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Book
1 PDF (xv, 116 pages).
  • 1. Introduction and scope
  • 1.1 Definitions
  • 1.2 User engagement vs. user experience
  • 1.3 Characteristics
  • 1.3.1 Focused attention
  • 1.3.2 Positive affect
  • 1.3.3 Aesthetics appeal
  • 1.3.4 Endurability
  • 1.3.5 Novelty
  • 1.3.6 Richness and control
  • 1.3.7 Reputation, trust, and expectation
  • 1.3.8 User context, motivation, incentives, and benefits
  • 1.4 Measurements
  • 1.5 Scope
  • 1.6 Structure
  • 2. Approaches based on self-report methods
  • 2.1 Self-report approaches
  • 2.2 Advantages and limitations of self-report methods
  • 2.2.1 Communication
  • 2.2.2 Methodology bias
  • 2.2.3 Reliability and validity
  • 2.3 Interviews
  • 2.3.1 Types of interviews
  • 2.3.2 Applying interviews to measure user engagement
  • 2.4 Think aloud and think after protocols
  • 2.4.1 Think aloud
  • 2.4.2 Think after
  • 2.4.3 Relationship to user engagement
  • 2.5 Questionnaires
  • 2.6 Questionnaires for measuring user engagement
  • 2.6.1 Survey to evaluate engagement
  • 2.6.2 Engagement and influences on questionnaire
  • 2.6.3 User engagement scale
  • 2.6.4 eHealth engagement scale
  • 2.7 Constructs related to user engagement
  • 2.7.1 Mental workload
  • 2.7.2 Disorientation
  • 2.7.3 Playfulness
  • 2.7.4 Cognitive absorption
  • 2.8 Summary
  • 3. Approaches based on physiological measurements
  • 3.1 Psychophysiological measurements
  • 3.2 Facial expressions
  • 3.3 Eye tracking
  • 3.3.1 Eye tracking and search
  • 3.3.2 Eye tracking and reading
  • 3.3.3 Eye tracking and selection
  • 3.3.4 Summary and limitations
  • 3.4 Cursor tracking
  • 3.4.1 Aligning eye gaze and mouse movement
  • 3.4.2 Mouse movement in search
  • 3.4.3 Mouse movement elsewhere
  • 3.5 Summary
  • 4. Approaches based on web analytics
  • 4.1 Intra-session vs. inter-session engagement
  • 4.2 Some dimensions of online measurements
  • 4.2.1 Dependence on the type of website
  • 4.2.2 Dependence on the type of user
  • 4.2.3 Dependence on the task
  • 4.3 Large-scale measurements
  • 4.4 Intra-session measurements
  • 4.4.1 Dwell time and similar measures
  • 4.4.2 Revisits to a site
  • 4.4.3 Clickthrough rate
  • 4.4.4 Number of pages viewed
  • 4.4.5 Other measurements
  • 4.5 Inter-session measurements
  • 4.5.1 Direct value measurement
  • 4.5.2 Total use measurement
  • 4.5.3 Return-rate measurement
  • 4.6 Summary
  • 5. Beyond desktop, single site, and single task
  • 5.1 Measuring for online multitasking
  • 5.2 Measuring on a network of sites
  • 5.3 Measuring in mobile information seeking
  • 5.4 Summary
  • 6. Enhancing the rigor of user engagement methods and measures
  • 6.1 Scale
  • 6.2 Setting
  • 6.3 Temporality
  • 6.4 Objectivity and subjectivity
  • 6.5 Process- and product-based
  • 6.6 Summary
  • 7. Conclusions and future research directions
  • 7.1 Summary
  • 7.2 Future research directions
  • 7.3 Take-aways
  • Bibliography
  • Authors' biographies
  • Index.
User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online applications are able to successfully engage users, and may inform the design of and use of applications. User engagement is a multifaceted, complex phenomenon; this gives rise to a number of potential measurement approaches. Common ways to evaluate user engagement include using self-report measures, e.g., questionnaires; observational methods, e.g. facial expression analysis, speech analysis; neuro-physiological signal processing methods, e.g., respiratory and cardiovascular accelerations and decelerations, muscle spasms; and web analytics, e.g., number of site visits, click depth. These methods represent various trade-offs in terms of the setting (laboratory versus "in the wild"), object of measurement (user behaviour, affect or cognition) and scale of data collected. For instance, small-scale user studies are deep and rich, but limited in terms of generalizability, whereas large-scale web analytic studies are powerful but negate users' motivation and context. The focus of this book is how user engagement is currently being measured and various considerations for its measurement. Our goal is to leave readers with an appreciation of the various ways in which to measure user engagement, and their associated strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize the multifaceted nature of user engagement and the unique contextual constraints that come to bear upon attempts to measure engagement in different settings, and across different user groups and web domains. At the same time, this book advocates for the development of "good" measures and good measurement practices that will advance the study of user engagement and improve our understanding of this construct, which has become so vital in our wired world.
  • 1. Introduction and scope
  • 1.1 Definitions
  • 1.2 User engagement vs. user experience
  • 1.3 Characteristics
  • 1.3.1 Focused attention
  • 1.3.2 Positive affect
  • 1.3.3 Aesthetics appeal
  • 1.3.4 Endurability
  • 1.3.5 Novelty
  • 1.3.6 Richness and control
  • 1.3.7 Reputation, trust, and expectation
  • 1.3.8 User context, motivation, incentives, and benefits
  • 1.4 Measurements
  • 1.5 Scope
  • 1.6 Structure
  • 2. Approaches based on self-report methods
  • 2.1 Self-report approaches
  • 2.2 Advantages and limitations of self-report methods
  • 2.2.1 Communication
  • 2.2.2 Methodology bias
  • 2.2.3 Reliability and validity
  • 2.3 Interviews
  • 2.3.1 Types of interviews
  • 2.3.2 Applying interviews to measure user engagement
  • 2.4 Think aloud and think after protocols
  • 2.4.1 Think aloud
  • 2.4.2 Think after
  • 2.4.3 Relationship to user engagement
  • 2.5 Questionnaires
  • 2.6 Questionnaires for measuring user engagement
  • 2.6.1 Survey to evaluate engagement
  • 2.6.2 Engagement and influences on questionnaire
  • 2.6.3 User engagement scale
  • 2.6.4 eHealth engagement scale
  • 2.7 Constructs related to user engagement
  • 2.7.1 Mental workload
  • 2.7.2 Disorientation
  • 2.7.3 Playfulness
  • 2.7.4 Cognitive absorption
  • 2.8 Summary
  • 3. Approaches based on physiological measurements
  • 3.1 Psychophysiological measurements
  • 3.2 Facial expressions
  • 3.3 Eye tracking
  • 3.3.1 Eye tracking and search
  • 3.3.2 Eye tracking and reading
  • 3.3.3 Eye tracking and selection
  • 3.3.4 Summary and limitations
  • 3.4 Cursor tracking
  • 3.4.1 Aligning eye gaze and mouse movement
  • 3.4.2 Mouse movement in search
  • 3.4.3 Mouse movement elsewhere
  • 3.5 Summary
  • 4. Approaches based on web analytics
  • 4.1 Intra-session vs. inter-session engagement
  • 4.2 Some dimensions of online measurements
  • 4.2.1 Dependence on the type of website
  • 4.2.2 Dependence on the type of user
  • 4.2.3 Dependence on the task
  • 4.3 Large-scale measurements
  • 4.4 Intra-session measurements
  • 4.4.1 Dwell time and similar measures
  • 4.4.2 Revisits to a site
  • 4.4.3 Clickthrough rate
  • 4.4.4 Number of pages viewed
  • 4.4.5 Other measurements
  • 4.5 Inter-session measurements
  • 4.5.1 Direct value measurement
  • 4.5.2 Total use measurement
  • 4.5.3 Return-rate measurement
  • 4.6 Summary
  • 5. Beyond desktop, single site, and single task
  • 5.1 Measuring for online multitasking
  • 5.2 Measuring on a network of sites
  • 5.3 Measuring in mobile information seeking
  • 5.4 Summary
  • 6. Enhancing the rigor of user engagement methods and measures
  • 6.1 Scale
  • 6.2 Setting
  • 6.3 Temporality
  • 6.4 Objectivity and subjectivity
  • 6.5 Process- and product-based
  • 6.6 Summary
  • 7. Conclusions and future research directions
  • 7.1 Summary
  • 7.2 Future research directions
  • 7.3 Take-aways
  • Bibliography
  • Authors' biographies
  • Index.
User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online applications are able to successfully engage users, and may inform the design of and use of applications. User engagement is a multifaceted, complex phenomenon; this gives rise to a number of potential measurement approaches. Common ways to evaluate user engagement include using self-report measures, e.g., questionnaires; observational methods, e.g. facial expression analysis, speech analysis; neuro-physiological signal processing methods, e.g., respiratory and cardiovascular accelerations and decelerations, muscle spasms; and web analytics, e.g., number of site visits, click depth. These methods represent various trade-offs in terms of the setting (laboratory versus "in the wild"), object of measurement (user behaviour, affect or cognition) and scale of data collected. For instance, small-scale user studies are deep and rich, but limited in terms of generalizability, whereas large-scale web analytic studies are powerful but negate users' motivation and context. The focus of this book is how user engagement is currently being measured and various considerations for its measurement. Our goal is to leave readers with an appreciation of the various ways in which to measure user engagement, and their associated strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize the multifaceted nature of user engagement and the unique contextual constraints that come to bear upon attempts to measure engagement in different settings, and across different user groups and web domains. At the same time, this book advocates for the development of "good" measures and good measurement practices that will advance the study of user engagement and improve our understanding of this construct, which has become so vital in our wired world.
Book
1 online resource.
This book provides an overview of skeletal biology from the molecular level to the organ level, including cellular control, interaction and response; adaptive responses to various external stimuli; the interaction of the skeletal system with other metabolic processes in the body; and the effect of various disease processes on the skeleton. The book also includes chapters that address how the skeleton can be evaluated through the use of various imaging technologies, biomechanical testing, histomorphometric analysis, and the use of genetically modified animal models. It presents an in-depth overview of skeletal biology from the molecular to the organ level. It offers "refresher" level content for clinicians or researchers outside their areas of expertise. It boasts editors and many chapter authors from Indiana and Purdue Universities, two of the broadest and deepest programs in skeletal biology in the US; other chapter authors include clinician scientists from pharmaceutical companies that apply the basics of bone biology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book provides an overview of skeletal biology from the molecular level to the organ level, including cellular control, interaction and response; adaptive responses to various external stimuli; the interaction of the skeletal system with other metabolic processes in the body; and the effect of various disease processes on the skeleton. The book also includes chapters that address how the skeleton can be evaluated through the use of various imaging technologies, biomechanical testing, histomorphometric analysis, and the use of genetically modified animal models. It presents an in-depth overview of skeletal biology from the molecular to the organ level. It offers "refresher" level content for clinicians or researchers outside their areas of expertise. It boasts editors and many chapter authors from Indiana and Purdue Universities, two of the broadest and deepest programs in skeletal biology in the US; other chapter authors include clinician scientists from pharmaceutical companies that apply the basics of bone biology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (295 pages)
Calculus of Thought: Neuromorphic Logistic Regression in Cognitive Machines is a must-read for all scientists about a very simple computation method designed to simulate big-data neural processing. This book is inspired by the Calculus Ratiocinator idea of Gottfried Leibniz, which is that machine computation should be developed to simulate human cognitive processes, thus avoiding problematic subjective bias in analytic solutions to practical and scientific problems. The reduced error logistic regression (RELR) method is proposed as such a "Calculus of Thought." This book reviews how RELR's completely automated processing may parallel important aspects of explicit and implicit learning in neural processes. It emphasizes the fact that RELR is really just a simple adjustment to already widely used logistic regression, along with RELR's new applications that go well beyond standard logistic regression in prediction and explanation. Readers will learn how RELR solves some of the most basic problems in today's big and small data related to high dimensionality, multi-colinearity, and cognitive bias in capricious outcomes commonly involving human behavior. Features include: provides a high-level introduction and detailed reviews of the neural, statistical and machine learning knowledge base as a foundation for a new era of smarter machines; argues that smarter machine learning to handle both explanation and prediction without cognitive bias must have a foundation in cognitive neuroscience and must embody similar explicit and implicit learning principles that occur in the brain; and offers a new neuromorphic foundation for machine learning based upon the reduced error logistic regression (RELR) method and provides simple examples of RELR computations in toy problems that can be accessed in spreadsheet workbooks through a companion website.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Calculus of Thought: Neuromorphic Logistic Regression in Cognitive Machines is a must-read for all scientists about a very simple computation method designed to simulate big-data neural processing. This book is inspired by the Calculus Ratiocinator idea of Gottfried Leibniz, which is that machine computation should be developed to simulate human cognitive processes, thus avoiding problematic subjective bias in analytic solutions to practical and scientific problems. The reduced error logistic regression (RELR) method is proposed as such a "Calculus of Thought." This book reviews how RELR's completely automated processing may parallel important aspects of explicit and implicit learning in neural processes. It emphasizes the fact that RELR is really just a simple adjustment to already widely used logistic regression, along with RELR's new applications that go well beyond standard logistic regression in prediction and explanation. Readers will learn how RELR solves some of the most basic problems in today's big and small data related to high dimensionality, multi-colinearity, and cognitive bias in capricious outcomes commonly involving human behavior. Features include: provides a high-level introduction and detailed reviews of the neural, statistical and machine learning knowledge base as a foundation for a new era of smarter machines; argues that smarter machine learning to handle both explanation and prediction without cognitive bias must have a foundation in cognitive neuroscience and must embody similar explicit and implicit learning principles that occur in the brain; and offers a new neuromorphic foundation for machine learning based upon the reduced error logistic regression (RELR) method and provides simple examples of RELR computations in toy problems that can be accessed in spreadsheet workbooks through a companion website.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (408 pages)
  • History of the study and nomenclature of the claustrum
  • The structure and connections of the claustrum
  • The neurochemical organization of the claustrum
  • Development and evolution of the claustrum
  • Physiology of the claustrum
  • Neurocomputation and coding in the claustrum
  • Structural and functional connectivity of the claustrum in the human brain
  • Delayed development of the claustrum in autism
  • The claustrum in schizophrenia
  • Clinical relations: epilepsy
  • The claustrum and Alzheimer's disease
  • Parkinson's disease and the claustrum
  • Hypotheses relating to the function of the claustrum
  • What is it to be conscious?
  • Selected key areas for future research on the claustrum.
The present day is witnessing an explosion of our understanding of how the brain works at all levels, in which complexity is piled on complexity, and mechanisms of astonishing elegance are being continually discovered. This process is most developed in the major areas of the brain, such as the cortex, thalamus, and striatum. The Claustrum instead focuses on a small, remote, and, until recently, relatively unknown area of the brain. In recent years, researchers have come to believe that the claustrum is concerned with consciousness, a bold hypothesis supported by the claustrum's two-way connections with nearly every other region of the brain and its seeming involvement with multisensory integrations-the hallmark of consciousness. The claustrum, previously in a humble position at the back of the stage, might in fact be the conductor of the brain's orchestra. The Claustrum brings together leading experts on the claustrum from the varied disciplines of neuroscience, providing a state-of-the-art presentation of what is currently known about the claustrum, promising lines of current research (including epigenetics), and projections of new lines of investigation on the horizon. It develops a unifying hypothesis about the claustrum's role in consciousness, as well as the integration of sensory information and other higher brain functions. It discusses the involvement of the claustrum with autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Coverage of all aspects of the claustrum, from its evolution and development to promising new lines of research, including epigenetics, provides a platform and point of reference for future investigative efforts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • History of the study and nomenclature of the claustrum
  • The structure and connections of the claustrum
  • The neurochemical organization of the claustrum
  • Development and evolution of the claustrum
  • Physiology of the claustrum
  • Neurocomputation and coding in the claustrum
  • Structural and functional connectivity of the claustrum in the human brain
  • Delayed development of the claustrum in autism
  • The claustrum in schizophrenia
  • Clinical relations: epilepsy
  • The claustrum and Alzheimer's disease
  • Parkinson's disease and the claustrum
  • Hypotheses relating to the function of the claustrum
  • What is it to be conscious?
  • Selected key areas for future research on the claustrum.
The present day is witnessing an explosion of our understanding of how the brain works at all levels, in which complexity is piled on complexity, and mechanisms of astonishing elegance are being continually discovered. This process is most developed in the major areas of the brain, such as the cortex, thalamus, and striatum. The Claustrum instead focuses on a small, remote, and, until recently, relatively unknown area of the brain. In recent years, researchers have come to believe that the claustrum is concerned with consciousness, a bold hypothesis supported by the claustrum's two-way connections with nearly every other region of the brain and its seeming involvement with multisensory integrations-the hallmark of consciousness. The claustrum, previously in a humble position at the back of the stage, might in fact be the conductor of the brain's orchestra. The Claustrum brings together leading experts on the claustrum from the varied disciplines of neuroscience, providing a state-of-the-art presentation of what is currently known about the claustrum, promising lines of current research (including epigenetics), and projections of new lines of investigation on the horizon. It develops a unifying hypothesis about the claustrum's role in consciousness, as well as the integration of sensory information and other higher brain functions. It discusses the involvement of the claustrum with autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Coverage of all aspects of the claustrum, from its evolution and development to promising new lines of research, including epigenetics, provides a platform and point of reference for future investigative efforts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (178 p.)
Clinical Anatomy of the Cranial Nerves combines anatomical knowledge, pathology, clinical examination, and explanation of clinical findings, drawing together material typically scattered throughout anatomical textbooks. All of the pertinent anatomical topics are conveniently organized to instruct on anatomy, but also on how to examine the functioning of this anatomy in the patient. Providing a clear and succinct presentation of the underlying anatomy, with directly related applications of the anatomy to clinical examination, the book also provides unique images of anatomical structures of plastinated cadaveric dissections. These images are the only ones that exist in this form, and have been professionally produced in the Laboratory of Human Anatomy, University of Glasgow under the auspices of the author. These specimens offer a novel way of visualizing the cranial nerves and related important anatomical structures. * Anatomy of cranial nerves described in text format with accompanying high-resolution images of professional, high-quality prosected cadaveric material, demonstrating exactly what the structures (and related ones) look like* Succinct yet comprehensive format with quick and easy access to facts in clearly laid out key regions, common throughout the different cranial nerves* Includes clinical examination and related pathologies, featuring diagnostic summaries of potential clinical presentations and clinically relevant questions on the anatomy of these nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Clinical Anatomy of the Cranial Nerves combines anatomical knowledge, pathology, clinical examination, and explanation of clinical findings, drawing together material typically scattered throughout anatomical textbooks. All of the pertinent anatomical topics are conveniently organized to instruct on anatomy, but also on how to examine the functioning of this anatomy in the patient. Providing a clear and succinct presentation of the underlying anatomy, with directly related applications of the anatomy to clinical examination, the book also provides unique images of anatomical structures of plastinated cadaveric dissections. These images are the only ones that exist in this form, and have been professionally produced in the Laboratory of Human Anatomy, University of Glasgow under the auspices of the author. These specimens offer a novel way of visualizing the cranial nerves and related important anatomical structures. * Anatomy of cranial nerves described in text format with accompanying high-resolution images of professional, high-quality prosected cadaveric material, demonstrating exactly what the structures (and related ones) look like* Succinct yet comprehensive format with quick and easy access to facts in clearly laid out key regions, common throughout the different cranial nerves* Includes clinical examination and related pathologies, featuring diagnostic summaries of potential clinical presentations and clinically relevant questions on the anatomy of these nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Definition of comparative medicine: History and new identity
  • 2. Smallest unit of life: Cell biology
  • 3. Supporting apparatus of vertebrates: Skeleton and bones
  • 4. Locomotor principles: Anatomy and physiology of skeletal muscles
  • 5. Lifeblood flow: The circulatory systems
  • 6. Steering and communication: Nervous system and sensory organs
  • 7. Surface, barrier, and interface zone: Comparative aspects of the skin
  • 8. Body messaging: The endocrine systems
  • 9. Alimentation and elimination: The principles of gastrointestinal digestion
  • 10. Volume and clearance: Kidneys and excretory systems
  • 11. Breathing: Comparative aspects of the respiratory system
  • 12. Propagation: Mammalian reproduction
  • 13. Common concepts of immune defense
  • 14. Laboratory animal law: An introduction to its history and principles
  • 15. Ethics inlaboratory animal science.
  • 1. Definition of comparative medicine: History and new identity
  • 2. Smallest unit of life: Cell biology
  • 3. Supporting apparatus of vertebrates: Skeleton and bones
  • 4. Locomotor principles: Anatomy and physiology of skeletal muscles
  • 5. Lifeblood flow: The circulatory systems
  • 6. Steering and communication: Nervous system and sensory organs
  • 7. Surface, barrier, and interface zone: Comparative aspects of the skin
  • 8. Body messaging: The endocrine systems
  • 9. Alimentation and elimination: The principles of gastrointestinal digestion
  • 10. Volume and clearance: Kidneys and excretory systems
  • 11. Breathing: Comparative aspects of the respiratory system
  • 12. Propagation: Mammalian reproduction
  • 13. Common concepts of immune defense
  • 14. Laboratory animal law: An introduction to its history and principles
  • 15. Ethics inlaboratory animal science.
Book
1 online resource (xiii, 585 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Section 1: Neurohistological techniques
  • 1. Brain tissue preparation, sectioning and staining
  • 2. Brain stereotactic injections
  • 3. Tract tracing at light and electron microscopy
  • 4. Stereological analysis of neurological tissues
  • Section 2: In vitro preparations
  • 5. Preparation and use of rodent hippocampal brain slices
  • 6.? Single-Cell Neuronal Dissociation For Electrophysiological Studies
  • 7. Isolation and Culture of Human Neurons, Microglia and Astrocytes
  • 8. Isolation and Culture of Neural Stem/progenitor Cells
  • 9. Isolation of mitochondria from brain tissue and cells
  • 10. Isolation of synaptosomes from archived brain tissues
  • 11. Xenopus oocytes isolation and microinjection
  • Section 3: Leukocyte isolation and application in neuroscience
  • 12. Centrifugal elutriation for studies of neuroimmunity
  • 13. Flow cytometry in neuroscience research
  • Section 4: Standard Laboratory Nucleic Acid and Protein Detections
  • 14. Western Blotting Technique in Biomedical Research
  • 15. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Real-time RT PCR
  • Section 5: Nanomedicine
  • 16. Nanoformulations
  • 17. Neuronanomedicine
  • Section 6: Bioimaging
  • 18. Confocal imaging of nerve cells
  • 19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • 20. X-Ray, Positron Emission, and Single Photon Emission Tomographic Bioimaging
  • 21. Non-Invasive Neurophysiological Imaging with Magnetoencephalography
  • 22. Multiphoton Brain Imaging
  • Section 7: Neuroelectrophysiology
  • 23. Techniques for Extracellular Recordings
  • 24. Blind patch-clamp recordings from rodent hippocampal slices
  • 25. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings
  • Section 8: Immunohistochemistry and autoradiography
  • 26. Analysis of Receptor Binding And Quantitative Autoradiography
  • 27. Techniques in Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry
  • Section 9: Analysis of Gene Expression
  • 28. Protein identification by mass spectrometry: Proteomics
  • 29. DNA Microarrays as a Tool for Neurosciences Research
  • 30. Metabolomics
  • 31. Bioinformatic Methods and Resources for Neuroscience Research
  • Section 10: Animal Models: Behavior and Pathology
  • 32. Motor function in rodent models of neurodegenerative disorders
  • 33. Humanized mice
  • 34. Animal models for PD and ALS
  • 35. Animal models for Alzheimer's Disease
  • 36. Animal Models: Behavior and Pathology.
Current Laboratory Methods in Neuroscience Research is a research manual for both students and seasoned researchers. It focuses on commonly-used techniques employed in neuroscience research, presented in a simple, step-by-step manner for laboratory use. The manual also offers a blueprint for bench-to-bedside research designed to facilitate multidisciplinary neuroscience pursuits. Sections include coverage of neurohistological techniques, in vitro preparations, leukocyte isolation and application in neuroscience, standard laboratory nucleic acid and protein detections, nanomedicine, bioimaging, neuroelectrophysiology, immunohistochemistry and autoradiography, analysis of gene expression, and animal models.
  • Section 1: Neurohistological techniques
  • 1. Brain tissue preparation, sectioning and staining
  • 2. Brain stereotactic injections
  • 3. Tract tracing at light and electron microscopy
  • 4. Stereological analysis of neurological tissues
  • Section 2: In vitro preparations
  • 5. Preparation and use of rodent hippocampal brain slices
  • 6.? Single-Cell Neuronal Dissociation For Electrophysiological Studies
  • 7. Isolation and Culture of Human Neurons, Microglia and Astrocytes
  • 8. Isolation and Culture of Neural Stem/progenitor Cells
  • 9. Isolation of mitochondria from brain tissue and cells
  • 10. Isolation of synaptosomes from archived brain tissues
  • 11. Xenopus oocytes isolation and microinjection
  • Section 3: Leukocyte isolation and application in neuroscience
  • 12. Centrifugal elutriation for studies of neuroimmunity
  • 13. Flow cytometry in neuroscience research
  • Section 4: Standard Laboratory Nucleic Acid and Protein Detections
  • 14. Western Blotting Technique in Biomedical Research
  • 15. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Real-time RT PCR
  • Section 5: Nanomedicine
  • 16. Nanoformulations
  • 17. Neuronanomedicine
  • Section 6: Bioimaging
  • 18. Confocal imaging of nerve cells
  • 19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • 20. X-Ray, Positron Emission, and Single Photon Emission Tomographic Bioimaging
  • 21. Non-Invasive Neurophysiological Imaging with Magnetoencephalography
  • 22. Multiphoton Brain Imaging
  • Section 7: Neuroelectrophysiology
  • 23. Techniques for Extracellular Recordings
  • 24. Blind patch-clamp recordings from rodent hippocampal slices
  • 25. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings
  • Section 8: Immunohistochemistry and autoradiography
  • 26. Analysis of Receptor Binding And Quantitative Autoradiography
  • 27. Techniques in Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry
  • Section 9: Analysis of Gene Expression
  • 28. Protein identification by mass spectrometry: Proteomics
  • 29. DNA Microarrays as a Tool for Neurosciences Research
  • 30. Metabolomics
  • 31. Bioinformatic Methods and Resources for Neuroscience Research
  • Section 10: Animal Models: Behavior and Pathology
  • 32. Motor function in rodent models of neurodegenerative disorders
  • 33. Humanized mice
  • 34. Animal models for PD and ALS
  • 35. Animal models for Alzheimer's Disease
  • 36. Animal Models: Behavior and Pathology.
Current Laboratory Methods in Neuroscience Research is a research manual for both students and seasoned researchers. It focuses on commonly-used techniques employed in neuroscience research, presented in a simple, step-by-step manner for laboratory use. The manual also offers a blueprint for bench-to-bedside research designed to facilitate multidisciplinary neuroscience pursuits. Sections include coverage of neurohistological techniques, in vitro preparations, leukocyte isolation and application in neuroscience, standard laboratory nucleic acid and protein detections, nanomedicine, bioimaging, neuroelectrophysiology, immunohistochemistry and autoradiography, analysis of gene expression, and animal models.
Book
1 online resource (ix, 170 pages) : ill.
  • A Short History of Birth Defect Epidemiology.- Genetic and Non-genetic Factors in the Origin of Congenital Malformations.- Ascertainment of Children with Congenital Malformations.- Statistical Considerations.- Epidemiological Methods.- Neural Tube Defects.- Microcephaly.- Hydrocephaly.- Agenesis of Corpus Callosum and Holoprosencephaly.- Severe Eye Malformations.- Severe Ear Malformations.- Cardiovascular Defects.- Orofacial Clefts.- Atresia or Stenosis of the Alimentary Tract.- Pyloric Stenosis.- Malrotation of the Gut.- Megacolon.- Hypospadias.- Epispadias, Cloacal and Bladder Exstrophy.- Severe Renal Malformations.- Posterior Urethral Valve.- Pes Equinovarus.- Other Foot Deformities than Pes Equinovarus.- Polydactyly and Syndactyly.- Limb Reduction Defects.- Craniostenosis.- Diaphragmatic Hernia.- Abdominal Wall Defects.- Children with multiple malformations.- "Syndromes".- Down Syndrome.- Explanation and Prevention of Birth Defects.- Eight Commandments: Rules for the Interpretation of Birth Defect Epidemiological Studies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Authored by Bengt Kallen, professor emeritus in embryology at Lund University in Sweden. The subject of this book is to describe the occurrence of congenital malformations among children born and what risk factors exist. Population data are presented for a number of malformations, ascertained with the use of data from the Swedish national health registers for the period 1998-2010 corresponding to some 1.3 million births, together with prospectively collected information on a group of exposures of possible interest. The structure of the analysis is such that it excludes studies of, for instance, nutrition, alcohol or street drug use and many other lifestyle factors where prospective information or independent register information is difficult or impossible to obtain. Epidemiology of Human Congenital Malformations culminates with a discussion on how the presence of malformations can be explained and various possibilities for the prevention of birth defects. Moreover, it will include a series of instructions on how to read epidemiological literature in this field making it an essential resource both for those currently working in the field of reproductive epidemiology or those intending to enter it. It will additionally be useful for doctors working with malformations, either as obstetricians, neonatologists or pediatricians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A Short History of Birth Defect Epidemiology.- Genetic and Non-genetic Factors in the Origin of Congenital Malformations.- Ascertainment of Children with Congenital Malformations.- Statistical Considerations.- Epidemiological Methods.- Neural Tube Defects.- Microcephaly.- Hydrocephaly.- Agenesis of Corpus Callosum and Holoprosencephaly.- Severe Eye Malformations.- Severe Ear Malformations.- Cardiovascular Defects.- Orofacial Clefts.- Atresia or Stenosis of the Alimentary Tract.- Pyloric Stenosis.- Malrotation of the Gut.- Megacolon.- Hypospadias.- Epispadias, Cloacal and Bladder Exstrophy.- Severe Renal Malformations.- Posterior Urethral Valve.- Pes Equinovarus.- Other Foot Deformities than Pes Equinovarus.- Polydactyly and Syndactyly.- Limb Reduction Defects.- Craniostenosis.- Diaphragmatic Hernia.- Abdominal Wall Defects.- Children with multiple malformations.- "Syndromes".- Down Syndrome.- Explanation and Prevention of Birth Defects.- Eight Commandments: Rules for the Interpretation of Birth Defect Epidemiological Studies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Authored by Bengt Kallen, professor emeritus in embryology at Lund University in Sweden. The subject of this book is to describe the occurrence of congenital malformations among children born and what risk factors exist. Population data are presented for a number of malformations, ascertained with the use of data from the Swedish national health registers for the period 1998-2010 corresponding to some 1.3 million births, together with prospectively collected information on a group of exposures of possible interest. The structure of the analysis is such that it excludes studies of, for instance, nutrition, alcohol or street drug use and many other lifestyle factors where prospective information or independent register information is difficult or impossible to obtain. Epidemiology of Human Congenital Malformations culminates with a discussion on how the presence of malformations can be explained and various possibilities for the prevention of birth defects. Moreover, it will include a series of instructions on how to read epidemiological literature in this field making it an essential resource both for those currently working in the field of reproductive epidemiology or those intending to enter it. It will additionally be useful for doctors working with malformations, either as obstetricians, neonatologists or pediatricians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xx, 829 p.) : ill.
  • Atlas
  • Basic biology
  • Protocols.
The Guide to Investigation of Mouse Pregnancy is the first publication to cover the mouse placenta or the angiogenic tree the mother develops to support the placenta. This much-needed resource covers monitoring of the cardiovascular system, gestational programming of chronic adult disease, epigenetic regulation, gene imprinting, and stem cells. Offering detailed and integrated information on how drugs, biologics, stress, and manipulations impact pregnancy in the mouse model, this reference highlights techniques used to analyze mouse pregnancy. Joining the ranks of much referenced mouse resources, The Guide to Investigation of Mouse Pregnancy is the only manual providing needed content on pregnancy in animal models for translational medicine and research. It provides instruction on how to collect pre-clinical data on pregnancy in mouse models for eventual use in human applications. It describes the angiogenic tree the mother's uterus develops to support pregnancy and the monitoring of pregnancy-induced cardiovascular changes. It educates readers on placental cell lineages, decidual development including immune cells, epigenetic regulation, gene imprinting, stem cells, birth and lactation. It discusses how stress, environmental toxicants and other manipulations impact upon placental function and pregnancy success.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Atlas
  • Basic biology
  • Protocols.
The Guide to Investigation of Mouse Pregnancy is the first publication to cover the mouse placenta or the angiogenic tree the mother develops to support the placenta. This much-needed resource covers monitoring of the cardiovascular system, gestational programming of chronic adult disease, epigenetic regulation, gene imprinting, and stem cells. Offering detailed and integrated information on how drugs, biologics, stress, and manipulations impact pregnancy in the mouse model, this reference highlights techniques used to analyze mouse pregnancy. Joining the ranks of much referenced mouse resources, The Guide to Investigation of Mouse Pregnancy is the only manual providing needed content on pregnancy in animal models for translational medicine and research. It provides instruction on how to collect pre-clinical data on pregnancy in mouse models for eventual use in human applications. It describes the angiogenic tree the mother's uterus develops to support pregnancy and the monitoring of pregnancy-induced cardiovascular changes. It educates readers on placental cell lineages, decidual development including immune cells, epigenetic regulation, gene imprinting, stem cells, birth and lactation. It discusses how stress, environmental toxicants and other manipulations impact upon placental function and pregnancy success.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xxii, 384 p. : ill. (some col.).
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • Human Thermal Environments Introduction Basic Parameters Heat Transfer for a Cylinder Role of Heat Transfer Theory in the Assessment of Human Thermal Environments The Human Heat Balance Equation and the Thermal Audit The Heat Balance Equation for the Human Body The Thermal Audit Expert Estimation of the Thermal Audit Assessment of Environments Using the Thermal Audit Summary Human Thermal Physiology and Thermoregulation Introduction Thermal Properties of the Human Body Human Thermoregulation Physiological Responses Behavioural Thermoregulation Body Temperature Comfort as the Regulated Variable Psychological Responses and Human Behaviour Introduction Psychological Models Thermal Sensation Thermoreception Psychophysics Semantics, Psychological Models and Multidimensional Scaling Mood, Aggression, Depression and Other Psychological Reactions Discussion Measurement Methods and Assessment Techniques Introduction Measuring Kits and Composite Instruments Measurement of Physiological Response Measurement of Psychological Responses Thermal Index: An Assessment Technique Dehydration and Water Requirements Introduction Body Water Dehydration Measures Thirst Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) Dehydration Limits Practical Recommendations for Drinking Drinking Too Much Thermal Models Introduction Thermal Models Empirical Models Rational Thermal Models Do Models Work? Hybrid Models Computer-Aided Design Metabolic Heat Production Introduction Where Does the Heat Come from? Estimation of Metabolic Heat Production Collection and Analysis of Expired Air The Doubly Labelled Water (DLW) Method The Use of Tables and Databases Empirical Models Subjective Methods Special Populations: Children, People with Physical Disabilities and People Wearing Protective Clothing and Equipment The Thermal Properties of Clothing Introduction The Two-Parameter Model More Complex Clothing Models and the Three-Parameter Model Testing and Developing Clothing Introduction Determination of the Thermal Properties of Clothing Performance Tests Performance Trials Clothing Specification and the Window of Application Thermal Comfort Introduction Whole-Body Thermal Comfort Thermal Models and Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort for Special Environments Thermal Comfort in Special Environments Personal Control Environments Displacement Ventilation and Chilled Ceiling Environments Thermal Comfort in Vehicles Outdoor Thermal Comfort Other Special Environments Thermal Comfort for Special Populations Introduction Do Requirements for Comfort Apply Universally? Effects of Acclimatisation State on Thermal Comfort Requirements Other Factors People with Disabilities Babies, Children, the Sick and the Pregnant Heat Stress Introduction Physiological Responses to Heat Heat Stress Indices Direct Heat Stress Indices Acclimatisation Working Practices for Hot Environments Cold Stress Introduction Physiological Responses to Cold Psychological Response to Cold Cold Injury and Illness Cold Stress Indices Working Practices for Cold Environments Case Study of Cold Work in a Hospital 'Plating Area' Thermal Environments and Human Performance Introduction Early Studies: Factory Output and Accidents Performance in Moderate Environments Performance in Cold Performance Models and Indices Summary Models Environmental Design for Productivity Human Skin Contact with Hot, Moderate and Cold Surfaces Introduction Skin Contact with a Hot Surface: Analysis of the Event Mathematical Models of Heat Transfer Surfaces of Moderate Temperature Cold Surfaces International Standards Introduction ISO Standards Standards in the United States Standards in China Standards in the United Kingdom European Standards (CEN) Example of the Application of International ISO Standards to the Assessment of a Hot Environment Example of the Application of International (ISO) Standards for the Assessment of Moderate Environments Example of the Application of International (ISO) Standards for the Assessment of Cold Environments Weather, Climate Change and Energy Use Introduction Meteorological Observations Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) Future Development and Application of the UTCI Climate Change Human Thermal Environments and Energy Use People in Extreme Heat and Cold, Hypobaric and Hyperbaric Environments, Water, Space and Extreme Sport Introduction People in Extreme Heat People in Extreme Cold People Under Pressure People in Hyperbaric Environments People in Water Frozen Terrain, Snow, Rain, Wind and Floods People in Space Extreme Sport Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Appendix 3 References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the ten years since the publication of the second edition of Human Thermal Environments: The Effects of Hot, Moderate, and Cold Environments on Human Health, Comfort, and Performance, Third Edition, the world has embraced electronic communications, making international collaboration almost instantaneous and global. However, there is still a need for a compilation of up-to-date information and best practices. Reflecting current changes in theory and applications, this third edition of a bestseller continues to be the standard text for the design of environments for humans to live and work safely, comfortably, and effectively, and for the design of materials that help people cope with their environments. See What's New in the Third Edition: All existing chapters significantly updated Five new chapters Testing and development of clothing Adaptive models Thermal comfort for special populations Thermal comfort for special environments Extreme environments Weather Outdoor environments and climate change Fun runs, cold snaps, and heat waves The book covers hot, moderate, and cold environments, and defines them in terms of six basic parameters: air temperature, radiant temperature, humidity, air velocity, clothing worn, and the person's activity. It focuses on the principles and practice of human response, which incorporates psychology, physiology, and environmental physics with applied ergonomics. The text then discusses water requirements, computer modeling, computer-aided design, and current standards. A systematic treatment of thermal environments and how they affect humans in real-world applications, the book links the health and engineering aspects of the built environment. It provides you with updated tools, techniques, and methods for the design of products and environments that achieve thermal comfort.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Human Thermal Environments Introduction Basic Parameters Heat Transfer for a Cylinder Role of Heat Transfer Theory in the Assessment of Human Thermal Environments The Human Heat Balance Equation and the Thermal Audit The Heat Balance Equation for the Human Body The Thermal Audit Expert Estimation of the Thermal Audit Assessment of Environments Using the Thermal Audit Summary Human Thermal Physiology and Thermoregulation Introduction Thermal Properties of the Human Body Human Thermoregulation Physiological Responses Behavioural Thermoregulation Body Temperature Comfort as the Regulated Variable Psychological Responses and Human Behaviour Introduction Psychological Models Thermal Sensation Thermoreception Psychophysics Semantics, Psychological Models and Multidimensional Scaling Mood, Aggression, Depression and Other Psychological Reactions Discussion Measurement Methods and Assessment Techniques Introduction Measuring Kits and Composite Instruments Measurement of Physiological Response Measurement of Psychological Responses Thermal Index: An Assessment Technique Dehydration and Water Requirements Introduction Body Water Dehydration Measures Thirst Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) Dehydration Limits Practical Recommendations for Drinking Drinking Too Much Thermal Models Introduction Thermal Models Empirical Models Rational Thermal Models Do Models Work? Hybrid Models Computer-Aided Design Metabolic Heat Production Introduction Where Does the Heat Come from? Estimation of Metabolic Heat Production Collection and Analysis of Expired Air The Doubly Labelled Water (DLW) Method The Use of Tables and Databases Empirical Models Subjective Methods Special Populations: Children, People with Physical Disabilities and People Wearing Protective Clothing and Equipment The Thermal Properties of Clothing Introduction The Two-Parameter Model More Complex Clothing Models and the Three-Parameter Model Testing and Developing Clothing Introduction Determination of the Thermal Properties of Clothing Performance Tests Performance Trials Clothing Specification and the Window of Application Thermal Comfort Introduction Whole-Body Thermal Comfort Thermal Models and Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort for Special Environments Thermal Comfort in Special Environments Personal Control Environments Displacement Ventilation and Chilled Ceiling Environments Thermal Comfort in Vehicles Outdoor Thermal Comfort Other Special Environments Thermal Comfort for Special Populations Introduction Do Requirements for Comfort Apply Universally? Effects of Acclimatisation State on Thermal Comfort Requirements Other Factors People with Disabilities Babies, Children, the Sick and the Pregnant Heat Stress Introduction Physiological Responses to Heat Heat Stress Indices Direct Heat Stress Indices Acclimatisation Working Practices for Hot Environments Cold Stress Introduction Physiological Responses to Cold Psychological Response to Cold Cold Injury and Illness Cold Stress Indices Working Practices for Cold Environments Case Study of Cold Work in a Hospital 'Plating Area' Thermal Environments and Human Performance Introduction Early Studies: Factory Output and Accidents Performance in Moderate Environments Performance in Cold Performance Models and Indices Summary Models Environmental Design for Productivity Human Skin Contact with Hot, Moderate and Cold Surfaces Introduction Skin Contact with a Hot Surface: Analysis of the Event Mathematical Models of Heat Transfer Surfaces of Moderate Temperature Cold Surfaces International Standards Introduction ISO Standards Standards in the United States Standards in China Standards in the United Kingdom European Standards (CEN) Example of the Application of International ISO Standards to the Assessment of a Hot Environment Example of the Application of International (ISO) Standards for the Assessment of Moderate Environments Example of the Application of International (ISO) Standards for the Assessment of Cold Environments Weather, Climate Change and Energy Use Introduction Meteorological Observations Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) Future Development and Application of the UTCI Climate Change Human Thermal Environments and Energy Use People in Extreme Heat and Cold, Hypobaric and Hyperbaric Environments, Water, Space and Extreme Sport Introduction People in Extreme Heat People in Extreme Cold People Under Pressure People in Hyperbaric Environments People in Water Frozen Terrain, Snow, Rain, Wind and Floods People in Space Extreme Sport Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Appendix 3 References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the ten years since the publication of the second edition of Human Thermal Environments: The Effects of Hot, Moderate, and Cold Environments on Human Health, Comfort, and Performance, Third Edition, the world has embraced electronic communications, making international collaboration almost instantaneous and global. However, there is still a need for a compilation of up-to-date information and best practices. Reflecting current changes in theory and applications, this third edition of a bestseller continues to be the standard text for the design of environments for humans to live and work safely, comfortably, and effectively, and for the design of materials that help people cope with their environments. See What's New in the Third Edition: All existing chapters significantly updated Five new chapters Testing and development of clothing Adaptive models Thermal comfort for special populations Thermal comfort for special environments Extreme environments Weather Outdoor environments and climate change Fun runs, cold snaps, and heat waves The book covers hot, moderate, and cold environments, and defines them in terms of six basic parameters: air temperature, radiant temperature, humidity, air velocity, clothing worn, and the person's activity. It focuses on the principles and practice of human response, which incorporates psychology, physiology, and environmental physics with applied ergonomics. The text then discusses water requirements, computer modeling, computer-aided design, and current standards. A systematic treatment of thermal environments and how they affect humans in real-world applications, the book links the health and engineering aspects of the built environment. It provides you with updated tools, techniques, and methods for the design of products and environments that achieve thermal comfort.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (225 pages).
  • Chapter 1. Introduction to Informatics Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 2. Basic Computing Seung L. Park, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 3. Networking Muhammad A. Syed, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 4. Databases Seung L. Park, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 5. Coding Seung L. Park, Jacqueline Cuda, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 6. Laboratory Information Systems Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 7. Laboratory Information System Operations and Regulations Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 8. Reporting Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 9. Quality Management Liron Pantanowitz, Luke T. Wiehagen, and R. Marshall Austin Chapter 10. Barcoding Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 11. Informatics Projects Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 12. Lean Six Sigma Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 13. Electronic Medical Records Seung L. Park, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 14. Digital Imaging Milon Amin, Liron Pantanowitz, and Anil V. Parwani Chapter 15. Automated Pap Tests Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 16. Telecytology Sara E. Monaco and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 17. Cytology Online Walid E. Khalbuss Chapter 18. Bioinformatics Somak Roy, Liron Pantanowitz, and Anil V. Parwani Chapter 19. Research Informatics Somak Roy, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Practical Informatics for Cytopathology provides a concise and practical overview of pathology informatics. The book offers a succinct overview of basic computing and laboratory information systems applied specifically to the field of cytopathology. Readers are exposed to emerging areas in pathology informatics, such as specimen tracking and digital imaging. Valuable features of this volume include summary tables, diagrams, vital resources and a glossary of informatics terms to help readers. Written by authorizes in the field, Practical Informatics for Cytopathology is a vital resource that provides users with a solid, comprehensive foundation and practical working knowledge of the rapidly emerging field of pathology informatics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1. Introduction to Informatics Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 2. Basic Computing Seung L. Park, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 3. Networking Muhammad A. Syed, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 4. Databases Seung L. Park, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 5. Coding Seung L. Park, Jacqueline Cuda, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 6. Laboratory Information Systems Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 7. Laboratory Information System Operations and Regulations Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 8. Reporting Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 9. Quality Management Liron Pantanowitz, Luke T. Wiehagen, and R. Marshall Austin Chapter 10. Barcoding Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 11. Informatics Projects Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 12. Lean Six Sigma Ioan C. Cucoranu, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 13. Electronic Medical Records Seung L. Park, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 14. Digital Imaging Milon Amin, Liron Pantanowitz, and Anil V. Parwani Chapter 15. Automated Pap Tests Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 16. Telecytology Sara E. Monaco and Liron Pantanowitz Chapter 17. Cytology Online Walid E. Khalbuss Chapter 18. Bioinformatics Somak Roy, Liron Pantanowitz, and Anil V. Parwani Chapter 19. Research Informatics Somak Roy, Anil V. Parwani, and Liron Pantanowitz.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Practical Informatics for Cytopathology provides a concise and practical overview of pathology informatics. The book offers a succinct overview of basic computing and laboratory information systems applied specifically to the field of cytopathology. Readers are exposed to emerging areas in pathology informatics, such as specimen tracking and digital imaging. Valuable features of this volume include summary tables, diagrams, vital resources and a glossary of informatics terms to help readers. Written by authorizes in the field, Practical Informatics for Cytopathology is a vital resource that provides users with a solid, comprehensive foundation and practical working knowledge of the rapidly emerging field of pathology informatics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
  • .- 1 Understanding Retina Development Can Inform Future Regenerative Therapies .- Peter D. Westenskow .- 2 Mitochondria in retinal neurodegeneration and stem cell models .- Ian A. Trounce .- 3 The regenerative potential of the vertebrate retina - lessons from the zebrafish .- Jeremy Ng, Peter D. Currie, Patricia R. Jusuf .- 4 Stem Cells and Regeneration in the Xenopus Retina .- Magdalena Hidalgo, Morgane Locker, Albert Chesneau, Muriel Perron .- 5 Advances in Pluripotent and Adult Stem Cells for Eye Research .- Gary S.L. Peh, Raymond C.B. Wong .- 6 Stem cell strategies for optic nerve protection .- Alessia Tassoni, Keith R. Martin .- 7 Stem cell strategies for diseases of the outer retina .- Alex W. Hewitt, Kathryn C. Davidson .- 8 Potential of Muller cells and stem/progenitor cells to regenerate retinal tissue .- Marius Ader, Volker Enzmann, Mike Francke .- 9 Stem cells and the ocular lens: implications for cataract research and therapy .- Patricia Murphy, Michael D. O'Connor .- 10 Trabecular Meshwork Stem Cells .- Hongmin Yun, Joel S. Schuman, Yiqin Du .- 11 Stem Cells of the Human Corneoscleral Niche .- Samuel McLenachan, Dan Zhang, Fred K. Chen .- 12 Advances on optic nerve regeneration and therapeutic strategies .- Silmara de Lima, Yoshiki Koriyama, Takuji Kurimoto, Larry I. Benowitz .- 13 Bionic Eyes: Vision Restoration through Electronic or Photovoltaic Stimulation .- Lauren N. Ayton, Robyn H. Guymer, Penelope J. Allen, Chi D. Luu .- 14 Stem Cell-Derived RPE Transplantation for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Experimental Studies to Improve Transplant Survival and Differentiation .- Ilene K. Sugino, Qian Sun, Noounanong Cheewatrakoolpong, Christopher Malcuit, Marco A Zarbin .- 15 Seeing The Full Picture: The Hidden Cost Of The Stem Cell And Regenerative Medicine Revolution .- Claire Tanner, Megan Munsie.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This text is a comprehensive look at the current knowledge on stem cell application for vision loss, showcasing different types of stem cells (adult, embryonic, iPSCs) for diseases of the front and the back of the eye. It also highlights data obtained in various models from fish to human, as well as from the bionic eye project for vision regeneration. This volume in the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series is essential reading for stem cell biologists, ophthalmologists, advanced and graduate students, in addition to academics and medical staff who work in these disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • .- 1 Understanding Retina Development Can Inform Future Regenerative Therapies .- Peter D. Westenskow .- 2 Mitochondria in retinal neurodegeneration and stem cell models .- Ian A. Trounce .- 3 The regenerative potential of the vertebrate retina - lessons from the zebrafish .- Jeremy Ng, Peter D. Currie, Patricia R. Jusuf .- 4 Stem Cells and Regeneration in the Xenopus Retina .- Magdalena Hidalgo, Morgane Locker, Albert Chesneau, Muriel Perron .- 5 Advances in Pluripotent and Adult Stem Cells for Eye Research .- Gary S.L. Peh, Raymond C.B. Wong .- 6 Stem cell strategies for optic nerve protection .- Alessia Tassoni, Keith R. Martin .- 7 Stem cell strategies for diseases of the outer retina .- Alex W. Hewitt, Kathryn C. Davidson .- 8 Potential of Muller cells and stem/progenitor cells to regenerate retinal tissue .- Marius Ader, Volker Enzmann, Mike Francke .- 9 Stem cells and the ocular lens: implications for cataract research and therapy .- Patricia Murphy, Michael D. O'Connor .- 10 Trabecular Meshwork Stem Cells .- Hongmin Yun, Joel S. Schuman, Yiqin Du .- 11 Stem Cells of the Human Corneoscleral Niche .- Samuel McLenachan, Dan Zhang, Fred K. Chen .- 12 Advances on optic nerve regeneration and therapeutic strategies .- Silmara de Lima, Yoshiki Koriyama, Takuji Kurimoto, Larry I. Benowitz .- 13 Bionic Eyes: Vision Restoration through Electronic or Photovoltaic Stimulation .- Lauren N. Ayton, Robyn H. Guymer, Penelope J. Allen, Chi D. Luu .- 14 Stem Cell-Derived RPE Transplantation for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Experimental Studies to Improve Transplant Survival and Differentiation .- Ilene K. Sugino, Qian Sun, Noounanong Cheewatrakoolpong, Christopher Malcuit, Marco A Zarbin .- 15 Seeing The Full Picture: The Hidden Cost Of The Stem Cell And Regenerative Medicine Revolution .- Claire Tanner, Megan Munsie.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This text is a comprehensive look at the current knowledge on stem cell application for vision loss, showcasing different types of stem cells (adult, embryonic, iPSCs) for diseases of the front and the back of the eye. It also highlights data obtained in various models from fish to human, as well as from the bionic eye project for vision regeneration. This volume in the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series is essential reading for stem cell biologists, ophthalmologists, advanced and graduate students, in addition to academics and medical staff who work in these disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
online resource (xxvii, 533 pages) : illustrations, portraits
  • A Scientific Genealogy: The Development of Fetal-Neonatal Research
  • Oxford and the Development of Physiology, with Notes on the Nuffield Institute
  • Geoffrey S. Dawes: A Life in Science
  • Dawes and Fetal Asphyxia: The Primate Colony in Puerto Rico
  • Dawes, the Pulmonary Vasculature and his Foetal and Neonatal Physiology
  • Embryology and Early Developmental Physiology
  • Some Aspects of the Physiology of the Placenta
  • Governmental Support of Research in Fetal and Newborn Physiology
  • Fetal-Neonatal Growth and Metabolism
  • Epigenetics and the Fetal Origins of Adult Heath and Disease
  • Related Developments in Fetal and Neonatal Endocrinology
  • Further Developments in Fetal and Neonatal Physiology
  • Some Clinical Aspects of Developmental Physiology
  • Bioethical Issues in Research on the Fetus and Newborn Infant
  • Textbooks, Monographs and other Volumes on Fetal and Newborn Physiology
  • Dawes and Fetal Breathing in the 1970s, and Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in the 1980s and early 1990s
  • Dawes Contributions to Symposia and a Summing Up
  • Dawes as a Mentor: Reminisces of Former Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Associates
  • Early Years of the Society for Gynecologic Investigation, the Fetal and Neonatal.
During the mid- to late-twentieth century, study of the physiology of the developing fetus and newborn infant evolved rapidly to become a major discipline in the biomedical sciences. Initially of interest from a standpoint of function of the placenta and oxygenation of the fetus, the field advanced to explore both normal functional mechanisms as well as pathophysiologic aspects of their regulation. Examples include studying the role and regulation of circulatory vascular anatomic shunts in oxygenation, cardiac function, certain aspects of asphyxia in the fetus and newborn infant, the role of fetal breathing movements, cyclic electroencephalographic activity, and analysis of electronic monitoring of fetal heart rate variability and its significance. Included in this book are reminisces of several dozen individuals who played a vital role in these developments. Overall, this survey considers a number of aspects of the development of the science of fetal and neonatal physiology, and its role in the greatly improved care of pregnant women and their newborn infants.
  • A Scientific Genealogy: The Development of Fetal-Neonatal Research
  • Oxford and the Development of Physiology, with Notes on the Nuffield Institute
  • Geoffrey S. Dawes: A Life in Science
  • Dawes and Fetal Asphyxia: The Primate Colony in Puerto Rico
  • Dawes, the Pulmonary Vasculature and his Foetal and Neonatal Physiology
  • Embryology and Early Developmental Physiology
  • Some Aspects of the Physiology of the Placenta
  • Governmental Support of Research in Fetal and Newborn Physiology
  • Fetal-Neonatal Growth and Metabolism
  • Epigenetics and the Fetal Origins of Adult Heath and Disease
  • Related Developments in Fetal and Neonatal Endocrinology
  • Further Developments in Fetal and Neonatal Physiology
  • Some Clinical Aspects of Developmental Physiology
  • Bioethical Issues in Research on the Fetus and Newborn Infant
  • Textbooks, Monographs and other Volumes on Fetal and Newborn Physiology
  • Dawes and Fetal Breathing in the 1970s, and Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in the 1980s and early 1990s
  • Dawes Contributions to Symposia and a Summing Up
  • Dawes as a Mentor: Reminisces of Former Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Associates
  • Early Years of the Society for Gynecologic Investigation, the Fetal and Neonatal.
During the mid- to late-twentieth century, study of the physiology of the developing fetus and newborn infant evolved rapidly to become a major discipline in the biomedical sciences. Initially of interest from a standpoint of function of the placenta and oxygenation of the fetus, the field advanced to explore both normal functional mechanisms as well as pathophysiologic aspects of their regulation. Examples include studying the role and regulation of circulatory vascular anatomic shunts in oxygenation, cardiac function, certain aspects of asphyxia in the fetus and newborn infant, the role of fetal breathing movements, cyclic electroencephalographic activity, and analysis of electronic monitoring of fetal heart rate variability and its significance. Included in this book are reminisces of several dozen individuals who played a vital role in these developments. Overall, this survey considers a number of aspects of the development of the science of fetal and neonatal physiology, and its role in the greatly improved care of pregnant women and their newborn infants.
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Book
1 online resource (ix, 414 p.) : ill.
  • Introduction to the human body
  • Cellular chemistry
  • Cell structure and function
  • Tissues
  • Integumentary system
  • Skeletal system
  • Muscle tissue and mode of contraction
  • Muscular system
  • Nervous tissue
  • Central nervous system
  • Peripheral and autonomic nervous systems
  • Sensory organs
  • Endocrine system
  • Cardiovascular system: blood
  • Cardiovascular system: the heart
  • Cardiovascular system: vessels and blood circulation
  • Lymphatic system and body immunity
  • Respiratory system
  • Digestive system
  • Metabolism, nutrition, and temperature regulation
  • Urinary system
  • Water and electrolyte balance
  • Reproductive system.
Tough Test Questions? Missed Lectures? Not Enough Time? Fortunately for you, there's Schaum's. This all-in-one-package includes more than 1,400 fully solved problems, examples, and practice exercises to sharpen your problem-solving skills. Plus, you will have access to 20 detailed videos featuring Science instructors who explain the most commonly tested concepts - it's just like having your own virtual tutor! You'll find everything you need to build confidence, skills, and knowledge for the highest score possible. More than 40 million students have trusted Schaum's to help them succeed in the classroom and on exams. Schaum's is the key to faster learning and higher grades in every subject. Each Outline presents all the essential course information in an easy-to-follow, topic-by-topic format. You also get hundreds of examples, solved problems, and practice exercises to test your skills. This Schaum's Outline gives you: 1,470 fully solved problems; clear, concise explanations of all human anatomy and physiology concepts; and a complete review of the human body's cellular chemistry and structure, tissues, systems, immunity, and reproduction process. Fully compatible with your classroom text, Schaum's highlights all the important facts you need to know. Use Schaum's to shorten your study time-and get your best test scores!.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction to the human body
  • Cellular chemistry
  • Cell structure and function
  • Tissues
  • Integumentary system
  • Skeletal system
  • Muscle tissue and mode of contraction
  • Muscular system
  • Nervous tissue
  • Central nervous system
  • Peripheral and autonomic nervous systems
  • Sensory organs
  • Endocrine system
  • Cardiovascular system: blood
  • Cardiovascular system: the heart
  • Cardiovascular system: vessels and blood circulation
  • Lymphatic system and body immunity
  • Respiratory system
  • Digestive system
  • Metabolism, nutrition, and temperature regulation
  • Urinary system
  • Water and electrolyte balance
  • Reproductive system.
Tough Test Questions? Missed Lectures? Not Enough Time? Fortunately for you, there's Schaum's. This all-in-one-package includes more than 1,400 fully solved problems, examples, and practice exercises to sharpen your problem-solving skills. Plus, you will have access to 20 detailed videos featuring Science instructors who explain the most commonly tested concepts - it's just like having your own virtual tutor! You'll find everything you need to build confidence, skills, and knowledge for the highest score possible. More than 40 million students have trusted Schaum's to help them succeed in the classroom and on exams. Schaum's is the key to faster learning and higher grades in every subject. Each Outline presents all the essential course information in an easy-to-follow, topic-by-topic format. You also get hundreds of examples, solved problems, and practice exercises to test your skills. This Schaum's Outline gives you: 1,470 fully solved problems; clear, concise explanations of all human anatomy and physiology concepts; and a complete review of the human body's cellular chemistry and structure, tissues, systems, immunity, and reproduction process. Fully compatible with your classroom text, Schaum's highlights all the important facts you need to know. Use Schaum's to shorten your study time-and get your best test scores!.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (x, 174 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • 1 Introduction (Kazunori Sango and Junji Yamauchi)
  • 2 Recent insights into molecular mechanisms that control growth factor receptor-mediated Schwann cell morphological changes during development (Yuki Miyamoto and Junji Yamauchi)
  • 3 Membrane Skeleton in Schmidt-Lanterman Incisure in Schwann cells of Peripheral Nervous System (Nobuo Terada, Yurika Saitoh, Nobuhiko Ohno, and Shinichi Ohno)
  • 4 Schwann cell-axon interactions: the molecular and metabolic link between Schwann cells and axons (Nobuhiko Ohno, Takashi Sakoh, Yurika Saitoh, Nobuo Terada, and Shinichi Ohno)
  • 5 Schwann cell-dependent regulation of peripheral nerve injury and repair (Keiichiro Susuki )
  • 6 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (Toru Ogata)
  • 7 Expression of the transthyretin gene in Schwann cells, and familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy-mediated neurodegeneration (Tatsufumi Murakami and Yoshihide Sunada)
  • 8 Node of Ranvier disruption: a key pathophysiology in immune-mediated neuropathies (Keiichiro Susuki )
  • 9 Pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy from the viewpoint of Schwann cell abnormalities (Koichi Kato, Eva L. Feldman, and Jiro Nakamura)
  • 10 Spontaneously immortalized adult rodent Schwann cells as valuable tools for the study of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration (Kazunori Sango, Masami Tsukamoto, Kazunori Utsunomiya, and Kazuhiko Watabe)
  • BM Index.
This book presents recent topics on the development, differentiation, and myelination of Schwann cells, as well as pathological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for peripheral neuropathies, such as Charcot?Marie?Tooth diseases, amyloid polyneuropathy, immune-mediated neuropathy, and diabetic neuropathy. The rapid progress of molecular biological techniques in the last decades, especially for RNA techniques and gene modification technologies, have allowed us to investigate the pathobiology of Schwann cells in vivo and in vitro. Studies combining recent stem cell biology with recent biotechnology, which is now closely linked to physicochemical fields, further explain how Schwann cell lineages develop, a process that has long been thought to be very complicated in vivo. The findings contribute to the elucidation of fundamental mechanisms during development and under pathological conditions. We now know that these are closely tied to each other. This book also introduces unique coculture systems to reproduce the neuron Schwann cell interplay during development, degeneration, and regeneration. Up-to-date research topics with high-quality immunofluorescence and electron micrographs introduced by young and energetic contributors are sure to arouse the readers' interest in Schwann cell biology. Discussion from the viewpoint of basic and clinical neuroscience makes the book educational for researchers, medical students, and young clinicians.
  • 1 Introduction (Kazunori Sango and Junji Yamauchi)
  • 2 Recent insights into molecular mechanisms that control growth factor receptor-mediated Schwann cell morphological changes during development (Yuki Miyamoto and Junji Yamauchi)
  • 3 Membrane Skeleton in Schmidt-Lanterman Incisure in Schwann cells of Peripheral Nervous System (Nobuo Terada, Yurika Saitoh, Nobuhiko Ohno, and Shinichi Ohno)
  • 4 Schwann cell-axon interactions: the molecular and metabolic link between Schwann cells and axons (Nobuhiko Ohno, Takashi Sakoh, Yurika Saitoh, Nobuo Terada, and Shinichi Ohno)
  • 5 Schwann cell-dependent regulation of peripheral nerve injury and repair (Keiichiro Susuki )
  • 6 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (Toru Ogata)
  • 7 Expression of the transthyretin gene in Schwann cells, and familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy-mediated neurodegeneration (Tatsufumi Murakami and Yoshihide Sunada)
  • 8 Node of Ranvier disruption: a key pathophysiology in immune-mediated neuropathies (Keiichiro Susuki )
  • 9 Pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy from the viewpoint of Schwann cell abnormalities (Koichi Kato, Eva L. Feldman, and Jiro Nakamura)
  • 10 Spontaneously immortalized adult rodent Schwann cells as valuable tools for the study of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration (Kazunori Sango, Masami Tsukamoto, Kazunori Utsunomiya, and Kazuhiko Watabe)
  • BM Index.
This book presents recent topics on the development, differentiation, and myelination of Schwann cells, as well as pathological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for peripheral neuropathies, such as Charcot?Marie?Tooth diseases, amyloid polyneuropathy, immune-mediated neuropathy, and diabetic neuropathy. The rapid progress of molecular biological techniques in the last decades, especially for RNA techniques and gene modification technologies, have allowed us to investigate the pathobiology of Schwann cells in vivo and in vitro. Studies combining recent stem cell biology with recent biotechnology, which is now closely linked to physicochemical fields, further explain how Schwann cell lineages develop, a process that has long been thought to be very complicated in vivo. The findings contribute to the elucidation of fundamental mechanisms during development and under pathological conditions. We now know that these are closely tied to each other. This book also introduces unique coculture systems to reproduce the neuron Schwann cell interplay during development, degeneration, and regeneration. Up-to-date research topics with high-quality immunofluorescence and electron micrographs introduced by young and energetic contributors are sure to arouse the readers' interest in Schwann cell biology. Discussion from the viewpoint of basic and clinical neuroscience makes the book educational for researchers, medical students, and young clinicians.
Book
1 online resource (xiii, 908 p.) : ill. (chiefly color).
  • Part 1: Endocrinology of Reproduction 1. Neuroendocrinology of Reproduction 2. The Gonadotropin Hormones and Their Receptors 3. Prolactin in Human Reproduction 4. The Synthesis and Metabolism of Steroid Hormones 5. Steroid Hormone Action 6. Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators in Reproductive Medicine 7. Growth Factors and Reproduction 8. Neuroendocrine Control of the Menstrual Cycle 9. The Ovarian Life Cycle 10. The Structure, Function, and Evaluation of the Female Reproductive Tract 11. The Breast 12. The Endocrinology of Human Pregnancy and Fetal-Placental Neuroendocrine Development 13. The Hypothalamo-Pituitary Unit, Testis, and Male Accessory Organs 14. Immunology and Reproduction 15. Menopause and Aging 16. Male Reproductive Aging Part 2: Pathophysiology and Therapy 17. Disorders of Sex Development 18. Puberty: Gonadarche and Adrenarche 19. Nutrition and Reproduction 20. Environmental Factors and Reproduction 21. Physiological and Pathophysiologic Alterations of the Neuroendocrine Components of the Reproductive Axis 22. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Hyperandrogenic States 23. Female Infertility 24. Male Infertility 25. Endocrine Disturbances Affecting Reproduction 26. Endometriosis 27. Benign Uterine Disorders 28. Endocrine Diseases of Pregnancy 29. Hormone Responsive Cancers Part 3: Reproductive Technologies 30. Medical Approaches to Ovarian Stimulation for Infertility 31. Assisted Reproduction 32. Gamete and Embryo Manipulation 33. Fertility Preservation 34. Laboratory Assessment 35. Pelvic Imaging in Reproductive Endocrinology 36. Contraception Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Yen & Jaffe's Reproductive Endocrinology helps you successfully diagnose and manage the spectrum of female and male reproductive system diseases, from impaired fertility, infertility, and recurrent pregnancy loss through problems of sexual development, puberty, menstrual disturbances, fibroids, endometriosis, and reproductive aging. This trusted endocrinology reference book is ideal for fellows, endocrinologists, or as a quick reference when making daily diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. It is just the resource you need to offer your patients the best possible reproductive care.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part 1: Endocrinology of Reproduction 1. Neuroendocrinology of Reproduction 2. The Gonadotropin Hormones and Their Receptors 3. Prolactin in Human Reproduction 4. The Synthesis and Metabolism of Steroid Hormones 5. Steroid Hormone Action 6. Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators in Reproductive Medicine 7. Growth Factors and Reproduction 8. Neuroendocrine Control of the Menstrual Cycle 9. The Ovarian Life Cycle 10. The Structure, Function, and Evaluation of the Female Reproductive Tract 11. The Breast 12. The Endocrinology of Human Pregnancy and Fetal-Placental Neuroendocrine Development 13. The Hypothalamo-Pituitary Unit, Testis, and Male Accessory Organs 14. Immunology and Reproduction 15. Menopause and Aging 16. Male Reproductive Aging Part 2: Pathophysiology and Therapy 17. Disorders of Sex Development 18. Puberty: Gonadarche and Adrenarche 19. Nutrition and Reproduction 20. Environmental Factors and Reproduction 21. Physiological and Pathophysiologic Alterations of the Neuroendocrine Components of the Reproductive Axis 22. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Hyperandrogenic States 23. Female Infertility 24. Male Infertility 25. Endocrine Disturbances Affecting Reproduction 26. Endometriosis 27. Benign Uterine Disorders 28. Endocrine Diseases of Pregnancy 29. Hormone Responsive Cancers Part 3: Reproductive Technologies 30. Medical Approaches to Ovarian Stimulation for Infertility 31. Assisted Reproduction 32. Gamete and Embryo Manipulation 33. Fertility Preservation 34. Laboratory Assessment 35. Pelvic Imaging in Reproductive Endocrinology 36. Contraception Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Yen & Jaffe's Reproductive Endocrinology helps you successfully diagnose and manage the spectrum of female and male reproductive system diseases, from impaired fertility, infertility, and recurrent pregnancy loss through problems of sexual development, puberty, menstrual disturbances, fibroids, endometriosis, and reproductive aging. This trusted endocrinology reference book is ideal for fellows, endocrinologists, or as a quick reference when making daily diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. It is just the resource you need to offer your patients the best possible reproductive care.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface xv List of Figures xvii INTRODUCTION 1 PART I. AXIAL SKELETON 7 A. SKULL 9 A-1. CRANIAL VAULT DEVELOPMENT 9 CRANIAL VAULT ANOMALIES 10 A-1.1. Extra Ossicles 10 A-1.2. Extra Sutures 11 A-1.3. Sutural Agenesis 11 A-1.4. Parietal Thinning 11 A-1.5. Enlarged Parietal Foramina 11 A-1.6. Inclusion Cysts 11 A-1.7. Cranial Neural Tube Defects 19 A-1.8. Hydrocephaly 20 A-1.9. Microcephaly 21 A-2. FACE DEVELOPMENT 21 FACIAL ANOMALIES 24 A-2.1. Facial Clefts 24 A-2.2. Nasal Bone Hypoplasia/Aplasia 25 A-2.3.1. Cleft Lip 25 A-2.3.2. Cleft Lip with Cleft Palate 26 A-2.4. Cleft Palate 32 A-2.5. Cleft Mandible 32 A-2.6. Mandibular Hypoplasia 32 A-2.7. Bifid Mandibular Condyle 32 A-2.8. Coronoid Hyperplasia 35 A-2.9. Palate Inclusion (Fissural) Cyst 35 A-2.10. Mandibular Inclusion Cyst 37 A-2.11. Mandibular Torus 37 A-3. EXTERNAL AUDITORY MEATUS AND TYMPANIC PLATE DEVELOPMENT37 EXTERNAL AUDITORY MEATUS AND TYMPANIC PLATE ANOMALIES 42 A-3.1. Atresia (Aplasia)/Hypoplasia External Auditory Meatus42 A-3.2. Tympanic Aperture 42 A-3.3. External Auditory Torus 42 A-4. STYLOHYOID CHAIN DEVELOPMENT 43 STYLOHYOID CHAIN ANOMALIES 43 A-4.1. Stylohyoid Chain Variations in Ossification 43 A-4.2. Thyroglossal Developmental Cyst 46 A-5. SKULL BASE DEVELOPMENT 49 SKULL BASE ANOMALIES 50 A-5.1. Basioccipital Hypoplasia/Aplasia 50 A-5.2. Basioccipital Clefts 50 OCCIPITAL CERVICAL (O-C) BORDER DEVELOPMENT 50 A-5.3. Cranial Shifting of the O-C Border 50 A-5.4. Caudal Shifting of the O-C Border 55 B. VERTEBRAL COLUMN 59 VERTEBRAL COLUMN DEVELOPMENT 59 VERTEBRAL COLUMN ANOMALIES 61 B-1. Vertebral Border Shifting 61 B-1.1. Cranial Shifts of the Cervical Thoracic (C-T)Border 61 B-1.2. Caudal Shifts of the C-T Border 61 B-1.3. Cranial Shifts of the Thoracic Lumbar (T-L) Border61 B-1.4. Caudal Shifts of the T-L Border 65 B-1.5. Cranial Shifts of the Lumbar Sacral (L-S) Border65 B-1.6. Caudal Shifts of the L-S Border 68 B-1.7. Cranial Shifts of the Sacral Caudal (S-C) Border70 B-1.8. Caudal Shifts of the S-C Border 70 B-2. Extra Vertebral Segment (Transitional Vertebra) 70 B-3. Cleft Neural Arch 71 B-4. Cleft Atlas Anterior Arch 74 B-5.1. Notochord Defect: Sagittal Cleft Vertebra 75 B-5.2. Notochord Defect Diastematomyelia 76 B-6. Neural Tube Defect Spina Bifi da 76 B-7. Hemivertebra: Hemimetameric Shifts 80 B-8. Lateral Hypoplasia/Aplasia 81 B-9. Ventral Hypoplasia/Aplasia 81 B-10. Dorsal Hypoplasia/Aplasia 88 B-11.1. Single Block Vertebra 92 B-11.2. Multiple Block Vertebra 92 B-11.3. Klippel Feil Multiple Block Vertebra 93 B-12. Neural Arch Complex Disorders 93 B-13. Atlas Posterior/Lateral Bridging 95 B-14. Multiple Vertebral Anomalies 97 B-15. Sacral Agenesis versus Hemisacrum 97 B-16. Enlarged Anterior Basivertebral Foramina 103 C. RIBS 105 RIB DEVELOPMENT 105 RIB ANOMALIES 106 C-1. Supernumerary Ribs 106 Transitional Vertebra Extra Rib 106 Intrathoracic Rib 106 C-2. Rib Hypoplasia/Aplasia 106 C-3. Merged Ribs 107 C-4. Bifurcated Ribs 107 C-5. Other Rib Disorders 107 Bridged Ribs 107 Rib Spur 108 Flared Rib 108 Rib Hyperplasia 108 D. STERNUM 109 STERNUM DEVELOPMENT 109 STERNUM ANOMALIES AND VARIATIONS 109 D-1. Suprasternal Ossicles 109 D-2. Mesosternum Shape Variations 110 D-3. Manubrium Mesosternal Joint Fusion 116 D-4. Misplaced Manubrium Mesosternal Joint 116 D-5. Mesosternal Hypoplasia/Aplasia 117 D-6. Sternal Hyperplasia 117 D-7. Sternal Aperture 117 D-8. Sternal Caudal Clefting 118 D-9. Bifurcated Sternum 118 D-10. Pectus Excavatum (Funnel Chest) 119 D-11. Pectus Carinatum (Pigeon Breast) 120 PART II. APPENDICULAR SKELETON 121 E. UPPER LIMBS 123 UPPER LIMB DEVELOPMENT 123 SHOULDER GIRDLE SEGMENT 124 E-1. CLAVICLE DEVELOPMENT 124 CLAVICLE ANOMALIES 124 E-1.1. Clavicle Hypoplasia/Aplasia 124 E-1.2. Bifurcated Clavicle (Congenital Pseudoarthrosis) 125 E-1.3. Clavicle Duplication 125 E-2. SCAPULA DEVELOPMENT 126 SCAPULA ANOMALIES 126 E-2.1. Scapular Secondary Ossicles 126 E-2.2. Scapula Secondary Ossifi cation Hypoplasia/Aplasia126 E-2.3. Scapula Glenoid Neck Hypoplasia 128 E-2.4. Scapular Aperture 128 E-2.5. Sprengel s Deformity of the Scapula 128 E-2.6. Scapular Coracoid Clavicular Bony Bridge 130 ARM SEGMENT 130 E-3. HUMERUS DEVELOPMENT 130 HUMERUS ANOMALIES 131 E-3.1. Phocomelia 131 Proximal Phocomelia (Agenesis of the Humerus) 131 Distal Phocomelia (Agenesis of the Forearm) 131 E-3.2. Proximal Humeral Head Disturbance 131 E-3.3. Distal Humerus Disturbances 131 Supracondylar Process 131 Septal Aperture 131 Nonunion of Distal Secondary Ossifications 132 Aplasia of Distal Secondary Ossifications 132 E-3.4. Elbow Patella Cubiti 132 FOREARM AND HAND SEGMENTS 132 PARAXIAL DEVELOPMENT 132 E-4. RADIUS AND ULNA DEVELOPMENT 135 RADIUS AND ULNA ANOMALIES 136 E-4.1. Forearm Meromelia (Congenital Amputation) 136 E-4.2. Forearm Paraxial Hemimelia 136 Radial (Preaxial) Hemimelia 137 Ulnar (Postaxial) Hemimelia 137 E-4.3. Duplication (Dimelia) Forearm Ray 139 E-4.4. Madelung s Deformity 139 E-4.5. Radial Ulnar Synostosis 139 E-4.6. Ulnar Styloid Os/Aplasia 140 E-5. CARPUS DEVELOPMENT 140 CARPAL ANOMALIES 142 E-5.1. Carpal Coalitions 142 E-5.2. Atypical Carpal Coalitions 142 Massive Carpal Coalition 144 E-5.3. Carpals Bipartite and Separated Marginal Carpal Elements144 E-5.4. Carpal Hypoplasia/Aplasia/Hyperplasia 144 E-5.5. Os Metastyloideum 150 E-6. DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT 150 DIGITAL ANOMALIES 150 E-6.1. Brachydactyly 150 Atypical Brachydactyly 151 E-6.2. Syndactyly Complex 154 E-6.3. Symphalangism 154 E-6.4. Triphalangeal Thumb 155 E-6.5. Ectrodactyly 158 E-6.6. Polydactyly 160 F. LOWER LIMBS 163 LOWER LIMB DEVELOPMENT 163 PELVIC GIRDLE SEGMENT 164 F-1. INNOMINATE DEVELOPMENT 164 INNOMINATE ANOMALIES 165 F-1.1. Developmental Hip Dysplasia 165 F-1.2. Sacroiliac Coalition 167 THIGH SEGMENT 168 F-2. FEMUR DEVELOPMENT 168 FEMUR ANOMALIES 168 F-2.1. Proximal Femur Variations 168 Asymmetrical Torsion of the Femoral Neck 168 Hypoplasia of the Femoral Head and/or Neck 168 Coxa Vara 168 Coxa Valga 168 F-2.2. Femur Hypoplasia/Aplasia 168 Proximal Femoral Focal Defi ciency 168 Phocomelia 170 F-2.3. Bifurcated Distal Femur 170 F-3. PATELLA DEVELOPMENT 170 PATELLA ANOMALIES 170 F-3.1. Patella Hypoplasia/Aplasia 170 F-3.2. Segmented Patella 170 LOWER LEG AND FOOT SEGMENTS 171 PARAXIAL DEVELOPMENT 171 F-4. TIBIA AND FIBULA DEVELOPMENT 173 TIBIA AND FIBULA ANOMALIES 173 F-4.1. Lower Leg Meromelia (Congenital Amputation) 173 F-4.2. Lower Leg Paraxial Hemimelia 173 Tibial (Preaxial) Hemimelia 174 Fibular (Postaxial) Hemimelia 174 F-4.3. Duplication (Dimelia) Lower Leg Ray 174 F-4.4. Tibia Fibula Synostosis 174 F-5. TARSUS DEVELOPMENT 177 TARSAL ANOMALIES 179 F-5.1. Club Foot (Talipes Equinovarus) 179 F-5.2. Vertical Talus 180 F-5.3. Tarsal Coalitions 180 F-5.4. Tarsal Metatarsal Coalitions 182 F-5.5. Metatarsal Phalanx Coalitions 183 F-5.6. Tibia Hindfoot Coalition 183 F-5.7. Tarsals Bipartite and Separate Marginal Elements 183 F-5.8. Tarsal Hyperplasia/Hypoplasia/Aplasia 187 F-6. DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT 188 DIGITAL ANOMALIES 188 F-6.1. Os Metatarsium and Os Vesalianum 188 F-6.2. Brachydactyly 188 F-6.3. Syndactyly Complex 191 F-6.4. Symphalangism 191 F-6.5. Ectrodactyly 193 F-6.6. Polydactyly 193 Literature Cited 199 Index 203.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Written by one of the most consulted authorities on the subject, Atlas of Developmental Field Anomalies of the Human Skeleton is the pre-eminent resource for developmental defects of the skeleton. This guide focuses on localized bone structures utilizing the morphogenetic approach that addresses the origins of variability within specific developmental fields during embryonic development. Drawings and photographs make up most of the text, forming a picture atlas with descriptive text for each group of illustrations. Each section and subdivision is accompanied by brief discussions and drawings of morphogenetic development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface xv List of Figures xvii INTRODUCTION 1 PART I. AXIAL SKELETON 7 A. SKULL 9 A-1. CRANIAL VAULT DEVELOPMENT 9 CRANIAL VAULT ANOMALIES 10 A-1.1. Extra Ossicles 10 A-1.2. Extra Sutures 11 A-1.3. Sutural Agenesis 11 A-1.4. Parietal Thinning 11 A-1.5. Enlarged Parietal Foramina 11 A-1.6. Inclusion Cysts 11 A-1.7. Cranial Neural Tube Defects 19 A-1.8. Hydrocephaly 20 A-1.9. Microcephaly 21 A-2. FACE DEVELOPMENT 21 FACIAL ANOMALIES 24 A-2.1. Facial Clefts 24 A-2.2. Nasal Bone Hypoplasia/Aplasia 25 A-2.3.1. Cleft Lip 25 A-2.3.2. Cleft Lip with Cleft Palate 26 A-2.4. Cleft Palate 32 A-2.5. Cleft Mandible 32 A-2.6. Mandibular Hypoplasia 32 A-2.7. Bifid Mandibular Condyle 32 A-2.8. Coronoid Hyperplasia 35 A-2.9. Palate Inclusion (Fissural) Cyst 35 A-2.10. Mandibular Inclusion Cyst 37 A-2.11. Mandibular Torus 37 A-3. EXTERNAL AUDITORY MEATUS AND TYMPANIC PLATE DEVELOPMENT37 EXTERNAL AUDITORY MEATUS AND TYMPANIC PLATE ANOMALIES 42 A-3.1. Atresia (Aplasia)/Hypoplasia External Auditory Meatus42 A-3.2. Tympanic Aperture 42 A-3.3. External Auditory Torus 42 A-4. STYLOHYOID CHAIN DEVELOPMENT 43 STYLOHYOID CHAIN ANOMALIES 43 A-4.1. Stylohyoid Chain Variations in Ossification 43 A-4.2. Thyroglossal Developmental Cyst 46 A-5. SKULL BASE DEVELOPMENT 49 SKULL BASE ANOMALIES 50 A-5.1. Basioccipital Hypoplasia/Aplasia 50 A-5.2. Basioccipital Clefts 50 OCCIPITAL CERVICAL (O-C) BORDER DEVELOPMENT 50 A-5.3. Cranial Shifting of the O-C Border 50 A-5.4. Caudal Shifting of the O-C Border 55 B. VERTEBRAL COLUMN 59 VERTEBRAL COLUMN DEVELOPMENT 59 VERTEBRAL COLUMN ANOMALIES 61 B-1. Vertebral Border Shifting 61 B-1.1. Cranial Shifts of the Cervical Thoracic (C-T)Border 61 B-1.2. Caudal Shifts of the C-T Border 61 B-1.3. Cranial Shifts of the Thoracic Lumbar (T-L) Border61 B-1.4. Caudal Shifts of the T-L Border 65 B-1.5. Cranial Shifts of the Lumbar Sacral (L-S) Border65 B-1.6. Caudal Shifts of the L-S Border 68 B-1.7. Cranial Shifts of the Sacral Caudal (S-C) Border70 B-1.8. Caudal Shifts of the S-C Border 70 B-2. Extra Vertebral Segment (Transitional Vertebra) 70 B-3. Cleft Neural Arch 71 B-4. Cleft Atlas Anterior Arch 74 B-5.1. Notochord Defect: Sagittal Cleft Vertebra 75 B-5.2. Notochord Defect Diastematomyelia 76 B-6. Neural Tube Defect Spina Bifi da 76 B-7. Hemivertebra: Hemimetameric Shifts 80 B-8. Lateral Hypoplasia/Aplasia 81 B-9. Ventral Hypoplasia/Aplasia 81 B-10. Dorsal Hypoplasia/Aplasia 88 B-11.1. Single Block Vertebra 92 B-11.2. Multiple Block Vertebra 92 B-11.3. Klippel Feil Multiple Block Vertebra 93 B-12. Neural Arch Complex Disorders 93 B-13. Atlas Posterior/Lateral Bridging 95 B-14. Multiple Vertebral Anomalies 97 B-15. Sacral Agenesis versus Hemisacrum 97 B-16. Enlarged Anterior Basivertebral Foramina 103 C. RIBS 105 RIB DEVELOPMENT 105 RIB ANOMALIES 106 C-1. Supernumerary Ribs 106 Transitional Vertebra Extra Rib 106 Intrathoracic Rib 106 C-2. Rib Hypoplasia/Aplasia 106 C-3. Merged Ribs 107 C-4. Bifurcated Ribs 107 C-5. Other Rib Disorders 107 Bridged Ribs 107 Rib Spur 108 Flared Rib 108 Rib Hyperplasia 108 D. STERNUM 109 STERNUM DEVELOPMENT 109 STERNUM ANOMALIES AND VARIATIONS 109 D-1. Suprasternal Ossicles 109 D-2. Mesosternum Shape Variations 110 D-3. Manubrium Mesosternal Joint Fusion 116 D-4. Misplaced Manubrium Mesosternal Joint 116 D-5. Mesosternal Hypoplasia/Aplasia 117 D-6. Sternal Hyperplasia 117 D-7. Sternal Aperture 117 D-8. Sternal Caudal Clefting 118 D-9. Bifurcated Sternum 118 D-10. Pectus Excavatum (Funnel Chest) 119 D-11. Pectus Carinatum (Pigeon Breast) 120 PART II. APPENDICULAR SKELETON 121 E. UPPER LIMBS 123 UPPER LIMB DEVELOPMENT 123 SHOULDER GIRDLE SEGMENT 124 E-1. CLAVICLE DEVELOPMENT 124 CLAVICLE ANOMALIES 124 E-1.1. Clavicle Hypoplasia/Aplasia 124 E-1.2. Bifurcated Clavicle (Congenital Pseudoarthrosis) 125 E-1.3. Clavicle Duplication 125 E-2. SCAPULA DEVELOPMENT 126 SCAPULA ANOMALIES 126 E-2.1. Scapular Secondary Ossicles 126 E-2.2. Scapula Secondary Ossifi cation Hypoplasia/Aplasia126 E-2.3. Scapula Glenoid Neck Hypoplasia 128 E-2.4. Scapular Aperture 128 E-2.5. Sprengel s Deformity of the Scapula 128 E-2.6. Scapular Coracoid Clavicular Bony Bridge 130 ARM SEGMENT 130 E-3. HUMERUS DEVELOPMENT 130 HUMERUS ANOMALIES 131 E-3.1. Phocomelia 131 Proximal Phocomelia (Agenesis of the Humerus) 131 Distal Phocomelia (Agenesis of the Forearm) 131 E-3.2. Proximal Humeral Head Disturbance 131 E-3.3. Distal Humerus Disturbances 131 Supracondylar Process 131 Septal Aperture 131 Nonunion of Distal Secondary Ossifications 132 Aplasia of Distal Secondary Ossifications 132 E-3.4. Elbow Patella Cubiti 132 FOREARM AND HAND SEGMENTS 132 PARAXIAL DEVELOPMENT 132 E-4. RADIUS AND ULNA DEVELOPMENT 135 RADIUS AND ULNA ANOMALIES 136 E-4.1. Forearm Meromelia (Congenital Amputation) 136 E-4.2. Forearm Paraxial Hemimelia 136 Radial (Preaxial) Hemimelia 137 Ulnar (Postaxial) Hemimelia 137 E-4.3. Duplication (Dimelia) Forearm Ray 139 E-4.4. Madelung s Deformity 139 E-4.5. Radial Ulnar Synostosis 139 E-4.6. Ulnar Styloid Os/Aplasia 140 E-5. CARPUS DEVELOPMENT 140 CARPAL ANOMALIES 142 E-5.1. Carpal Coalitions 142 E-5.2. Atypical Carpal Coalitions 142 Massive Carpal Coalition 144 E-5.3. Carpals Bipartite and Separated Marginal Carpal Elements144 E-5.4. Carpal Hypoplasia/Aplasia/Hyperplasia 144 E-5.5. Os Metastyloideum 150 E-6. DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT 150 DIGITAL ANOMALIES 150 E-6.1. Brachydactyly 150 Atypical Brachydactyly 151 E-6.2. Syndactyly Complex 154 E-6.3. Symphalangism 154 E-6.4. Triphalangeal Thumb 155 E-6.5. Ectrodactyly 158 E-6.6. Polydactyly 160 F. LOWER LIMBS 163 LOWER LIMB DEVELOPMENT 163 PELVIC GIRDLE SEGMENT 164 F-1. INNOMINATE DEVELOPMENT 164 INNOMINATE ANOMALIES 165 F-1.1. Developmental Hip Dysplasia 165 F-1.2. Sacroiliac Coalition 167 THIGH SEGMENT 168 F-2. FEMUR DEVELOPMENT 168 FEMUR ANOMALIES 168 F-2.1. Proximal Femur Variations 168 Asymmetrical Torsion of the Femoral Neck 168 Hypoplasia of the Femoral Head and/or Neck 168 Coxa Vara 168 Coxa Valga 168 F-2.2. Femur Hypoplasia/Aplasia 168 Proximal Femoral Focal Defi ciency 168 Phocomelia 170 F-2.3. Bifurcated Distal Femur 170 F-3. PATELLA DEVELOPMENT 170 PATELLA ANOMALIES 170 F-3.1. Patella Hypoplasia/Aplasia 170 F-3.2. Segmented Patella 170 LOWER LEG AND FOOT SEGMENTS 171 PARAXIAL DEVELOPMENT 171 F-4. TIBIA AND FIBULA DEVELOPMENT 173 TIBIA AND FIBULA ANOMALIES 173 F-4.1. Lower Leg Meromelia (Congenital Amputation) 173 F-4.2. Lower Leg Paraxial Hemimelia 173 Tibial (Preaxial) Hemimelia 174 Fibular (Postaxial) Hemimelia 174 F-4.3. Duplication (Dimelia) Lower Leg Ray 174 F-4.4. Tibia Fibula Synostosis 174 F-5. TARSUS DEVELOPMENT 177 TARSAL ANOMALIES 179 F-5.1. Club Foot (Talipes Equinovarus) 179 F-5.2. Vertical Talus 180 F-5.3. Tarsal Coalitions 180 F-5.4. Tarsal Metatarsal Coalitions 182 F-5.5. Metatarsal Phalanx Coalitions 183 F-5.6. Tibia Hindfoot Coalition 183 F-5.7. Tarsals Bipartite and Separate Marginal Elements 183 F-5.8. Tarsal Hyperplasia/Hypoplasia/Aplasia 187 F-6. DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT 188 DIGITAL ANOMALIES 188 F-6.1. Os Metatarsium and Os Vesalianum 188 F-6.2. Brachydactyly 188 F-6.3. Syndactyly Complex 191 F-6.4. Symphalangism 191 F-6.5. Ectrodactyly 193 F-6.6. Polydactyly 193 Literature Cited 199 Index 203.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Written by one of the most consulted authorities on the subject, Atlas of Developmental Field Anomalies of the Human Skeleton is the pre-eminent resource for developmental defects of the skeleton. This guide focuses on localized bone structures utilizing the morphogenetic approach that addresses the origins of variability within specific developmental fields during embryonic development. Drawings and photographs make up most of the text, forming a picture atlas with descriptive text for each group of illustrations. Each section and subdivision is accompanied by brief discussions and drawings of morphogenetic development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library