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Book
xv, p. : ill.
  • 1. Algorithmic systems biology. 1.1. Converging sciences. 1.2. The approach. 1.3. Structure of the book. 1.4. Summary. 1.5. Further reading
  • 2. Setting the context. 2.1. The structure of the cell. 2.2. DNA, RNA and genes. 2.3. Proteins. 2.4. Metabolites. 2.5. Cellular processes. 2.6. Experimental methods. 2.7. Summary. 2.8. Further reading
  • 3. Systems and models. 3.1. Systems. 3.2. Model. 3.3. Summary. 3.4. Further reading
  • 4. Static modeling technologies. 4.1. Preliminary assessment. 4.2. Linear regression. 4.3. Dimensionality reduction methods. 4.4. Clustering. 4.5. Gene set analysis. 4.6. Analysis of biological networks. 4.7. Summary. 4.8. Further reading
  • 5. Dynamic modeling technologies. 5.1. Equation-based approaches. 5.2. Rewriting systems. 5.3. Network-based approaches. 5.4. Automata-based approaches. 5.5. Relationship between continuous and stochastic models. 5.6. Diagrammatic modeling. 5.7. Summary. 5.8. Further reading
  • 6. Language-based modeling. 6.1. Process calculi. 6.2. Third generation: from calculi to modeling languages. 6.3. Self-assembly. 6.4. An evolutionary framework. 6.6. Summary. 6.7. Further reading
  • 7. Dynamic modeling process. 7.1. Setting the objectives and the acceptance criteria. 7.2. Building the knowledge base. 7.3. From the knowledge base to a model schema. 7.4. From the model schema to a concrete model. 7.5. Model calibration, evaluation and refinement. 7.6. Summary. 7.7. Further reading
  • 8. Simulation. 8.1. Model execution. 8.2. Random number generation. 8.3. Stochastic simulation algorithms. 8.4. Summary. 8.5. Further reading
  • 9. Perspectives and conclusions.
Modeling is fast becoming fundamental to understanding the processes that define biological systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Algorithmic systems biology. 1.1. Converging sciences. 1.2. The approach. 1.3. Structure of the book. 1.4. Summary. 1.5. Further reading
  • 2. Setting the context. 2.1. The structure of the cell. 2.2. DNA, RNA and genes. 2.3. Proteins. 2.4. Metabolites. 2.5. Cellular processes. 2.6. Experimental methods. 2.7. Summary. 2.8. Further reading
  • 3. Systems and models. 3.1. Systems. 3.2. Model. 3.3. Summary. 3.4. Further reading
  • 4. Static modeling technologies. 4.1. Preliminary assessment. 4.2. Linear regression. 4.3. Dimensionality reduction methods. 4.4. Clustering. 4.5. Gene set analysis. 4.6. Analysis of biological networks. 4.7. Summary. 4.8. Further reading
  • 5. Dynamic modeling technologies. 5.1. Equation-based approaches. 5.2. Rewriting systems. 5.3. Network-based approaches. 5.4. Automata-based approaches. 5.5. Relationship between continuous and stochastic models. 5.6. Diagrammatic modeling. 5.7. Summary. 5.8. Further reading
  • 6. Language-based modeling. 6.1. Process calculi. 6.2. Third generation: from calculi to modeling languages. 6.3. Self-assembly. 6.4. An evolutionary framework. 6.6. Summary. 6.7. Further reading
  • 7. Dynamic modeling process. 7.1. Setting the objectives and the acceptance criteria. 7.2. Building the knowledge base. 7.3. From the knowledge base to a model schema. 7.4. From the model schema to a concrete model. 7.5. Model calibration, evaluation and refinement. 7.6. Summary. 7.7. Further reading
  • 8. Simulation. 8.1. Model execution. 8.2. Random number generation. 8.3. Stochastic simulation algorithms. 8.4. Summary. 8.5. Further reading
  • 9. Perspectives and conclusions.
Modeling is fast becoming fundamental to understanding the processes that define biological systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Part I. Human Peripheral Nerve.- 1. Ultrastructure of Myelinated and Unmyelinated Axons.- 2. Macrophages, Mastocytes, and Plasma Cells.- 3. Ultrastructure of the Endoneurium.- 4. Ultrastructure of the Perineurium.- 5. Ultrastructure of the Epineurium .- 6. Origin of the Fascicles and Intraneural Plexus.- 7. Macroscopic View of the Cervical Plexus and Brachial Plexus.- 8. Anna Carrera, Francisco Reina.- 9. Macroscopic View of the Lumbar Plexus and Sacral Plexus.- 10. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and its Dissected Branches.- 11. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and Paraneural Sheaths.- 12. Computerized Tomographic Images of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 13. Ultrasound View of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 14. Histologic Features of Needle-Nerve and Intraneural Injection Injury as Seen on Light Microscopy.- 15. Structure of Nerve Lesions after "In Vitro" Punctures.- 16. Scanning Electron Microscopy View of In Vitro Intraneural Injections.- 17. Injection of Dye Inside the Paraneural Sheath of the Sciatic Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa.- 18. High-Definition and Three-Dimensional Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging of the Sciatic Nerve.- Part II. Component of the Spinal Canal.- 19. Spinal Dural Sac, Nerve Root Cuffs, Rootlets, and Nerve Roots.- 20. Ultrastructure of Spinal Dura Mater.- 21. Ultrastructure of the Spinal Arachnoid Layer.- 22. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Dural Sac.- 23. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Epidural Fat.- 24. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Trabecular Arachnoid.- 25. Ultrastructure of Spinal Pia Mater.- 26. Ultrastructure of Spinal Subdural Compartment: Origin of Spinal Subdural Space.- 27. Unintentional Subdural and Intradural Placement of Epidural Catheters.- 28. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Nerve Roots.- 29. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Cauda Equine Nerve Roots.- 30. Spinal Nerve Root Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture.- 31. Nerve Root Cuff Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture and Model of "In Vitro" Nerve Stimuli Caused by Epidural Catheters.- 32. Ligamentum Flavum and Related Spinal Ligaments.- 33. The Ligamentum Flavum.- 34. Subarachnoid (Intrathecal) Ligaments.- 35. Displacement of the Nerve Roots of Cauda Equina in Different Positions.- 36. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- 37. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cauda Equina Nerve Roots, and Estimation of a Related Vulnerability Ratio.- 38. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Dura-Epineurium Transition Tissue.- 39. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Arachnoid Layer-Perineurium Transition Tissue at Preganglionic, Ganglionic, and Postganglionic Levels.- 40. Spinal Cord Stimulation.- 41. Ultrastructure of Dural Lesions Produced in Lumbar Punctures.- 42. Injections of Particulate Steroids for Nerve Root Blockade: Ultrastructural Examination of Complicating Factors.- 43. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- Part III. Materials.- 44. Needles in Regional Anesthesia.- 45. Catheters in Regional Anesthesia.- 46. Epidural Filters and Particles from Surgical Gloves.- Part IV. Research Techniques.- 47. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid, Roots, and Surrounding Structures.- 48. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Root Volume Quantification from Magnetic Resonance Images.- 49. Scanning Electron Microscopy.- 50. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first atlas to depict in high-resolution images the fine structure of the spinal canal, the nervous plexuses, and the peripheral nerves in relation to clinical practice. The Atlas of Functional Anatomy for Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine contains more than 1500 images of unsurpassed quality, most of which have never been published, including scanning electron microscopy images of neuronal ultrastructures, macroscopic sectional anatomy, and three-dimensional images reconstructed from patient imaging studies. Each chapter begins with a short introduction on the covered subject but then allows the images to embody the rest of the work; detailed text accompanies figures to guide readers through anatomy, providing evidence-based, clinically relevant information. Beyond clinically relevant anatomy, the book features regional anesthesia equipment (needles, catheters, surgical gloves) and overview of some cutting edge research instruments (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). Of interest to regional anesthesiologists, interventional pain physicians, and surgeons, this compendium is meant to complement texts that do not have this type of graphic material in the subjects of regional anesthesia, interventional pain management, and surgical techniques of the spine or peripheral nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Human Peripheral Nerve.- 1. Ultrastructure of Myelinated and Unmyelinated Axons.- 2. Macrophages, Mastocytes, and Plasma Cells.- 3. Ultrastructure of the Endoneurium.- 4. Ultrastructure of the Perineurium.- 5. Ultrastructure of the Epineurium .- 6. Origin of the Fascicles and Intraneural Plexus.- 7. Macroscopic View of the Cervical Plexus and Brachial Plexus.- 8. Anna Carrera, Francisco Reina.- 9. Macroscopic View of the Lumbar Plexus and Sacral Plexus.- 10. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and its Dissected Branches.- 11. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and Paraneural Sheaths.- 12. Computerized Tomographic Images of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 13. Ultrasound View of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 14. Histologic Features of Needle-Nerve and Intraneural Injection Injury as Seen on Light Microscopy.- 15. Structure of Nerve Lesions after "In Vitro" Punctures.- 16. Scanning Electron Microscopy View of In Vitro Intraneural Injections.- 17. Injection of Dye Inside the Paraneural Sheath of the Sciatic Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa.- 18. High-Definition and Three-Dimensional Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging of the Sciatic Nerve.- Part II. Component of the Spinal Canal.- 19. Spinal Dural Sac, Nerve Root Cuffs, Rootlets, and Nerve Roots.- 20. Ultrastructure of Spinal Dura Mater.- 21. Ultrastructure of the Spinal Arachnoid Layer.- 22. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Dural Sac.- 23. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Epidural Fat.- 24. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Trabecular Arachnoid.- 25. Ultrastructure of Spinal Pia Mater.- 26. Ultrastructure of Spinal Subdural Compartment: Origin of Spinal Subdural Space.- 27. Unintentional Subdural and Intradural Placement of Epidural Catheters.- 28. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Nerve Roots.- 29. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Cauda Equine Nerve Roots.- 30. Spinal Nerve Root Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture.- 31. Nerve Root Cuff Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture and Model of "In Vitro" Nerve Stimuli Caused by Epidural Catheters.- 32. Ligamentum Flavum and Related Spinal Ligaments.- 33. The Ligamentum Flavum.- 34. Subarachnoid (Intrathecal) Ligaments.- 35. Displacement of the Nerve Roots of Cauda Equina in Different Positions.- 36. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- 37. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cauda Equina Nerve Roots, and Estimation of a Related Vulnerability Ratio.- 38. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Dura-Epineurium Transition Tissue.- 39. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Arachnoid Layer-Perineurium Transition Tissue at Preganglionic, Ganglionic, and Postganglionic Levels.- 40. Spinal Cord Stimulation.- 41. Ultrastructure of Dural Lesions Produced in Lumbar Punctures.- 42. Injections of Particulate Steroids for Nerve Root Blockade: Ultrastructural Examination of Complicating Factors.- 43. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- Part III. Materials.- 44. Needles in Regional Anesthesia.- 45. Catheters in Regional Anesthesia.- 46. Epidural Filters and Particles from Surgical Gloves.- Part IV. Research Techniques.- 47. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid, Roots, and Surrounding Structures.- 48. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Root Volume Quantification from Magnetic Resonance Images.- 49. Scanning Electron Microscopy.- 50. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first atlas to depict in high-resolution images the fine structure of the spinal canal, the nervous plexuses, and the peripheral nerves in relation to clinical practice. The Atlas of Functional Anatomy for Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine contains more than 1500 images of unsurpassed quality, most of which have never been published, including scanning electron microscopy images of neuronal ultrastructures, macroscopic sectional anatomy, and three-dimensional images reconstructed from patient imaging studies. Each chapter begins with a short introduction on the covered subject but then allows the images to embody the rest of the work; detailed text accompanies figures to guide readers through anatomy, providing evidence-based, clinically relevant information. Beyond clinically relevant anatomy, the book features regional anesthesia equipment (needles, catheters, surgical gloves) and overview of some cutting edge research instruments (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). Of interest to regional anesthesiologists, interventional pain physicians, and surgeons, this compendium is meant to complement texts that do not have this type of graphic material in the subjects of regional anesthesia, interventional pain management, and surgical techniques of the spine or peripheral nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
28 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
This paper presents an analysis of the effect of international co-authorship of scientific publications on patenting in wind energy technologies. It is found that the number of scientific publications co-authored by researchers in OECD countries has a positive and very significant impact on the number of wind energy innovations patented in OECD countries. However, non-OECD countries produce a greater number of patent filings when their researchers collaborate with OECD countries. This suggests that there exist knowledge spillovers between OECD and non-OECD countries that particularly benefit non-OECD countries. This empirical finding is important because it strengthens the case for international research cooperation between OECD and non-OECD countries in the area of climate mitigation.
This paper presents an analysis of the effect of international co-authorship of scientific publications on patenting in wind energy technologies. It is found that the number of scientific publications co-authored by researchers in OECD countries has a positive and very significant impact on the number of wind energy innovations patented in OECD countries. However, non-OECD countries produce a greater number of patent filings when their researchers collaborate with OECD countries. This suggests that there exist knowledge spillovers between OECD and non-OECD countries that particularly benefit non-OECD countries. This empirical finding is important because it strengthens the case for international research cooperation between OECD and non-OECD countries in the area of climate mitigation.
Book
x, 324 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
  • List of contributors-- Introduction M. F. Watson and C. Lyal-- Part I. The Widening Audience: 1. Floras yesterday, today and tomorrow A. G. Miller, M. Hall, M. F. Watson, S. G. Knees, C. Pendry and M. R. Pullan-- 2. Current uses and future perspectives for conservation biology B. Collen-- 3. The present and future value of Floras for functional ecologists J. Dick, R. Smith and R. Wadsworth-- 4. A publisher's perspective: making biodiversity information available and relevant to a wide audience J. Connor-- Part II. The Products of Descriptive Taxonomy: 5. Lessons learned from two projects, the Fauna Europaea and the Checklist delle specie della fauna italiana A. Minelli-- 6. Flora Europaea and Euro+Med S. L. Jury-- 7. Increasing the utility of the regional African Floras D. W. Kirkup, P. Malcolm and A. Paton-- 8. Cybertruffle: an on-line resource for mycology D. W. Minter-- 9. Zooplankton Identification Manual for North European Seas (ZIMNES) L. C. Hastie-- 10. A field guide to the dragonflies and damselflies of Britain and Ireland S. J. Brooks-- 11. Sangha Trees: an identification and training guide to the trees of the northern Republic of Congo A. H. Wortley and D. J. Harris-- 12. Millennium Seed Bank collector guides D. Hopkins-- 13. Training in tropical plant identification D. J. Harris, S. Bridgewater and J.-M. Moutsambote-- 14. Field identification of vectors and pathogens of military significance A. G. Gutierrez-- Part III. The Influence of Technology on Data Gathering in the Field: 15. The changing role of collections and field research S. Knapp-- 16. Field methods for inventorying insects C. L. Hauser and K. Riede-- 17. From seabed to world wide web: an overview of marine zoological sampling, data processing and potential production of digital marine faunas A. L. Allcock and M. Ryan-- 18. Advancements in electronic data capture for botanical field research in temperate regions M. F. Watson, A. G. Miller, M. R. Pullan, C. Pendry and S. G. Knees-- Part IV. New Technologies: Their Current Use and Future Potential: 19. Extending floras and faunas to include users' views A. L. Weitzman and C. Lyal-- 20. Taxa, taxon names and globally unique identifiers in perspective R. Hyam-- 21. E-publishing descriptive taxonomy: the convergence of taxonomic journals and databases V. S. Smith-- 22. DNA barcoding in floral and faunal research S. E. Miller-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In an age when biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate, it is vital that floristic and faunistic information is up to date, reliable and easily accessible for the formulation of effective conservation strategies. Electronic data management and communication are transforming descriptive taxonomy radically, enhancing both the collection and dissemination of crucial data on biodiversity. This volume is written by scientists at the forefront of current developments of floras and faunas, along with specialists from applied user groups. The chapters review novel methods of research, development and dissemination, which aim to maximise the relevance and impact of data. Regional case studies are used to illustrate the outputs and impacts of taxonomic research. Integrated approaches are presented which have the capacity to accelerate the production of floras and faunas and to better serve the needs of a widening audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of contributors-- Introduction M. F. Watson and C. Lyal-- Part I. The Widening Audience: 1. Floras yesterday, today and tomorrow A. G. Miller, M. Hall, M. F. Watson, S. G. Knees, C. Pendry and M. R. Pullan-- 2. Current uses and future perspectives for conservation biology B. Collen-- 3. The present and future value of Floras for functional ecologists J. Dick, R. Smith and R. Wadsworth-- 4. A publisher's perspective: making biodiversity information available and relevant to a wide audience J. Connor-- Part II. The Products of Descriptive Taxonomy: 5. Lessons learned from two projects, the Fauna Europaea and the Checklist delle specie della fauna italiana A. Minelli-- 6. Flora Europaea and Euro+Med S. L. Jury-- 7. Increasing the utility of the regional African Floras D. W. Kirkup, P. Malcolm and A. Paton-- 8. Cybertruffle: an on-line resource for mycology D. W. Minter-- 9. Zooplankton Identification Manual for North European Seas (ZIMNES) L. C. Hastie-- 10. A field guide to the dragonflies and damselflies of Britain and Ireland S. J. Brooks-- 11. Sangha Trees: an identification and training guide to the trees of the northern Republic of Congo A. H. Wortley and D. J. Harris-- 12. Millennium Seed Bank collector guides D. Hopkins-- 13. Training in tropical plant identification D. J. Harris, S. Bridgewater and J.-M. Moutsambote-- 14. Field identification of vectors and pathogens of military significance A. G. Gutierrez-- Part III. The Influence of Technology on Data Gathering in the Field: 15. The changing role of collections and field research S. Knapp-- 16. Field methods for inventorying insects C. L. Hauser and K. Riede-- 17. From seabed to world wide web: an overview of marine zoological sampling, data processing and potential production of digital marine faunas A. L. Allcock and M. Ryan-- 18. Advancements in electronic data capture for botanical field research in temperate regions M. F. Watson, A. G. Miller, M. R. Pullan, C. Pendry and S. G. Knees-- Part IV. New Technologies: Their Current Use and Future Potential: 19. Extending floras and faunas to include users' views A. L. Weitzman and C. Lyal-- 20. Taxa, taxon names and globally unique identifiers in perspective R. Hyam-- 21. E-publishing descriptive taxonomy: the convergence of taxonomic journals and databases V. S. Smith-- 22. DNA barcoding in floral and faunal research S. E. Miller-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In an age when biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate, it is vital that floristic and faunistic information is up to date, reliable and easily accessible for the formulation of effective conservation strategies. Electronic data management and communication are transforming descriptive taxonomy radically, enhancing both the collection and dissemination of crucial data on biodiversity. This volume is written by scientists at the forefront of current developments of floras and faunas, along with specialists from applied user groups. The chapters review novel methods of research, development and dissemination, which aim to maximise the relevance and impact of data. Regional case studies are used to illustrate the outputs and impacts of taxonomic research. Integrated approaches are presented which have the capacity to accelerate the production of floras and faunas and to better serve the needs of a widening audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH75 .D465 2015 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (1149 pages).
  • Introduction
  • General ecology and human impacts
  • Protozoa to tardigrada
  • Phylum mollusca
  • Phylum annelida
  • Phylum arthropoda.
Readers familiar with the first three editions of Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates (edited by J.H. Thorp and A.P. Covich) will welcome the comprehensive revision and expansion of that trusted professional reference manual and educational textbook from a single North American tome into a developing multi-volume series covering inland water invertebrates of the world. The series entitled Thorp and Covich's Freshwater Invertebrates (edited by J.H. Thorp) begins with the current Volume I: Ecology and General Biology (edited by J.H. Thorp and D.C. Rogers), whic.
  • Introduction
  • General ecology and human impacts
  • Protozoa to tardigrada
  • Phylum mollusca
  • Phylum annelida
  • Phylum arthropoda.
Readers familiar with the first three editions of Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates (edited by J.H. Thorp and A.P. Covich) will welcome the comprehensive revision and expansion of that trusted professional reference manual and educational textbook from a single North American tome into a developing multi-volume series covering inland water invertebrates of the world. The series entitled Thorp and Covich's Freshwater Invertebrates (edited by J.H. Thorp) begins with the current Volume I: Ecology and General Biology (edited by J.H. Thorp and D.C. Rogers), whic.
Book
22 p.
La présente Ligne directrice porte sur le danger de sensibilisation cutanée pour la santé humaine faisant suite à une exposition avec un produit chimique. La sensibilisation cutanée se réfère à une réponse allergique faisant suite à un contact avec la peau, selon la définition du Système général harmonisé de classification et d'étiquetage des produits chimiques (SGH) des Nations Unies. La méthode in chemico décrite dans la présente Ligne directrice, à savoir l’essai de réactivité peptidique directe (Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay, DPRA), doit aider à distinguer les sensibilisants des non-sensibilisants cutanés. Le DPRA est proposé pour l'étude de l'événement moléculaire initiateur menant aux effets néfastes de sensibilisation cutanée, nommément la réactivité protéique, par quantification de la réactivité des produits chimiques testés vis-à-vis de modèles peptidiques de synthèse contenant soit de la lysine, soit de la cystéine. Les taux de déplétion de la cystéine et de la lysine sont ensuite calculés et utilisés dans un modèle de prédiction pour classer les substances dans l'une des quatre classes de réactivité, afin d’aider à distinguer les sensibilisants des non-sensibilisants cutanés.
La présente Ligne directrice porte sur le danger de sensibilisation cutanée pour la santé humaine faisant suite à une exposition avec un produit chimique. La sensibilisation cutanée se réfère à une réponse allergique faisant suite à un contact avec la peau, selon la définition du Système général harmonisé de classification et d'étiquetage des produits chimiques (SGH) des Nations Unies. La méthode in chemico décrite dans la présente Ligne directrice, à savoir l’essai de réactivité peptidique directe (Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay, DPRA), doit aider à distinguer les sensibilisants des non-sensibilisants cutanés. Le DPRA est proposé pour l'étude de l'événement moléculaire initiateur menant aux effets néfastes de sensibilisation cutanée, nommément la réactivité protéique, par quantification de la réactivité des produits chimiques testés vis-à-vis de modèles peptidiques de synthèse contenant soit de la lysine, soit de la cystéine. Les taux de déplétion de la cystéine et de la lysine sont ensuite calculés et utilisés dans un modèle de prédiction pour classer les substances dans l'une des quatre classes de réactivité, afin d’aider à distinguer les sensibilisants des non-sensibilisants cutanés.
Book
23 p.
La présente Ligne directrice porte sur le danger de sensibilisation cutanée pour la santé humaine faisant suite à une exposition avec un produit chimique. La sensibilisation cutanée se réfère à une réponse allergique faisant suite à un contact avec la peau, selon la définition du Système général harmonisé de classification et d'étiquetage des produits chimiques (SGH) des Nations Unies. La méthode in vitro décrite dans la présente Ligne directrice (LD) pour les essais de produits chimiques (méthode d'essai ARE-Nrf2 luciférase) doit aider à distinguer les sensibilisants des non-sensibilisants cutanés, selon le SGH. Le deuxième événement clé sur la voie toxicologique menant à des effets indésirable de sensibilisation cutanée se déroule dans les kératinocytes. Cet événement comprend des réponses inflammatoires et des phénomènes d'expression génique, liés à des voies de signalisation cellulaire spécifiques telles que les voies dépendant de l'élément de réponse antioxydant/électrophile (ARE, Antioxidant Response Element). La méthode d'essai décrite dans la présente Ligne directrice (méthode d'essai ARE-Nrf2 luciférase) est proposée pour l'étude de cette deuxième étape. La lignée cellulaire employée contient le gène de la luciférase sous le contrôle transcriptionnel d'un promoteur constitutif fusionné à un élément ARE d'un gène connu pour l’intensification de son expression sous l’effet de sensibilisants cutanés. Le signal de la luciférase reflète l'activation par les sensibilisants de gènes endogènes dépendants du facteur Nrf2. Cela permet la mesure quantitative (par détection de luminescence) de l'induction du gène de la luciférase, grâce à l'utilisation de substrats de luciférase produisant une luminescence satisfaisante, comme indicateur de l'activité du facteur de transcription Nrf2 dans les cellules après exposition à des substances chimiques d’essai électrophiles. A l'heure actuelle, la seule méthode d'essai ARE-Nrf2 luciférase in vitro couverte par la présente ligne directrice est la méthode KeratinoSensTM.
La présente Ligne directrice porte sur le danger de sensibilisation cutanée pour la santé humaine faisant suite à une exposition avec un produit chimique. La sensibilisation cutanée se réfère à une réponse allergique faisant suite à un contact avec la peau, selon la définition du Système général harmonisé de classification et d'étiquetage des produits chimiques (SGH) des Nations Unies. La méthode in vitro décrite dans la présente Ligne directrice (LD) pour les essais de produits chimiques (méthode d'essai ARE-Nrf2 luciférase) doit aider à distinguer les sensibilisants des non-sensibilisants cutanés, selon le SGH. Le deuxième événement clé sur la voie toxicologique menant à des effets indésirable de sensibilisation cutanée se déroule dans les kératinocytes. Cet événement comprend des réponses inflammatoires et des phénomènes d'expression génique, liés à des voies de signalisation cellulaire spécifiques telles que les voies dépendant de l'élément de réponse antioxydant/électrophile (ARE, Antioxidant Response Element). La méthode d'essai décrite dans la présente Ligne directrice (méthode d'essai ARE-Nrf2 luciférase) est proposée pour l'étude de cette deuxième étape. La lignée cellulaire employée contient le gène de la luciférase sous le contrôle transcriptionnel d'un promoteur constitutif fusionné à un élément ARE d'un gène connu pour l’intensification de son expression sous l’effet de sensibilisants cutanés. Le signal de la luciférase reflète l'activation par les sensibilisants de gènes endogènes dépendants du facteur Nrf2. Cela permet la mesure quantitative (par détection de luminescence) de l'induction du gène de la luciférase, grâce à l'utilisation de substrats de luciférase produisant une luminescence satisfaisante, comme indicateur de l'activité du facteur de transcription Nrf2 dans les cellules après exposition à des substances chimiques d’essai électrophiles. A l'heure actuelle, la seule méthode d'essai ARE-Nrf2 luciférase in vitro couverte par la présente ligne directrice est la méthode KeratinoSensTM.
Book
66 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
Quantifying the effect of public interventions aimed at mobilising private finance for climate activities is technically complex and challenging. As a step towards addressing this complexity, the report presents a framework of key decision points for estimating publicly mobilised private finance. This framework outlines different methodological options and choices needed to make these estimates. It assesses trade-offs and implications of these choices in terms of their accuracy, the incentives they provide, their potential to be standardised across entities, and their practicality (data availability, expertise and resource demands). The report further identifies and suggests practical options available in the short-term for estimating mobilised private finance, while underlining the need to provide transparency about underlying definitions, assumptions and limitations. It also recommends longer-term actions to improve these methods, including the need to converge on definitions, to build data systems and to improve and standardise estimation methods. The primary objective of this report is to inform the development of methods to measure in a transparent manner progress towards the fulfilment of the financial commitments made by developed countries in the context of international negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It also aims to encourage careful examination of the links between public interventions and private climate finance. This is to ensure that methods to estimate mobilisation help encourage the efficiency and effectiveness of public interventions aimed at mobilising such finance.
Quantifying the effect of public interventions aimed at mobilising private finance for climate activities is technically complex and challenging. As a step towards addressing this complexity, the report presents a framework of key decision points for estimating publicly mobilised private finance. This framework outlines different methodological options and choices needed to make these estimates. It assesses trade-offs and implications of these choices in terms of their accuracy, the incentives they provide, their potential to be standardised across entities, and their practicality (data availability, expertise and resource demands). The report further identifies and suggests practical options available in the short-term for estimating mobilised private finance, while underlining the need to provide transparency about underlying definitions, assumptions and limitations. It also recommends longer-term actions to improve these methods, including the need to converge on definitions, to build data systems and to improve and standardise estimation methods. The primary objective of this report is to inform the development of methods to measure in a transparent manner progress towards the fulfilment of the financial commitments made by developed countries in the context of international negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It also aims to encourage careful examination of the links between public interventions and private climate finance. This is to ensure that methods to estimate mobilisation help encourage the efficiency and effectiveness of public interventions aimed at mobilising such finance.
Book
484 pages : color illustrations, maps ; 27 cm
  • Section 1: Basics -- 1. The evidence for evolution -- 2. The engine of evolution -- Section 2: History -- 3. The tree of life -- 4. The diversity of life -- 5. The ancestry of life -- Section 3: Origins -- 6. The origin of variation -- 7. The origin of species -- 8. The origin of innovation -- Section 4: Adaptation -- 9. Adaptation and evolved design -- 10. Evolving bodies -- 11. The dynamic genome -- Section 5: Selection -- 12. Artificial selection -- 13. Experimental evolution -- 14. Selection in natural populations -- Section 6: Interaction -- 15. Sexual selection -- 16. Cooperation and conflict -- 17. Symbiosis and struggle.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Evolution of Life stands alone amongst the major textbooks by focusing on key principles to offer a truly accessible, unintimidating treatment of evolutionary biology. With adaptation through natural selection - how the integrated complexity of living organisms comes about - as its central theme, the book adopts a lucid, crystal-clear narrative to explain the mechanism of evolution and its main outcomes. Chapters are grouped into six themed parts - basics, history, origins, adaptation, selection, and interaction - and the text is regularly interspersed with descriptive headings that set out a clear path through the subject. The Evolution of Life is written to instil a true understanding of the essential principles of evolutionary biology without that understanding being compromised by peripheral detail. As such, it is the ideal introduction for any student encountering this fascinating subject for the first time. Online Resource Centre The Evolution of Life is supported by the following online resources: For registered adopters: - Figures from the book in electronic format for use in lectures - A set of exam questions for each chapter - Journal Clubs: discussion questions that guide students through research papers related to each chapter For students: - Programs and interactive spreadsheets related to activities posed in the book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Section 1: Basics -- 1. The evidence for evolution -- 2. The engine of evolution -- Section 2: History -- 3. The tree of life -- 4. The diversity of life -- 5. The ancestry of life -- Section 3: Origins -- 6. The origin of variation -- 7. The origin of species -- 8. The origin of innovation -- Section 4: Adaptation -- 9. Adaptation and evolved design -- 10. Evolving bodies -- 11. The dynamic genome -- Section 5: Selection -- 12. Artificial selection -- 13. Experimental evolution -- 14. Selection in natural populations -- Section 6: Interaction -- 15. Sexual selection -- 16. Cooperation and conflict -- 17. Symbiosis and struggle.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Evolution of Life stands alone amongst the major textbooks by focusing on key principles to offer a truly accessible, unintimidating treatment of evolutionary biology. With adaptation through natural selection - how the integrated complexity of living organisms comes about - as its central theme, the book adopts a lucid, crystal-clear narrative to explain the mechanism of evolution and its main outcomes. Chapters are grouped into six themed parts - basics, history, origins, adaptation, selection, and interaction - and the text is regularly interspersed with descriptive headings that set out a clear path through the subject. The Evolution of Life is written to instil a true understanding of the essential principles of evolutionary biology without that understanding being compromised by peripheral detail. As such, it is the ideal introduction for any student encountering this fascinating subject for the first time. Online Resource Centre The Evolution of Life is supported by the following online resources: For registered adopters: - Figures from the book in electronic format for use in lectures - A set of exam questions for each chapter - Journal Clubs: discussion questions that guide students through research papers related to each chapter For students: - Programs and interactive spreadsheets related to activities posed in the book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH366.2 .B415 2015 Unknown
Book
11 p. ; 21x28 cm.
The peer review process can lead to changes in the interpretation of the slides and the reported results, and potentially the outcome and conclusions of the study. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to pathologists, test facility management, study directors and quality assurance personnel on how the peer review of histopathology should be planned, managed, documented and reported in order to meet GLP expectations and requirements. This document is a complement to the guidance provided in section 3.6.3.7 of OECD Guidance Document 116 (series on testing and assessment), whose focus is on how histopathology peer review should be conducted.
The peer review process can lead to changes in the interpretation of the slides and the reported results, and potentially the outcome and conclusions of the study. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to pathologists, test facility management, study directors and quality assurance personnel on how the peer review of histopathology should be planned, managed, documented and reported in order to meet GLP expectations and requirements. This document is a complement to the guidance provided in section 3.6.3.7 of OECD Guidance Document 116 (series on testing and assessment), whose focus is on how histopathology peer review should be conducted.
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Introduction.- Introduction and prospects of Marine natural compounds.- Development of Anticancer Drugs from Marine Sources.- Seaweeds.- Bacteria and Cyanobacteria Fungal metabolites.- Sponge derived bioactive compounds Mollusk.- Soft corals.- Algae.- Tunicate.- Other marine organisms derived compounds.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This timely desk reference focuses on marine-derived bioactive substances which have biological, medical and industrial applications. The medicinal value of these marine natural products are assessed and discussed. Their function as a new and important resource in novel, anticancer drug discovery research is also presented in international contributions from several research groups. For example, the potential role of Spongistatin, Apratoxin A, Eribulin mesylate, phlorotannins, fucoidan, as anticancer agents is explained. The mechanism of action of bioactive compounds present in marine algae, bacteria, fungus, sponges, seaweeds and other marine animals and plants are illustrated via several mechanisms. In addition, this handbook lists various compounds that are active candidates in chemoprevention and their target actions. The handbook also places into context the demand for anticancer nutraceuticals and their use as potential anti-cancer pharmaceuticals and medicines. This study of advanced and future types of natural compounds from marine sources is written to facilitate the understanding of Biotechnology and its application to marine natural product drug discovery research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction.- Introduction and prospects of Marine natural compounds.- Development of Anticancer Drugs from Marine Sources.- Seaweeds.- Bacteria and Cyanobacteria Fungal metabolites.- Sponge derived bioactive compounds Mollusk.- Soft corals.- Algae.- Tunicate.- Other marine organisms derived compounds.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This timely desk reference focuses on marine-derived bioactive substances which have biological, medical and industrial applications. The medicinal value of these marine natural products are assessed and discussed. Their function as a new and important resource in novel, anticancer drug discovery research is also presented in international contributions from several research groups. For example, the potential role of Spongistatin, Apratoxin A, Eribulin mesylate, phlorotannins, fucoidan, as anticancer agents is explained. The mechanism of action of bioactive compounds present in marine algae, bacteria, fungus, sponges, seaweeds and other marine animals and plants are illustrated via several mechanisms. In addition, this handbook lists various compounds that are active candidates in chemoprevention and their target actions. The handbook also places into context the demand for anticancer nutraceuticals and their use as potential anti-cancer pharmaceuticals and medicines. This study of advanced and future types of natural compounds from marine sources is written to facilitate the understanding of Biotechnology and its application to marine natural product drug discovery research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
37 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
Concerns around potential losses of competitiveness as a result of unilateral action on carbon pricing are often central for policy makers contemplating the introduction of such instruments. This paper is a review of literature on ex post empirical evaluations of the impacts of carbon prices on indicators of competitiveness as employed in the literature, including employment, output or exports, at different levels of aggregation.
Concerns around potential losses of competitiveness as a result of unilateral action on carbon pricing are often central for policy makers contemplating the introduction of such instruments. This paper is a review of literature on ex post empirical evaluations of the impacts of carbon prices on indicators of competitiveness as employed in the literature, including employment, output or exports, at different levels of aggregation.
Book
1 online resource (pages cm.)
  • Genetic resources in a multi-layered institutional cake : the regulation of access benefit-sharing in Belgium / John pitseys Brendan Coolsaet, Fulya Batur, Tom Dedeurwae rdere and Arianna Broggiato
  • The ABS framework in Denmark / Veit Koester
  • Commentary on the ABS provisions of the draft biodiversity law of France / Claudio Chiarolla
  • Access and benefit-sharing in Germany / Lily 0. Rodriguez, Miriam Dross, and Karin Holm-Mueller
  • Legal framework in Greece regarding the ABS Regime, implementation : gaps and issues requiring national and international attention / Efpraxia-Aithra Maria and Georgia-Panagiota Limniou
  • An analysis of the ABS Regime in the Netherlands / Bert Visser, Bernd van der Meulen and Hanna Schebesta
  • Norwegian experiences with ABS / Morten Walloe Tvedt
  • Analysis of the ABS framework in the United Kingdom / Elta Smith
  • Implementing the Nagoya Protocol in Spain : challenges perspectives / Luciana Silvestri and Alejandro Lago Candeira
  • The legal regime of genetic resources in Turkey : opportunities for access and benefit-sharing / Fufyabatur
  • N privateer, pirate or ghost ship? : an inquiry into the complementarity between community law and French law for the benefit of the indigenous people of French Guiana / Philippe Karpe, Alexis Tiouka, Ivan Boev, Armelle Guignier, and Florencine Edouard
  • Private standards and the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol : defining and putting in practice due diligence in the EU regulation on ABS / Marfa Julia Oliva
  • The multilevel implementation of the Nagoya Protocol in the European Union / Christine Godt
  • Collecting plant genetic resources in Europe : a survey of legal requirements and practical experiences / Lorenzo Maggioni, Isabel Lopez Noriega, Isabel Lapefia, Vojtech Holubec, and johannes Engels.
  • Genetic resources in a multi-layered institutional cake : the regulation of access benefit-sharing in Belgium / John pitseys Brendan Coolsaet, Fulya Batur, Tom Dedeurwae rdere and Arianna Broggiato
  • The ABS framework in Denmark / Veit Koester
  • Commentary on the ABS provisions of the draft biodiversity law of France / Claudio Chiarolla
  • Access and benefit-sharing in Germany / Lily 0. Rodriguez, Miriam Dross, and Karin Holm-Mueller
  • Legal framework in Greece regarding the ABS Regime, implementation : gaps and issues requiring national and international attention / Efpraxia-Aithra Maria and Georgia-Panagiota Limniou
  • An analysis of the ABS Regime in the Netherlands / Bert Visser, Bernd van der Meulen and Hanna Schebesta
  • Norwegian experiences with ABS / Morten Walloe Tvedt
  • Analysis of the ABS framework in the United Kingdom / Elta Smith
  • Implementing the Nagoya Protocol in Spain : challenges perspectives / Luciana Silvestri and Alejandro Lago Candeira
  • The legal regime of genetic resources in Turkey : opportunities for access and benefit-sharing / Fufyabatur
  • N privateer, pirate or ghost ship? : an inquiry into the complementarity between community law and French law for the benefit of the indigenous people of French Guiana / Philippe Karpe, Alexis Tiouka, Ivan Boev, Armelle Guignier, and Florencine Edouard
  • Private standards and the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol : defining and putting in practice due diligence in the EU regulation on ABS / Marfa Julia Oliva
  • The multilevel implementation of the Nagoya Protocol in the European Union / Christine Godt
  • Collecting plant genetic resources in Europe : a survey of legal requirements and practical experiences / Lorenzo Maggioni, Isabel Lopez Noriega, Isabel Lapefia, Vojtech Holubec, and johannes Engels.
site.ebrary.com For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Online resource
(no call number) Unknown
Book
56 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
This paper identifies over 50 000 patents filed worldwide in various water-related adaptation technologies between 1990 and 2010, distinguishing between those related to water availability (supply) and water conservation (demand) technologies. The paper then analyses the innovation activity – including inventive activity by country and technology, international collaboration in technology development, and international diffusion of such water-related technologies. The results suggest that although innovation activity in water-related technologies has been increasing over the last two decades, this growth has been disproportionately concentrated on supply-side technologies. Moreover, most innovation worldwide occurs in countries with low or moderate vulnerability towards water scarcity. While this is a reflection of the fact that most developed economies do not face severe water stress, this result highlights the importance of international technology transfer and policies that facilitate broad diffusion of these technologies in water-stressed countries.
This paper identifies over 50 000 patents filed worldwide in various water-related adaptation technologies between 1990 and 2010, distinguishing between those related to water availability (supply) and water conservation (demand) technologies. The paper then analyses the innovation activity – including inventive activity by country and technology, international collaboration in technology development, and international diffusion of such water-related technologies. The results suggest that although innovation activity in water-related technologies has been increasing over the last two decades, this growth has been disproportionately concentrated on supply-side technologies. Moreover, most innovation worldwide occurs in countries with low or moderate vulnerability towards water scarcity. While this is a reflection of the fact that most developed economies do not face severe water stress, this result highlights the importance of international technology transfer and policies that facilitate broad diffusion of these technologies in water-stressed countries.
Book
35 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
"Green growth" and transport combines several different concepts that are central to sustainable mobility, including sustainable economic activity, reduced environmental impact and sustained growth in high quality jobs. It attempts to balance the importance of economic growth, with environmental damage and social priorities through assessing positive actions that can be taken by a wide variety of public and private stakeholders. It has arisen out of the concern over the use of non-renewable resources in transport, increasing emissions of carbon and other pollutants, and the expected levels of growth in mobility over the next 40 years. But it also acknowledges the importance of transport to the economy, and its role in helping to create jobs, improving levels of productivity and output, and in promoting agglomeration benefits. This means that transport should be efficient, but at the same time make less demand on the environment through less use of resources, through recycling and reuse of materials, and through embracing a life cycle perspective...
"Green growth" and transport combines several different concepts that are central to sustainable mobility, including sustainable economic activity, reduced environmental impact and sustained growth in high quality jobs. It attempts to balance the importance of economic growth, with environmental damage and social priorities through assessing positive actions that can be taken by a wide variety of public and private stakeholders. It has arisen out of the concern over the use of non-renewable resources in transport, increasing emissions of carbon and other pollutants, and the expected levels of growth in mobility over the next 40 years. But it also acknowledges the importance of transport to the economy, and its role in helping to create jobs, improving levels of productivity and output, and in promoting agglomeration benefits. This means that transport should be efficient, but at the same time make less demand on the environment through less use of resources, through recycling and reuse of materials, and through embracing a life cycle perspective...
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • 1. Introduction.- 2. Methodology (Materials and Methods).- 3. Results and Discussion.- 4. Impact of stress on Tintinnid Community.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is an integrated approach to present a detailed case study in order to address the taxonomic and ecological features of this planktonic choreotrich protists in an iconic tropical mangrove wetland - Sundarban. To identify each tintinnid species, emphasis is given with regards to taxonomic features accompanied by high resolution images. This work explores the interaction between man-induced stress and the impact of climate change which is threatening the tintinnid biodiversity, and suggests, for example, remedial measures by adopting sound management strategies. Tintinnids (Protozoa: Ciliata: Tintinnida) are a coherent group ecologically recognized as micro-zooplankton. They deserve special attention because of their unique biodiversity and their crucial, functional role in the marine food chain. This is a valuable reference source for students, researchers, policy planners and coastal managers engaged in the field of marine biology, microbial ecology and marine bio-resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction.- 2. Methodology (Materials and Methods).- 3. Results and Discussion.- 4. Impact of stress on Tintinnid Community.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is an integrated approach to present a detailed case study in order to address the taxonomic and ecological features of this planktonic choreotrich protists in an iconic tropical mangrove wetland - Sundarban. To identify each tintinnid species, emphasis is given with regards to taxonomic features accompanied by high resolution images. This work explores the interaction between man-induced stress and the impact of climate change which is threatening the tintinnid biodiversity, and suggests, for example, remedial measures by adopting sound management strategies. Tintinnids (Protozoa: Ciliata: Tintinnida) are a coherent group ecologically recognized as micro-zooplankton. They deserve special attention because of their unique biodiversity and their crucial, functional role in the marine food chain. This is a valuable reference source for students, researchers, policy planners and coastal managers engaged in the field of marine biology, microbial ecology and marine bio-resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
56 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
This report develops an analytical framework that assesses the macroeconomic, environmental and distributional consequences of energy subsidy reforms. The framework is applied to the case of Indonesia to study the consequences in this country of a gradual phase out of all energy consumption subsidies between 2012 and 2020. The energy subsidy estimates used as inputs to this modelling analysis are those calculated by the International Energy Agency, using a synthetic indicator known as "price gaps". The analysis relies on simulations made with an extended version of the OECD’s ENV-Linkages model. The phase out of energy consumption subsidies was simulated under three stylised redistribution schemes: direct payment on a per household basis, support to labour incomes, and subsidies on food products. The modelling results in this report indicate that if Indonesia were to remove its fossil fuel and electricity consumption subsidies, it would record real GDP gains of 0.4% to 0.7% in 2020, according to the redistribution scheme envisaged. The redistribution through direct payment on a per household basis performs best in terms of GDP gains. The aggregate gains for consumers in terms of welfare are higher, ranging from 0.8% to 1.6% in 2020. Both GDP and welfare gains arise from a more efficient allocation of resources across sectors resulting from phasing out energy subsidies. Meanwhile, a redistribution scheme through food subsidies tends to create other inefficiencies. The simulations show that the redistribution scheme ultimately matters in determining the overall distributional performance of the reform. Cash transfers, and to a lesser extent food subsidies, can make the reform more attractive for poorer households and reduce poverty. Mechanisms that compensate households via payments proportional to labour income are, on the contrary, more beneficial to higher income households and increase poverty. This is because households with informal labour earnings, which are not eligible for these payments, are more represented among the poor. The analysis also shows that phasing out energy subsidies is projected to reduce Indonesian CO2 emissions from fuel combustion by 10.8% to 12.6% and GHG emissions by 7.9% to 8.3%, in 2020 in the various scenarios, with respect to the baseline. These emission reductions exclude emissions from deforestation, which are large but highly uncertain and for which the model cannot make reliable projections.
This report develops an analytical framework that assesses the macroeconomic, environmental and distributional consequences of energy subsidy reforms. The framework is applied to the case of Indonesia to study the consequences in this country of a gradual phase out of all energy consumption subsidies between 2012 and 2020. The energy subsidy estimates used as inputs to this modelling analysis are those calculated by the International Energy Agency, using a synthetic indicator known as "price gaps". The analysis relies on simulations made with an extended version of the OECD’s ENV-Linkages model. The phase out of energy consumption subsidies was simulated under three stylised redistribution schemes: direct payment on a per household basis, support to labour incomes, and subsidies on food products. The modelling results in this report indicate that if Indonesia were to remove its fossil fuel and electricity consumption subsidies, it would record real GDP gains of 0.4% to 0.7% in 2020, according to the redistribution scheme envisaged. The redistribution through direct payment on a per household basis performs best in terms of GDP gains. The aggregate gains for consumers in terms of welfare are higher, ranging from 0.8% to 1.6% in 2020. Both GDP and welfare gains arise from a more efficient allocation of resources across sectors resulting from phasing out energy subsidies. Meanwhile, a redistribution scheme through food subsidies tends to create other inefficiencies. The simulations show that the redistribution scheme ultimately matters in determining the overall distributional performance of the reform. Cash transfers, and to a lesser extent food subsidies, can make the reform more attractive for poorer households and reduce poverty. Mechanisms that compensate households via payments proportional to labour income are, on the contrary, more beneficial to higher income households and increase poverty. This is because households with informal labour earnings, which are not eligible for these payments, are more represented among the poor. The analysis also shows that phasing out energy subsidies is projected to reduce Indonesian CO2 emissions from fuel combustion by 10.8% to 12.6% and GHG emissions by 7.9% to 8.3%, in 2020 in the various scenarios, with respect to the baseline. These emission reductions exclude emissions from deforestation, which are large but highly uncertain and for which the model cannot make reliable projections.
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of Contributors ix Preface xiii 1 Technological Advances in Studies of Plant Adaptation 1 Jose G. Vallarino and Sonia Osorio Introduction 1 Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies 2 Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing 7 Proteome Analysis in Understanding Plant Adaptation 12 Applications of Proteomics 16 Metabolome Analysis in Plant Adaptation 17 Applications of Metabolic Profiling 18 Concluding Remarks and Future Prospects 21 Acknowledgments 22 References 22 2 Use of Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to Study Adaptation 31 Lisa M. Smith and Roosa A. E. Laitinen Introduction 31 Genetic Natural Variation 33 Epigenetic Natural Variation 37 Natural Variation and Metabolites 42 Use of A. thaliana Hybrids in Understanding Evolution 46 Conclusion 49 Acknowledgments 50 References 50 3 Seed Dormancy, Longevity and Their Adaptation 61 Thu-Phuong Nguyen and Leonie Bentsink Introduction 61 The Induction of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 62 Factors Affecting Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 63 Seed Dry Storage 64 Genetics of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 67 The Relation Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity and its Ecological Significance 70 Ecological Role 70 The Trade-off Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 73 Conclusions 74 References 74 4 The Gatekeeper Concept: Cell-Type Specific Molecular Mechanisms of Plant Adaptation to Abiotic Stress 83 SamW. Henderson and Matthew Gilliham Introduction 83 The Gatekeeper Concept 85 Single Cell TypesWithin Plant Roots 86 Root Hairs Tolerance to Phosphorus Deficiency 88 Epidermal Cells of the Root Apex Aluminum Tolerance 91 Xylem Parenchyma Cells Salinity Tolerance 94 Pericycle Cells Nitrogen Starvation 99 Endodermal Cells ABA Signaling Under Abiotic Stress 102 Beyond Gatekeepers Conclusions and Perspectives 103 References 105 5 Regulatory and Biosynthetic Mechanisms Underlying Plant Chemical Defense Responses to Biotic Stresses 117 William R. Chezem and Nicole K. Clay Introduction 117 Defensive Phenylpropanoids 119 Defense-Related Regulators of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism 124 Defensive Aromatic Alkaloids 126 Defense-Related Regulators of Aromatic Alkaloid Metabolism 131 Conclusion 134 References 135 6 Role of Small RNAs in Regulation of Plant Responses to Stress 147 Luis A.A. Toledo-Filho and Sascha Laubinger Introduction 147 miRNAs Biogenesis and Function 148 Evolution of miRNAs 149 siRNAs Biogenesis and Function 150 sRNA Stress Responses 151 sRNA in Abiotic Stress Responses 157 Conclusions and Future Prospects 162 References 163 7 Adaptation of Flower Form: An Evo-Devo Approach to Study Adaptive Evolution in Flower Morphology 169 Roxana Yockteng, Ana M.R. Almeida, Alma Pi neyro-Nelson, and Chelsea D. Specht Introduction 169 Flower Developmental Genetics: (A)BCs and Beyond 171 Approaches to the Study of Evolution of Floral Morphology 172 Using GRNs to Investigate Adaptive Evolution of Floral Form: SEP3 as a Case Study 176 Conclusions 184 Acknowledgments 185 References 185 8 Computational Approaches to Dissect and Understand Mechanisms of Adaptation 191 Sabrina Kleessen and Zoran Nikoloski Introduction 191 Experimental Set-Ups for Data Acquisition to Reveal Trade-Offs via Correlations 193 Pareto Front Approaches 195 The Triangulation Criterion 195 Ranking of Genotypes 197 From Models to Elements Contributing to Adaptation 199 Cellular Tasks Involved in Adaptation 202 Minimal Network Adjustments Upon Perturbations 202 Investigation of Network Adjustments by Integrating High-Throughput Data 204 Non-Steady State Behavior and Metabolic Network Adjustments 205 Future Challenges and Perspectives 207 References 208 9 From the Greenhouse to the Real World Arabidopsis Field Trials and Applications 215 Karin Kohl and Roosa A.E. Laitinen Introduction 215 Field Experiments in A. thaliana 216 How to do Field Trials? 220 From Arabidopsis to Crops 228 Future Prospects 230 References 230 Index 235.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Plants are forced to adapt for a variety of reasons protection, reproductive viability, and environmental and climatic changes. Computational tools and molecular advances have provided researchers with significant new insights into the molecular basis of plant adaptation. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation provides a comprehensive overview of a wide variety of these different mechanisms underlying adaptation to these challenges to plant survival. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation opens with a chapter that explores the latest technological advances used in plant adaptation research, providing readers with an overview of high-throughput technologies and their applications. The chapters that follow cover the latest developments on using natural variation to dissect genetic, epigenetic and metabolic responses of plant adaptation. Subsequent chapters describe plant responses to biotic and abiotic stressors and adaptive reproductive strategies. Emerging topics such as secondary metabolism, small RNA mediated regulation as well as cell type specific responses to stresses are given special precedence. The book ends with chapters introducing computational approaches to study adaptation and focusing on how to apply laboratory findings to field studies and breeding programs. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation interest plant molecular biologists and physiologists, plant stress biologists, plant geneticists and advanced plant biology students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Contributors ix Preface xiii 1 Technological Advances in Studies of Plant Adaptation 1 Jose G. Vallarino and Sonia Osorio Introduction 1 Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies 2 Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing 7 Proteome Analysis in Understanding Plant Adaptation 12 Applications of Proteomics 16 Metabolome Analysis in Plant Adaptation 17 Applications of Metabolic Profiling 18 Concluding Remarks and Future Prospects 21 Acknowledgments 22 References 22 2 Use of Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to Study Adaptation 31 Lisa M. Smith and Roosa A. E. Laitinen Introduction 31 Genetic Natural Variation 33 Epigenetic Natural Variation 37 Natural Variation and Metabolites 42 Use of A. thaliana Hybrids in Understanding Evolution 46 Conclusion 49 Acknowledgments 50 References 50 3 Seed Dormancy, Longevity and Their Adaptation 61 Thu-Phuong Nguyen and Leonie Bentsink Introduction 61 The Induction of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 62 Factors Affecting Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 63 Seed Dry Storage 64 Genetics of Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 67 The Relation Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity and its Ecological Significance 70 Ecological Role 70 The Trade-off Between Seed Dormancy and Seed Longevity 73 Conclusions 74 References 74 4 The Gatekeeper Concept: Cell-Type Specific Molecular Mechanisms of Plant Adaptation to Abiotic Stress 83 SamW. Henderson and Matthew Gilliham Introduction 83 The Gatekeeper Concept 85 Single Cell TypesWithin Plant Roots 86 Root Hairs Tolerance to Phosphorus Deficiency 88 Epidermal Cells of the Root Apex Aluminum Tolerance 91 Xylem Parenchyma Cells Salinity Tolerance 94 Pericycle Cells Nitrogen Starvation 99 Endodermal Cells ABA Signaling Under Abiotic Stress 102 Beyond Gatekeepers Conclusions and Perspectives 103 References 105 5 Regulatory and Biosynthetic Mechanisms Underlying Plant Chemical Defense Responses to Biotic Stresses 117 William R. Chezem and Nicole K. Clay Introduction 117 Defensive Phenylpropanoids 119 Defense-Related Regulators of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism 124 Defensive Aromatic Alkaloids 126 Defense-Related Regulators of Aromatic Alkaloid Metabolism 131 Conclusion 134 References 135 6 Role of Small RNAs in Regulation of Plant Responses to Stress 147 Luis A.A. Toledo-Filho and Sascha Laubinger Introduction 147 miRNAs Biogenesis and Function 148 Evolution of miRNAs 149 siRNAs Biogenesis and Function 150 sRNA Stress Responses 151 sRNA in Abiotic Stress Responses 157 Conclusions and Future Prospects 162 References 163 7 Adaptation of Flower Form: An Evo-Devo Approach to Study Adaptive Evolution in Flower Morphology 169 Roxana Yockteng, Ana M.R. Almeida, Alma Pi neyro-Nelson, and Chelsea D. Specht Introduction 169 Flower Developmental Genetics: (A)BCs and Beyond 171 Approaches to the Study of Evolution of Floral Morphology 172 Using GRNs to Investigate Adaptive Evolution of Floral Form: SEP3 as a Case Study 176 Conclusions 184 Acknowledgments 185 References 185 8 Computational Approaches to Dissect and Understand Mechanisms of Adaptation 191 Sabrina Kleessen and Zoran Nikoloski Introduction 191 Experimental Set-Ups for Data Acquisition to Reveal Trade-Offs via Correlations 193 Pareto Front Approaches 195 The Triangulation Criterion 195 Ranking of Genotypes 197 From Models to Elements Contributing to Adaptation 199 Cellular Tasks Involved in Adaptation 202 Minimal Network Adjustments Upon Perturbations 202 Investigation of Network Adjustments by Integrating High-Throughput Data 204 Non-Steady State Behavior and Metabolic Network Adjustments 205 Future Challenges and Perspectives 207 References 208 9 From the Greenhouse to the Real World Arabidopsis Field Trials and Applications 215 Karin Kohl and Roosa A.E. Laitinen Introduction 215 Field Experiments in A. thaliana 216 How to do Field Trials? 220 From Arabidopsis to Crops 228 Future Prospects 230 References 230 Index 235.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Plants are forced to adapt for a variety of reasons protection, reproductive viability, and environmental and climatic changes. Computational tools and molecular advances have provided researchers with significant new insights into the molecular basis of plant adaptation. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation provides a comprehensive overview of a wide variety of these different mechanisms underlying adaptation to these challenges to plant survival. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation opens with a chapter that explores the latest technological advances used in plant adaptation research, providing readers with an overview of high-throughput technologies and their applications. The chapters that follow cover the latest developments on using natural variation to dissect genetic, epigenetic and metabolic responses of plant adaptation. Subsequent chapters describe plant responses to biotic and abiotic stressors and adaptive reproductive strategies. Emerging topics such as secondary metabolism, small RNA mediated regulation as well as cell type specific responses to stresses are given special precedence. The book ends with chapters introducing computational approaches to study adaptation and focusing on how to apply laboratory findings to field studies and breeding programs. Molecular Mechanisms in Plant Adaptation interest plant molecular biologists and physiologists, plant stress biologists, plant geneticists and advanced plant biology students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
88 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
This study uses a unique dataset of investment flows to analyse the role of two categories of public interventions (finance and policies) in mobilising flows of private climate finance worldwide and in the more specific context of flows to and in developing countries. The objectives are threefold. First, the paper presents ‘observed’ ratios of total private to public finance in selected climate-related sectors. Second, it seeks to understand the determinants of private climate finance flows by analysing the role of key public finance (bilateral, domestic and multilateral) and public policy instruments (feed-in tariffs, renewable energy quotas, the Clean Development Mechanism), while taking into account a number of market and country conditions. For reasons of data availability, the focus of this econometric analysis is on a subset of six renewable energy sectors (wind, solar, biomass, small hydro, marine and geothermal). Finally, the paper assesses the likely mobilisation impact of past public interventions in these six sectors, and draws a comparison with approaches that ignore the role of policy as well as country and market conditions. Results suggest that both public finance and public policies have played an important role in private finance mobilisation globally. In the context of finance to and in developing countries, the results highlight the currently untapped potential of domestic public policies to increase mobilisation. The methodology proposed in this report is an initial attempt to estimate private climate finance mobilisation empirically. It should be seen as a first step towards developing more comprehensive methodologies for analysing and estimating private finance mobilisation in the global climate policy context.
This study uses a unique dataset of investment flows to analyse the role of two categories of public interventions (finance and policies) in mobilising flows of private climate finance worldwide and in the more specific context of flows to and in developing countries. The objectives are threefold. First, the paper presents ‘observed’ ratios of total private to public finance in selected climate-related sectors. Second, it seeks to understand the determinants of private climate finance flows by analysing the role of key public finance (bilateral, domestic and multilateral) and public policy instruments (feed-in tariffs, renewable energy quotas, the Clean Development Mechanism), while taking into account a number of market and country conditions. For reasons of data availability, the focus of this econometric analysis is on a subset of six renewable energy sectors (wind, solar, biomass, small hydro, marine and geothermal). Finally, the paper assesses the likely mobilisation impact of past public interventions in these six sectors, and draws a comparison with approaches that ignore the role of policy as well as country and market conditions. Results suggest that both public finance and public policies have played an important role in private finance mobilisation globally. In the context of finance to and in developing countries, the results highlight the currently untapped potential of domestic public policies to increase mobilisation. The methodology proposed in this report is an initial attempt to estimate private climate finance mobilisation empirically. It should be seen as a first step towards developing more comprehensive methodologies for analysing and estimating private finance mobilisation in the global climate policy context.
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Module 1: Rethinking Infrastructure Design For Multi-Use Water Services 1. Introduction 2. The Most Apparent Impacts of Climate Changes And Variability 3. What Is Wrong with Existing Systems? 4. What Is the Blue Green Solution Concept? 4.1 Reduced Pluvial Flood Risk 4.2 Water Pollution 4.3 Alternative Water (Re)Sources 4.4 Urban Heat Island 4.5 Air Pollution 4.6 Droughts 4.7 Urban Agriculture 4.8 Urban Amenity and Blue Green Corridors 5. Conclusions References Module 2: What Are the Main Options For Applying the Blue-Green Dream 1. Introduction 2. Wastewater Reuse And Recycling 3. Urban Green Spaces 4. Rainwater Harvesting 5. Green Roofs 6. Urban Agriculture 7. Living Wall Systems 8. Decentralized Systems To Manage and Reuse Stormwater Runoff On-Site 9. Integrating Blue and Green Measures 10. How Can We Calculate the Value of Blue Green Systems? 11. Tools For Supporting Urban Blue-Green Design 12. References Module 3: Case Studies Illustrating The Blue-Green Options 1. "Four Alls For All": Policy Act On Decentralized Water Supply Through Rainwater Harvesting and Management Systems in Seoul 2. Water Sensitive Urban Design in Lynbrook Estate, Melbourne, Australia 3. Green City, Clean Waters: The Vision Of Philadelphia 4. Integrated Water Recycling in Brisbane, Australia 5. Bedzed - Zero Energy Development References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
As we approach a historic tipping point in the global trend toward urbanisation - within two decades urban dwellers will increase from 49% to 60% of the planet's population - this book identifies and addresses a critical problem: water. The editors show how cities can shift from being water consumers to resource managers, applying urban water management principles to ensure access to water and sanitation infrastructure and services; manage rainwater, wastewater, storm water drainage, and runoff pollution; control waterborne diseases and epidemics; and reduce the risk of such water-related hazards as floods, droughts and landslides. The book explores the Multiple-Use Water Services (MUS) paradigm, offering a section on the MUS approach and a means of calculating the value of MUS systems, as well as tools and resources to support decision-making. Case studies illustrate MUS in selected urban and rural contexts. Each case study breaks out the challenges, policy framework, benefits, benchmarks, lessons learned (success and failures) and potential next steps. The contributors consider the main options for applying the Multiple-Use Water Services (MUS) paradigm, breaking down its components and offering cost-benefit analyses along with challenges and considerations for both the short and long term. Also discussed are methods by which mutual interactions of water infrastructure and vegetated areas are taken into account in the synergy of spatial planning and optimised modelling of ecosystems' performance indicators. This method of planning should make future developments cheaper to build; their users will pay lower utility bills for water, energy and heating. These developments will be more pleasant to live in and property value would likely be higher. The brief includes a section on the MUS approach and a means to calculate the value of MUS systems, as well as provides tools and resources to support decision-making. Case studies are included to illustrate MUS in selected urban and rural contexts. Each case study breaks out the challenges, policy framework, benefits, benchmarks, lessons learned (success and failures) and potential next steps.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Module 1: Rethinking Infrastructure Design For Multi-Use Water Services 1. Introduction 2. The Most Apparent Impacts of Climate Changes And Variability 3. What Is Wrong with Existing Systems? 4. What Is the Blue Green Solution Concept? 4.1 Reduced Pluvial Flood Risk 4.2 Water Pollution 4.3 Alternative Water (Re)Sources 4.4 Urban Heat Island 4.5 Air Pollution 4.6 Droughts 4.7 Urban Agriculture 4.8 Urban Amenity and Blue Green Corridors 5. Conclusions References Module 2: What Are the Main Options For Applying the Blue-Green Dream 1. Introduction 2. Wastewater Reuse And Recycling 3. Urban Green Spaces 4. Rainwater Harvesting 5. Green Roofs 6. Urban Agriculture 7. Living Wall Systems 8. Decentralized Systems To Manage and Reuse Stormwater Runoff On-Site 9. Integrating Blue and Green Measures 10. How Can We Calculate the Value of Blue Green Systems? 11. Tools For Supporting Urban Blue-Green Design 12. References Module 3: Case Studies Illustrating The Blue-Green Options 1. "Four Alls For All": Policy Act On Decentralized Water Supply Through Rainwater Harvesting and Management Systems in Seoul 2. Water Sensitive Urban Design in Lynbrook Estate, Melbourne, Australia 3. Green City, Clean Waters: The Vision Of Philadelphia 4. Integrated Water Recycling in Brisbane, Australia 5. Bedzed - Zero Energy Development References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
As we approach a historic tipping point in the global trend toward urbanisation - within two decades urban dwellers will increase from 49% to 60% of the planet's population - this book identifies and addresses a critical problem: water. The editors show how cities can shift from being water consumers to resource managers, applying urban water management principles to ensure access to water and sanitation infrastructure and services; manage rainwater, wastewater, storm water drainage, and runoff pollution; control waterborne diseases and epidemics; and reduce the risk of such water-related hazards as floods, droughts and landslides. The book explores the Multiple-Use Water Services (MUS) paradigm, offering a section on the MUS approach and a means of calculating the value of MUS systems, as well as tools and resources to support decision-making. Case studies illustrate MUS in selected urban and rural contexts. Each case study breaks out the challenges, policy framework, benefits, benchmarks, lessons learned (success and failures) and potential next steps. The contributors consider the main options for applying the Multiple-Use Water Services (MUS) paradigm, breaking down its components and offering cost-benefit analyses along with challenges and considerations for both the short and long term. Also discussed are methods by which mutual interactions of water infrastructure and vegetated areas are taken into account in the synergy of spatial planning and optimised modelling of ecosystems' performance indicators. This method of planning should make future developments cheaper to build; their users will pay lower utility bills for water, energy and heating. These developments will be more pleasant to live in and property value would likely be higher. The brief includes a section on the MUS approach and a means to calculate the value of MUS systems, as well as provides tools and resources to support decision-making. Case studies are included to illustrate MUS in selected urban and rural contexts. Each case study breaks out the challenges, policy framework, benefits, benchmarks, lessons learned (success and failures) and potential next steps.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)