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x, 98 pages ; 24 cm.
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  • Foreword: Contribution to Teacher Education Marilyn Cochran-Smith Foreword: Contribution to Social Studies Stephanie van Hover and Keith C. Barton Foreword: Contribution to Multicultural Pedagogy Alexandra C. Rolfsmeyer and Adam J. Greteman Introduction: How to Use This Book Elizabeth E. Heilman Section 1: Purposes, Beliefs, and Contexts in Social Studies Education Introduction by Elizabeth Heilman 1. Developing a Pedagogic Creed through Critical, Social Reflection William Gaudelli 2. The Metaphors We Teach By Margaret Crocco 3. Exploring Three Orientations to Social Studies Thomas Fallace 4. My Pedagogic Creed as Foundation Ronald Evans 5. The Social Studies Topical Index Paul Robinson 6. Exploring Taylorism and its Continued Influence on Work and Schooling E. Wayne Ross 7. Purposes, Possibilities and Complexities of Teaching Secondary Social Studies Hilary Conklin 8. Four Way Street: Curriculum, Pedagogy, Content and Purpose to Advance the Common Good Dave Powell and Todd Hawley Section 2: Democratic Values and Government Introduction by Aaron Bodle and Elizabeth E. Heilman 9. Those Pesky Little Words: How to Teach Abstract Civic Concepts. Barbara Slater Stern 10. Understanding and Teaching "Core" Democratic Concepts Elizabeth E. Heilman 11. Studying Authority in a Secondary Teacher Education Class Judith L. Pace 12. Using Children's Books to Explore Power, Tyranny and Justice Rich Gibson and E. Wayne Ross 13. Learning to Teach the Cultures, Covenants and Controversies of Universal Human Rights John Myers 14. Feelings Exploration in Social Justice Education Jeff Passe 15. Teaching Procedural Democracy in the Classroom David Vawter 16. Preparing Teachers and Educating Citizens: The Simulated Congressional Hearing Terrence C. Mason and Jennifer Ponder 17. Service Learning Field Placements as Community Based Instruction/Action Brian Sevier Section 3: Evidence and Interpretation in History Introduction by Brenda Trofanenko and Matthew T. Missias 18. Generating Effective Teaching through Primary Sources Theresa McCormick 19. Incorporating Archives in Social Studies Methods Frans H. Doppen 20. Historical Perspective, Causality and Significance: The Historical Scene Investigation Project Kathleen Owings Swan, Kathi Kern, and Mark Hofer 21. Writing from Visual Prompts: Animating Imagination for Social Studies and Diversity Education Donald S. Blumenfeld-Jones 22. Using Content Resources to Analyze a Historical Decision Scott Alan Metzger 23. The First Day of Class: Developing an Awareness of Inference in History and Culture David Hicks and Melissa Lisanti 24. Gazing on the Past: Examining the Pedagogical Purposes of Public History Brenda Trofanenko Section 4: History in Social Context Introduction by Matthew T. Missias and Morgan Ott 25. The Nature of Evidence and Interpretation in History Scott W. Dewitt 26. A Boston Massacre in Room 202: Understanding the Construction of Historical Narratives Timothy D. Slekar 27. Oral Histories in Social Education Edric Johnson 28. Designing an Interactive Learning Center Museum in the School Context Hilary Landorf and Ethan Lowenstein 29. Scaffolding Conceptual Reasoning about History David Gerwin 30. Teaching Historical Understanding with Christopher Columbus Benjamin Justice 31. Addressing Subjectivity in Historical Thinking: Who was Christopher Columbus? Jennifer Hauver James Section 5: Perspective Consciousness about Identity, Power and Culture Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 32. Exploring Identity, Commonality and Difference Tracy Rock 33. Who Are We? Exploring Our Class as a Cultural Demographic John Hoge 34. It's all in your name: Seeing ourselves in historical and cultural context Ozlem Sensoy 35. Seeing the Hidden Curricula of Social Spaces and Places Elizabeth E. Heilman 36. Teaching from a critical global perspective: Investigating Power and Marginalization Binaya Subedi 37. The Family History Project: Uncovering the Personal as Political Nancye McCrary 38. Who Has a Good Family? Exploring Beliefs and Prejudices About Family Structures Tammy Turner-Vorbeck 39. Representation, Power and Stereotyping: A Lesson on Indigenous People and Sports Mascots Glenabah Martinez 40. Breaking down barriers, constructing connections: Strategies for connecting "us" to "them" Heather Sadlier 41. A Meeting On the Congo: Race, Voice and Representation Merry Merryfield 42. Implicating Race in Students' Learning How to Teach History Avner Segall Section 6: Local and Global Communities and Economies Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 43. Social Studies is Everywhere: Developing Social Scientist Sensitivities Janet Alleman 44. Understanding Personal Choice and Structured Inequality as Aspects of Family Finance Diane S. Illig 45. The Race to the Bottom: An Introduction to Textile Manufacturing and Working Conditions in the Global Economy Peter Moran 46. Examining Privilege in Globalization Sandra Schmidt 47. Teaching Global Education in Seemingly Regional and National Curriculum Elizabeth E. Heilman 48. "Baltimore and the World" Project: The Intersection of Local and Global Issues Todd Kenreich 49. Teaching Current Events from a Global Perspective Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker 50. Environment toxins near and far: Health and civic responsibility David Hursh, Camille Martina and Michael Fantauzzo Section 7: Current Events and Controversies Introduction by Elizabeth E. Heilman and Katie Gjerpen 51. Teaching Student Teachers to Examine How Their Political Views Inform Their Teaching Diana Hess 52. Preparing Future Teachers and Citizens to Address Controversial Issues: The Four Corner Debate Thomas H. Levine 53. Good Discussions Don't Just Happen: Verbal Questioning Skills Kenneth E. Vogler 54. Getting Students to Actively Follow the News Deborah Byrnes 55. Teaching about Disasters Reported in the News Brian Lanahan 56. Issues-Centered Social Studies Unit Sampler Kim Koeppen 57. The "Daily Dilemma": Sharing Power with a Purpose Beth Rubin 58. Encouraging Transformative Understanding of Controversial Social Issues Bruna Grimberg 59. Social Studies Methods, Purpose, and the Execution Class Todd Dinkelman Section 8: Using a Range of Resources Introduction: Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 60. Modeling with Matryoshkas: Connecting Curriculum, Community, and Culture in the Classroom Nancy P. Gallavan and Ellen Kottler 61. Motivating for Inquiry and Civic Participation through Primary Sources About Historical Peers Eula Fresch 62. Incorporating Visual Learning in the Classroom Brooke Orr and Signia Warner 63. Textbook Analysis: Using James Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me in Teacher Education Mara Dodge 64. Teaching with and about Maps Avner Segall 65. Reinventing the Field Trip: Pre-Service Teachers Explore Museums and Historic Sites Alan Marcus 66. Socratic Seminar: A Model for Film Discussion in the Social Studies Jeremy D. Stoddard 67. Not Playing Around: Teaching Role Plays in Social Education Wayne Au 68. Using Multicultural Literature in Teaching for Social Justice Sung Choon Park and Cynthia A. Tyson 69. Voices of our community: Making Connections through Digital Stories Elizabeth K. Wilson and Vivian Harris Wright 70. Modeling Technology-Based Social Studies Instruction: A Simulated WebQuest Christy G. Keeler Section 9: Instruction and Designing Curriculum Introduction: Elizabeth E. Heilman and Mark Kissling 71. Providing Elementary Teachers with Experience of Children's Thinking in Social Studies Keith Barton 72. What to Teach, When and Why: Masterful Curriculum Unit Planning Elizabeth E. Heilman 73. The Modeling Approach to Social Studies Teacher Education Michael Marino and Benjamin M. Jacobs 74. Instructional Planning and Practice through Micro-teaching Anne-lise Halvorsen 75. Approaching Curriculum Units as Terrains and Systems to Explore Paul Skilton-Sylvester 76. Teaching Teachers to Teach for Understanding in Social Studies Methods Classes John Gunn 77. Teaching Students to Use the Inquiry Method James Hartwick 78. Comparing Visions: Do Our State Standards Align with the National Standards? Barbara Foulks Boyd 79. Reflections on Learners and Learning in Early Field Experiences for Secondary Social Studies Susan B. Serota and Linda Bennett 80. Creating Units to Create Meaning out of Social Studies Content Audrey Rogers 81. Using Narrative to Reflect on the Process of Curriculum Enactment Gail Hickey Conclusion: The present and future of Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: A Critical Review Susan Adler Won Pyo Hong Appendices Elizabeth E. Heilman Appendix 1: Planning Instruction with Learning Disabilities in Mind Appendix 2: Building a Repertoire of Instructional Strategies Appendix 3: Reading and Comprehension Teaching Methods Contributor Biographies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The preparation of teachers, especially as they get ready to teach social studies and social science in our schools and colleges, is crucial not only to the project of good education, but even more broadly, to the cultivation of healthy democracy and the growth of the nation's citizens. This book features the ideas from 78 of our nation's most thoughtful teacher educators reflecting on their best practices and offering specific strategies through which future teachers learn to teach. The essays in this volume illuminate how future teachers wrestle with high-minded questions pertaining to the sociocultural, philosophical and historical aspects of education, but they also explain how to teach day to day skills such as lesson planning and meeting national standards. Sections in this book are arranged by both disciplinary organization and approach or activity. Each section is rich and coherent and is introduced with a scholarly essay that both provides a theoretical overview, analysis, and explication of this aspect of teacher education and scaffolds as well as introduces for the reader the essays to come. Each essay is coded to key words, to the level at which the lesson can be used, and to both NCSS and NCATE standards, for quick reference in classroom planning as well as institutional development and implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Foreword: Contribution to Teacher Education Marilyn Cochran-Smith Foreword: Contribution to Social Studies Stephanie van Hover and Keith C. Barton Foreword: Contribution to Multicultural Pedagogy Alexandra C. Rolfsmeyer and Adam J. Greteman Introduction: How to Use This Book Elizabeth E. Heilman Section 1: Purposes, Beliefs, and Contexts in Social Studies Education Introduction by Elizabeth Heilman 1. Developing a Pedagogic Creed through Critical, Social Reflection William Gaudelli 2. The Metaphors We Teach By Margaret Crocco 3. Exploring Three Orientations to Social Studies Thomas Fallace 4. My Pedagogic Creed as Foundation Ronald Evans 5. The Social Studies Topical Index Paul Robinson 6. Exploring Taylorism and its Continued Influence on Work and Schooling E. Wayne Ross 7. Purposes, Possibilities and Complexities of Teaching Secondary Social Studies Hilary Conklin 8. Four Way Street: Curriculum, Pedagogy, Content and Purpose to Advance the Common Good Dave Powell and Todd Hawley Section 2: Democratic Values and Government Introduction by Aaron Bodle and Elizabeth E. Heilman 9. Those Pesky Little Words: How to Teach Abstract Civic Concepts. Barbara Slater Stern 10. Understanding and Teaching "Core" Democratic Concepts Elizabeth E. Heilman 11. Studying Authority in a Secondary Teacher Education Class Judith L. Pace 12. Using Children's Books to Explore Power, Tyranny and Justice Rich Gibson and E. Wayne Ross 13. Learning to Teach the Cultures, Covenants and Controversies of Universal Human Rights John Myers 14. Feelings Exploration in Social Justice Education Jeff Passe 15. Teaching Procedural Democracy in the Classroom David Vawter 16. Preparing Teachers and Educating Citizens: The Simulated Congressional Hearing Terrence C. Mason and Jennifer Ponder 17. Service Learning Field Placements as Community Based Instruction/Action Brian Sevier Section 3: Evidence and Interpretation in History Introduction by Brenda Trofanenko and Matthew T. Missias 18. Generating Effective Teaching through Primary Sources Theresa McCormick 19. Incorporating Archives in Social Studies Methods Frans H. Doppen 20. Historical Perspective, Causality and Significance: The Historical Scene Investigation Project Kathleen Owings Swan, Kathi Kern, and Mark Hofer 21. Writing from Visual Prompts: Animating Imagination for Social Studies and Diversity Education Donald S. Blumenfeld-Jones 22. Using Content Resources to Analyze a Historical Decision Scott Alan Metzger 23. The First Day of Class: Developing an Awareness of Inference in History and Culture David Hicks and Melissa Lisanti 24. Gazing on the Past: Examining the Pedagogical Purposes of Public History Brenda Trofanenko Section 4: History in Social Context Introduction by Matthew T. Missias and Morgan Ott 25. The Nature of Evidence and Interpretation in History Scott W. Dewitt 26. A Boston Massacre in Room 202: Understanding the Construction of Historical Narratives Timothy D. Slekar 27. Oral Histories in Social Education Edric Johnson 28. Designing an Interactive Learning Center Museum in the School Context Hilary Landorf and Ethan Lowenstein 29. Scaffolding Conceptual Reasoning about History David Gerwin 30. Teaching Historical Understanding with Christopher Columbus Benjamin Justice 31. Addressing Subjectivity in Historical Thinking: Who was Christopher Columbus? Jennifer Hauver James Section 5: Perspective Consciousness about Identity, Power and Culture Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 32. Exploring Identity, Commonality and Difference Tracy Rock 33. Who Are We? Exploring Our Class as a Cultural Demographic John Hoge 34. It's all in your name: Seeing ourselves in historical and cultural context Ozlem Sensoy 35. Seeing the Hidden Curricula of Social Spaces and Places Elizabeth E. Heilman 36. Teaching from a critical global perspective: Investigating Power and Marginalization Binaya Subedi 37. The Family History Project: Uncovering the Personal as Political Nancye McCrary 38. Who Has a Good Family? Exploring Beliefs and Prejudices About Family Structures Tammy Turner-Vorbeck 39. Representation, Power and Stereotyping: A Lesson on Indigenous People and Sports Mascots Glenabah Martinez 40. Breaking down barriers, constructing connections: Strategies for connecting "us" to "them" Heather Sadlier 41. A Meeting On the Congo: Race, Voice and Representation Merry Merryfield 42. Implicating Race in Students' Learning How to Teach History Avner Segall Section 6: Local and Global Communities and Economies Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 43. Social Studies is Everywhere: Developing Social Scientist Sensitivities Janet Alleman 44. Understanding Personal Choice and Structured Inequality as Aspects of Family Finance Diane S. Illig 45. The Race to the Bottom: An Introduction to Textile Manufacturing and Working Conditions in the Global Economy Peter Moran 46. Examining Privilege in Globalization Sandra Schmidt 47. Teaching Global Education in Seemingly Regional and National Curriculum Elizabeth E. Heilman 48. "Baltimore and the World" Project: The Intersection of Local and Global Issues Todd Kenreich 49. Teaching Current Events from a Global Perspective Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker 50. Environment toxins near and far: Health and civic responsibility David Hursh, Camille Martina and Michael Fantauzzo Section 7: Current Events and Controversies Introduction by Elizabeth E. Heilman and Katie Gjerpen 51. Teaching Student Teachers to Examine How Their Political Views Inform Their Teaching Diana Hess 52. Preparing Future Teachers and Citizens to Address Controversial Issues: The Four Corner Debate Thomas H. Levine 53. Good Discussions Don't Just Happen: Verbal Questioning Skills Kenneth E. Vogler 54. Getting Students to Actively Follow the News Deborah Byrnes 55. Teaching about Disasters Reported in the News Brian Lanahan 56. Issues-Centered Social Studies Unit Sampler Kim Koeppen 57. The "Daily Dilemma": Sharing Power with a Purpose Beth Rubin 58. Encouraging Transformative Understanding of Controversial Social Issues Bruna Grimberg 59. Social Studies Methods, Purpose, and the Execution Class Todd Dinkelman Section 8: Using a Range of Resources Introduction: Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 60. Modeling with Matryoshkas: Connecting Curriculum, Community, and Culture in the Classroom Nancy P. Gallavan and Ellen Kottler 61. Motivating for Inquiry and Civic Participation through Primary Sources About Historical Peers Eula Fresch 62. Incorporating Visual Learning in the Classroom Brooke Orr and Signia Warner 63. Textbook Analysis: Using James Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me in Teacher Education Mara Dodge 64. Teaching with and about Maps Avner Segall 65. Reinventing the Field Trip: Pre-Service Teachers Explore Museums and Historic Sites Alan Marcus 66. Socratic Seminar: A Model for Film Discussion in the Social Studies Jeremy D. Stoddard 67. Not Playing Around: Teaching Role Plays in Social Education Wayne Au 68. Using Multicultural Literature in Teaching for Social Justice Sung Choon Park and Cynthia A. Tyson 69. Voices of our community: Making Connections through Digital Stories Elizabeth K. Wilson and Vivian Harris Wright 70. Modeling Technology-Based Social Studies Instruction: A Simulated WebQuest Christy G. Keeler Section 9: Instruction and Designing Curriculum Introduction: Elizabeth E. Heilman and Mark Kissling 71. Providing Elementary Teachers with Experience of Children's Thinking in Social Studies Keith Barton 72. What to Teach, When and Why: Masterful Curriculum Unit Planning Elizabeth E. Heilman 73. The Modeling Approach to Social Studies Teacher Education Michael Marino and Benjamin M. Jacobs 74. Instructional Planning and Practice through Micro-teaching Anne-lise Halvorsen 75. Approaching Curriculum Units as Terrains and Systems to Explore Paul Skilton-Sylvester 76. Teaching Teachers to Teach for Understanding in Social Studies Methods Classes John Gunn 77. Teaching Students to Use the Inquiry Method James Hartwick 78. Comparing Visions: Do Our State Standards Align with the National Standards? Barbara Foulks Boyd 79. Reflections on Learners and Learning in Early Field Experiences for Secondary Social Studies Susan B. Serota and Linda Bennett 80. Creating Units to Create Meaning out of Social Studies Content Audrey Rogers 81. Using Narrative to Reflect on the Process of Curriculum Enactment Gail Hickey Conclusion: The present and future of Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: A Critical Review Susan Adler Won Pyo Hong Appendices Elizabeth E. Heilman Appendix 1: Planning Instruction with Learning Disabilities in Mind Appendix 2: Building a Repertoire of Instructional Strategies Appendix 3: Reading and Comprehension Teaching Methods Contributor Biographies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The preparation of teachers, especially as they get ready to teach social studies and social science in our schools and colleges, is crucial not only to the project of good education, but even more broadly, to the cultivation of healthy democracy and the growth of the nation's citizens. This book features the ideas from 78 of our nation's most thoughtful teacher educators reflecting on their best practices and offering specific strategies through which future teachers learn to teach. The essays in this volume illuminate how future teachers wrestle with high-minded questions pertaining to the sociocultural, philosophical and historical aspects of education, but they also explain how to teach day to day skills such as lesson planning and meeting national standards. Sections in this book are arranged by both disciplinary organization and approach or activity. Each section is rich and coherent and is introduced with a scholarly essay that both provides a theoretical overview, analysis, and explication of this aspect of teacher education and scaffolds as well as introduces for the reader the essays to come. Each essay is coded to key words, to the level at which the lesson can be used, and to both NCSS and NCATE standards, for quick reference in classroom planning as well as institutional development and implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LB1584 .S6369 2010 Unknown
Book
xix, 387 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Dedication-- Acknowledgements Preface by Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams Alaska and its People: An Introduction by Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams A.Portraits of Nations: Telling Our Own Story James Kari, PhD and Katie and Fred John (Athabascan) / Reprint: "Lazeni 'Iinn Nataelde Ghadghaande: when Russians Were Killed at Roasted Salmon Place (Batlzulnetas)" Reprint from Tatl'ahwt'aenn Nenn' The Headwaters Peoples' Country, Alaska Native Language Center, Fairbanks, Alaska 1986 Katerina Solovjova and Aleksandra A. Vovnyanko / Reprint, excerpts from: "The Fur Rush:A Chronicle of Colonial Life" from The Fur Rush. (Phenix Press, 2002) Charlene Khaih Zhuu Stern (Neetsaii Gwich'in Athabascan) / "Redefining Our Planning Traditions: Caribou Fences, Community and the Neetsaii Experience" Maria Bolanz / "Memories of my Trap Line" Kanaqlak George Charles, PhD (Yup'ik) / reprint of "Cultural Identity through Yupiaq Narrative" From Circumpolar Ethnicity and Identity, Senri Ethnological Studies 66:41-62 copyright 2004, editors Takashi Irimoto and Takako Yamada James Fall, PhD / "Dena'ina Elnena: Dena'ina Country: The Dena'ina in Anchorage, Alaska" Walkie Charles (Yup'ik) / Walkie Charles article is a reprint of "Quaneryaramta Egmiucia: Continuing Our Language." From Anthropology and Education quarterly Volume 36, Issue 1, 2005. Beth Leonard (Deg Xinag Athabascan) / "Deg Xinag Oral Traditions: Reconnecting Indigenous Language And Education Through Traditional Narratives" Jeane Breinig, PhD (Haida) / "Alaska Haida Language Today: Reasons for Hope" B. Empire: Processing Colonization Harold Napoleon (Yup'ik) / reprint of portions of Yuuyaraq: The Way of the Human Being, (1991) Nancy Furlow (Tlingit) / "Angoon Remembers: The Religious Significance of Balance and Reciprocity" Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams (Tlingit) / "The Comity Agreement: Missionization of Alaska's Native People" Steve Langdon, PhD and Aaron Leggett (Dena'ina Athabascan) / "Dena'ina Heritage and Representation in Anchorage: A Collaborative Project" Ted Mayac, Sr. (King Island Inupiaq) / "How it feels to have your History Stolen" Evon Peter(Neetsaii Gwitch'in/Jewish) / "Undermining Our Tribal Governments: The Stripping of Land, Resources, and Rights from Alaska Native Nations" Subhankar Banerjee / "Terra Incognita: Communities and Resource Wars" Iggiagruk William L. Hensley (Inupiaq) / "Why the Natives of Alaska have a Land Claim" Written in 1969 during the height of the land claims debate in Alaska. Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams, PhD (Tlingit) / reprint of Tundra Times article originally published in October 1996 "Rise of Native Solidarity" C. Worldviews: Alaska Native and Indigenous Epistemologies Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley, PhD (Yupiaq) / A Yupiaq Worldview: A Pathway to Ecology and Spirit (Waveland Press 1995/2006). Reprint and excerpts of pages the "Introduction" and from Chapter 1: "Yupiaq Worldview: The Meeting of the Old and New" Gregory A. Cajete, PhD (Santa Clara Pueblo) / "The Cosmos: Indigenous Perspectives" Claudette Engblom-Bradley, PhD (Schaghticoke) / "Seeing Mathematics with Indian Eyes" Lilian Na'ia Alessa, PhD / "What is Truth? Where Western Science and Traditional Knowledge Converge" Joan Pirciralria Hamilton (Cup'ik) / "The Yup'ik and Cup'ik People" D. Native Arts: A Weaving of Melody and Color Deanna Paniataaq Kingston, PhD (Inupiaq) / "Ugiuvangmiut Illugiit Atuut: Teasing Cousin Songs of the King Island Inupiat" Larry McNeil (Tlingit and Nisga'a) / "fly by night mythology An Indigenous Guide to White Man, or How to Stay Sane When the World Makes No Sense" Perry Eaton (Alutiiq/Sugcestun) / "Kodiak Masks: A Personal Odyssey Craig Coray / "Artifacts in Sound: A Century of Field Recordings of Alaska Natives" Frank Francis-Chythlook (Yup'ik - Dillingham) / Essay: "Digital Media as a Means of Self Discovery: Identity Affirmations in Modern Technology" Erica Lord (Inupiaq/Athabascan) / "America's Wretched" Tim Murphrey / "The Alaska Native Arts Festival" Anna Smith (Tlingit) / "Smoke Signals and Thomas's Recreation Stories" Jim Ruppert / "Alaska Native Literature: an Updated Introduction" E. Ravenstale(s) Nora Marks Dauenhauer (Tlingit) and Richard Dauenhauer / POEMS Nora Marks Dauenhauer / Gathering at William Tyson Elementary School, Anchorage, Alaska / Cheerleading at Homecoming '98, Juneau-Douglas High School / Cole Sewing / Gabe's Birthday / Repatriation / Richard Dauenhauer / Group One. Family Poems / Group Two. Congestive Heart Failure: Letting Go / Group Three. Harvesting C.G. Williams / Four Wheeler Poem Denise Wartes / Living in the Arctic Eleanor Hadden (Tlingit/Haida/Tsimshian) / "Tunnel - What Tunnel?" Daisy Demientieff (Athabascan) / "Delicious recipe for how to cook moose ribs" Suggestions for Further Reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Alaska is home to more than two hundred federally recognized tribes. Yet the long histories and diverse cultures of Alaska's first peoples are often ignored, while the stories of Russian fur hunters and U.S. gold-miners, of salmon canneries and oil pipelines, are praised. Filled with essays, poems, songs, stories, maps, and visual art, this volume foregrounds the perspectives of Alaska Native people, from a Tlingit photographer to Athabascan and Yup'ik linguists, and from an Alutiiq mask carver to a prominent Native politician and member of Alaska's House of Representatives. The contributors, most of whom are Alaska Native, include scholars, political leaders, activists, and artists. The majority of the pieces in "The Alaska Native Reader" were written especially for the volume; several incorporate translations from Native languages. "The Alaska Native Reader" describes indigenous worldviews, languages, arts, and other cultural traditions as well as contemporary efforts to preserve them. Several pieces examine Alaska Natives' experiences of and resistance to Russian and American colonialism; some of these address land claims, self-determination, and sovereignty. Essays discuss contemporary Alaska Native literature, indigenous philosophical and spiritual tenets, and the ways that Native peoples are represented in the media. Others take up such diverse topics as the use of digital technologies to document Native cultures, planning systems that have enabled indigenous communities to survive in the Arctic for thousands of years, and a project to accurately represent Dena'ina heritage in and around Anchorage. Fourteen of the volume's many illustrations appear in colour; these include work by the contemporary artists Subhankar Banerjee, Perry, Eaton, Erica Lord, and Larry McNeil.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Dedication-- Acknowledgements Preface by Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams Alaska and its People: An Introduction by Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams A.Portraits of Nations: Telling Our Own Story James Kari, PhD and Katie and Fred John (Athabascan) / Reprint: "Lazeni 'Iinn Nataelde Ghadghaande: when Russians Were Killed at Roasted Salmon Place (Batlzulnetas)" Reprint from Tatl'ahwt'aenn Nenn' The Headwaters Peoples' Country, Alaska Native Language Center, Fairbanks, Alaska 1986 Katerina Solovjova and Aleksandra A. Vovnyanko / Reprint, excerpts from: "The Fur Rush:A Chronicle of Colonial Life" from The Fur Rush. (Phenix Press, 2002) Charlene Khaih Zhuu Stern (Neetsaii Gwich'in Athabascan) / "Redefining Our Planning Traditions: Caribou Fences, Community and the Neetsaii Experience" Maria Bolanz / "Memories of my Trap Line" Kanaqlak George Charles, PhD (Yup'ik) / reprint of "Cultural Identity through Yupiaq Narrative" From Circumpolar Ethnicity and Identity, Senri Ethnological Studies 66:41-62 copyright 2004, editors Takashi Irimoto and Takako Yamada James Fall, PhD / "Dena'ina Elnena: Dena'ina Country: The Dena'ina in Anchorage, Alaska" Walkie Charles (Yup'ik) / Walkie Charles article is a reprint of "Quaneryaramta Egmiucia: Continuing Our Language." From Anthropology and Education quarterly Volume 36, Issue 1, 2005. Beth Leonard (Deg Xinag Athabascan) / "Deg Xinag Oral Traditions: Reconnecting Indigenous Language And Education Through Traditional Narratives" Jeane Breinig, PhD (Haida) / "Alaska Haida Language Today: Reasons for Hope" B. Empire: Processing Colonization Harold Napoleon (Yup'ik) / reprint of portions of Yuuyaraq: The Way of the Human Being, (1991) Nancy Furlow (Tlingit) / "Angoon Remembers: The Religious Significance of Balance and Reciprocity" Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams (Tlingit) / "The Comity Agreement: Missionization of Alaska's Native People" Steve Langdon, PhD and Aaron Leggett (Dena'ina Athabascan) / "Dena'ina Heritage and Representation in Anchorage: A Collaborative Project" Ted Mayac, Sr. (King Island Inupiaq) / "How it feels to have your History Stolen" Evon Peter(Neetsaii Gwitch'in/Jewish) / "Undermining Our Tribal Governments: The Stripping of Land, Resources, and Rights from Alaska Native Nations" Subhankar Banerjee / "Terra Incognita: Communities and Resource Wars" Iggiagruk William L. Hensley (Inupiaq) / "Why the Natives of Alaska have a Land Claim" Written in 1969 during the height of the land claims debate in Alaska. Maria Shaan Tlaa Williams, PhD (Tlingit) / reprint of Tundra Times article originally published in October 1996 "Rise of Native Solidarity" C. Worldviews: Alaska Native and Indigenous Epistemologies Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley, PhD (Yupiaq) / A Yupiaq Worldview: A Pathway to Ecology and Spirit (Waveland Press 1995/2006). Reprint and excerpts of pages the "Introduction" and from Chapter 1: "Yupiaq Worldview: The Meeting of the Old and New" Gregory A. Cajete, PhD (Santa Clara Pueblo) / "The Cosmos: Indigenous Perspectives" Claudette Engblom-Bradley, PhD (Schaghticoke) / "Seeing Mathematics with Indian Eyes" Lilian Na'ia Alessa, PhD / "What is Truth? Where Western Science and Traditional Knowledge Converge" Joan Pirciralria Hamilton (Cup'ik) / "The Yup'ik and Cup'ik People" D. Native Arts: A Weaving of Melody and Color Deanna Paniataaq Kingston, PhD (Inupiaq) / "Ugiuvangmiut Illugiit Atuut: Teasing Cousin Songs of the King Island Inupiat" Larry McNeil (Tlingit and Nisga'a) / "fly by night mythology An Indigenous Guide to White Man, or How to Stay Sane When the World Makes No Sense" Perry Eaton (Alutiiq/Sugcestun) / "Kodiak Masks: A Personal Odyssey Craig Coray / "Artifacts in Sound: A Century of Field Recordings of Alaska Natives" Frank Francis-Chythlook (Yup'ik - Dillingham) / Essay: "Digital Media as a Means of Self Discovery: Identity Affirmations in Modern Technology" Erica Lord (Inupiaq/Athabascan) / "America's Wretched" Tim Murphrey / "The Alaska Native Arts Festival" Anna Smith (Tlingit) / "Smoke Signals and Thomas's Recreation Stories" Jim Ruppert / "Alaska Native Literature: an Updated Introduction" E. Ravenstale(s) Nora Marks Dauenhauer (Tlingit) and Richard Dauenhauer / POEMS Nora Marks Dauenhauer / Gathering at William Tyson Elementary School, Anchorage, Alaska / Cheerleading at Homecoming '98, Juneau-Douglas High School / Cole Sewing / Gabe's Birthday / Repatriation / Richard Dauenhauer / Group One. Family Poems / Group Two. Congestive Heart Failure: Letting Go / Group Three. Harvesting C.G. Williams / Four Wheeler Poem Denise Wartes / Living in the Arctic Eleanor Hadden (Tlingit/Haida/Tsimshian) / "Tunnel - What Tunnel?" Daisy Demientieff (Athabascan) / "Delicious recipe for how to cook moose ribs" Suggestions for Further Reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Alaska is home to more than two hundred federally recognized tribes. Yet the long histories and diverse cultures of Alaska's first peoples are often ignored, while the stories of Russian fur hunters and U.S. gold-miners, of salmon canneries and oil pipelines, are praised. Filled with essays, poems, songs, stories, maps, and visual art, this volume foregrounds the perspectives of Alaska Native people, from a Tlingit photographer to Athabascan and Yup'ik linguists, and from an Alutiiq mask carver to a prominent Native politician and member of Alaska's House of Representatives. The contributors, most of whom are Alaska Native, include scholars, political leaders, activists, and artists. The majority of the pieces in "The Alaska Native Reader" were written especially for the volume; several incorporate translations from Native languages. "The Alaska Native Reader" describes indigenous worldviews, languages, arts, and other cultural traditions as well as contemporary efforts to preserve them. Several pieces examine Alaska Natives' experiences of and resistance to Russian and American colonialism; some of these address land claims, self-determination, and sovereignty. Essays discuss contemporary Alaska Native literature, indigenous philosophical and spiritual tenets, and the ways that Native peoples are represented in the media. Others take up such diverse topics as the use of digital technologies to document Native cultures, planning systems that have enabled indigenous communities to survive in the Arctic for thousands of years, and a project to accurately represent Dena'ina heritage in and around Anchorage. Fourteen of the volume's many illustrations appear in colour; these include work by the contemporary artists Subhankar Banerjee, Perry, Eaton, Erica Lord, and Larry McNeil.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
F904 .A364 2009 Unknown

13. Media audiences [2009]

Book
4 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • VOLUME 1: HISTORY OF AUDIENCE STUDY Early Positions Television's Impact on Society - T. Coffin The State of Communication Research - B. Berelson On the Effect of Communication - W. Davison Functional Analysis and Mass Communication - C. R. Wright On the Use of the Mass Media as "Escape": Clarification of a concept - E. Katz and D. Foulkes Mass Communication Research: An old road surveyed - J. Klapper Audiences as Markets or Public The Audience - J. G. Webster Television Audience Research at Britain's Independent Broadcasting Authority, 1974-1984 - J. M. Wober and B. Gunter Audiences, Use and Effects Flow and Media Enjoyment - J. L. Sherry Expanding Disposition Theory: Reconsidering character liking, moral evaluations and enjoyment - A. A. Raney Interpretational Audiences Amassing the Multitude: Revisiting early audience studies - J. Z. Bratich Audience Semiotics, Interpretive Communities and the 'Ethnographic Turn' in Media Research - K. C. Schroder Social Action Media Studies: Foundational arguments and common premises - G. T. Schoening and J. A. Anderson Assessing Qualitative Television Audience Research: Incorporating feminist and anthropological theoretical innovation - A. D. Lotz Alternative Theoretical Traditions Five Traditions in Search of the Audience - K. B. Jensen and K. E. Rosengren The Rise and Fall of Audience Research: An old story with a new ending - S. M. Livingstone Active Audience Theory: Pendulums and pitfalls - D. Morley New Media Perspectives How do Communication and Technology Researchers Study the Internet? - J. B. Walther, G. Gay and J. T. Hancock New Media - New Pleasures? - A. Kerr, J. Kucklich, and P. Brereton VOLUME 2: MEASUREMENT OF AUDIENCES Quantitative Surveys Audience Flow Past and Present: Television inheritance effects reconsidered - J. G. Webster Television and Leisure Time: Yesterday, today and (maybe) tomorrow - J. P. Robinson Continuities and Discontinuities in Media Usage and Taste: A longitudinal study - H. T. Himmelweit and B. Swift Experience Sampling Methods Applications to Communication Research Questions - R. Kubey and M. Csikszentmihalyi Internet Use in the Contemporary Media Environment - A. J. Flanagin and M. J. Metzger What do Americans Really Want to Know? Tracking the behaviour of news readers on the internet - D. Tewkesbury Controlled Experiments Does Aggression Cause a Preference for Viewing Media Violence - A. Fengistein Forbidden Fruit Versus Tainted Fruit of Warning Labels on Attraction to Television Violence - B. Bushman and A.D. Stack Some Like it Bad: Testing a model for perceiving and experiencing fictional characters - E. A. Konijn and J. F. Hoorn Can you Hear Me Now? The impact of voice in an online gaming community - D. Williams, S. Capalan and L. Xiang Qualitative Depth Interviews Impact of the VCR on Control of Television Viewing - W. Y. Kim, S. J. Baran and K. K. Massey Rethinking the Focus Group in Media and Communications Research - P. Lunt and S. Livingstone Ethnographic/Observational Research Viewing the Viewers: Viewing behaviours by children and adults during television programs and commercials - K. L. Schmitt, K. D. Woolf and D. R. Anderson Do Children Learn How to Watch Television? The impact of extensive experience with Blue's Clues on preschool children's television viewing behaviour - A. M. Crawley, D. R. Anderson, A. Santomero, A. Wilder, W. Williams, M. R. Evans and J. Bryant The Rules of Viewing Television in Public Places - D. Lemish Reception Analysis Culture and Communication: Towards an ethnographic critique of media consumption in the transitional media system - I. Ang On Playfully Becoming the 'Other': Watching Oprah Winfrey on Malaysian television - T. Wilson From 'Interpretive Communities' to 'Communities of Improvisation' - D. Machin and M. Carrithers VOLUME 3: AGGREGATED AND DISAGGREGATED AUDIENCES Demographics Watching Talk: Gender and engagement in the viewing of audience discussion programmes - S. Livingstone Developmental Changes in Adolescents' Television Viewing Habits: Longitudinal trajectories in a three-wave panel study - S. Eggermont In Search of the Older Audience: Adult age differences in television viewing - M. L. Mares and W. E. Woodard Black and White Viewers' Perception and Recall of Occupational Characters on Television - O. Appiah Assertions of Identities Through News Production: News making among teenage Muslim girls in London and New York - H. Noor Beliefs How the Media Effect What People Think: An information processing approach - R. M. Entman Consumers' Intentions to Opt In To SMS Advertising: A cross national study of young Americans and Koreans - A. Muk Personality and Motivational Factors Modeling the Gratification Seeking Process of Television Viewing - C. Lin Uses and Gratifications of Media Violence: Personality correlates of viewing and liking violent genres - M. Krcmar and L.G. Kean Effects of Personality Type on the Use of Television Genre - J. W. Shim and B. Paul Is Psychopathology the Key to Understanding Why Some Children Become Aggressive When They Are Exposed to Violent Television Programming? - T. Grimes, L. Bergen, K. Nichols, E. Vernberg and P. Fonagy Fandom 'Celebrating the Story the Way it is': Cultural studies, corporate media and the contested utility of fandom - S. Murray Medium and Genre Factors Beneath the Viewer of Fragmentation: Television audience polarization in a multichannel world - J. G. Webster TV Diets: Towards a typology of TV viewership - G. Weimann, H. B. Brosius, and M. Wober Why People Watch Reality TV? - S. Reiss and J. Wiltz Living on Dawson's Creek: Teen viewers, cultural convergence and television overflow - W. Brooker Rereading David Morley's the 'Nationwide' Audience - S. Kim VOLUME 4: AUDIENCES AND INFLUENCES Intended Effects - Political Campaigning Appeals and Strategies of Negative Political Advertising - B. L. Roddy and G. M. Garramone Campaign Advertisements Versus Television News as Sources of Political Issue Information - X. Zhao and S. H. Chaffee Issue-advocacy versus candidate advertising: Effects on candidate preferences and democratic process - M. Pfau, R. L. Holbert, E. A. Szabo and K. Kaminski The Impact of Political Advertising on Knowledge, Internet Information Seeking, and Candidate Preference - N. A. Valentino, V. L. Hutchings and D. Williams Intended Effects - Social Marketing J. L. Andsager, E. W. Austin and B. E. Pinkleton - C. Schooler, J. A. Flora and J. W. Farquhar Moving Toward Synergy: Media supplementation in the Stanford Five-City Project Unintended Effects - Activities and Time Use - Questioning the Value of Realism: Young adults' processing of messages in alcohol-related public service announcements and advertising Reconsidering the Displacement Hypothesis - D. C. Mutz, D. F. Roberts and D. P. van Vuuren Longitudinal Effects of Television on Children's Leisure-time Reading: A test of three explanatory models - C. M. Koolstra and T. H. van der Voort Unintended Effects - Antisocial Behaviour Effect of Television Violence on Aggressiveness - J. L. Freedman Television Violence and Aggression: The debate continues - L. Friedrich-Cofer and A. C. Huston Television Violence and Aggression: A rejoinder - J. L. Freedman Does Viewing Violent Media Really Cause Criminal Violence? A methodological review - J. Savage Unintended Effects - Public/Private Impression Formation The Anatomy of Agenda-setting Research - E. M. Rogers, J. W. Dearing, and D. Brequian Framing as a Theory of Media Effects - D. A. Scheufele Do talk Shows Cultivate Adolescents' Views of the World? A prolonged exposure experiment - P. Rossler and H.B. Brosius Scope of Self: Toward a model of television's effects on self-complexity in adolescence - K. Harrison Media Effects on Ethnic Identity Among Linguistic Majorities and Minorities: A longitudinal study of a bilingual setting - R. Clement, S.C. Baker, G. Josephson and K. A. Noels Unintended Effects - Cognitive and Emotional Development Television's Impact on High School Achievement - G. D. Gaddy The Effects of Television Advertising on Materialism, Parent-child Conflict, and Unhappiness: A review of research - M. Buijzen and P.M. Valkenburg.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The relationship between the media and viewers, readers and listeners is complex and consequently 'audiences' have become a key area in media and communications research in the social sciences and humanities. This major reference collection brings together a range of theoretical, methodological and thematically diverse articles and chapters that comprehensively map the most important kinds of work and ideas in international audience studies. Volume I overviews the history of audience research and the ways that audiences have been conceptualised. It includes papers that consider how debates and discussions about audiences have changed in the context of different media developments. Volume II deals with different ways that audiences and their responses/uses of media have been measured. This volume pays particular attention to the way that audience studies have responded to the challenges of different media. Volume III focuses on specific genres of entertainment, specific media, or on specific media groups. Finally, Volume IV looks specifically at audience research that has tested the way that the media influence society, attitudes and behaviours. The papers reflect a range of the different topics that have been tested and also to give a sense of different methodologies used to test these.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • VOLUME 1: HISTORY OF AUDIENCE STUDY Early Positions Television's Impact on Society - T. Coffin The State of Communication Research - B. Berelson On the Effect of Communication - W. Davison Functional Analysis and Mass Communication - C. R. Wright On the Use of the Mass Media as "Escape": Clarification of a concept - E. Katz and D. Foulkes Mass Communication Research: An old road surveyed - J. Klapper Audiences as Markets or Public The Audience - J. G. Webster Television Audience Research at Britain's Independent Broadcasting Authority, 1974-1984 - J. M. Wober and B. Gunter Audiences, Use and Effects Flow and Media Enjoyment - J. L. Sherry Expanding Disposition Theory: Reconsidering character liking, moral evaluations and enjoyment - A. A. Raney Interpretational Audiences Amassing the Multitude: Revisiting early audience studies - J. Z. Bratich Audience Semiotics, Interpretive Communities and the 'Ethnographic Turn' in Media Research - K. C. Schroder Social Action Media Studies: Foundational arguments and common premises - G. T. Schoening and J. A. Anderson Assessing Qualitative Television Audience Research: Incorporating feminist and anthropological theoretical innovation - A. D. Lotz Alternative Theoretical Traditions Five Traditions in Search of the Audience - K. B. Jensen and K. E. Rosengren The Rise and Fall of Audience Research: An old story with a new ending - S. M. Livingstone Active Audience Theory: Pendulums and pitfalls - D. Morley New Media Perspectives How do Communication and Technology Researchers Study the Internet? - J. B. Walther, G. Gay and J. T. Hancock New Media - New Pleasures? - A. Kerr, J. Kucklich, and P. Brereton VOLUME 2: MEASUREMENT OF AUDIENCES Quantitative Surveys Audience Flow Past and Present: Television inheritance effects reconsidered - J. G. Webster Television and Leisure Time: Yesterday, today and (maybe) tomorrow - J. P. Robinson Continuities and Discontinuities in Media Usage and Taste: A longitudinal study - H. T. Himmelweit and B. Swift Experience Sampling Methods Applications to Communication Research Questions - R. Kubey and M. Csikszentmihalyi Internet Use in the Contemporary Media Environment - A. J. Flanagin and M. J. Metzger What do Americans Really Want to Know? Tracking the behaviour of news readers on the internet - D. Tewkesbury Controlled Experiments Does Aggression Cause a Preference for Viewing Media Violence - A. Fengistein Forbidden Fruit Versus Tainted Fruit of Warning Labels on Attraction to Television Violence - B. Bushman and A.D. Stack Some Like it Bad: Testing a model for perceiving and experiencing fictional characters - E. A. Konijn and J. F. Hoorn Can you Hear Me Now? The impact of voice in an online gaming community - D. Williams, S. Capalan and L. Xiang Qualitative Depth Interviews Impact of the VCR on Control of Television Viewing - W. Y. Kim, S. J. Baran and K. K. Massey Rethinking the Focus Group in Media and Communications Research - P. Lunt and S. Livingstone Ethnographic/Observational Research Viewing the Viewers: Viewing behaviours by children and adults during television programs and commercials - K. L. Schmitt, K. D. Woolf and D. R. Anderson Do Children Learn How to Watch Television? The impact of extensive experience with Blue's Clues on preschool children's television viewing behaviour - A. M. Crawley, D. R. Anderson, A. Santomero, A. Wilder, W. Williams, M. R. Evans and J. Bryant The Rules of Viewing Television in Public Places - D. Lemish Reception Analysis Culture and Communication: Towards an ethnographic critique of media consumption in the transitional media system - I. Ang On Playfully Becoming the 'Other': Watching Oprah Winfrey on Malaysian television - T. Wilson From 'Interpretive Communities' to 'Communities of Improvisation' - D. Machin and M. Carrithers VOLUME 3: AGGREGATED AND DISAGGREGATED AUDIENCES Demographics Watching Talk: Gender and engagement in the viewing of audience discussion programmes - S. Livingstone Developmental Changes in Adolescents' Television Viewing Habits: Longitudinal trajectories in a three-wave panel study - S. Eggermont In Search of the Older Audience: Adult age differences in television viewing - M. L. Mares and W. E. Woodard Black and White Viewers' Perception and Recall of Occupational Characters on Television - O. Appiah Assertions of Identities Through News Production: News making among teenage Muslim girls in London and New York - H. Noor Beliefs How the Media Effect What People Think: An information processing approach - R. M. Entman Consumers' Intentions to Opt In To SMS Advertising: A cross national study of young Americans and Koreans - A. Muk Personality and Motivational Factors Modeling the Gratification Seeking Process of Television Viewing - C. Lin Uses and Gratifications of Media Violence: Personality correlates of viewing and liking violent genres - M. Krcmar and L.G. Kean Effects of Personality Type on the Use of Television Genre - J. W. Shim and B. Paul Is Psychopathology the Key to Understanding Why Some Children Become Aggressive When They Are Exposed to Violent Television Programming? - T. Grimes, L. Bergen, K. Nichols, E. Vernberg and P. Fonagy Fandom 'Celebrating the Story the Way it is': Cultural studies, corporate media and the contested utility of fandom - S. Murray Medium and Genre Factors Beneath the Viewer of Fragmentation: Television audience polarization in a multichannel world - J. G. Webster TV Diets: Towards a typology of TV viewership - G. Weimann, H. B. Brosius, and M. Wober Why People Watch Reality TV? - S. Reiss and J. Wiltz Living on Dawson's Creek: Teen viewers, cultural convergence and television overflow - W. Brooker Rereading David Morley's the 'Nationwide' Audience - S. Kim VOLUME 4: AUDIENCES AND INFLUENCES Intended Effects - Political Campaigning Appeals and Strategies of Negative Political Advertising - B. L. Roddy and G. M. Garramone Campaign Advertisements Versus Television News as Sources of Political Issue Information - X. Zhao and S. H. Chaffee Issue-advocacy versus candidate advertising: Effects on candidate preferences and democratic process - M. Pfau, R. L. Holbert, E. A. Szabo and K. Kaminski The Impact of Political Advertising on Knowledge, Internet Information Seeking, and Candidate Preference - N. A. Valentino, V. L. Hutchings and D. Williams Intended Effects - Social Marketing J. L. Andsager, E. W. Austin and B. E. Pinkleton - C. Schooler, J. A. Flora and J. W. Farquhar Moving Toward Synergy: Media supplementation in the Stanford Five-City Project Unintended Effects - Activities and Time Use - Questioning the Value of Realism: Young adults' processing of messages in alcohol-related public service announcements and advertising Reconsidering the Displacement Hypothesis - D. C. Mutz, D. F. Roberts and D. P. van Vuuren Longitudinal Effects of Television on Children's Leisure-time Reading: A test of three explanatory models - C. M. Koolstra and T. H. van der Voort Unintended Effects - Antisocial Behaviour Effect of Television Violence on Aggressiveness - J. L. Freedman Television Violence and Aggression: The debate continues - L. Friedrich-Cofer and A. C. Huston Television Violence and Aggression: A rejoinder - J. L. Freedman Does Viewing Violent Media Really Cause Criminal Violence? A methodological review - J. Savage Unintended Effects - Public/Private Impression Formation The Anatomy of Agenda-setting Research - E. M. Rogers, J. W. Dearing, and D. Brequian Framing as a Theory of Media Effects - D. A. Scheufele Do talk Shows Cultivate Adolescents' Views of the World? A prolonged exposure experiment - P. Rossler and H.B. Brosius Scope of Self: Toward a model of television's effects on self-complexity in adolescence - K. Harrison Media Effects on Ethnic Identity Among Linguistic Majorities and Minorities: A longitudinal study of a bilingual setting - R. Clement, S.C. Baker, G. Josephson and K. A. Noels Unintended Effects - Cognitive and Emotional Development Television's Impact on High School Achievement - G. D. Gaddy The Effects of Television Advertising on Materialism, Parent-child Conflict, and Unhappiness: A review of research - M. Buijzen and P.M. Valkenburg.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The relationship between the media and viewers, readers and listeners is complex and consequently 'audiences' have become a key area in media and communications research in the social sciences and humanities. This major reference collection brings together a range of theoretical, methodological and thematically diverse articles and chapters that comprehensively map the most important kinds of work and ideas in international audience studies. Volume I overviews the history of audience research and the ways that audiences have been conceptualised. It includes papers that consider how debates and discussions about audiences have changed in the context of different media developments. Volume II deals with different ways that audiences and their responses/uses of media have been measured. This volume pays particular attention to the way that audience studies have responded to the challenges of different media. Volume III focuses on specific genres of entertainment, specific media, or on specific media groups. Finally, Volume IV looks specifically at audience research that has tested the way that the media influence society, attitudes and behaviours. The papers reflect a range of the different topics that have been tested and also to give a sense of different methodologies used to test these.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
P96 .A83 M424 2009 V.1 Unknown
P96 .A83 M424 2009 V.2 Unknown
P96 .A83 M424 2009 V.3 Unknown
P96 .A83 M424 2009 V.4 Unknown
Book
xxii, 362 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • ContentsIntroduction to the handbook Part 1 --Research - current and future developments 1 Dyslexia - an overview of recent research 2 Dyslexia and IQ: From Research to Practice 3 Dyslexia and Cognitive Skills 4 Dyslexia and Glue Ear Syndrome5 Visual Stress and Dyslexia Part 2. Dimensions of Dyslexia 6 The Role of Early Identification -- Models from Practice7 The Role of Early Identification -- Models from Research and Practice8 Identification and Assessment of dyslexia and planning for learning9 Extending Literacy Skills -- issues for practice10 Spelling: Development, Assessment and Instruction11 Dyscalculia and Learning Difficulties in Mathematics 12 Phonological Awareness in Reading Disabilities Remediation: Some General Issues13 Alternative and innovative interventions for Dyslexia -- a critical commentaryPart 3. Identifying and Meeting Needs in an Inclusive Context: Inclusion andthe barriers to learning 14 How compatible is the recognition of dyslexia with inclusive education?15 Identifying and overcoming the barriers to learning in an inclusive context 16 Dyslexia in the Secondary School: Improving whole school achievement through dyslexia aware best practice17 School-wide professional development to raise students' literacy levels at Clyde Quay School, Wellington, New Zealand18 Dyslexia -- Overcoming the barriers of transition 19 Overcoming the barriers to literacy: An integrated, contextual workshop approach 20 The implications of students' perspectives on dyslexia for school ImprovementPart 4 Identifying and Meeting Needs in further, higher education and the workplace 21 The Development of Protocols for assessment and intervention at university for students with dyslexia 22 Reading Comprehension Solutions for College Students with Dyslexia in an Era of Technology: An Integrated Approach23 Dyslexia: Meeting the needs of employers and employees in the workplacePart 5 - Diversity, culture and language 24 Dyslexia and foreign language learning25 Reading and Dyslexia in Arabic26 Reading and Reading Disabilities in Spanish and Spanish-English Contexts27 Responsive approaches to literacy learning within cultural contexts.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"The Routledge Companion to Dyslexia" is a ground-breaking analysis of the whole field of dyslexia by a distinguished team of international contributors and editors, engaged in literacy, inclusion and learning. Their diverse perspectives and wide expertise make this invaluable guide one of the most important additions to the field of dyslexia for over a decade. Dyslexia is without doubt the most high profile and contentious learning difficulty, and it is a topic that has attracted a vast amount of research, opinion, professional schisms, and debate. The Companion provides an invaluable overview of the field of dyslexia with vital and clear emphasis on linking theoretical perspectives with best practice. This accessible text: presents a survey of current and future development in research, with a focus on how research can inform practice; focuses on areas such as neurobiology, phonological processing, literacy acquisition, numeracy and multilingualism; considers assessment and identification, with contributions on early identification, reading, spelling and mathematics; addresses identifying and meeting needs in an inclusive context; discusses inclusion and barriers to learning in a variety of different national contexts; and, includes models of instruction, direct instruction, co-operative learning and cross-curricular learning. "The Routledge Companion to Dyslexia" is a superb resource for anyone interested in the subject, whether in education or related subjects such as psychology or neurology. Fully indexed and cross-referenced, with helpful further reading sections at the end of each entry, it is ideal for those coming to the field of dyslexia for the first time as well as students and practitioners already familiar with the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • ContentsIntroduction to the handbook Part 1 --Research - current and future developments 1 Dyslexia - an overview of recent research 2 Dyslexia and IQ: From Research to Practice 3 Dyslexia and Cognitive Skills 4 Dyslexia and Glue Ear Syndrome5 Visual Stress and Dyslexia Part 2. Dimensions of Dyslexia 6 The Role of Early Identification -- Models from Practice7 The Role of Early Identification -- Models from Research and Practice8 Identification and Assessment of dyslexia and planning for learning9 Extending Literacy Skills -- issues for practice10 Spelling: Development, Assessment and Instruction11 Dyscalculia and Learning Difficulties in Mathematics 12 Phonological Awareness in Reading Disabilities Remediation: Some General Issues13 Alternative and innovative interventions for Dyslexia -- a critical commentaryPart 3. Identifying and Meeting Needs in an Inclusive Context: Inclusion andthe barriers to learning 14 How compatible is the recognition of dyslexia with inclusive education?15 Identifying and overcoming the barriers to learning in an inclusive context 16 Dyslexia in the Secondary School: Improving whole school achievement through dyslexia aware best practice17 School-wide professional development to raise students' literacy levels at Clyde Quay School, Wellington, New Zealand18 Dyslexia -- Overcoming the barriers of transition 19 Overcoming the barriers to literacy: An integrated, contextual workshop approach 20 The implications of students' perspectives on dyslexia for school ImprovementPart 4 Identifying and Meeting Needs in further, higher education and the workplace 21 The Development of Protocols for assessment and intervention at university for students with dyslexia 22 Reading Comprehension Solutions for College Students with Dyslexia in an Era of Technology: An Integrated Approach23 Dyslexia: Meeting the needs of employers and employees in the workplacePart 5 - Diversity, culture and language 24 Dyslexia and foreign language learning25 Reading and Dyslexia in Arabic26 Reading and Reading Disabilities in Spanish and Spanish-English Contexts27 Responsive approaches to literacy learning within cultural contexts.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"The Routledge Companion to Dyslexia" is a ground-breaking analysis of the whole field of dyslexia by a distinguished team of international contributors and editors, engaged in literacy, inclusion and learning. Their diverse perspectives and wide expertise make this invaluable guide one of the most important additions to the field of dyslexia for over a decade. Dyslexia is without doubt the most high profile and contentious learning difficulty, and it is a topic that has attracted a vast amount of research, opinion, professional schisms, and debate. The Companion provides an invaluable overview of the field of dyslexia with vital and clear emphasis on linking theoretical perspectives with best practice. This accessible text: presents a survey of current and future development in research, with a focus on how research can inform practice; focuses on areas such as neurobiology, phonological processing, literacy acquisition, numeracy and multilingualism; considers assessment and identification, with contributions on early identification, reading, spelling and mathematics; addresses identifying and meeting needs in an inclusive context; discusses inclusion and barriers to learning in a variety of different national contexts; and, includes models of instruction, direct instruction, co-operative learning and cross-curricular learning. "The Routledge Companion to Dyslexia" is a superb resource for anyone interested in the subject, whether in education or related subjects such as psychology or neurology. Fully indexed and cross-referenced, with helpful further reading sections at the end of each entry, it is ideal for those coming to the field of dyslexia for the first time as well as students and practitioners already familiar with the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LB1050.5 .R68 2009 Unknown
Book
2 v. (cii, 1006 p.) : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 29 cm.
  • v. 1. Abrupt Climate Change to Gulf Stream
  • v. 2. Halocarbons to World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
Climate Change in Context is a comprehensive guide to the increasingly important topic of climate change, including global warming. Cross-curricular in nature, the title supports both basic and advanced curricula in earth and environmental science, general science, history, government, and the social sciences. Geared for high school students, this 2-volume, 4-color title offers coverage of the impact of climate change on daily life, trade and commerce, travel, and the future of both industrialized and impoverished nations. It brings together original essays written by leading experts in the field, primary source documents, and sidebars on the cultural, economic, and political issues surrounding climate change. Topics include: Abrupt Climate Change, Carbon Footprint, Climate Engineering, Climate Change Skeptics, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007 Report, Media Coverage of Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth and many more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • v. 1. Abrupt Climate Change to Gulf Stream
  • v. 2. Halocarbons to World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
Climate Change in Context is a comprehensive guide to the increasingly important topic of climate change, including global warming. Cross-curricular in nature, the title supports both basic and advanced curricula in earth and environmental science, general science, history, government, and the social sciences. Geared for high school students, this 2-volume, 4-color title offers coverage of the impact of climate change on daily life, trade and commerce, travel, and the future of both industrialized and impoverished nations. It brings together original essays written by leading experts in the field, primary source documents, and sidebars on the cultural, economic, and political issues surrounding climate change. Topics include: Abrupt Climate Change, Carbon Footprint, Climate Engineering, Climate Change Skeptics, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007 Report, Media Coverage of Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth and many more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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