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1 online resource (1 v.) : ill.
Book
p. ; cm.
Book
1 online resource (610 p.)
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Authors' Biographies; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations and Acronyms; Chapter 1 LTE Network Architecture and Protocols; 1.1 Evolution of 3GPP Standards; 1.1.1 3GPP Release 99; 1.1.2 3GPP Release 4; 1.1.3 3GPP Release 5; 1.1.4 3GPP Release 6; 1.1.5 3GPP Release 7; 1.1.6 3GPP Release 8; 1.1.7 3GPP Release 9 and Beyond; 1.2 Radio Interface Techniques in 3GPP Systems; 1.2.1 Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA); 1.2.2 Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA); 1.2.3 Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA)
  • 1.2.4 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA)1.3 Radio Access Mode Operations; 1.3.1 Frequency Division Duplex (FDD); 1.3.2 Time Division Duplex (TDD); 1.4 Spectrum Allocation in UMTS and LTE; 1.5 LTE Network Architecture; 1.5.1 Evolved Packet System (EPS); 1.5.2 Evolved Packet Core (EPC); 1.5.3 Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network (E-UTRAN); 1.5.4 LTE User Equipment; 1.6 EPS Interfaces; 1.6.1 S1-MME Interface; 1.6.2 LTE-Uu Interface; 1.6.3 S1-U Interface; 1.6.4 S3 Interface (SGSN-MME); 1.6.5 S4 (SGSN to SGW); 1.6.6 S5/S8 Interface; 1.6.7 S6a (Diameter)
  • 1.6.8 S6b Interface (Diameter)1.6.9 S6d (Diameter); 1.6.10 S9 Interface (H-PCRF-VPCRF); 1.6.11 S10 Interface (MME-MME); 1.6.12 S11 Interface (MME-SGW); 1.6.13 S12 Interface; 1.6.14 S13 Interface; 1.6.15 SGs Interface; 1.6.16 SGi Interface; 1.6.17 Gx Interface; 1.6.18 Gy and Gz Interfaces; 1.6.19 DNS Interface; 1.6.20 Gn/Gp Interface; 1.6.21 SBc Interface; 1.6.22 Sv Interface; 1.7 EPS Protocols and Planes; 1.7.1 Access and Non-Access Stratum; 1.7.2 Control Plane; 1.7.3 User Plane; 1.8 EPS Procedures Overview; 1.8.1 EPS Registration and Attach Procedures; 1.8.2 EPS Quality of Service (QoS)
  • 1.8.3 EPS Security Basics1.8.4 EPS Idle and Active States; 1.8.5 EPS Network Topology for Mobility Procedures; 1.8.6 EPS Identifiers; References; Chapter 2 LTE Air Interface and Procedures; 2.1 LTE Protocol Stack; 2.2 SDU and PDU; 2.3 LTE Radio Resource Control (RRC); 2.4 LTE Packet Data Convergence Protocol Layer (PDCP); 2.4.1 PDCP Architecture; 2.4.2 PDCP Data and Control SDUs; 2.4.3 PDCP Header Compression; 2.4.4 PDCP Ciphering; 2.4.5 PDCP In-Order Delivery; 2.4.6 PDCP in LTE versus HSPA; 2.5 LTE Radio Link Control (RLC); 2.5.1 RLC Architecture; 2.5.2 RLC Modes; 2.5.3 Control and Data PDUs
  • 2.5.4 RLC in LTE versus HSPA2.6 LTE Medium Access Control (MAC); 2.7 LTE Physical Layer (PHY); 2.7.1 HSPA(+) Channel Overview; 2.7.2 General LTE Physical Channels; 2.7.3 LTE Downlink Physical Channels; 2.7.4 LTE Uplink Physical Channels; 2.8 Channel Mapping of Protocol Layers; 2.8.1 E-UTRAN Channel Mapping; 2.8.2 UTRAN Channel Mapping; 2.9 LTE Air Interface; 2.9.1 LTE Frame Structure; 2.9.2 LTE Frequency and Time Domains Structure; 2.9.3 OFDM Downlink Transmission Example; 2.9.4 Downlink Scheduling; 2.9.5 Uplink Scheduling; 2.9.6 LTE Hybrid Automatic Repeat Request (HARQ)
This book provides an insight into the key practical aspects and best practice of 4G-LTE network design, performance, and deployment Design, Deployment and Performance of 4G-LTE Networks addresses the key practical aspects and best practice of 4G networks design, performance, and deployment. In addition, the book focuses on the end-to-end aspects of the LTE network architecture and different deployment scenarios of commercial LTE networks. It describes the air interface of LTE focusing on the access stratum protocol layers: PDCP, RLC, MAC, and Physical Layer. The air int.
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Authors' Biographies; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations and Acronyms; Chapter 1 LTE Network Architecture and Protocols; 1.1 Evolution of 3GPP Standards; 1.1.1 3GPP Release 99; 1.1.2 3GPP Release 4; 1.1.3 3GPP Release 5; 1.1.4 3GPP Release 6; 1.1.5 3GPP Release 7; 1.1.6 3GPP Release 8; 1.1.7 3GPP Release 9 and Beyond; 1.2 Radio Interface Techniques in 3GPP Systems; 1.2.1 Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA); 1.2.2 Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA); 1.2.3 Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA)
  • 1.2.4 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA)1.3 Radio Access Mode Operations; 1.3.1 Frequency Division Duplex (FDD); 1.3.2 Time Division Duplex (TDD); 1.4 Spectrum Allocation in UMTS and LTE; 1.5 LTE Network Architecture; 1.5.1 Evolved Packet System (EPS); 1.5.2 Evolved Packet Core (EPC); 1.5.3 Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network (E-UTRAN); 1.5.4 LTE User Equipment; 1.6 EPS Interfaces; 1.6.1 S1-MME Interface; 1.6.2 LTE-Uu Interface; 1.6.3 S1-U Interface; 1.6.4 S3 Interface (SGSN-MME); 1.6.5 S4 (SGSN to SGW); 1.6.6 S5/S8 Interface; 1.6.7 S6a (Diameter)
  • 1.6.8 S6b Interface (Diameter)1.6.9 S6d (Diameter); 1.6.10 S9 Interface (H-PCRF-VPCRF); 1.6.11 S10 Interface (MME-MME); 1.6.12 S11 Interface (MME-SGW); 1.6.13 S12 Interface; 1.6.14 S13 Interface; 1.6.15 SGs Interface; 1.6.16 SGi Interface; 1.6.17 Gx Interface; 1.6.18 Gy and Gz Interfaces; 1.6.19 DNS Interface; 1.6.20 Gn/Gp Interface; 1.6.21 SBc Interface; 1.6.22 Sv Interface; 1.7 EPS Protocols and Planes; 1.7.1 Access and Non-Access Stratum; 1.7.2 Control Plane; 1.7.3 User Plane; 1.8 EPS Procedures Overview; 1.8.1 EPS Registration and Attach Procedures; 1.8.2 EPS Quality of Service (QoS)
  • 1.8.3 EPS Security Basics1.8.4 EPS Idle and Active States; 1.8.5 EPS Network Topology for Mobility Procedures; 1.8.6 EPS Identifiers; References; Chapter 2 LTE Air Interface and Procedures; 2.1 LTE Protocol Stack; 2.2 SDU and PDU; 2.3 LTE Radio Resource Control (RRC); 2.4 LTE Packet Data Convergence Protocol Layer (PDCP); 2.4.1 PDCP Architecture; 2.4.2 PDCP Data and Control SDUs; 2.4.3 PDCP Header Compression; 2.4.4 PDCP Ciphering; 2.4.5 PDCP In-Order Delivery; 2.4.6 PDCP in LTE versus HSPA; 2.5 LTE Radio Link Control (RLC); 2.5.1 RLC Architecture; 2.5.2 RLC Modes; 2.5.3 Control and Data PDUs
  • 2.5.4 RLC in LTE versus HSPA2.6 LTE Medium Access Control (MAC); 2.7 LTE Physical Layer (PHY); 2.7.1 HSPA(+) Channel Overview; 2.7.2 General LTE Physical Channels; 2.7.3 LTE Downlink Physical Channels; 2.7.4 LTE Uplink Physical Channels; 2.8 Channel Mapping of Protocol Layers; 2.8.1 E-UTRAN Channel Mapping; 2.8.2 UTRAN Channel Mapping; 2.9 LTE Air Interface; 2.9.1 LTE Frame Structure; 2.9.2 LTE Frequency and Time Domains Structure; 2.9.3 OFDM Downlink Transmission Example; 2.9.4 Downlink Scheduling; 2.9.5 Uplink Scheduling; 2.9.6 LTE Hybrid Automatic Repeat Request (HARQ)
This book provides an insight into the key practical aspects and best practice of 4G-LTE network design, performance, and deployment Design, Deployment and Performance of 4G-LTE Networks addresses the key practical aspects and best practice of 4G networks design, performance, and deployment. In addition, the book focuses on the end-to-end aspects of the LTE network architecture and different deployment scenarios of commercial LTE networks. It describes the air interface of LTE focusing on the access stratum protocol layers: PDCP, RLC, MAC, and Physical Layer. The air int.
Video
1 streaming video file (58 min.) : digital, sd., col.
Luis, young and curious, is determined to find out where Europeans come from. His early investigations lead him to meet Eudald Carbonell, co-director of excavations at Atapuerca, and he invites him on a journey in search of the traces of Europe's ancestors. The extraordinary journeys take the viewer through Africa and Asia to reach Europe where Luis finds that the origin of what are now called Europeans is not in the old continent.
Luis, young and curious, is determined to find out where Europeans come from. His early investigations lead him to meet Eudald Carbonell, co-director of excavations at Atapuerca, and he invites him on a journey in search of the traces of Europe's ancestors. The extraordinary journeys take the viewer through Africa and Asia to reach Europe where Luis finds that the origin of what are now called Europeans is not in the old continent.
Book
1 online resource (342 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
Book
1 online resource (248 pages)
  • Front Cover; Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. The Modern Synthesis of Evolutionary Biology and the Health Sciences; 2. Evolution and Pathology; 2.1 Pathogens and Pathologies May Have Adaptive and/or Evolutionary Importance; 2.2 Evolution vs. Pathology Paradox of Mutations; 3. The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors in Multicellular Organisms; 3.1 Comparative Oncological Data on the Prevalence of Tumors in Different Groups of Multicellular Organisms.
  • 3.2 Ancient Origin and Conservatism of Cellular Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes3.3 The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors Suggests that They May Be Evolutionarily Meaningful; 4. Features of Tumors that Could Be Used in Evolution; 4.1 Unusual Genes and Gene Sets are Activated in Tumors and may Participate in the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.2 Tumor Cells Can Differentiate with the Loss of Malignancy that may Lead to the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.3 Tumors Provide Excessive Cell Masses Functionally Unnecessary to the Organism that Could be used for the Origin of New ...
  • 4.4 Tumors as Atypical Organs/Tissues that may Eventually Evolve into Normal Structures4.4.1 Morphogenetic Potential of Tumors May Be Used in the Origin of Morphological Novelties and Diversity; 5. Tumors Might Participate in the Evolution of Ontogenesis; 5.1 Tumors and Normal Embryogenesis; 5.2 Tumors as Disease of Differentiation; 5.3 The Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Occurs in Normal and Neoplastic Development; 5.4 Tumors, Evo-Devo and Addition of Final Stages in the Evolution of Ontogenesis.
  • 5.5 The Human Brain, as the Most Recently Evolved Organ, Recapitulates Many Features Resembling those of Tumors5.5.1 The Expansion of Brain Size During Mammalian and Primate Evolution Involved Many Protooncogenes and Tumor Suppressor ... ; 5.5.2 Human Cerebral Cortex as a Result of Selection for Tumor Growth; 5.5.3 Brain Enlargement, Microcephaly Genes and Tumors; 5.5.3.1 MCPH1 is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Interrelated with the other Tumor Suppressor, BRCA1; 5.5.3.2 ASPM is a Major Determinant of Human Cerebral Cortical Size, and is Overexpressed in Tumors and Testis.
  • 5.5.4 Long-Term Neural Stem Cell Expansion Leads to Brain Tumors5.6 The Eutherian Placenta is Evolutionary Innovation and Recapitulates Many Tumor Features; 6. Tumors that Might Play a Role in Evolution; 6.1 Hereditary Tumors; 6.2 Fetal, Neonatal and Infantile Tumors; 6.3 Benign Tumors, Carcinomas in situ and Pseudodiseases; 6.4 Tumors at the Early and Intermediate Stages of Progression; 6.5 Tumors that Spontaneously Regress; 6.6 Sustainable Tumor Masses; 7. Tumors that have Played a Role in Evolution; 7.1 The Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules of Legumes.
Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization explores the possibility of the positive role of tumors in evolution of multicellular organisms. This unique perspective goes beyond recent publications on how evolution may influence tumors, to consider the possible role of tumors in evolution. Widespread in nature tumors represent a much broader category than malignant tumors only. The majority of tumors in humans and other animals may never undergo malignant transformation. Tumors may differentiate with the loss of malignancy, and malignant tumors may spontaneously regress. Cellular o.
  • Front Cover; Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. The Modern Synthesis of Evolutionary Biology and the Health Sciences; 2. Evolution and Pathology; 2.1 Pathogens and Pathologies May Have Adaptive and/or Evolutionary Importance; 2.2 Evolution vs. Pathology Paradox of Mutations; 3. The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors in Multicellular Organisms; 3.1 Comparative Oncological Data on the Prevalence of Tumors in Different Groups of Multicellular Organisms.
  • 3.2 Ancient Origin and Conservatism of Cellular Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes3.3 The Widespread Occurrence of Tumors Suggests that They May Be Evolutionarily Meaningful; 4. Features of Tumors that Could Be Used in Evolution; 4.1 Unusual Genes and Gene Sets are Activated in Tumors and may Participate in the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.2 Tumor Cells Can Differentiate with the Loss of Malignancy that may Lead to the Origin of New Cell Types; 4.3 Tumors Provide Excessive Cell Masses Functionally Unnecessary to the Organism that Could be used for the Origin of New ...
  • 4.4 Tumors as Atypical Organs/Tissues that may Eventually Evolve into Normal Structures4.4.1 Morphogenetic Potential of Tumors May Be Used in the Origin of Morphological Novelties and Diversity; 5. Tumors Might Participate in the Evolution of Ontogenesis; 5.1 Tumors and Normal Embryogenesis; 5.2 Tumors as Disease of Differentiation; 5.3 The Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Occurs in Normal and Neoplastic Development; 5.4 Tumors, Evo-Devo and Addition of Final Stages in the Evolution of Ontogenesis.
  • 5.5 The Human Brain, as the Most Recently Evolved Organ, Recapitulates Many Features Resembling those of Tumors5.5.1 The Expansion of Brain Size During Mammalian and Primate Evolution Involved Many Protooncogenes and Tumor Suppressor ... ; 5.5.2 Human Cerebral Cortex as a Result of Selection for Tumor Growth; 5.5.3 Brain Enlargement, Microcephaly Genes and Tumors; 5.5.3.1 MCPH1 is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Interrelated with the other Tumor Suppressor, BRCA1; 5.5.3.2 ASPM is a Major Determinant of Human Cerebral Cortical Size, and is Overexpressed in Tumors and Testis.
  • 5.5.4 Long-Term Neural Stem Cell Expansion Leads to Brain Tumors5.6 The Eutherian Placenta is Evolutionary Innovation and Recapitulates Many Tumor Features; 6. Tumors that Might Play a Role in Evolution; 6.1 Hereditary Tumors; 6.2 Fetal, Neonatal and Infantile Tumors; 6.3 Benign Tumors, Carcinomas in situ and Pseudodiseases; 6.4 Tumors at the Early and Intermediate Stages of Progression; 6.5 Tumors that Spontaneously Regress; 6.6 Sustainable Tumor Masses; 7. Tumors that have Played a Role in Evolution; 7.1 The Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules of Legumes.
Evolution by Tumor Neofunctionalization explores the possibility of the positive role of tumors in evolution of multicellular organisms. This unique perspective goes beyond recent publications on how evolution may influence tumors, to consider the possible role of tumors in evolution. Widespread in nature tumors represent a much broader category than malignant tumors only. The majority of tumors in humans and other animals may never undergo malignant transformation. Tumors may differentiate with the loss of malignancy, and malignant tumors may spontaneously regress. Cellular o.
Book
1 online resource (211 p.)
  • Evolution
  • Natural Selection
  • Adaptation
  • Competition
  • Genetics Basics & Mutations
  • Transposable Elements, Viruses, and Genomes
  • Horizontal Gene Transfer
  • Neutral Evolution
  • Genetic Drift
  • Environment
  • Development
  • Symbiosis
  • Speciation
  • Micro- and Macroevolution
  • Homology
  • Imperfection
  • The Fossil Record and the History of Life
  • Contingency and Evolution
  • Opportunity
  • Phylogeny:The Tree of Life
  • Progress-Purpose?
Evolution: Components and Mechanisms introduces the many recent discoveries and insights that have added to the discipline of organic evolution, and combines them with the key topics needed to gain a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of evolution. Each chapter covers an important topic or factor pertinent to a modern understanding of evolutionary theory, allowing easy access to particular topics for either study or review. Many chapters are cross-referenced. Modern evolutionary theory has expanded significantly within only the past two to three decades.
  • Evolution
  • Natural Selection
  • Adaptation
  • Competition
  • Genetics Basics & Mutations
  • Transposable Elements, Viruses, and Genomes
  • Horizontal Gene Transfer
  • Neutral Evolution
  • Genetic Drift
  • Environment
  • Development
  • Symbiosis
  • Speciation
  • Micro- and Macroevolution
  • Homology
  • Imperfection
  • The Fossil Record and the History of Life
  • Contingency and Evolution
  • Opportunity
  • Phylogeny:The Tree of Life
  • Progress-Purpose?
Evolution: Components and Mechanisms introduces the many recent discoveries and insights that have added to the discipline of organic evolution, and combines them with the key topics needed to gain a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of evolution. Each chapter covers an important topic or factor pertinent to a modern understanding of evolutionary theory, allowing easy access to particular topics for either study or review. Many chapters are cross-referenced. Modern evolutionary theory has expanded significantly within only the past two to three decades.
Book
1 online resource (297 pages)
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; About the Authors; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; List of Acronyms; Chapter 1 An Introduction to Heterogeneous Networks; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Heterogeneous Network Deployments; 1.2.1 Distributed Antenna Systems; 1.2.2 Public Access Picocells/Metrocells; 1.2.3 Consumer-Grade Femtocells; 1.2.4 WiFi Systems; 1.3 Features of Heterogeneous Networks; 1.3.1 Association and Load Balancing; 1.3.2 Interference Management; 1.3.3 Self-Organizing Networks; 1.3.4 Mobility Management; 1.4 Evolution of Cellular Technology and Standards.
  • 1.4.1 3GPP Standardization ProcessReferences; Part I Overview; Chapter 2 Fundamentals of LTE; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 LTE Core Network; 2.2.1 Control Plane; 2.2.2 User Plane; 2.2.3 Practical Implementations of the Core Network; 2.3 LTE Radio Access Network; 2.3.1 Control Plane; 2.3.2 User Plane; 2.4 Connectivity Among eNodeBs: The X2 Interface; 2.4.1 Load- and Interference-Related Information; 2.4.2 Handover-Related Information; 2.5 Technologies in LTE; 2.5.1 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing; 2.5.2 Multiple Antenna Communications; References.
  • Chapter 3 LTE Signal Structure and Physical Channels3.1 Introduction; 3.2 LTE Signal Structure; 3.3 Introduction to LTE Physical Channels and Reference Signals; 3.4 Resource Block Assignment; 3.5 Downlink Physical Channels; 3.5.1 Physical Broadcast Channel (PBCH); 3.5.2 Physical Downlink Shared Channel (PDSCH); 3.5.3 Physical Multicast Channel (PMCH); 3.5.4 Physical Control Format Indicator Channel (PCFICH); 3.5.5 Physical Hybrid ARQ Indicator Channel (PHICH); 3.5.6 Physical Downlink Control Channel (PDCCH); 3.6 Uplink Physical Channels; 3.6.1 Physical Uplink Shared Channel (PUSCH).
  • 3.6.2 Physical Uplink Control Channel (PUCCH)3.6.3 Physical Random Access Channel (PRACH); References; Chapter 4 Physical Layer Signal Processing in LTE; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Downlink Synchronization Signals; 4.2.1 Primary Synchronization Signal; 4.2.2 Secondary Synchronization Signal; 4.3 Reference Signals; 4.3.1 Downlink Reference Signals; 4.3.2 Uplink Reference Signals; 4.4 Channel Estimation and Feedback; 4.4.1 Basics of Link Adaptation; 4.4.2 Feedback for MIMO OFDM Channels; 4.4.3 New Features in LTE-Advanced; 4.5 Design Paradigm of LTE Signaling; 4.6 Scheduling and Resource Allocation.
  • 4.6.1 Scheduling Algorithms4.6.2 Inter-eNodeB Coordination for Resource Allocation in LTE; References; Part II Inter-Cell Interference Coordination; Chapter 5 Release 10 Enhanced ICIC; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Typical Deployment Scenarios; 5.2.1 Macro-Pico Deployment Scenario; 5.2.2 Macro-Femto Deployment Scenario; 5.3 Time Domain Techniques; 5.3.1 Almost Blank Subframe; 5.3.2 ABS Use Cases; 5.3.3 UE Measurement and Reporting; 5.3.4 Backhaul Support; 5.3.5 Simulation Results; 5.4 Power Control Techniques; 5.4.1 Target Scenario; 5.4.2 Power Control Schemes.
A comprehensive summary of theoretical and practical developments in LTE Heterogeneous Networks The last decade has witnessed the proliferation of mobile broadband data and the trend is likely to increase in the coming years. Current cellular networks are ill equipped to deal with this surge in demand. To satisfy user demand and maximize profits, a new paradigm to operate networks is needed. Heterogeneous networks, that deploy an overlay of small cells with limited coverage and transmit power, over a macro coverage area is the solution by providing capacity and coverage.
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; About the Authors; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; List of Acronyms; Chapter 1 An Introduction to Heterogeneous Networks; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Heterogeneous Network Deployments; 1.2.1 Distributed Antenna Systems; 1.2.2 Public Access Picocells/Metrocells; 1.2.3 Consumer-Grade Femtocells; 1.2.4 WiFi Systems; 1.3 Features of Heterogeneous Networks; 1.3.1 Association and Load Balancing; 1.3.2 Interference Management; 1.3.3 Self-Organizing Networks; 1.3.4 Mobility Management; 1.4 Evolution of Cellular Technology and Standards.
  • 1.4.1 3GPP Standardization ProcessReferences; Part I Overview; Chapter 2 Fundamentals of LTE; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 LTE Core Network; 2.2.1 Control Plane; 2.2.2 User Plane; 2.2.3 Practical Implementations of the Core Network; 2.3 LTE Radio Access Network; 2.3.1 Control Plane; 2.3.2 User Plane; 2.4 Connectivity Among eNodeBs: The X2 Interface; 2.4.1 Load- and Interference-Related Information; 2.4.2 Handover-Related Information; 2.5 Technologies in LTE; 2.5.1 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing; 2.5.2 Multiple Antenna Communications; References.
  • Chapter 3 LTE Signal Structure and Physical Channels3.1 Introduction; 3.2 LTE Signal Structure; 3.3 Introduction to LTE Physical Channels and Reference Signals; 3.4 Resource Block Assignment; 3.5 Downlink Physical Channels; 3.5.1 Physical Broadcast Channel (PBCH); 3.5.2 Physical Downlink Shared Channel (PDSCH); 3.5.3 Physical Multicast Channel (PMCH); 3.5.4 Physical Control Format Indicator Channel (PCFICH); 3.5.5 Physical Hybrid ARQ Indicator Channel (PHICH); 3.5.6 Physical Downlink Control Channel (PDCCH); 3.6 Uplink Physical Channels; 3.6.1 Physical Uplink Shared Channel (PUSCH).
  • 3.6.2 Physical Uplink Control Channel (PUCCH)3.6.3 Physical Random Access Channel (PRACH); References; Chapter 4 Physical Layer Signal Processing in LTE; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Downlink Synchronization Signals; 4.2.1 Primary Synchronization Signal; 4.2.2 Secondary Synchronization Signal; 4.3 Reference Signals; 4.3.1 Downlink Reference Signals; 4.3.2 Uplink Reference Signals; 4.4 Channel Estimation and Feedback; 4.4.1 Basics of Link Adaptation; 4.4.2 Feedback for MIMO OFDM Channels; 4.4.3 New Features in LTE-Advanced; 4.5 Design Paradigm of LTE Signaling; 4.6 Scheduling and Resource Allocation.
  • 4.6.1 Scheduling Algorithms4.6.2 Inter-eNodeB Coordination for Resource Allocation in LTE; References; Part II Inter-Cell Interference Coordination; Chapter 5 Release 10 Enhanced ICIC; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Typical Deployment Scenarios; 5.2.1 Macro-Pico Deployment Scenario; 5.2.2 Macro-Femto Deployment Scenario; 5.3 Time Domain Techniques; 5.3.1 Almost Blank Subframe; 5.3.2 ABS Use Cases; 5.3.3 UE Measurement and Reporting; 5.3.4 Backhaul Support; 5.3.5 Simulation Results; 5.4 Power Control Techniques; 5.4.1 Target Scenario; 5.4.2 Power Control Schemes.
A comprehensive summary of theoretical and practical developments in LTE Heterogeneous Networks The last decade has witnessed the proliferation of mobile broadband data and the trend is likely to increase in the coming years. Current cellular networks are ill equipped to deal with this surge in demand. To satisfy user demand and maximize profits, a new paradigm to operate networks is needed. Heterogeneous networks, that deploy an overlay of small cells with limited coverage and transmit power, over a macro coverage area is the solution by providing capacity and coverage.
Book
p. ; cm.
The last decade has witnessed the proliferation of mobile broadband data and the trend is likely to increase in the coming years. Current cellular networks are ill equipped to deal with this surge in demand. To satisfy user demand and maximize profits, a new paradigm to operate networks is needed. Heterogeneous networks, that deploy an overlay of small cells with limited coverage and transmit power, over a macro coverage area is the solution by providing capacity and coverage where it is needed. This book presents a comprehensive overview of small cell based heterogeneous networks within the framework of 3GPP LTE-Advanced which is the major enabler of current and future heterogeneous networks. Fully illustrated throughout, the book offers an accompanying website including Matlab code for simulating heterogeneous networks, LTE channel models, and references to 3GPP specifications, contributions, and updates on recent standardization activities.
The last decade has witnessed the proliferation of mobile broadband data and the trend is likely to increase in the coming years. Current cellular networks are ill equipped to deal with this surge in demand. To satisfy user demand and maximize profits, a new paradigm to operate networks is needed. Heterogeneous networks, that deploy an overlay of small cells with limited coverage and transmit power, over a macro coverage area is the solution by providing capacity and coverage where it is needed. This book presents a comprehensive overview of small cell based heterogeneous networks within the framework of 3GPP LTE-Advanced which is the major enabler of current and future heterogeneous networks. Fully illustrated throughout, the book offers an accompanying website including Matlab code for simulating heterogeneous networks, LTE channel models, and references to 3GPP specifications, contributions, and updates on recent standardization activities.
Book
1 online resource (1,147 p.)
This book is an in-depth, systematic and structured technical reference on 3GPP's LTE-Advanced (Releases 10 and 11), covering theory, technology and implementation, written by an author who has been involved in the inception and development of these technologies for over 20 years. The book not only describes the operation of individual components, but also shows how they fit into the overall system and operate from a systems perspective. Uniquely, this book gives in-depth information on upper protocol layers, implementation and deployment issues, and services.
This book is an in-depth, systematic and structured technical reference on 3GPP's LTE-Advanced (Releases 10 and 11), covering theory, technology and implementation, written by an author who has been involved in the inception and development of these technologies for over 20 years. The book not only describes the operation of individual components, but also shows how they fit into the overall system and operate from a systems perspective. Uniquely, this book gives in-depth information on upper protocol layers, implementation and deployment issues, and services.
Book
p. ; cm.
Book
1 online resource (xi, 444 pages) : illustrations (some color).
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
(no call number) Unavailable
Book
1 online resource (555 p.)
  • Radio Resource Management for Coordinated Multipoint Systems
  • Resource Allocation for Improved User Satisfaction with Applications to LTE
  • Radio Resource Management for Device-to-Device Communications in Long Term Evolution Networks
  • Capacity, Fairness and QoS Trade-Offs in Wireless Networks with Applications to LTE
  • The Design of Efficient, Low-Complexity Cooperative Diversity Schemes from Different Perspectives
  • Distributed Optimization Techniques in Wireless Communication Networks
  • A Genetic Algorithm for the Optimization of MIMO Antenna Arrays
  • Multiantenna Multicarrier Transceiver Architectures
  • Precoder Design for Coordinated Multipoint Systems
  • Interference Alignment, Concepts and Algorithms for Wireless Systems
  • Null-space Precoder for Dense 4G and Beyond Networks.
This book will be a comprehensive collection of advanced concepts related to 4th generation wireless communication systems. It will be divided into two main parts: resource allocation and transceiver architectures. These two research areas are at the core of the recent advances experimented by wireless communication systems. Each chapter will cover a relevant, timely, topic with two focuses: a first part which is of tutorial and survey nature, reviews the state of the art in that topic, followed by a more deep treatment including current research topics, case studies and performance analysis.
  • Radio Resource Management for Coordinated Multipoint Systems
  • Resource Allocation for Improved User Satisfaction with Applications to LTE
  • Radio Resource Management for Device-to-Device Communications in Long Term Evolution Networks
  • Capacity, Fairness and QoS Trade-Offs in Wireless Networks with Applications to LTE
  • The Design of Efficient, Low-Complexity Cooperative Diversity Schemes from Different Perspectives
  • Distributed Optimization Techniques in Wireless Communication Networks
  • A Genetic Algorithm for the Optimization of MIMO Antenna Arrays
  • Multiantenna Multicarrier Transceiver Architectures
  • Precoder Design for Coordinated Multipoint Systems
  • Interference Alignment, Concepts and Algorithms for Wireless Systems
  • Null-space Precoder for Dense 4G and Beyond Networks.
This book will be a comprehensive collection of advanced concepts related to 4th generation wireless communication systems. It will be divided into two main parts: resource allocation and transceiver architectures. These two research areas are at the core of the recent advances experimented by wireless communication systems. Each chapter will cover a relevant, timely, topic with two focuses: a first part which is of tutorial and survey nature, reviews the state of the art in that topic, followed by a more deep treatment including current research topics, case studies and performance analysis.
Book
1 online resource (342 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
Book
1 online resource.
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
1 online resource.
Book
1 online resource (480 p.)