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Book
1 online resource.
Abstract Not Provided
Abstract Not Provided
Book
xv, p. : ill.
  • 1. Algorithmic systems biology. 1.1. Converging sciences. 1.2. The approach. 1.3. Structure of the book. 1.4. Summary. 1.5. Further reading
  • 2. Setting the context. 2.1. The structure of the cell. 2.2. DNA, RNA and genes. 2.3. Proteins. 2.4. Metabolites. 2.5. Cellular processes. 2.6. Experimental methods. 2.7. Summary. 2.8. Further reading
  • 3. Systems and models. 3.1. Systems. 3.2. Model. 3.3. Summary. 3.4. Further reading
  • 4. Static modeling technologies. 4.1. Preliminary assessment. 4.2. Linear regression. 4.3. Dimensionality reduction methods. 4.4. Clustering. 4.5. Gene set analysis. 4.6. Analysis of biological networks. 4.7. Summary. 4.8. Further reading
  • 5. Dynamic modeling technologies. 5.1. Equation-based approaches. 5.2. Rewriting systems. 5.3. Network-based approaches. 5.4. Automata-based approaches. 5.5. Relationship between continuous and stochastic models. 5.6. Diagrammatic modeling. 5.7. Summary. 5.8. Further reading
  • 6. Language-based modeling. 6.1. Process calculi. 6.2. Third generation: from calculi to modeling languages. 6.3. Self-assembly. 6.4. An evolutionary framework. 6.6. Summary. 6.7. Further reading
  • 7. Dynamic modeling process. 7.1. Setting the objectives and the acceptance criteria. 7.2. Building the knowledge base. 7.3. From the knowledge base to a model schema. 7.4. From the model schema to a concrete model. 7.5. Model calibration, evaluation and refinement. 7.6. Summary. 7.7. Further reading
  • 8. Simulation. 8.1. Model execution. 8.2. Random number generation. 8.3. Stochastic simulation algorithms. 8.4. Summary. 8.5. Further reading
  • 9. Perspectives and conclusions.
Modeling is fast becoming fundamental to understanding the processes that define biological systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Algorithmic systems biology. 1.1. Converging sciences. 1.2. The approach. 1.3. Structure of the book. 1.4. Summary. 1.5. Further reading
  • 2. Setting the context. 2.1. The structure of the cell. 2.2. DNA, RNA and genes. 2.3. Proteins. 2.4. Metabolites. 2.5. Cellular processes. 2.6. Experimental methods. 2.7. Summary. 2.8. Further reading
  • 3. Systems and models. 3.1. Systems. 3.2. Model. 3.3. Summary. 3.4. Further reading
  • 4. Static modeling technologies. 4.1. Preliminary assessment. 4.2. Linear regression. 4.3. Dimensionality reduction methods. 4.4. Clustering. 4.5. Gene set analysis. 4.6. Analysis of biological networks. 4.7. Summary. 4.8. Further reading
  • 5. Dynamic modeling technologies. 5.1. Equation-based approaches. 5.2. Rewriting systems. 5.3. Network-based approaches. 5.4. Automata-based approaches. 5.5. Relationship between continuous and stochastic models. 5.6. Diagrammatic modeling. 5.7. Summary. 5.8. Further reading
  • 6. Language-based modeling. 6.1. Process calculi. 6.2. Third generation: from calculi to modeling languages. 6.3. Self-assembly. 6.4. An evolutionary framework. 6.6. Summary. 6.7. Further reading
  • 7. Dynamic modeling process. 7.1. Setting the objectives and the acceptance criteria. 7.2. Building the knowledge base. 7.3. From the knowledge base to a model schema. 7.4. From the model schema to a concrete model. 7.5. Model calibration, evaluation and refinement. 7.6. Summary. 7.7. Further reading
  • 8. Simulation. 8.1. Model execution. 8.2. Random number generation. 8.3. Stochastic simulation algorithms. 8.4. Summary. 8.5. Further reading
  • 9. Perspectives and conclusions.
Modeling is fast becoming fundamental to understanding the processes that define biological systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (40 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Patterns of genetic variation in Europe and the Neolithic
  • Ancient DNA and anatomically modern humans (Challenges & Potential)
  • The Neolithic transition in Europe (Scandinavia, Iberia and Eastern Europe).
  • Contents: Patterns of genetic variation in Europe and the Neolithic
  • Ancient DNA and anatomically modern humans (Challenges & Potential)
  • The Neolithic transition in Europe (Scandinavia, Iberia and Eastern Europe).
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Part I. Human Peripheral Nerve.- 1. Ultrastructure of Myelinated and Unmyelinated Axons.- 2. Macrophages, Mastocytes, and Plasma Cells.- 3. Ultrastructure of the Endoneurium.- 4. Ultrastructure of the Perineurium.- 5. Ultrastructure of the Epineurium .- 6. Origin of the Fascicles and Intraneural Plexus.- 7. Macroscopic View of the Cervical Plexus and Brachial Plexus.- 8. Anna Carrera, Francisco Reina.- 9. Macroscopic View of the Lumbar Plexus and Sacral Plexus.- 10. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and its Dissected Branches.- 11. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and Paraneural Sheaths.- 12. Computerized Tomographic Images of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 13. Ultrasound View of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 14. Histologic Features of Needle-Nerve and Intraneural Injection Injury as Seen on Light Microscopy.- 15. Structure of Nerve Lesions after "In Vitro" Punctures.- 16. Scanning Electron Microscopy View of In Vitro Intraneural Injections.- 17. Injection of Dye Inside the Paraneural Sheath of the Sciatic Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa.- 18. High-Definition and Three-Dimensional Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging of the Sciatic Nerve.- Part II. Component of the Spinal Canal.- 19. Spinal Dural Sac, Nerve Root Cuffs, Rootlets, and Nerve Roots.- 20. Ultrastructure of Spinal Dura Mater.- 21. Ultrastructure of the Spinal Arachnoid Layer.- 22. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Dural Sac.- 23. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Epidural Fat.- 24. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Trabecular Arachnoid.- 25. Ultrastructure of Spinal Pia Mater.- 26. Ultrastructure of Spinal Subdural Compartment: Origin of Spinal Subdural Space.- 27. Unintentional Subdural and Intradural Placement of Epidural Catheters.- 28. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Nerve Roots.- 29. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Cauda Equine Nerve Roots.- 30. Spinal Nerve Root Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture.- 31. Nerve Root Cuff Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture and Model of "In Vitro" Nerve Stimuli Caused by Epidural Catheters.- 32. Ligamentum Flavum and Related Spinal Ligaments.- 33. The Ligamentum Flavum.- 34. Subarachnoid (Intrathecal) Ligaments.- 35. Displacement of the Nerve Roots of Cauda Equina in Different Positions.- 36. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- 37. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cauda Equina Nerve Roots, and Estimation of a Related Vulnerability Ratio.- 38. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Dura-Epineurium Transition Tissue.- 39. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Arachnoid Layer-Perineurium Transition Tissue at Preganglionic, Ganglionic, and Postganglionic Levels.- 40. Spinal Cord Stimulation.- 41. Ultrastructure of Dural Lesions Produced in Lumbar Punctures.- 42. Injections of Particulate Steroids for Nerve Root Blockade: Ultrastructural Examination of Complicating Factors.- 43. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- Part III. Materials.- 44. Needles in Regional Anesthesia.- 45. Catheters in Regional Anesthesia.- 46. Epidural Filters and Particles from Surgical Gloves.- Part IV. Research Techniques.- 47. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid, Roots, and Surrounding Structures.- 48. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Root Volume Quantification from Magnetic Resonance Images.- 49. Scanning Electron Microscopy.- 50. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first atlas to depict in high-resolution images the fine structure of the spinal canal, the nervous plexuses, and the peripheral nerves in relation to clinical practice. The Atlas of Functional Anatomy for Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine contains more than 1500 images of unsurpassed quality, most of which have never been published, including scanning electron microscopy images of neuronal ultrastructures, macroscopic sectional anatomy, and three-dimensional images reconstructed from patient imaging studies. Each chapter begins with a short introduction on the covered subject but then allows the images to embody the rest of the work; detailed text accompanies figures to guide readers through anatomy, providing evidence-based, clinically relevant information. Beyond clinically relevant anatomy, the book features regional anesthesia equipment (needles, catheters, surgical gloves) and overview of some cutting edge research instruments (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). Of interest to regional anesthesiologists, interventional pain physicians, and surgeons, this compendium is meant to complement texts that do not have this type of graphic material in the subjects of regional anesthesia, interventional pain management, and surgical techniques of the spine or peripheral nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Human Peripheral Nerve.- 1. Ultrastructure of Myelinated and Unmyelinated Axons.- 2. Macrophages, Mastocytes, and Plasma Cells.- 3. Ultrastructure of the Endoneurium.- 4. Ultrastructure of the Perineurium.- 5. Ultrastructure of the Epineurium .- 6. Origin of the Fascicles and Intraneural Plexus.- 7. Macroscopic View of the Cervical Plexus and Brachial Plexus.- 8. Anna Carrera, Francisco Reina.- 9. Macroscopic View of the Lumbar Plexus and Sacral Plexus.- 10. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and its Dissected Branches.- 11. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and Paraneural Sheaths.- 12. Computerized Tomographic Images of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 13. Ultrasound View of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 14. Histologic Features of Needle-Nerve and Intraneural Injection Injury as Seen on Light Microscopy.- 15. Structure of Nerve Lesions after "In Vitro" Punctures.- 16. Scanning Electron Microscopy View of In Vitro Intraneural Injections.- 17. Injection of Dye Inside the Paraneural Sheath of the Sciatic Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa.- 18. High-Definition and Three-Dimensional Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging of the Sciatic Nerve.- Part II. Component of the Spinal Canal.- 19. Spinal Dural Sac, Nerve Root Cuffs, Rootlets, and Nerve Roots.- 20. Ultrastructure of Spinal Dura Mater.- 21. Ultrastructure of the Spinal Arachnoid Layer.- 22. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Dural Sac.- 23. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Epidural Fat.- 24. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Trabecular Arachnoid.- 25. Ultrastructure of Spinal Pia Mater.- 26. Ultrastructure of Spinal Subdural Compartment: Origin of Spinal Subdural Space.- 27. Unintentional Subdural and Intradural Placement of Epidural Catheters.- 28. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Nerve Roots.- 29. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Cauda Equine Nerve Roots.- 30. Spinal Nerve Root Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture.- 31. Nerve Root Cuff Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture and Model of "In Vitro" Nerve Stimuli Caused by Epidural Catheters.- 32. Ligamentum Flavum and Related Spinal Ligaments.- 33. The Ligamentum Flavum.- 34. Subarachnoid (Intrathecal) Ligaments.- 35. Displacement of the Nerve Roots of Cauda Equina in Different Positions.- 36. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- 37. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cauda Equina Nerve Roots, and Estimation of a Related Vulnerability Ratio.- 38. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Dura-Epineurium Transition Tissue.- 39. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Arachnoid Layer-Perineurium Transition Tissue at Preganglionic, Ganglionic, and Postganglionic Levels.- 40. Spinal Cord Stimulation.- 41. Ultrastructure of Dural Lesions Produced in Lumbar Punctures.- 42. Injections of Particulate Steroids for Nerve Root Blockade: Ultrastructural Examination of Complicating Factors.- 43. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- Part III. Materials.- 44. Needles in Regional Anesthesia.- 45. Catheters in Regional Anesthesia.- 46. Epidural Filters and Particles from Surgical Gloves.- Part IV. Research Techniques.- 47. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid, Roots, and Surrounding Structures.- 48. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Root Volume Quantification from Magnetic Resonance Images.- 49. Scanning Electron Microscopy.- 50. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first atlas to depict in high-resolution images the fine structure of the spinal canal, the nervous plexuses, and the peripheral nerves in relation to clinical practice. The Atlas of Functional Anatomy for Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine contains more than 1500 images of unsurpassed quality, most of which have never been published, including scanning electron microscopy images of neuronal ultrastructures, macroscopic sectional anatomy, and three-dimensional images reconstructed from patient imaging studies. Each chapter begins with a short introduction on the covered subject but then allows the images to embody the rest of the work; detailed text accompanies figures to guide readers through anatomy, providing evidence-based, clinically relevant information. Beyond clinically relevant anatomy, the book features regional anesthesia equipment (needles, catheters, surgical gloves) and overview of some cutting edge research instruments (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). Of interest to regional anesthesiologists, interventional pain physicians, and surgeons, this compendium is meant to complement texts that do not have this type of graphic material in the subjects of regional anesthesia, interventional pain management, and surgical techniques of the spine or peripheral nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (51 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Contribution of animal models to biomedical research
  • Modeling psychiatric diseases
  • Targeted gene mutations mouse models
  • Behavioral phenotyping: a three-tiered strategy
  • General health, neurological reflexes, sensory, motor abilities and specific tests
  • Mouse models for autism
  • Key experimental design issues.
  • Contents: Contribution of animal models to biomedical research
  • Modeling psychiatric diseases
  • Targeted gene mutations mouse models
  • Behavioral phenotyping: a three-tiered strategy
  • General health, neurological reflexes, sensory, motor abilities and specific tests
  • Mouse models for autism
  • Key experimental design issues.
Book
28 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
This paper presents an analysis of the effect of international co-authorship of scientific publications on patenting in wind energy technologies. It is found that the number of scientific publications co-authored by researchers in OECD countries has a positive and very significant impact on the number of wind energy innovations patented in OECD countries. However, non-OECD countries produce a greater number of patent filings when their researchers collaborate with OECD countries. This suggests that there exist knowledge spillovers between OECD and non-OECD countries that particularly benefit non-OECD countries. This empirical finding is important because it strengthens the case for international research cooperation between OECD and non-OECD countries in the area of climate mitigation.
This paper presents an analysis of the effect of international co-authorship of scientific publications on patenting in wind energy technologies. It is found that the number of scientific publications co-authored by researchers in OECD countries has a positive and very significant impact on the number of wind energy innovations patented in OECD countries. However, non-OECD countries produce a greater number of patent filings when their researchers collaborate with OECD countries. This suggests that there exist knowledge spillovers between OECD and non-OECD countries that particularly benefit non-OECD countries. This empirical finding is important because it strengthens the case for international research cooperation between OECD and non-OECD countries in the area of climate mitigation.
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (29 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Brief history of bioterrorism
  • Bioterrorism agents
  • Types of vaccines
  • Vaccine development: special requirements
  • Unique aspects of biodefense vaccines.
  • Contents: Brief history of bioterrorism
  • Bioterrorism agents
  • Types of vaccines
  • Vaccine development: special requirements
  • Unique aspects of biodefense vaccines.
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (33 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Case studies of biodefence vaccines: Smallpox vaccines
  • Anthrax vaccines
  • Ebola virus vaccines development
  • Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases
  • Future of biodefense and emerging infectious diseases vaccines.
  • Contents: Case studies of biodefence vaccines: Smallpox vaccines
  • Anthrax vaccines
  • Ebola virus vaccines development
  • Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases
  • Future of biodefense and emerging infectious diseases vaccines.
Book
1 online resource (22 p.)
With data from the nearly 6,000 households in the Nepal Living Standards Survey of 2010-11, this paper finds that the mean reduction in household firewood collection associated with use of a biogas plant for cooking is about 1,100 kilograms per year from a mean of about 2,400 kilograms per year. This estimate is derived by comparing only households with and without biogas in the same village, thus effectively removing the influence of many potential confounders. Further controls for important determinants of firewood collection, such as household size, per capita consumption expenditure, cattle ownership, and unemployment are used to identify the effect of biogas adoption on firewood collection. Bounds on omitted variable bias are derived with the proportional selection assumption. The central estimate is much smaller than those in the previous literature, but is still large enough for the cost of adopting biogas to be significantly reduced via carbon offsets at a modest carbon price of 0 per ton of CO2e when using central estimates of emission factors and global warming potentials of pollutants taken from the scientific literature.
With data from the nearly 6,000 households in the Nepal Living Standards Survey of 2010-11, this paper finds that the mean reduction in household firewood collection associated with use of a biogas plant for cooking is about 1,100 kilograms per year from a mean of about 2,400 kilograms per year. This estimate is derived by comparing only households with and without biogas in the same village, thus effectively removing the influence of many potential confounders. Further controls for important determinants of firewood collection, such as household size, per capita consumption expenditure, cattle ownership, and unemployment are used to identify the effect of biogas adoption on firewood collection. Bounds on omitted variable bias are derived with the proportional selection assumption. The central estimate is much smaller than those in the previous literature, but is still large enough for the cost of adopting biogas to be significantly reduced via carbon offsets at a modest carbon price of 0 per ton of CO2e when using central estimates of emission factors and global warming potentials of pollutants taken from the scientific literature.
Book
1 online resource (xv, 307 p.) : ill. (some col.).
"The proceedings were designed to bring together researchers who share a common interest in the quantitative description of the biological form. Participants came from very diverse disciplines such as agricultural genetics, botany, entomology, forensics, human anatomy, paleontology, human evolution, primatology, dentistry, etc. The participants applied various methodological approaches that are being increasingly used to describe aspects of the biological form. These techniques include neural networks, Fourier descriptors, shape mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), Riemann curves, surface mapping, etc. A number of the contributions in the proceedings represent state of the art research that reflects advances in that discipline."-- Provided by publisher.
"The proceedings were designed to bring together researchers who share a common interest in the quantitative description of the biological form. Participants came from very diverse disciplines such as agricultural genetics, botany, entomology, forensics, human anatomy, paleontology, human evolution, primatology, dentistry, etc. The participants applied various methodological approaches that are being increasingly used to describe aspects of the biological form. These techniques include neural networks, Fourier descriptors, shape mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), Riemann curves, surface mapping, etc. A number of the contributions in the proceedings represent state of the art research that reflects advances in that discipline."-- Provided by publisher.
Book
1 online resource.
Abstract Not Provided
Abstract Not Provided
Book
1 online resource.
Abstract Not Provided
Abstract Not Provided
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (55 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Ciliopathies: multisystemic disorders caused by structural and/or functional defects of the primary cilium
  • Mutations in almost 100 genes discovered to date, no clear pattern between specific genes and specific phenotypes
  • Functional interpretation of variants critical for understanding the contribution of alleles to disease severity and pleiotropy
  • A systems-based consideration for the total amount of pathogenic variation in the ciliary proteome begins to predict clinical substructure.
  • Contents: Ciliopathies: multisystemic disorders caused by structural and/or functional defects of the primary cilium
  • Mutations in almost 100 genes discovered to date, no clear pattern between specific genes and specific phenotypes
  • Functional interpretation of variants critical for understanding the contribution of alleles to disease severity and pleiotropy
  • A systems-based consideration for the total amount of pathogenic variation in the ciliary proteome begins to predict clinical substructure.
Book
1 online resource (43 p.)
A significant portion of the world's forests that are eligible for Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, known as REDD+, payments are community managed forests. However, there is little knowledge about preferences of households living in community managed forests for REDD+ contracts, or the opportunity costs of accepting REDD+ contracts for these communities. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of rural communities in Nepal to understand respondents' preferences toward the institutional structure of REDD+ contracts. The sample is split across communities with community managed forests groups and those without community managed forest groups to see how prior involvement in community managed forest groups affects preferences. The results show that respondents care about how the payments are divided between households and communities, the severity of restrictions on firewood use, the restrictions on grazing, and the fairness of access to community managed forest resources as well as the level of payments. The preferences for REDD contracts are in general similar between community managed and non-community managed forest resource respondents, but there are differences, in particular with regard to how beliefs influence the likelihood of accepting the contracts. Finally, the paper finds that the opportunity cost of REDD+ payments, although cheaper than many other carbon dioxide abatement options, is higher than previously suggested in the literature.
A significant portion of the world's forests that are eligible for Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, known as REDD+, payments are community managed forests. However, there is little knowledge about preferences of households living in community managed forests for REDD+ contracts, or the opportunity costs of accepting REDD+ contracts for these communities. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of rural communities in Nepal to understand respondents' preferences toward the institutional structure of REDD+ contracts. The sample is split across communities with community managed forests groups and those without community managed forest groups to see how prior involvement in community managed forest groups affects preferences. The results show that respondents care about how the payments are divided between households and communities, the severity of restrictions on firewood use, the restrictions on grazing, and the fairness of access to community managed forest resources as well as the level of payments. The preferences for REDD contracts are in general similar between community managed and non-community managed forest resource respondents, but there are differences, in particular with regard to how beliefs influence the likelihood of accepting the contracts. Finally, the paper finds that the opportunity cost of REDD+ payments, although cheaper than many other carbon dioxide abatement options, is higher than previously suggested in the literature.
Book
26 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
Proposals to increase environmentally related taxes are often challenged on competitiveness grounds. The concern is that value creation in certain sectors might decline domestically if a country introduces environmentally related taxes unilaterally. Furthermore, environmental goals might not be reached if pollution shifts abroad. A competing view argues that properly implemented environmentally related taxes foster innovation, thereby boosting productivity and competitiveness. Empirical research is needed to gain insight into the strength of these various effects. This paper provides evidence on the short-term competitiveness impacts of the German electricity tax introduced unilaterally in 1999. Germany’s manufacturing sector uses significant amounts of electricity, and to counteract potential negative effects on competitiveness, relief was provided: firms using more electricity than specified thresholds benefitted from reduced electricity tax rates. The tax reduction amounted up to EUR 14.6 per megawatt hour, about 80% of the full tax rate. When measured as an effective rate on the carbon content in the average unit of electricity, the electricity tax translates into EUR 44.4 per tonne of carbon dioxide, indicating the magnitude of the tax. The econometric analysis – a regression discontinuity design – shows no robust effects in either direction of the reduced electricity tax rates on firms’ competitiveness. Firms subject to the full tax rates, but otherwise similar to firms facing reduced rates, did not perform worse in terms of turnover, exports, value added, investment and employment. The analysis questions the relevance of the tax reduction for competitiveness reasons and suggests that it could be gradually removed. The energy use threshold, above which a reduced tax rate applies, could be raised over time and competitiveness impacts monitored.
Proposals to increase environmentally related taxes are often challenged on competitiveness grounds. The concern is that value creation in certain sectors might decline domestically if a country introduces environmentally related taxes unilaterally. Furthermore, environmental goals might not be reached if pollution shifts abroad. A competing view argues that properly implemented environmentally related taxes foster innovation, thereby boosting productivity and competitiveness. Empirical research is needed to gain insight into the strength of these various effects. This paper provides evidence on the short-term competitiveness impacts of the German electricity tax introduced unilaterally in 1999. Germany’s manufacturing sector uses significant amounts of electricity, and to counteract potential negative effects on competitiveness, relief was provided: firms using more electricity than specified thresholds benefitted from reduced electricity tax rates. The tax reduction amounted up to EUR 14.6 per megawatt hour, about 80% of the full tax rate. When measured as an effective rate on the carbon content in the average unit of electricity, the electricity tax translates into EUR 44.4 per tonne of carbon dioxide, indicating the magnitude of the tax. The econometric analysis – a regression discontinuity design – shows no robust effects in either direction of the reduced electricity tax rates on firms’ competitiveness. Firms subject to the full tax rates, but otherwise similar to firms facing reduced rates, did not perform worse in terms of turnover, exports, value added, investment and employment. The analysis questions the relevance of the tax reduction for competitiveness reasons and suggests that it could be gradually removed. The energy use threshold, above which a reduced tax rate applies, could be raised over time and competitiveness impacts monitored.
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (51 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Identity by descent (IBD): mechanism
  • Identity by descent (IBD): insight into modern humans
  • Estimating IBD: Wright inbreeding coefficient
  • Estimating IBD: genomic inbreeding coefficient
  • Estimating IBD: runs of homozygosity (ROH)
  • Properties of ROH.
  • Contents: Identity by descent (IBD): mechanism
  • Identity by descent (IBD): insight into modern humans
  • Estimating IBD: Wright inbreeding coefficient
  • Estimating IBD: genomic inbreeding coefficient
  • Estimating IBD: runs of homozygosity (ROH)
  • Properties of ROH.
Book
1 online resource (48 p.)
This paper examines whether cooperative behavior by respondents measured as contributions in a one-shot public goods game correlates with reported pro-forest collective action behaviors. All the outcomes analyzed are costly in terms of time, land, or money. The study finds significant evidence that more cooperative individuals (or those who believe their group members will cooperate) engage in collective action behaviors that support common forests, once the analysis is adjusted for demographic factors, wealth, and location. Those who contribute more in the public goods experiment are found to be more likely to have planted trees in community forests during the previous month and to have invested in biogas. They also have planted more trees on their own farms and spent more time monitoring community forests. As cooperation appears to be highly conditional on beliefs about others' cooperation, these results suggest that policies to support cooperation and strengthen local governance could be important for collective action and economic outcomes associated with forest resources. As forest management and quality in developing countries is particularly important for climate change policy, these results suggest that international efforts such as the United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation should pay particular attention to supporting governance and cooperation at the local level.
This paper examines whether cooperative behavior by respondents measured as contributions in a one-shot public goods game correlates with reported pro-forest collective action behaviors. All the outcomes analyzed are costly in terms of time, land, or money. The study finds significant evidence that more cooperative individuals (or those who believe their group members will cooperate) engage in collective action behaviors that support common forests, once the analysis is adjusted for demographic factors, wealth, and location. Those who contribute more in the public goods experiment are found to be more likely to have planted trees in community forests during the previous month and to have invested in biogas. They also have planted more trees on their own farms and spent more time monitoring community forests. As cooperation appears to be highly conditional on beliefs about others' cooperation, these results suggest that policies to support cooperation and strengthen local governance could be important for collective action and economic outcomes associated with forest resources. As forest management and quality in developing countries is particularly important for climate change policy, these results suggest that international efforts such as the United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation should pay particular attention to supporting governance and cooperation at the local level.
Book
1 online resource (42 p.)
South Asian countries, facing challenges in efficiently meeting growing electricity demand, can benefit from increased cross-border electricity cooperation and trade by harnessing complementarities in electricity demand patterns, diversity in resource endowments for power generation, and gains from larger market access. The region has witnessed slow progress in expanding regional electricity cooperation and trade, and undertaking needed domestic sector reforms. Although bilateral electricity sector cooperation in the region is increasing, broader regional cooperation and trade initiatives have lagged in the face of regional barriers and domestic sector inefficiencies. Deeper electricity market reforms are not a necessity for further development of cross-border electricity trade, but limited progress in overcoming regional and domestic barriers will limit the scope of the regional market and the benefits it can provide.
South Asian countries, facing challenges in efficiently meeting growing electricity demand, can benefit from increased cross-border electricity cooperation and trade by harnessing complementarities in electricity demand patterns, diversity in resource endowments for power generation, and gains from larger market access. The region has witnessed slow progress in expanding regional electricity cooperation and trade, and undertaking needed domestic sector reforms. Although bilateral electricity sector cooperation in the region is increasing, broader regional cooperation and trade initiatives have lagged in the face of regional barriers and domestic sector inefficiencies. Deeper electricity market reforms are not a necessity for further development of cross-border electricity trade, but limited progress in overcoming regional and domestic barriers will limit the scope of the regional market and the benefits it can provide.
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (46 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Impact of women migration on the population genetics
  • Different social organizations in Central Asia
  • Common ancestors study in Pastoralists from Central Asia
  • Impact of social organization on genetic diversity
  • Cultural transmission of reproductive success
  • Genetic adaptations to diet.
  • Contents: Impact of women migration on the population genetics
  • Different social organizations in Central Asia
  • Common ancestors study in Pastoralists from Central Asia
  • Impact of social organization on genetic diversity
  • Cultural transmission of reproductive success
  • Genetic adaptations to diet.
Book
x, 324 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
  • List of contributors-- Introduction M. F. Watson and C. Lyal-- Part I. The Widening Audience: 1. Floras yesterday, today and tomorrow A. G. Miller, M. Hall, M. F. Watson, S. G. Knees, C. Pendry and M. R. Pullan-- 2. Current uses and future perspectives for conservation biology B. Collen-- 3. The present and future value of Floras for functional ecologists J. Dick, R. Smith and R. Wadsworth-- 4. A publisher's perspective: making biodiversity information available and relevant to a wide audience J. Connor-- Part II. The Products of Descriptive Taxonomy: 5. Lessons learned from two projects, the Fauna Europaea and the Checklist delle specie della fauna italiana A. Minelli-- 6. Flora Europaea and Euro+Med S. L. Jury-- 7. Increasing the utility of the regional African Floras D. W. Kirkup, P. Malcolm and A. Paton-- 8. Cybertruffle: an on-line resource for mycology D. W. Minter-- 9. Zooplankton Identification Manual for North European Seas (ZIMNES) L. C. Hastie-- 10. A field guide to the dragonflies and damselflies of Britain and Ireland S. J. Brooks-- 11. Sangha Trees: an identification and training guide to the trees of the northern Republic of Congo A. H. Wortley and D. J. Harris-- 12. Millennium Seed Bank collector guides D. Hopkins-- 13. Training in tropical plant identification D. J. Harris, S. Bridgewater and J.-M. Moutsambote-- 14. Field identification of vectors and pathogens of military significance A. G. Gutierrez-- Part III. The Influence of Technology on Data Gathering in the Field: 15. The changing role of collections and field research S. Knapp-- 16. Field methods for inventorying insects C. L. Hauser and K. Riede-- 17. From seabed to world wide web: an overview of marine zoological sampling, data processing and potential production of digital marine faunas A. L. Allcock and M. Ryan-- 18. Advancements in electronic data capture for botanical field research in temperate regions M. F. Watson, A. G. Miller, M. R. Pullan, C. Pendry and S. G. Knees-- Part IV. New Technologies: Their Current Use and Future Potential: 19. Extending floras and faunas to include users' views A. L. Weitzman and C. Lyal-- 20. Taxa, taxon names and globally unique identifiers in perspective R. Hyam-- 21. E-publishing descriptive taxonomy: the convergence of taxonomic journals and databases V. S. Smith-- 22. DNA barcoding in floral and faunal research S. E. Miller-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In an age when biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate, it is vital that floristic and faunistic information is up to date, reliable and easily accessible for the formulation of effective conservation strategies. Electronic data management and communication are transforming descriptive taxonomy radically, enhancing both the collection and dissemination of crucial data on biodiversity. This volume is written by scientists at the forefront of current developments of floras and faunas, along with specialists from applied user groups. The chapters review novel methods of research, development and dissemination, which aim to maximise the relevance and impact of data. Regional case studies are used to illustrate the outputs and impacts of taxonomic research. Integrated approaches are presented which have the capacity to accelerate the production of floras and faunas and to better serve the needs of a widening audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of contributors-- Introduction M. F. Watson and C. Lyal-- Part I. The Widening Audience: 1. Floras yesterday, today and tomorrow A. G. Miller, M. Hall, M. F. Watson, S. G. Knees, C. Pendry and M. R. Pullan-- 2. Current uses and future perspectives for conservation biology B. Collen-- 3. The present and future value of Floras for functional ecologists J. Dick, R. Smith and R. Wadsworth-- 4. A publisher's perspective: making biodiversity information available and relevant to a wide audience J. Connor-- Part II. The Products of Descriptive Taxonomy: 5. Lessons learned from two projects, the Fauna Europaea and the Checklist delle specie della fauna italiana A. Minelli-- 6. Flora Europaea and Euro+Med S. L. Jury-- 7. Increasing the utility of the regional African Floras D. W. Kirkup, P. Malcolm and A. Paton-- 8. Cybertruffle: an on-line resource for mycology D. W. Minter-- 9. Zooplankton Identification Manual for North European Seas (ZIMNES) L. C. Hastie-- 10. A field guide to the dragonflies and damselflies of Britain and Ireland S. J. Brooks-- 11. Sangha Trees: an identification and training guide to the trees of the northern Republic of Congo A. H. Wortley and D. J. Harris-- 12. Millennium Seed Bank collector guides D. Hopkins-- 13. Training in tropical plant identification D. J. Harris, S. Bridgewater and J.-M. Moutsambote-- 14. Field identification of vectors and pathogens of military significance A. G. Gutierrez-- Part III. The Influence of Technology on Data Gathering in the Field: 15. The changing role of collections and field research S. Knapp-- 16. Field methods for inventorying insects C. L. Hauser and K. Riede-- 17. From seabed to world wide web: an overview of marine zoological sampling, data processing and potential production of digital marine faunas A. L. Allcock and M. Ryan-- 18. Advancements in electronic data capture for botanical field research in temperate regions M. F. Watson, A. G. Miller, M. R. Pullan, C. Pendry and S. G. Knees-- Part IV. New Technologies: Their Current Use and Future Potential: 19. Extending floras and faunas to include users' views A. L. Weitzman and C. Lyal-- 20. Taxa, taxon names and globally unique identifiers in perspective R. Hyam-- 21. E-publishing descriptive taxonomy: the convergence of taxonomic journals and databases V. S. Smith-- 22. DNA barcoding in floral and faunal research S. E. Miller-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In an age when biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate, it is vital that floristic and faunistic information is up to date, reliable and easily accessible for the formulation of effective conservation strategies. Electronic data management and communication are transforming descriptive taxonomy radically, enhancing both the collection and dissemination of crucial data on biodiversity. This volume is written by scientists at the forefront of current developments of floras and faunas, along with specialists from applied user groups. The chapters review novel methods of research, development and dissemination, which aim to maximise the relevance and impact of data. Regional case studies are used to illustrate the outputs and impacts of taxonomic research. Integrated approaches are presented which have the capacity to accelerate the production of floras and faunas and to better serve the needs of a widening audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH75 .D465 2015 Unknown