humans
  • Part IV: The Mind Consists of the Same Matter that has Displayed Order and Coherence throughout its Evolution
  • It may Sound Outrageous but the Human Condition Appears to be Anchored in the Organization of Galaxies
  • The Evolution of Matter is Characterized by Geometry and Permanence
  • Self-Assembly
  • the Primary Source of Coherence
  • Part V: The Brain has its Own Geometry and is Able to Change the Body?s Geometry in Seconds
  • The Presence of Chromosomes is not Obligatory for Brain Function Brain, Eye, Blood and Skin Cells Work Efficiently without a Nucleus
  • The Ordered Origin of the Brain
  • The Brain Turns Out to have its Own Geometry
  • Left and Right Side, of the Body and of the Brain, are not Mirror Images and Behave Independently
  • How the Brain Changes the Body Geometry at Will
  • Part VI: The Brain is an Unreliable Magician
  • The Concept of Soul Became Evident Following the Agricultural Revolution 8,000 B.C
  • How it Changed Since Then
  • Brain Imagery
  • Visual Perception of Form, Color and Motion
  • The Dream
  • Another Form of Brain Imagery
  • Plato had no Electron Microscope
  • Molecular Geometry Reverses his Concept of Reality.
Book
vii, 426 p. : ill. (some col.).
  • Cancer panomics: Computational methods and infrastructure for integrative analysis of cancer high-throughput "OMICS" data. Session introduction / Soren Brunak ... [et al.]
  • Tumor haplotype assembly algorithms for cancer genomics / Derek Aguiar, Wendy S.W. Wong, Sorin Istrail
  • Extracting significant sample-specific cancer mutations using their protein interactions / Liviu Badea
  • The stream algorithm: Computationally efficient ridge-regression via Bayesian model averaging, and applications to pharmacogenomic prediction of cancer cell line sensitivity / Elias Chaibub Neto ... [et al.]
  • Sharing information to reconstruct patient-specific pathways in heterogeneous diseases / Anthony Gitter ... [et al.]
  • Detecting statistical interaction between somatic mutational events and germline variation from next-generation sequence data / Hao Hu, Chad D. Huff
  • Systematic assessment of analytical methods for drug sensitivity prediction from cancer cell line data / In Sock Jang ... [et al.]
  • Integrative analysis of two cell lines derived from a non-small-lung cancer patient - A panomics approach / Oleg Mayba ... [et al.]
  • An integrated approach to blood-based cancer diagnosis and biomarker discovery / Martin Renqiang Min ... [et al.]
  • Multiplex meta-analysis of medulloblastoma expression studies with external controls / Alexander A. Morgan ... [et al.]
  • Computational approaches to drug repurposing and pharmacology. Session introduction / S. Joshua Swamidass ... [et al.]
  • Challenges in secondary analysis of high throughput screening data / Aurora S. Blucher, Shannon K. McWeeney
  • Drug intervention response predictions with paradigm (DIRPP) identifies drug resistant cancer cell lines and pathway mechanisms of resistance / Douglas Brubaker ... [et al.]
  • Anti-infectious drug repurposing using an integrated chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach / Clara Ng ... [et al.]
  • Drug-target interaction prediction by integrating chemical, genomic, functional and pharmacological data / Fan Yang, Jinbo Xu, Jianyang Zeng
  • Prediction of off-target drug effects through data fusion / Emmanuel R. Yera, Ann E. Cleves, Ajay N. Jain
  • Exploring the pharmacogenomics knowledge base (PharmGKB) for repositioning breast cancer drugs by leveraging web ontology language (OWL) and cheminformatics approaches / Qian Zhu ... [et al.]
  • Detecting and characterizing pleiotropy: New methods for uncovering the connection between the complexity of genomic architecture and multiple phenotypes. Session introduction / Anna L. Tyler, Dana C. Crawford, Sarah A. Pendergrass
  • Using the bipartite human phenotype network to reveal pleiotropy and epistasis beyond the gene / Christian Darabos, Samantha H. Harmon, Jason H. Moore
  • Environment-wide association study (EWAS) for type 2 diabetes in the Marshfield personalized medicine research project biobank / Molly A. Hall ... [et al.]
  • Dissection of complex gene expression using the combined analysis of pleiotropy and epistasis / Vivek M. Philip, Anna L. Tyler, Gregory W. Carter
  • Personalized medicine: From genotypes and molecular phenotypes towards therapy. Session introduction / Jennifer Listgarten ... [et al.]
  • PATH-SCAN: A reporting tool for identifying clinically actionable variants / Roxana Daneshjou ... [et al.]
  • Imputation-based assessment of next generation rare exome variant arrays / Alicia R. Martin ... [et al.]
  • Utilization of an EMR-biorepository to identify the genetic predictors of calcineurin-inhibitor toxicity in heart transplant recipients/ Matthew Oetjens ... [et al.]
  • Robust reverse engineering of dynamic gene networks under sample size heterogeneity / Ankur P. Parikh, Wei Wu, Eric P. Xing
  • Variant priorization and analysis incorporating problematic regions of the genome / Anil Patwardhan ... [et al.]
  • Bags of words models of epitope sets: HIV viral load regression with counting grids / Alessandro Perina, Pietro Lovato, Nebojsa Jojic
  • Joint association discovery and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by supervised heterogeneous multiview learning / Shandian Zhe ... [et al.]
  • Text and data mining for biomedical discover. Session introduction / Graciela H. Gonzalez ... [et al.]
  • Vector quantization kernels for the classification of protein sequences and structures / Wyatt T. Clark, Predrag Radivojac
  • Combining Heterogenous data for prediction of disease related and pharmacogenes / Christopher S. Funk, Lawrence E. Hunter, K. Bretonnel Cohen
  • A novel profile biomarker diagnosis for mass spectral proteomics / Henry Han
  • Towards pathway curation through literature mining - A case study using PharmGKB / Ravikumar K.E., Kavishwar B. Wagholikar, Hongfang Liu
  • Sparse generalized functional linear model for predicting remission status of depression patients / Yashu Liu ... [et al.]
  • Development of a data-mining algorithm to identify ages at reproductive milestones in electronic medical records / Jennifer Malinowski, Eric Farber-Eger, Dana C. Crawford
  • An efficient algorithm to integrate network and attribute data for gene function prediction / Shankar Vembu, Quaid Morris
  • Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in Baker's yeast and slime mold / Marinka Zitnik, Blaz Zupan
  • Workshops. Applications of bioinformatics to non-coding RNAs in the era of next-generation sequencing / Chao Cheng, Jason Moore, Casey Greene
  • Building the next generation of quantitative biologists / Kristine A. Pattin ... [et al.]
  • Uncovering the etiology of autism spectrum disorders: Genomics, bioinformatics, environment, data collection and exploration, and future possibilities / Sarah A. Pendergrass, Santhosh Girirajan, Scott Selleck.
The Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing (PSB) 2014 is an international, multidisciplinary conference for the presentation and discussion of current research in the theory and application of computational methods in problems of biological significance. Presentations are rigorously peer reviewed and are published in an archival proceedings volume. PSB 2014 will be held from January 3 – 7, 2014 in Kohala Coast, Hawaii. Tutorials and workshops will be offered prior to the start of the conference. PSB 2014 will bring together top researchers from the US, the Asian Pacific nations, and around the world to exchange research results and address open issues in all aspects of computational biology. It is a forum for the presentation of work in databases, algorithms, interfaces, visualization, modeling, and other computational methods, as applied to biological problems, with emphasis on applications in data-rich areas of molecular biology. The PSB has been designed to be responsive to the need for critical mass in sub-disciplines within biocomputing. For that reason, it is the only meeting whose sessions are defined dynamically each year in response to specific proposals. PSB sessions are organized by leaders of research in biocomputing's "hot topics." In this way, the meeting provides an early forum for serious examination of emerging methods and approaches in this rapidly changing field.
  • Cancer panomics: Computational methods and infrastructure for integrative analysis of cancer high-throughput "OMICS" data. Session introduction / Soren Brunak ... [et al.]
  • Tumor haplotype assembly algorithms for cancer genomics / Derek Aguiar, Wendy S.W. Wong, Sorin Istrail
  • Extracting significant sample-specific cancer mutations using their protein interactions / Liviu Badea
  • The stream algorithm: Computationally efficient ridge-regression via Bayesian model averaging, and applications to pharmacogenomic prediction of cancer cell line sensitivity / Elias Chaibub Neto ... [et al.]
  • Sharing information to reconstruct patient-specific pathways in heterogeneous diseases / Anthony Gitter ... [et al.]
  • Detecting statistical interaction between somatic mutational events and germline variation from next-generation sequence data / Hao Hu, Chad D. Huff
  • Systematic assessment of analytical methods for drug sensitivity prediction from cancer cell line data / In Sock Jang ... [et al.]
  • Integrative analysis of two cell lines derived from a non-small-lung cancer patient - A panomics approach / Oleg Mayba ... [et al.]
  • An integrated approach to blood-based cancer diagnosis and biomarker discovery / Martin Renqiang Min ... [et al.]
  • Multiplex meta-analysis of medulloblastoma expression studies with external controls / Alexander A. Morgan ... [et al.]
  • Computational approaches to drug repurposing and pharmacology. Session introduction / S. Joshua Swamidass ... [et al.]
  • Challenges in secondary analysis of high throughput screening data / Aurora S. Blucher, Shannon K. McWeeney
  • Drug intervention response predictions with paradigm (DIRPP) identifies drug resistant cancer cell lines and pathway mechanisms of resistance / Douglas Brubaker ... [et al.]
  • Anti-infectious drug repurposing using an integrated chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach / Clara Ng ... [et al.]
  • Drug-target interaction prediction by integrating chemical, genomic, functional and pharmacological data / Fan Yang, Jinbo Xu, Jianyang Zeng
  • Prediction of off-target drug effects through data fusion / Emmanuel R. Yera, Ann E. Cleves, Ajay N. Jain
  • Exploring the pharmacogenomics knowledge base (PharmGKB) for repositioning breast cancer drugs by leveraging web ontology language (OWL) and cheminformatics approaches / Qian Zhu ... [et al.]
  • Detecting and characterizing pleiotropy: New methods for uncovering the connection between the complexity of genomic architecture and multiple phenotypes. Session introduction / Anna L. Tyler, Dana C. Crawford, Sarah A. Pendergrass
  • Using the bipartite human phenotype network to reveal pleiotropy and epistasis beyond the gene / Christian Darabos, Samantha H. Harmon, Jason H. Moore
  • Environment-wide association study (EWAS) for type 2 diabetes in the Marshfield personalized medicine research project biobank / Molly A. Hall ... [et al.]
  • Dissection of complex gene expression using the combined analysis of pleiotropy and epistasis / Vivek M. Philip, Anna L. Tyler, Gregory W. Carter
  • Personalized medicine: From genotypes and molecular phenotypes towards therapy. Session introduction / Jennifer Listgarten ... [et al.]
  • PATH-SCAN: A reporting tool for identifying clinically actionable variants / Roxana Daneshjou ... [et al.]
  • Imputation-based assessment of next generation rare exome variant arrays / Alicia R. Martin ... [et al.]
  • Utilization of an EMR-biorepository to identify the genetic predictors of calcineurin-inhibitor toxicity in heart transplant recipients/ Matthew Oetjens ... [et al.]
  • Robust reverse engineering of dynamic gene networks under sample size heterogeneity / Ankur P. Parikh, Wei Wu, Eric P. Xing
  • Variant priorization and analysis incorporating problematic regions of the genome / Anil Patwardhan ... [et al.]
  • Bags of words models of epitope sets: HIV viral load regression with counting grids / Alessandro Perina, Pietro Lovato, Nebojsa Jojic
  • Joint association discovery and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by supervised heterogeneous multiview learning / Shandian Zhe ... [et al.]
  • Text and data mining for biomedical discover. Session introduction / Graciela H. Gonzalez ... [et al.]
  • Vector quantization kernels for the classification of protein sequences and structures / Wyatt T. Clark, Predrag Radivojac
  • Combining Heterogenous data for prediction of disease related and pharmacogenes / Christopher S. Funk, Lawrence E. Hunter, K. Bretonnel Cohen
  • A novel profile biomarker diagnosis for mass spectral proteomics / Henry Han
  • Towards pathway curation through literature mining - A case study using PharmGKB / Ravikumar K.E., Kavishwar B. Wagholikar, Hongfang Liu
  • Sparse generalized functional linear model for predicting remission status of depression patients / Yashu Liu ... [et al.]
  • Development of a data-mining algorithm to identify ages at reproductive milestones in electronic medical records / Jennifer Malinowski, Eric Farber-Eger, Dana C. Crawford
  • An efficient algorithm to integrate network and attribute data for gene function prediction / Shankar Vembu, Quaid Morris
  • Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in Baker's yeast and slime mold / Marinka Zitnik, Blaz Zupan
  • Workshops. Applications of bioinformatics to non-coding RNAs in the era of next-generation sequencing / Chao Cheng, Jason Moore, Casey Greene
  • Building the next generation of quantitative biologists / Kristine A. Pattin ... [et al.]
  • Uncovering the etiology of autism spectrum disorders: Genomics, bioinformatics, environment, data collection and exploration, and future possibilities / Sarah A. Pendergrass, Santhosh Girirajan, Scott Selleck.
The Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing (PSB) 2014 is an international, multidisciplinary conference for the presentation and discussion of current research in the theory and application of computational methods in problems of biological significance. Presentations are rigorously peer reviewed and are published in an archival proceedings volume. PSB 2014 will be held from January 3 – 7, 2014 in Kohala Coast, Hawaii. Tutorials and workshops will be offered prior to the start of the conference. PSB 2014 will bring together top researchers from the US, the Asian Pacific nations, and around the world to exchange research results and address open issues in all aspects of computational biology. It is a forum for the presentation of work in databases, algorithms, interfaces, visualization, modeling, and other computational methods, as applied to biological problems, with emphasis on applications in data-rich areas of molecular biology. The PSB has been designed to be responsive to the need for critical mass in sub-disciplines within biocomputing. For that reason, it is the only meeting whose sessions are defined dynamically each year in response to specific proposals. PSB sessions are organized by leaders of research in biocomputing's "hot topics." In this way, the meeting provides an early forum for serious examination of emerging methods and approaches in this rapidly changing field.
Book
1 online resource (355 pages)
  • Plant Signaling: Response to Reactive Oxygen Species / Bisma Malik, Tanveer Bilal Pirzadah, Inayatullah Tahir, Reiaz Ul Rehman [and 2 others]
  • SNARE Proteins as Signaling Elements / Reiaz Ul Rehman and Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano
  • Plant Rab GTPases in Membrane Trafficking and Signalling / Reiaz Ul Rehman and Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano
  • PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P 2 as Signalling Phosphoinositides Involved in Tip Growth / Laura Saavedra
  • Sugar Signaling in Plant Growth and Development / Waseem Shahri, Syed Sabhi Ahmad and Inayatullah Tahir
  • Nitrogen Regulation and Signalling in Plants / Khalid Rehman Hakeem, Muhammad Sabir, Faheema Khan and Reiaz Ul Rehman
  • Phosphorus Deficiency in Plants: Responses, Adaptive Mechanisms, and Signaling / Tariq Aziz, Muhammad Sabir, Muhammad Farooq, M. Aamer Maqsood, Hamaad Raza Ahmad and Ejaz Ahmad Warraich
  • Reactive Oxygen Species-Associated Mechanism of Acclamatory Stress Tolerance, Signaling and Redox-Regulated Gene Expression in Plants / Soumen Bhattacharjee
  • Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels: Essential Signaling Components in Plants for Fertilization and Immunity Responses / Reiaz Ul Rehman
  • Signaling in Response to Cold Stress / Tanveer Bilal Pirzadah, Bisma Malik, Reiaz Ul Rehman, Khalid Rehman Hakeem and M. Irfan Qureshi
  • Cell Signaling During Drought and Salt Stress / Faheema Khan and Khalid Rehman Hakeem
  • Heat Signaling and Stress Responses in Photosynthesis / Marian Brestic, Marek Zivcak, Katarina Olsovska, Hazem Mohamed Kalaji, Hongbo Shao and Khalid Rehman Hakeem
  • Senescence: Regulation and Signalling / Riyaz Ahmad Dar, Inayatullah Tahir and Syed Sabhi Ahmad
  • Molecular Builders of Cell Walls of Lignocellulosic Feedstock: A Source for Biofuels / Neeru Gandotra
  • Recent Trends in Jasmonate Signaling Pathway / Tariq Ahmad Dar, Moinuddin, Nadeem Hashmi, Mohd Idrees and Akbar Ali
  • Salicylic Acid Signaling / Asım Kadıoğlu and Aykut Sağlam
  • Ethylene Signaling in Plants: Introspection / Syed Sabhi Ahmad, Waseem Shahri, Shiekh Tajamul Islam, Riyaz Ahmad Dar and Inayatullah Tahir
  • Plant, Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Bacterial Network / M. Miransari
  • Self-Incompatibility Patterns and Signal Transduction / Latif Ahmad Peer
  • Plant Disease Resistance Genes: From Perception to Signal Transduction / B. A. Padder.
Plant signalling has emerged as an integrated field which has become indispensable in recent times to study any biological process. Over the last decade, an enormous amount of information has been generated in this field and the advances in information technology gave birth to bioinformatics which has helped greatly in managing the galaxy of information. It is now possible to view the different information's in a systems biology approach which has unravelled the association/ new processes and thus helped us enormously in understanding of the biological processes. The present book is an attempt at understanding the plant signalling processes with different perspectives. Even though the plants are sessile but there exists a tremendous interconnected network of perception at morphological, physiological and molecular levels. The impact of the surrounding environment in terms of abiotic and biotic stresses is significant in terms of its survival, adaptation and productivity for the human welfare. The plants possess a wide array of processes at the organ, tissue and cellular levels which are governed by a plethora of molecules. The molecules govern individual processes and these exists a cross talk between them to form a complex network of processes. The book tries to envision how different processes are operating at different points in the life cycle of the plant.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Plant Signaling: Response to Reactive Oxygen Species / Bisma Malik, Tanveer Bilal Pirzadah, Inayatullah Tahir, Reiaz Ul Rehman [and 2 others]
  • SNARE Proteins as Signaling Elements / Reiaz Ul Rehman and Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano
  • Plant Rab GTPases in Membrane Trafficking and Signalling / Reiaz Ul Rehman and Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano
  • PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P 2 as Signalling Phosphoinositides Involved in Tip Growth / Laura Saavedra
  • Sugar Signaling in Plant Growth and Development / Waseem Shahri, Syed Sabhi Ahmad and Inayatullah Tahir
  • Nitrogen Regulation and Signalling in Plants / Khalid Rehman Hakeem, Muhammad Sabir, Faheema Khan and Reiaz Ul Rehman
  • Phosphorus Deficiency in Plants: Responses, Adaptive Mechanisms, and Signaling / Tariq Aziz, Muhammad Sabir, Muhammad Farooq, M. Aamer Maqsood, Hamaad Raza Ahmad and Ejaz Ahmad Warraich
  • Reactive Oxygen Species-Associated Mechanism of Acclamatory Stress Tolerance, Signaling and Redox-Regulated Gene Expression in Plants / Soumen Bhattacharjee
  • Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels: Essential Signaling Components in Plants for Fertilization and Immunity Responses / Reiaz Ul Rehman
  • Signaling in Response to Cold Stress / Tanveer Bilal Pirzadah, Bisma Malik, Reiaz Ul Rehman, Khalid Rehman Hakeem and M. Irfan Qureshi
  • Cell Signaling During Drought and Salt Stress / Faheema Khan and Khalid Rehman Hakeem
  • Heat Signaling and Stress Responses in Photosynthesis / Marian Brestic, Marek Zivcak, Katarina Olsovska, Hazem Mohamed Kalaji, Hongbo Shao and Khalid Rehman Hakeem
  • Senescence: Regulation and Signalling / Riyaz Ahmad Dar, Inayatullah Tahir and Syed Sabhi Ahmad
  • Molecular Builders of Cell Walls of Lignocellulosic Feedstock: A Source for Biofuels / Neeru Gandotra
  • Recent Trends in Jasmonate Signaling Pathway / Tariq Ahmad Dar, Moinuddin, Nadeem Hashmi, Mohd Idrees and Akbar Ali
  • Salicylic Acid Signaling / Asım Kadıoğlu and Aykut Sağlam
  • Ethylene Signaling in Plants: Introspection / Syed Sabhi Ahmad, Waseem Shahri, Shiekh Tajamul Islam, Riyaz Ahmad Dar and Inayatullah Tahir
  • Plant, Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Bacterial Network / M. Miransari
  • Self-Incompatibility Patterns and Signal Transduction / Latif Ahmad Peer
  • Plant Disease Resistance Genes: From Perception to Signal Transduction / B. A. Padder.
Plant signalling has emerged as an integrated field which has become indispensable in recent times to study any biological process. Over the last decade, an enormous amount of information has been generated in this field and the advances in information technology gave birth to bioinformatics which has helped greatly in managing the galaxy of information. It is now possible to view the different information's in a systems biology approach which has unravelled the association/ new processes and thus helped us enormously in understanding of the biological processes. The present book is an attempt at understanding the plant signalling processes with different perspectives. Even though the plants are sessile but there exists a tremendous interconnected network of perception at morphological, physiological and molecular levels. The impact of the surrounding environment in terms of abiotic and biotic stresses is significant in terms of its survival, adaptation and productivity for the human welfare. The plants possess a wide array of processes at the organ, tissue and cellular levels which are governed by a plethora of molecules. The molecules govern individual processes and these exists a cross talk between them to form a complex network of processes. The book tries to envision how different processes are operating at different points in the life cycle of the plant.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
Book
1 online resource (vi, 220 pages) : ill. (some color). Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Bioinformatics for complex diseases: the basics.- Network based diagnosis of complex diseases.- Applications in Detection and Treatment of Complex Diseases.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book introduces the bioinformatics tools, databases and strategies for the translational research, focuses on the biomarker discovery based on integrative data analysis and systems biological network reconstruction. With the coming of personal genomics era, the biomedical data will be accumulated fast and then it will become reality for the personalized and accurate diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of complex diseases. The book covers both state of the art of bioinformatics methodologies and the examples for the identification of simple or network biomarkers. In addition, bioinformatics software tools and scripts are provided to the practical application in the study of complex diseases. The present state, the future challenges and perspectives were discussed. The book is written for biologists, biomedical informatics scientists and clinicians, etc. Dr. Bairong Shen is Professor and Director of Center for Systems Biology, Soochow University; he is also Director of Taicang Center for Translational Bioinformatics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Bioinformatics for complex diseases: the basics.- Network based diagnosis of complex diseases.- Applications in Detection and Treatment of Complex Diseases.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book introduces the bioinformatics tools, databases and strategies for the translational research, focuses on the biomarker discovery based on integrative data analysis and systems biological network reconstruction. With the coming of personal genomics era, the biomedical data will be accumulated fast and then it will become reality for the personalized and accurate diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of complex diseases. The book covers both state of the art of bioinformatics methodologies and the examples for the identification of simple or network biomarkers. In addition, bioinformatics software tools and scripts are provided to the practical application in the study of complex diseases. The present state, the future challenges and perspectives were discussed. The book is written for biologists, biomedical informatics scientists and clinicians, etc. Dr. Bairong Shen is Professor and Director of Center for Systems Biology, Soochow University; he is also Director of Taicang Center for Translational Bioinformatics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Clinical Bioinformatics in Human Proteomics Research / Duojiao Wu, Haihao Li
  • Proteomics Defines Protein Interaction Network of Signaling Pathways / Shitao Li
  • Protein Function Microarrays: Design, Use and Bioinformatic Analysis in Cancer Biomarker Discovery and Quantitation / Jessica Duarte, Jean-Michel Serufuri, Nicola Mulder
  • Proteomics and Cancer Research / Elena Lopez Villar
  • Toward Development of Novel Peptide-Based Cancer Therapeutics: Computational Design and Experimental Evaluation / Elena Pirogova, Taghrid Istivan
  • Advances in Proteomic Methods / Xianyin Lai
  • Clinical and Biomedical Mass Spectrometry: New Frontiers in Drug Developments and Diagnosis / Ákos Végvári, Melinda Rezeli
  • Disease Biomarkers: Modelling MR Spectroscopy and Clinical Applications / Luis Martí-Bonmati
  • Processing of Mass Spectrometry Data in Clinical Applications / Dario Di Silvestre, Pietro Brunetti, Pier Luigi Mauri
  • Bioinformatics Approach for Finding Target Protein in Infectious Disease / Hemant Ritturaj Kushwaha, Indira Ghosh
  • Identification of Network Biomarkers for Cancer Diagnosis / Jiajia Chen, Luonan Chen
  • Software Development for Quantitative Proteomics Using Stable Isotope Labeling / Xin Huang, Shi-Jian Ding
  • Clinical Translation of Protein Biomarkers Integrated with Bioinformatics / Xu Yang, Juanjuan Zhou, Chaoqin Du
  • Proteomic Approaches for Urine Biomarker Discovery in Bladder Cancer / Ming-Hui Yang, Yu-Chang Tyan
  • Antibody Microarrays and Multiplexing / Jerry Zhou, Larissa Belov, Nicola Armstrong
  • Proteomics in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine / Ornella Piazza, Giuseppe De Benedictis.
"Bioinformatics of Human Proteomics" discusses the development of methods, techniques and applications in the field of protein bioinformatics, an important direction in bioinformatics. It collects contributions from expert researchers in order to provide a practical guide to this complex field of study. The book covers the protein interaction network, drug discovery and development, the relationship between translational medicine and bioinformatics, and advances in proteomic methods, while also demonstrating important bioinformatics tools and methods available today for protein analysis, interpretation and predication. It is intended for experts or senior researchers in the fields of clinical research-related biostatistics, bioinformatics, computational biology, medicine, statistics, system biology, molecular diagnostics, biomarkers, or drug discovery and development. Dr.Xiangdong Wang works as a distinguished professor of Respiratory Medicine at Fudan University, Shanghai, China. He serves as Director of Biomedical Research Center, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital and adjunct professor of Clinical Bioinformatics at Lund University, Sweden. His main research is focused on the role of clinical bioinformatics in the development of disease-specific biomarkers and dynamic network biomarkers, the molecular mechanism of organ dysfunction and potential therapies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Clinical Bioinformatics in Human Proteomics Research / Duojiao Wu, Haihao Li
  • Proteomics Defines Protein Interaction Network of Signaling Pathways / Shitao Li
  • Protein Function Microarrays: Design, Use and Bioinformatic Analysis in Cancer Biomarker Discovery and Quantitation / Jessica Duarte, Jean-Michel Serufuri, Nicola Mulder
  • Proteomics and Cancer Research / Elena Lopez Villar
  • Toward Development of Novel Peptide-Based Cancer Therapeutics: Computational Design and Experimental Evaluation / Elena Pirogova, Taghrid Istivan
  • Advances in Proteomic Methods / Xianyin Lai
  • Clinical and Biomedical Mass Spectrometry: New Frontiers in Drug Developments and Diagnosis / Ákos Végvári, Melinda Rezeli
  • Disease Biomarkers: Modelling MR Spectroscopy and Clinical Applications / Luis Martí-Bonmati
  • Processing of Mass Spectrometry Data in Clinical Applications / Dario Di Silvestre, Pietro Brunetti, Pier Luigi Mauri
  • Bioinformatics Approach for Finding Target Protein in Infectious Disease / Hemant Ritturaj Kushwaha, Indira Ghosh
  • Identification of Network Biomarkers for Cancer Diagnosis / Jiajia Chen, Luonan Chen
  • Software Development for Quantitative Proteomics Using Stable Isotope Labeling / Xin Huang, Shi-Jian Ding
  • Clinical Translation of Protein Biomarkers Integrated with Bioinformatics / Xu Yang, Juanjuan Zhou, Chaoqin Du
  • Proteomic Approaches for Urine Biomarker Discovery in Bladder Cancer / Ming-Hui Yang, Yu-Chang Tyan
  • Antibody Microarrays and Multiplexing / Jerry Zhou, Larissa Belov, Nicola Armstrong
  • Proteomics in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine / Ornella Piazza, Giuseppe De Benedictis.
"Bioinformatics of Human Proteomics" discusses the development of methods, techniques and applications in the field of protein bioinformatics, an important direction in bioinformatics. It collects contributions from expert researchers in order to provide a practical guide to this complex field of study. The book covers the protein interaction network, drug discovery and development, the relationship between translational medicine and bioinformatics, and advances in proteomic methods, while also demonstrating important bioinformatics tools and methods available today for protein analysis, interpretation and predication. It is intended for experts or senior researchers in the fields of clinical research-related biostatistics, bioinformatics, computational biology, medicine, statistics, system biology, molecular diagnostics, biomarkers, or drug discovery and development. Dr.Xiangdong Wang works as a distinguished professor of Respiratory Medicine at Fudan University, Shanghai, China. He serves as Director of Biomedical Research Center, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital and adjunct professor of Clinical Bioinformatics at Lund University, Sweden. His main research is focused on the role of clinical bioinformatics in the development of disease-specific biomarkers and dynamic network biomarkers, the molecular mechanism of organ dysfunction and potential therapies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : ill.
  • Scaffold Design for Bone Tissue Engineering: From Micrometric to Nanometric Level / Vincenzo Guarino, Maria Grazia Raucci, Marco A. Alvarez-Perez, Valentina Cirillo and Alfredo Ronca, et al.
  • Molecular Scissors: From Biomaterials Implant to Tissue Remodeling / Tudor Petreus, Iulian Antoniac, Paul Sirbu and Carmen Elena Cotrutz
  • Synthetic Morphogens and Pro-morphogens for Aided Tissue Regeneration / Matteo Santin
  • The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Response of Endothelial Cells to Metals / Roman Tsaryk, Kirsten Peters, Ronald E. Unger, Dieter Scharnweber and C. James Kirkpatrick
  • Comparative Properties of Ethyl, n-Butyl, and n-Octyl Cyanoacrylate Bioadhesives Intended for Wound Closure / Ana María Villarreal-Gómez, Rafael Torregrosa-Coque and José Miguel Martín-Martínez
  • Development of Bioabsorbable Interference Screws: How Biomaterials Composition and Clinical and Retrieval Studies Influence the Innovative Screw Design and Manufacturing Processes / Iulian Antoniac, Dan Laptoiu, Diana Popescu, Cosmin Cotrut and Radu Parpala
  • Modeling and Numerical Analysis of a Cervical Spine Unit / Mirela Toth-Tascau and Dan Ioan Stoia
  • Carbon Nanotubes in Acrylic Bone Cement / Nicholas Dunne, Ross Ormsby and Christina A. Mitchell
  • Exploring the Future of Hydrogels in Rapid Prototyping: A Review on Current Trends and Limitations / Thomas Billiet, Mieke Vandenhaute, Jorg Schelfhout, Sandra Van Vlierberghe and Peter Dubruel.
Developments in the area of biomaterials, bionanotechnology, tissue engineering, and medical devices are becoming the core of health care. Almost all medical specialties involve the use of biomaterials, and research plays a key role in the development of new and improved treatment modalities. This volume focuses on several current trends in tissue engineering, remodelling and regeneration. Leading researchers describe the use of nanomaterials to create new functionalities when interfaced with biological molecules or structures. In addition to coverage of basic science and engineering aspects, a range of applications in bionanotechnology are presented, including diagnostic devices, contrast agents, analytical tools, physical therapy applications, and vehicles for targeted drug delivery. The use of polymers, alloys, and composites, or a combination of these, for biomaterials applications in orthopaedics is also explored. These contributions represent essential reading for the biomaterials and biomedical engineering communities, and can serve as instructional course lectures targeted at graduate and post-graduate students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Scaffold Design for Bone Tissue Engineering: From Micrometric to Nanometric Level / Vincenzo Guarino, Maria Grazia Raucci, Marco A. Alvarez-Perez, Valentina Cirillo and Alfredo Ronca, et al.
  • Molecular Scissors: From Biomaterials Implant to Tissue Remodeling / Tudor Petreus, Iulian Antoniac, Paul Sirbu and Carmen Elena Cotrutz
  • Synthetic Morphogens and Pro-morphogens for Aided Tissue Regeneration / Matteo Santin
  • The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Response of Endothelial Cells to Metals / Roman Tsaryk, Kirsten Peters, Ronald E. Unger, Dieter Scharnweber and C. James Kirkpatrick
  • Comparative Properties of Ethyl, n-Butyl, and n-Octyl Cyanoacrylate Bioadhesives Intended for Wound Closure / Ana María Villarreal-Gómez, Rafael Torregrosa-Coque and José Miguel Martín-Martínez
  • Development of Bioabsorbable Interference Screws: How Biomaterials Composition and Clinical and Retrieval Studies Influence the Innovative Screw Design and Manufacturing Processes / Iulian Antoniac, Dan Laptoiu, Diana Popescu, Cosmin Cotrut and Radu Parpala
  • Modeling and Numerical Analysis of a Cervical Spine Unit / Mirela Toth-Tascau and Dan Ioan Stoia
  • Carbon Nanotubes in Acrylic Bone Cement / Nicholas Dunne, Ross Ormsby and Christina A. Mitchell
  • Exploring the Future of Hydrogels in Rapid Prototyping: A Review on Current Trends and Limitations / Thomas Billiet, Mieke Vandenhaute, Jorg Schelfhout, Sandra Van Vlierberghe and Peter Dubruel.
Developments in the area of biomaterials, bionanotechnology, tissue engineering, and medical devices are becoming the core of health care. Almost all medical specialties involve the use of biomaterials, and research plays a key role in the development of new and improved treatment modalities. This volume focuses on several current trends in tissue engineering, remodelling and regeneration. Leading researchers describe the use of nanomaterials to create new functionalities when interfaced with biological molecules or structures. In addition to coverage of basic science and engineering aspects, a range of applications in bionanotechnology are presented, including diagnostic devices, contrast agents, analytical tools, physical therapy applications, and vehicles for targeted drug delivery. The use of polymers, alloys, and composites, or a combination of these, for biomaterials applications in orthopaedics is also explored. These contributions represent essential reading for the biomaterials and biomedical engineering communities, and can serve as instructional course lectures targeted at graduate and post-graduate students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)