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Book
xli, 1042 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 24 cm
  • Introducting visual legal studies
  • Visualizing legal scholarship
  • Law and iconic art
  • Visualizing law in indigenous or folk loric culture
  • Visualizing law's topography
  • Visual technologies of law
  • Law and popular visual media : "case studies"
  • Law and popular visual media : in theory.
The proposed volumes are aimed at a multidisciplinary audience and seek to fill the gap between law, semiotics and visuality providing a comprehensive theoretical and analytical overview of legal visual semiotics. They seek to promote an interdisciplinary debate from law, semiotics and visuality bringing together the cumulative research traditions of these related areas as a prelude to identifying fertile avenues for research going forward. Advance Praise for Law, Culture and Visual Studies This diverse and exhilarating collection of essays explores the many facets both historical and contemporary of visual culture in the law. It opens a window onto the substantive, jurisdictional, disciplinary and methodological diversity of current research. It is a cornucopia of materials that will enliven legal studies for those new to the field as well as for established scholars. It is a 'must read' that will leave you wondering about the validity of the long held obsession that reduces the law and legal studies to little more than a preoccupation with the word. Leslie J Moran Professor of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London Law, Culture & Visual Studies is a treasure trove of insights on the entwined roles of legality and visuality. From multiple interdisciplinary perspectives by scholars from around the world, these pieces reflect the fullness and complexities of our visual encounters with law and culture. From pictures to places to postage stamps, from forensics to film to folklore, this anthology is an exciting journey through the fertile field of law and visual culture as well as a testament that the field has come of age. Naomi Mezey, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., USA This highly interdisciplinary reference work brings together diverse fields including cultural studies, communication theory, rhetoric, law and film studies, legal and social history, visual and legal theory, in order to document the various historical, cultural, representational and theoretical links that bind together law and the visual. This book offers a breath-taking range of resources from both well-established and newer scholars who together cover the field of law's representation in, interrogation of, and dialogue with forms of visual rhetoric, practice, and discourse. Taken together this scholarship presents state of the art research into an important and developing dimension of contemporary legal and cultural inquiry. Above all, Law Culture and Visual Studies lays the groundwork for rethinking the nature of law in our densely visual culture: How are legal meanings produced, encoded, distributed, and decoded? What critical and hermeneutic skills, new or old, familiar or unfamiliar, will be needed? Topical, diverse, and enlivening, Law Culture and Visual Studies is a vital research tool and an urgent invitation to further critical thinking in the areas so well laid out in this collection. Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introducting visual legal studies
  • Visualizing legal scholarship
  • Law and iconic art
  • Visualizing law in indigenous or folk loric culture
  • Visualizing law's topography
  • Visual technologies of law
  • Law and popular visual media : "case studies"
  • Law and popular visual media : in theory.
The proposed volumes are aimed at a multidisciplinary audience and seek to fill the gap between law, semiotics and visuality providing a comprehensive theoretical and analytical overview of legal visual semiotics. They seek to promote an interdisciplinary debate from law, semiotics and visuality bringing together the cumulative research traditions of these related areas as a prelude to identifying fertile avenues for research going forward. Advance Praise for Law, Culture and Visual Studies This diverse and exhilarating collection of essays explores the many facets both historical and contemporary of visual culture in the law. It opens a window onto the substantive, jurisdictional, disciplinary and methodological diversity of current research. It is a cornucopia of materials that will enliven legal studies for those new to the field as well as for established scholars. It is a 'must read' that will leave you wondering about the validity of the long held obsession that reduces the law and legal studies to little more than a preoccupation with the word. Leslie J Moran Professor of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London Law, Culture & Visual Studies is a treasure trove of insights on the entwined roles of legality and visuality. From multiple interdisciplinary perspectives by scholars from around the world, these pieces reflect the fullness and complexities of our visual encounters with law and culture. From pictures to places to postage stamps, from forensics to film to folklore, this anthology is an exciting journey through the fertile field of law and visual culture as well as a testament that the field has come of age. Naomi Mezey, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., USA This highly interdisciplinary reference work brings together diverse fields including cultural studies, communication theory, rhetoric, law and film studies, legal and social history, visual and legal theory, in order to document the various historical, cultural, representational and theoretical links that bind together law and the visual. This book offers a breath-taking range of resources from both well-established and newer scholars who together cover the field of law's representation in, interrogation of, and dialogue with forms of visual rhetoric, practice, and discourse. Taken together this scholarship presents state of the art research into an important and developing dimension of contemporary legal and cultural inquiry. Above all, Law Culture and Visual Studies lays the groundwork for rethinking the nature of law in our densely visual culture: How are legal meanings produced, encoded, distributed, and decoded? What critical and hermeneutic skills, new or old, familiar or unfamiliar, will be needed? Topical, diverse, and enlivening, Law Culture and Visual Studies is a vital research tool and an urgent invitation to further critical thinking in the areas so well laid out in this collection. Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
K487 .C8 L393 2014 Unknown
Book
v, 40 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
US Federal Documents Find it
Y 1.1/3:113-23 Unknown SSRC: new documents shelf
Book
x, 98 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
US Federal Documents Find it
Y 1.1/3:112-12 Unknown
Book
xxv, 341 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • PART I: Rethinking Administrative Rationality in a Democratic Republic Chapter 1: Managing Successful Organizational Change in the Public Sector Authors: Sergio Fernandez, Indiana University, and Hal G. Rainey, University of Georgia Commentators: Patrick E. Connor and Fred Thompson, Willamette University J. Christopher Mihm, Government Accountability Office Mary Tschirhart, University of North Carolina-Charlotte Chapter 2: Back to the Future? Performance-Related Pay, Empirical Research, and the Perils of Persistence Authors: James L. Perry, Trent A. Engbers, and So Yun Jun, Indiana University Commentators: David J. Houston, University of Tennessee-Knoxville Sanjay K. Pandey, Rutgers University Howard Risher, Risher Enterprises, Ltd. Chapter 3: From "Need to Know" to "Need to Share": Tangled Problems, Information Boundaries, and the Building of Public Sector Knowledge Networks Authors: Sharon S. Dawes, Anthony M. Cresswell, and Theresa A. Pardo, SUNY-Albany Commentators: Lisa Blomgren Bingham, Indiana University Sharon L. Caudle, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University Chapter 4: Toward "Strong Democracy" in Global Cities? Social Capital Building, Theory-Driven Reform, and the Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Experience Authors: Juliet Musso, University of Southern California-- Christopher Weare, University of Southern California-- Thomas Bryer, University of Central Florida-- and Terry L. Cooper, University of Southern California Commentators: Brian J. Cook, Virginia Tech Tina Nabatchi, Syracuse University John Clayton Thomas, Georgia State University Chapter 5: Reinventing Administrative Prescriptions: The Case for Democratic-Constitutional Impact Statements and Scorecards Author: David H. Rosenbloom, American University Commentator: John M. Kamensky, IBM Center for the Business of Government PART II: Recapitalizing Organizational Capacity Chapter 6: Betting on the Future with a Cloudy Crystal Ball? How Financial Theory Can Improve Revenue Forecasting and Budgets in the States Authors: Fred Thompson and Bruce L. Gates, Willamette University Commentators: Roy T. Meyers, University of Maryland-Baltimore County Katherine G. Willoughby, Georgia State University Chapter 7: Managing Public Service Contracts: Aligning Values, Institutions, and Markets Authors: Trevor L. Brown, Ohio State University-- Matthew Potoski, University of California-Santa Barbara-- and David M. Van Slyke, Syracuse University Commentators: Ruth H. DeHoog, University of North Carolina-Greensboro Suzanne J. Piotrowski, Rutgers University-Newark Thomas F. Reilly, Clark County, Nevada Andrew B. Whitford, University of Georgia Chapter 8: A Return to Spoils? Revisiting Radical Civil Service Reform in the United States Authors: Stephen E. Condrey, Condrey and Associates, Inc., and R. Paul Battaglio, Jr., University of Texas-Dallas Commentators: Frank D. Ferris, Executive Vice President, National Treasury Employees Union Norma M. Riccucci, Rutgers University-Newark Frank J. Thompson, Rutgers University-Newark Chapter 9: A Solution in Search of a Problem? Discrimination, Affirmative Action, and the New Governance Author: Sally Coleman Selden, Lynchburg College Commentators: Domonic A. Bearfield, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University Lael R. Keiser, University of Missouri-Columbia Sharon H. Mastracci, University of Illinois-Chicago PART III: Reconceptualizing Institutions for New Policy Challenges Chapter 10: Is the World "Flat" or "Spiky? Rethinking the Governance Implications of Globalization for Economic Development Authors: Richard C. Feiock, Florida State University-- M. Jae Moon, Yonsei University-- and Hyung Jun Park, Sungkyunkwan University Commentators: William Lyons, City of Knoxville, Tennessee and the University of Tennessee-Knoxville Laura A. Reese, Michigan State University John C. Morris, Old Dominion University, and Douglas J. Watson, University of Texas-Dallas Chapter 11: Spanning "Bleeding" Boundaries: Humanitarianism, NGOs, and the Civilian-Military Nexus in the Post-Cold War Era Author: Nancy C. Roberts, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School Commentator: Robert "Robin" H. Dorff, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College Chapter 12: Left High and Dry? Climate Change, Common-Pool Resource Theory, and the Adaptability of Western Water Compacts Authors: Edella Schlager, University of Arizona, and Tanya Heikkila, University of Colorado-Denver Commentators: Elizabeth A. Graffy, U.S. Geological Survey and University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Dialog between practitioners and academics has increasingly become the exception rather than the rule in contemporary public administration circles. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, Debating Public Administration: Management Challenges, Choices, and Opportunities tackles some of the major management challenges, choices, and opportunities of the twenty-first century facing public managers across various subfields of public administration. Informed by contemporary pressures on public managers to reconceptualize purpose, redefine administrative rationality, recapitalize human assets, reengage resources, and revitalize democratic constitutionalism, the book offers students, practitioners, and researchers an opportunity to take stock and ponder the future of practice and research in public administration. Organized by three sets of major management challenges facing the field-Rethinking Administrative Rationality in a Democratic Republic, Recapitalizing Organizational Capacity, and Reconceptualizing Institutions for New Policy Challenges-the book takes an uncommon approach to the study of these topics. In it, leading practitioners and academics comment on condensed versions of articles appearing in the Theory to Practice feature of Public Administration Review (PAR) from 2006 through 2011. The authors and commentators focus on some of the best current research, draw lessons from that literature for practice, and identify gaps in research that need to be addressed. They expertly draw out themes, issues, problems, and prospects, providing bulleted lessons and practical takeaways. This makes the book a unique one-stop resource for cross-disciplinary, cross-sectoral, and cross-professional exchanges on contemporary challenges.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • PART I: Rethinking Administrative Rationality in a Democratic Republic Chapter 1: Managing Successful Organizational Change in the Public Sector Authors: Sergio Fernandez, Indiana University, and Hal G. Rainey, University of Georgia Commentators: Patrick E. Connor and Fred Thompson, Willamette University J. Christopher Mihm, Government Accountability Office Mary Tschirhart, University of North Carolina-Charlotte Chapter 2: Back to the Future? Performance-Related Pay, Empirical Research, and the Perils of Persistence Authors: James L. Perry, Trent A. Engbers, and So Yun Jun, Indiana University Commentators: David J. Houston, University of Tennessee-Knoxville Sanjay K. Pandey, Rutgers University Howard Risher, Risher Enterprises, Ltd. Chapter 3: From "Need to Know" to "Need to Share": Tangled Problems, Information Boundaries, and the Building of Public Sector Knowledge Networks Authors: Sharon S. Dawes, Anthony M. Cresswell, and Theresa A. Pardo, SUNY-Albany Commentators: Lisa Blomgren Bingham, Indiana University Sharon L. Caudle, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University Chapter 4: Toward "Strong Democracy" in Global Cities? Social Capital Building, Theory-Driven Reform, and the Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Experience Authors: Juliet Musso, University of Southern California-- Christopher Weare, University of Southern California-- Thomas Bryer, University of Central Florida-- and Terry L. Cooper, University of Southern California Commentators: Brian J. Cook, Virginia Tech Tina Nabatchi, Syracuse University John Clayton Thomas, Georgia State University Chapter 5: Reinventing Administrative Prescriptions: The Case for Democratic-Constitutional Impact Statements and Scorecards Author: David H. Rosenbloom, American University Commentator: John M. Kamensky, IBM Center for the Business of Government PART II: Recapitalizing Organizational Capacity Chapter 6: Betting on the Future with a Cloudy Crystal Ball? How Financial Theory Can Improve Revenue Forecasting and Budgets in the States Authors: Fred Thompson and Bruce L. Gates, Willamette University Commentators: Roy T. Meyers, University of Maryland-Baltimore County Katherine G. Willoughby, Georgia State University Chapter 7: Managing Public Service Contracts: Aligning Values, Institutions, and Markets Authors: Trevor L. Brown, Ohio State University-- Matthew Potoski, University of California-Santa Barbara-- and David M. Van Slyke, Syracuse University Commentators: Ruth H. DeHoog, University of North Carolina-Greensboro Suzanne J. Piotrowski, Rutgers University-Newark Thomas F. Reilly, Clark County, Nevada Andrew B. Whitford, University of Georgia Chapter 8: A Return to Spoils? Revisiting Radical Civil Service Reform in the United States Authors: Stephen E. Condrey, Condrey and Associates, Inc., and R. Paul Battaglio, Jr., University of Texas-Dallas Commentators: Frank D. Ferris, Executive Vice President, National Treasury Employees Union Norma M. Riccucci, Rutgers University-Newark Frank J. Thompson, Rutgers University-Newark Chapter 9: A Solution in Search of a Problem? Discrimination, Affirmative Action, and the New Governance Author: Sally Coleman Selden, Lynchburg College Commentators: Domonic A. Bearfield, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University Lael R. Keiser, University of Missouri-Columbia Sharon H. Mastracci, University of Illinois-Chicago PART III: Reconceptualizing Institutions for New Policy Challenges Chapter 10: Is the World "Flat" or "Spiky? Rethinking the Governance Implications of Globalization for Economic Development Authors: Richard C. Feiock, Florida State University-- M. Jae Moon, Yonsei University-- and Hyung Jun Park, Sungkyunkwan University Commentators: William Lyons, City of Knoxville, Tennessee and the University of Tennessee-Knoxville Laura A. Reese, Michigan State University John C. Morris, Old Dominion University, and Douglas J. Watson, University of Texas-Dallas Chapter 11: Spanning "Bleeding" Boundaries: Humanitarianism, NGOs, and the Civilian-Military Nexus in the Post-Cold War Era Author: Nancy C. Roberts, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School Commentator: Robert "Robin" H. Dorff, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College Chapter 12: Left High and Dry? Climate Change, Common-Pool Resource Theory, and the Adaptability of Western Water Compacts Authors: Edella Schlager, University of Arizona, and Tanya Heikkila, University of Colorado-Denver Commentators: Elizabeth A. Graffy, U.S. Geological Survey and University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Dialog between practitioners and academics has increasingly become the exception rather than the rule in contemporary public administration circles. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, Debating Public Administration: Management Challenges, Choices, and Opportunities tackles some of the major management challenges, choices, and opportunities of the twenty-first century facing public managers across various subfields of public administration. Informed by contemporary pressures on public managers to reconceptualize purpose, redefine administrative rationality, recapitalize human assets, reengage resources, and revitalize democratic constitutionalism, the book offers students, practitioners, and researchers an opportunity to take stock and ponder the future of practice and research in public administration. Organized by three sets of major management challenges facing the field-Rethinking Administrative Rationality in a Democratic Republic, Recapitalizing Organizational Capacity, and Reconceptualizing Institutions for New Policy Challenges-the book takes an uncommon approach to the study of these topics. In it, leading practitioners and academics comment on condensed versions of articles appearing in the Theory to Practice feature of Public Administration Review (PAR) from 2006 through 2011. The authors and commentators focus on some of the best current research, draw lessons from that literature for practice, and identify gaps in research that need to be addressed. They expertly draw out themes, issues, problems, and prospects, providing bulleted lessons and practical takeaways. This makes the book a unique one-stop resource for cross-disciplinary, cross-sectoral, and cross-professional exchanges on contemporary challenges.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
JF1351 .D435 2013 Unknown
Book
1 online resource.
  • Biographical notes on the editors.- Biographical notes on contributors.- Introduction: Law, Culture and Visual Studies-- Richard K. Sherwin.- Part I. Introducing Visual Legal Studies.- Part II. Visualizing Legal Scholarship.- Part III. Law And Iconic Art.- Part IV. Visualizing Law In Indigenous Or Folk Loric Culture.- Part V. Visualizing Law's Topography.- Part VI. Visual Technologies Of Law.- Part VII. Law And Popular Visual Media: "Case Studies".- Part VIII. Law And Popular Visual Media: In Theory.- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The proposed volumes are aimed at a multidisciplinary audience and seek to fill the gap between law, semiotics and visuality providing a comprehensive theoretical and analytical overview of legal visual semiotics. They seek to promote an interdisciplinary debate from law, semiotics and visuality bringing together the cumulative research traditions of these related areas as a prelude to identifying fertile avenues for research going forward. Advance Praise for Law, Culture and Visual Studies This diverse and exhilarating collection of essays explores the many facets both historical and contemporary of visual culture in the law. It opens a window onto the substantive, jurisdictional, disciplinary and methodological diversity of current research. It is a cornucopia of materials that will enliven legal studies for those new to the field as well as for established scholars. It is a 'must read' that will leave you wondering about the validity of the long held obsession that reduces the law and legal studies to little more than a preoccupation with the word. Leslie J Moran Professor of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London Law, Culture & Visual Studies is a treasure trove of insights on the entwined roles of legality and visuality. From multiple interdisciplinary perspectives by scholars from around the world, these pieces reflect the fullness and complexities of our visual encounters with law and culture. From pictures to places to postage stamps, from forensics to film to folklore, this anthology is an exciting journey through the fertile field of law and visual culture as well as a testament that the field has come of age. Naomi Mezey, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., USA This highly interdisciplinary reference work brings together diverse fields including cultural studies, communication theory, rhetoric, law and film studies, legal and social history, visual and legal theory, in order to document the various historical, cultural, representational and theoretical links that bind together law and the visual. This book offers a breath-taking range of resources from both well-established and newer scholars who together cover the field of law's representation in, interrogation of, and dialogue with forms of visual rhetoric, practice, and discourse. Taken together this scholarship presents state of the art research into an important and developing dimension of contemporary legal and cultural inquiry. Above all, Law Culture and Visual Studies lays the groundwork for rethinking the nature of law in our densely visual culture: How are legal meanings produced, encoded, distributed, and decoded? What critical and hermeneutic skills, new or old, familiar or unfamiliar, will be needed? Topical, diverse, and enlivening, Law Culture and Visual Studies is a vital research tool and an urgent invitation to further critical thinking in the areas so well laid out in this collection. Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Biographical notes on the editors.- Biographical notes on contributors.- Introduction: Law, Culture and Visual Studies-- Richard K. Sherwin.- Part I. Introducing Visual Legal Studies.- Part II. Visualizing Legal Scholarship.- Part III. Law And Iconic Art.- Part IV. Visualizing Law In Indigenous Or Folk Loric Culture.- Part V. Visualizing Law's Topography.- Part VI. Visual Technologies Of Law.- Part VII. Law And Popular Visual Media: "Case Studies".- Part VIII. Law And Popular Visual Media: In Theory.- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The proposed volumes are aimed at a multidisciplinary audience and seek to fill the gap between law, semiotics and visuality providing a comprehensive theoretical and analytical overview of legal visual semiotics. They seek to promote an interdisciplinary debate from law, semiotics and visuality bringing together the cumulative research traditions of these related areas as a prelude to identifying fertile avenues for research going forward. Advance Praise for Law, Culture and Visual Studies This diverse and exhilarating collection of essays explores the many facets both historical and contemporary of visual culture in the law. It opens a window onto the substantive, jurisdictional, disciplinary and methodological diversity of current research. It is a cornucopia of materials that will enliven legal studies for those new to the field as well as for established scholars. It is a 'must read' that will leave you wondering about the validity of the long held obsession that reduces the law and legal studies to little more than a preoccupation with the word. Leslie J Moran Professor of Law, Birkbeck College, University of London Law, Culture & Visual Studies is a treasure trove of insights on the entwined roles of legality and visuality. From multiple interdisciplinary perspectives by scholars from around the world, these pieces reflect the fullness and complexities of our visual encounters with law and culture. From pictures to places to postage stamps, from forensics to film to folklore, this anthology is an exciting journey through the fertile field of law and visual culture as well as a testament that the field has come of age. Naomi Mezey, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., USA This highly interdisciplinary reference work brings together diverse fields including cultural studies, communication theory, rhetoric, law and film studies, legal and social history, visual and legal theory, in order to document the various historical, cultural, representational and theoretical links that bind together law and the visual. This book offers a breath-taking range of resources from both well-established and newer scholars who together cover the field of law's representation in, interrogation of, and dialogue with forms of visual rhetoric, practice, and discourse. Taken together this scholarship presents state of the art research into an important and developing dimension of contemporary legal and cultural inquiry. Above all, Law Culture and Visual Studies lays the groundwork for rethinking the nature of law in our densely visual culture: How are legal meanings produced, encoded, distributed, and decoded? What critical and hermeneutic skills, new or old, familiar or unfamiliar, will be needed? Topical, diverse, and enlivening, Law Culture and Visual Studies is a vital research tool and an urgent invitation to further critical thinking in the areas so well laid out in this collection. Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia Desmond Manderson, Future Fellow, ANU College of Law / Research School of Humanities & the Arts, Australian National University, Australia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
v, 26 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
US Federal Documents Find it
Y 1.1/3:113-19 Unknown
Book
xiv, 456 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Table of Contents Preface Introduction I Cultural Exchanges and Cuisines in the Contact Zone 1. 'Fit for the table of the most fastidious epicure': Culinary Colonialism in the Upper Canadian Contact Zone 2. 'The snipe were good and the wine not bad': Enabling Public Life for Privileged Men 3. The Role of Food in Canadian Expressions of Christianity II Regional Food Identities and Traditions 4. Pine-clad hills and spindrift swirl: The Character, Persistence, and Significance of Rural Newfoundland Foodways 5. Stocking the Root Cellar: Foodscapes in the Peace River Region 6. Rational Meals for the Traditional Family: Nutrition in Quebec School Manuals, 1900-1960 III Foodways and Memories in Ethnic and Racial Communities 7. 'We Didn't Have A Lot of Money, But We Had Food': Ukrainians and Their Depression-Era Food Memories 8. Feeding the Dead: The Ukrainian Food Colossi of the Canadian Prairies 9. Toronto's Multicultured Tongues: Stories of South Asian Cuisines IV Gendering Food in Cookbooks and Family Spaces 10. More than 'just' Recipes: Mennonite Cookbooks in Mid-twentieth Century North America 11. Gefilte Fish and Roast Duck with Orange Slices: A Treasure for my Daughter and the Creation of a Jewish Cultural Orthodoxy in Postwar Montreal 12. 'Tutti a Tavola!' Feeding the Family in Two Generations of Italian Immigrant Households in Montreal V Single Food Commodities, Markets, and Cultural Debates 13. John Bull and Sons: The Empire Marketing Board and the Creation of a British Imperial Food System 14. Spreading Controversy: The Story of Margarine in Quebec VI Protests, Mindful Eating, and the Politics of Food 15. The Politics of Milk: Canadian Housewives Organize in the 1930s 16. 'Less Inefficiency, More Milk': The Politics of Food and the Culture of the English-Canadian University, 1900-1950 17. The Granola High: Eating Differently in the 1960s and 1970s 18. 'Meat Stinks/Eat Beef Dyke!': Coming out as a Vegetarian in the Prairies VII National Identities and Cultural Spectacles 19. Nationalism on the Menu: Three Banquets on the 1939 Royal Tour 20. Food Acts and Cultural Politics: Women and the Gendered Dialectics of Culinary Pluralism at the International Institute of Toronto, 1950s-1960s VIII Marketing and Imposing Nutritional Standards 21. Vim, Vigour and Vitality: 'Power' Foods for Kids in Canadian Popular Magazines, 1914-1954 22. Making and Breaking Canada's Food Rules: Science, the State, and the Government of Nutrition, 1942-1949 23. 'A National Priority': Nutrition Canada's Survey and the Disciplining of Aboriginal Bodies, 1964-75.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Just as the Canada's rich past resists any singular narrative, there is no such thing as a singular Canadian food tradition. This new book explores Canada's diverse food cultures and the varied relationships that Canadians have had historically with food practices in the context of community, region, nation and beyond. Based on findings from menus, cookbooks, government documents, advertisements, media sources, oral histories, memoirs, and archival collections, Edible Histories offers a veritable feast of original research on Canada's food history and its relationship to culture and politics. This exciting collection explores a wide variety of topics, including urban restaurant culture, ethnic cuisines, and the controversial history of margarine in Canada. It also covers a broad time-span, from early contact between European settlers and First Nations through the end of the twentieth century. Edible Histories intertwines information of Canada's 'foodways' - the practices and traditions associated with food and food preparation - and stories of immigration, politics, gender, economics, science, medicine and religion. Sophisticated, culturally sensitive, and accessible, Edible Histories will appeal to students, historians, and foodies alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Table of Contents Preface Introduction I Cultural Exchanges and Cuisines in the Contact Zone 1. 'Fit for the table of the most fastidious epicure': Culinary Colonialism in the Upper Canadian Contact Zone 2. 'The snipe were good and the wine not bad': Enabling Public Life for Privileged Men 3. The Role of Food in Canadian Expressions of Christianity II Regional Food Identities and Traditions 4. Pine-clad hills and spindrift swirl: The Character, Persistence, and Significance of Rural Newfoundland Foodways 5. Stocking the Root Cellar: Foodscapes in the Peace River Region 6. Rational Meals for the Traditional Family: Nutrition in Quebec School Manuals, 1900-1960 III Foodways and Memories in Ethnic and Racial Communities 7. 'We Didn't Have A Lot of Money, But We Had Food': Ukrainians and Their Depression-Era Food Memories 8. Feeding the Dead: The Ukrainian Food Colossi of the Canadian Prairies 9. Toronto's Multicultured Tongues: Stories of South Asian Cuisines IV Gendering Food in Cookbooks and Family Spaces 10. More than 'just' Recipes: Mennonite Cookbooks in Mid-twentieth Century North America 11. Gefilte Fish and Roast Duck with Orange Slices: A Treasure for my Daughter and the Creation of a Jewish Cultural Orthodoxy in Postwar Montreal 12. 'Tutti a Tavola!' Feeding the Family in Two Generations of Italian Immigrant Households in Montreal V Single Food Commodities, Markets, and Cultural Debates 13. John Bull and Sons: The Empire Marketing Board and the Creation of a British Imperial Food System 14. Spreading Controversy: The Story of Margarine in Quebec VI Protests, Mindful Eating, and the Politics of Food 15. The Politics of Milk: Canadian Housewives Organize in the 1930s 16. 'Less Inefficiency, More Milk': The Politics of Food and the Culture of the English-Canadian University, 1900-1950 17. The Granola High: Eating Differently in the 1960s and 1970s 18. 'Meat Stinks/Eat Beef Dyke!': Coming out as a Vegetarian in the Prairies VII National Identities and Cultural Spectacles 19. Nationalism on the Menu: Three Banquets on the 1939 Royal Tour 20. Food Acts and Cultural Politics: Women and the Gendered Dialectics of Culinary Pluralism at the International Institute of Toronto, 1950s-1960s VIII Marketing and Imposing Nutritional Standards 21. Vim, Vigour and Vitality: 'Power' Foods for Kids in Canadian Popular Magazines, 1914-1954 22. Making and Breaking Canada's Food Rules: Science, the State, and the Government of Nutrition, 1942-1949 23. 'A National Priority': Nutrition Canada's Survey and the Disciplining of Aboriginal Bodies, 1964-75.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Just as the Canada's rich past resists any singular narrative, there is no such thing as a singular Canadian food tradition. This new book explores Canada's diverse food cultures and the varied relationships that Canadians have had historically with food practices in the context of community, region, nation and beyond. Based on findings from menus, cookbooks, government documents, advertisements, media sources, oral histories, memoirs, and archival collections, Edible Histories offers a veritable feast of original research on Canada's food history and its relationship to culture and politics. This exciting collection explores a wide variety of topics, including urban restaurant culture, ethnic cuisines, and the controversial history of margarine in Canada. It also covers a broad time-span, from early contact between European settlers and First Nations through the end of the twentieth century. Edible Histories intertwines information of Canada's 'foodways' - the practices and traditions associated with food and food preparation - and stories of immigration, politics, gender, economics, science, medicine and religion. Sophisticated, culturally sensitive, and accessible, Edible Histories will appeal to students, historians, and foodies alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GT2853 .C3 E35 2012 Unknown
Book
xxvi, 383 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The classroom as an tolerance lab / Lorenzo Zucca
  • Jewish day schools in France : mapping their Jewish identity proposals / Martine Cohen
  • Having faith in our schools : struggling with definitions of religion / Arif A. Jamal, Farid Panjwani
  • Religious discrimination and schools : the employment of teachers and the public sector duty / Lucy Vickers
  • Religion, regionalism and education in the United Kingdom : tales from Wales / Russell Sandberg, Anna Buchanan
  • Religion and education in Northern Ireland : voluntary segregation reflecting historical divisions / Christopher McCrudden
  • The French model : tensions between laïc and religious allegiances in French state and Catholic schools / Blandine Chélini-Pont
  • Religious education in a religiously neutral state : the German model / Heinrich de Wall
  • The controversy surrounding the denominational teaching of religion in Spanish state schools / Javier García Oliva
  • Religious education in Europe in the twenty-first century / Peter Cumper
  • Religious education and religious liberty : opt-outs and young people's sense of belonging / Alison Mawhinney ... [et al.]
  • History textbooks within the framework of French laïcité / Anna van den Kerchove
  • Teaching evolution, creationism and intelligent design in US schools (with some European comparisons) / Eric Barendt
  • Beating people is wrong : Campbell and Cosans, Williamson and their aftermath / Frank Cranmer
  • Bracelets, rings and veils : the accommodation of religious symbols in the uniform policies of English schools / Mark Hill
  • A uniform approach to religious discrimination? : the position of teachers and other school staff in the UK / Russell Sandberg
  • Of crucifixes and headscarves : religious symbols in German schools / Tobias Lock.
This collection considers how contemporary cultural and religious diversity challenges and redefines national constitutional and legal frameworks and concepts, within the context of education. It offers a critical reflection on the extent and meanings given to religious freedom in education across Europe. The contributions deal primarily with Western Europe although the book also includes a study of the US vibrant debates on Creationism. This volume considers issues such as religious expression, faith schooling and worship in schools, in a multidisciplinary and comparative approach. The book first examines key concepts, before presenting national models of religion and education in Europe and analyzing case studies relating to religious symbols worn at school and to the teaching of religious education. Legal questions are examined in a wider context, in the light of the intentions of state policy and of current national and transnational debates. Controversies on the legal implications of personal and national identities are for example analyzed. From a comparative perspective, the chapters examine the possible converging power of human rights and anti-discrimination discourses and reveal the difficulties and risks involved in seeking to identify the best model for Europe. This topical study of a highly sensitive area of education presents a valuable insight for students, researchers and academics with an interest in cultural and religious diversity, human rights and education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The classroom as an tolerance lab / Lorenzo Zucca
  • Jewish day schools in France : mapping their Jewish identity proposals / Martine Cohen
  • Having faith in our schools : struggling with definitions of religion / Arif A. Jamal, Farid Panjwani
  • Religious discrimination and schools : the employment of teachers and the public sector duty / Lucy Vickers
  • Religion, regionalism and education in the United Kingdom : tales from Wales / Russell Sandberg, Anna Buchanan
  • Religion and education in Northern Ireland : voluntary segregation reflecting historical divisions / Christopher McCrudden
  • The French model : tensions between laïc and religious allegiances in French state and Catholic schools / Blandine Chélini-Pont
  • Religious education in a religiously neutral state : the German model / Heinrich de Wall
  • The controversy surrounding the denominational teaching of religion in Spanish state schools / Javier García Oliva
  • Religious education in Europe in the twenty-first century / Peter Cumper
  • Religious education and religious liberty : opt-outs and young people's sense of belonging / Alison Mawhinney ... [et al.]
  • History textbooks within the framework of French laïcité / Anna van den Kerchove
  • Teaching evolution, creationism and intelligent design in US schools (with some European comparisons) / Eric Barendt
  • Beating people is wrong : Campbell and Cosans, Williamson and their aftermath / Frank Cranmer
  • Bracelets, rings and veils : the accommodation of religious symbols in the uniform policies of English schools / Mark Hill
  • A uniform approach to religious discrimination? : the position of teachers and other school staff in the UK / Russell Sandberg
  • Of crucifixes and headscarves : religious symbols in German schools / Tobias Lock.
This collection considers how contemporary cultural and religious diversity challenges and redefines national constitutional and legal frameworks and concepts, within the context of education. It offers a critical reflection on the extent and meanings given to religious freedom in education across Europe. The contributions deal primarily with Western Europe although the book also includes a study of the US vibrant debates on Creationism. This volume considers issues such as religious expression, faith schooling and worship in schools, in a multidisciplinary and comparative approach. The book first examines key concepts, before presenting national models of religion and education in Europe and analyzing case studies relating to religious symbols worn at school and to the teaching of religious education. Legal questions are examined in a wider context, in the light of the intentions of state policy and of current national and transnational debates. Controversies on the legal implications of personal and national identities are for example analyzed. From a comparative perspective, the chapters examine the possible converging power of human rights and anti-discrimination discourses and reveal the difficulties and risks involved in seeking to identify the best model for Europe. This topical study of a highly sensitive area of education presents a valuable insight for students, researchers and academics with an interest in cultural and religious diversity, human rights and education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
KJC6275 .L39 2011 Unknown
Book
xiv, 206 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1 Learning about sustainable communities Robert Rogerson, Sue Sadler, Anne Green and Cecilia Wong Chapter 2 Educating built environment professionals for stakeholder engagement Sarah Sayce and Judith Farren-Bradley Chapter 3 Generic skills and workplace learning: supporting professional development through online learning communities Ann Hockey, Carlos Jimenez-Bescos, Janice MacLean and Martin Spaul Chapter 4 Developing the learning potential of strategic environmental assessment in spatial planning Sue Kidd, Thomas Fischer and Urmila Jha-Thakur Chapter 5 Situated learning and the delivery of built environments for sustainable communitiesChapter 6 Understanding and experimenting with skills for community planning Brendan Murtagh and Geraint Ellis Chapter 7 Raising catchment consciousness - how imaginative engagement can help sustainable use of rivers Paul Selman, Claudia Carter, Clare Morgan and Anna Lawrence Chapter 8 Confronting sustainable community issues in a contested city Ken Sterrett and Frank Gaffikin Chapter 9 'Chain gang conservation': young people and environmental volunteering Michael Leyshon and Robert Fish Chapter 10 Action research to promote leadership and agency in developing sustainable schools and communities Barry Percy-Smith Chapter 11 The future of sustainable communities Robert Rogerson and Sue Sadler.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The desire to create places which offer high quality of life and contribute to national and global sustainable development principles has emerged over the last few decades as a focus for government policy and community action. Drawing on inter-disciplinary research conducted across UK universities and with community-based groups, this book offers insights into how local initiatives can enhance sustainable development and engage people in creating better places in which to live. It illustrates imaginative, practical and accessible ways in which communities and built-environment professionals are working and learning together towards a more sustainable future. It shows how such learning can result in more inclusive and desirable places to live, both for the residents of today and for future generations. Drawing on the experiences of nine locally based examples from across the UK, it brings together elements of debates as diverse as sustainable development, education, community coherence and conflict resolution, planning and environmental management. The book will be of value to all those who have a stake in the formation of communities, whether in professions such as architecture, urban design, planning or geography or who are involved through community and local organisations; it will contribute to the narrowing of the perceived sustainable communities 'skills gap'. The focus throughout is on the motivational aspects of learning and the different and often highly imaginative approaches which can be adopted to enable partnerships to work effectively. Topics include how groups, including young people and communities that are viewed as divided, can be engaged effectively through practices such as community planning and environmental volunteering as well as more innovative projects. Key themes that emerge are the need for a new 'transformational' leadership style where enabling people to be responsible for their own development and effectiveness is the key, and also for a new attitude towards skills so that these are no longer expected to be embodied within a single 'gatekeeper' but collectively within a team. If successive governments continue to devolve ever greater responsibility onto local communities, then the skills and learning to support them in deriving practical visions of a sustainable future will be crucial.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1 Learning about sustainable communities Robert Rogerson, Sue Sadler, Anne Green and Cecilia Wong Chapter 2 Educating built environment professionals for stakeholder engagement Sarah Sayce and Judith Farren-Bradley Chapter 3 Generic skills and workplace learning: supporting professional development through online learning communities Ann Hockey, Carlos Jimenez-Bescos, Janice MacLean and Martin Spaul Chapter 4 Developing the learning potential of strategic environmental assessment in spatial planning Sue Kidd, Thomas Fischer and Urmila Jha-Thakur Chapter 5 Situated learning and the delivery of built environments for sustainable communitiesChapter 6 Understanding and experimenting with skills for community planning Brendan Murtagh and Geraint Ellis Chapter 7 Raising catchment consciousness - how imaginative engagement can help sustainable use of rivers Paul Selman, Claudia Carter, Clare Morgan and Anna Lawrence Chapter 8 Confronting sustainable community issues in a contested city Ken Sterrett and Frank Gaffikin Chapter 9 'Chain gang conservation': young people and environmental volunteering Michael Leyshon and Robert Fish Chapter 10 Action research to promote leadership and agency in developing sustainable schools and communities Barry Percy-Smith Chapter 11 The future of sustainable communities Robert Rogerson and Sue Sadler.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The desire to create places which offer high quality of life and contribute to national and global sustainable development principles has emerged over the last few decades as a focus for government policy and community action. Drawing on inter-disciplinary research conducted across UK universities and with community-based groups, this book offers insights into how local initiatives can enhance sustainable development and engage people in creating better places in which to live. It illustrates imaginative, practical and accessible ways in which communities and built-environment professionals are working and learning together towards a more sustainable future. It shows how such learning can result in more inclusive and desirable places to live, both for the residents of today and for future generations. Drawing on the experiences of nine locally based examples from across the UK, it brings together elements of debates as diverse as sustainable development, education, community coherence and conflict resolution, planning and environmental management. The book will be of value to all those who have a stake in the formation of communities, whether in professions such as architecture, urban design, planning or geography or who are involved through community and local organisations; it will contribute to the narrowing of the perceived sustainable communities 'skills gap'. The focus throughout is on the motivational aspects of learning and the different and often highly imaginative approaches which can be adopted to enable partnerships to work effectively. Topics include how groups, including young people and communities that are viewed as divided, can be engaged effectively through practices such as community planning and environmental volunteering as well as more innovative projects. Key themes that emerge are the need for a new 'transformational' leadership style where enabling people to be responsible for their own development and effectiveness is the key, and also for a new attitude towards skills so that these are no longer expected to be embodied within a single 'gatekeeper' but collectively within a team. If successive governments continue to devolve ever greater responsibility onto local communities, then the skills and learning to support them in deriving practical visions of a sustainable future will be crucial.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
HC79 .E5 S86673 2011 Unknown
Book
4 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • VOLUME ONE: THEORETICAL ORIGINS OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION Part A: Theoretical Tributaries from Anthropology, Sociology and Social Psychology Thick Description: Towards an interpretive theory of culture - Clifford Geertz Extracts from Symbolic Interactionism: perspective and method - Herbert Blumer Extracts from Collected Papers 1: The problems of social reality - Alfred Schutz Extracts from Studies in Ethnomethodology - Harold Garfinkel Extracts from The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life - Erving Goffman Part B: Case Study, Ethnography and Evaluation Extracts from Boys in White: Student culture in medical school - Howard Becker, Blanche Geer, Everett Hughes and Anselm Strauss Extracts from The Man in the Principal's Office - Harry Wolcott Structuring School Structure - Hugh Mehan Extracts from Social Relations in a Secondary School - David Hargreaves Extracts from 'Problems of Sociological Fieldwork: A review of the methodology of Hightown Grammar' - Colin Lacey Extracts from Beachside Comprehensive - Stephen Ball The Countenance of Educational Evaluation - Robert Stake Evaluation and the Control of Education - Barry MacDonald The Conduct of Educational Case Study: Ethics, theory and procedures - Rob Walker The Study Method in Social Inquiry - Robert Stake The Imagination of the Case and the Invention of the Study - Stephen Kemmis Evaluation as Illumination: A new approach to the study of innovatory programmes - Malcolm Parlett and David Hamilton The Teacher as Researcher - Lawrence Stenhouse Extracts from Fourth Generation Evaluation - Egon Guba and Yvonna Lincoln The Deliberative Democratic View - Ernest House and Kenneth Howe Qualitative Research Traditions: A review - Evelyn Jacob Qualitative Research Traditions: A British response to Jacob - Paul Atkinson, Sara Delamont and Martyn Hammersley Critical Ethnography in Education: Origins, current status and new directions - Gary Anderson VOLUME TWO: LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS - ADDITIONAL THEORETICAL TRIBUTARIES AND METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Part A: Other Contributory Social Scientific Traditions Extracts from Class, Codes and Control - Basil Bernstein Extracts from 'The Forms of Capital' - Pierre Bourdieu Extracts from 'An Approach to the Study of Curricula as Socially Organised Knowledge' - Michael Young Feminisms and Education - Gaby Weiner Extracts from Common Knowledge: The development of understanding in the classroom - Derek Edwards and Neil Mercer Text and Discourse in Education: An introduction to critical discourse analysis - Allan Luke Thinking and Learning in Social Context - Barbara Rogoff Extracts from Situated Learning: Legitimate peripheral participation - Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger Extracts from Discourse and Cognition - Derek Edwards Beyond Developmentalism - Valerie Walkerdine Part B: Developing the Political, Ethical, Epistemological and Emancipatory Implications of Qualitative Approaches Extracts from Action Research for Educational Change - John Elliott Research as Praxis - Patti Lather Post-Structural Feminism in Education: An overview - Elizabeth Adams St.Pierre The Problem of Speaking for Others - Linda Alcoff Transformative Approaches to Student Voice: Theoretical underpinnings, recalcitrant realities - Michael Fielding Silence Speaks: Whiteness revealed in the absence of voice - Lisa Mazzei Disability Research and the 'Researcher Template': Reflections on grounded subjectivity in ethnographic research - Dan Goodley Gazing with Intent: Ethnographic practice in classrooms - Tuula Gordon et al What's Race Got to Do with It? Critical Race Theory's conflicts with and connections to qualitative research methodology and epistemology - Laurence Parker and Marvin Lynn Writing the 'Wrongs' of Fieldwork: Confronting our own research writing dilemmas in urban ethnographies - Michelle Fine and Lois Weis On Tricky Ground: Researching the native in the age of uncertainty - Linda Tuhiwai Smith Rhizovocality - Alecia Youngblood Jackson Extracts from Performance Ethnography: Critical pedagogy and the politics of culture - Norman Denzin The Bone in the Throat: Some uncertain thoughts on baroque method - Maggie MacLure VOLUME THREE: KEY SUBSTANTIVE FIELDS AND TOPICS OF INQUIRY IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Part A: Social Scientific Topics and Issues Extracts from Life in Classrooms - Philip Jackson A Model of Classroom Coping Strategies - Andrew Pollard Coping at School through Humour - Peter Woods Extracts from Learning to Labour: How working class kids get working class jobs - Paul Willis Deadlier than the Male? Girls' conformity and deviance in school - Lewes Davies Cherokee School Society and the Intercultural Classroom - Robert Dumont and Murray Wax Empowerment and Cultural Conflict: Navajo parents and the schooling of their children - Donna Deyhle The Silenced Dialogue: Power and pedagogy in educating other people's children - Lisa Delpit Beyond the White Norm: The use of qualitative methods in the study of black youth's schooling in England - Mairtin Mac an Ghaill Flexible Identities: Exploring race and gender issues among a group of immigrant pupils in an inner-city comprehensive school - Naz Rassool Who is 'Us'? Students negotiating discourses of racism and national indentification in Australia - Julie McLeod and Lyn Yates I Don't Need This: Acts of transgression by students with special educational needs - Julie Allan Sex-Gender-Sexuality: How sex, gender and sexuality constellations are constituted in secondary school - Deborah Youdell Becoming Schoolgirls: The ambivalent project of subjectification - Bronwyn Davies et al The Question of Belief: Writing post-structural ethnography - Deborah Britzman Part B: Investigating Education Policy and Practice Extracts from The Man in the Principal's Office - Harry Wolcott The Reconstruction of Primary Teachers' Identities - Peter Woods and Bob Jeffrey Good School/Bad School: Paradox and fabrication - Stephen Ball "I'll be a Nothing": Structure, agency and the construction of identity through assessment - Diane Reay and Dylan Wiliam Extracts from High Stakes Education - Pauline Lipman Investigating Formative Classroom Assessment - Harry Torrance and John Pryor Education Change over Time? The sustainability and nonsustainability of three decades of secondary school change and continuity - Andy Hargreaves and Ivor Goodson VOLUME FOUR: CONTEMPORARY METHODS, ISSUES AND DEBATES IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION - ETHICS, SCIENCE, POLICY AND POLITICS Extracts from Action Research: A methodology for change and development - Bridget Somekh Representing Teachers - Ivor Goodson Storying Schools: Issues around attempts to create a sense of feel and place in narrative research writing - Pat Sikes Visual Methods and the Visual Culture of Schools - Jon Prosser Multimodal Ethnography - Bella Dicks et al Ethnography and Data Re-use: Issues of context and hypertext - Bella Dicks et al Multiple Methods in Qualitative Research with Children: More insight or just more? - Philip Darbyshire, Colin MacDougal and Wendy Schiller Developing an Emancipatory Research Agenda: Possibilities and dilemmas - Len Barton Ethics, Institutional Review Boards and the Changing Face of Educational Research - Kenneth Howe and Katharine Dougherty Qualitative Research and Institutional Review Boards - Yvonna Lincoln and William Tierney Ethics and Ethnography - Paul Atkinson Research Ethical Guidelines and Anonymity - Geoffrey Walford Rethinking Ethics Review as Institutional Discourse - Christine Halse and Anne Honey 'Caught in the Act': Ethics committee review and researching the sexual culture of schools - Louisa Allen 'Reading' the Nursery Classroom: A Foucauldian perspective - Liz Jones and Tony Brown Deterritorializations: Putting postmodernism to work on teacher education and inclusion - Julie Allan Beyond 'Emotional Literacy' in Feminist and Educational Research - Erica Burman Scientific Culture and Educational Research - Michael Feuer, Lisa Towne and Richard Shavelson Culture, Rigor and Science in Educational Research - Frederick Erickson and Kris Gutierrez This IS your Father's Paradigm: Government intrusion and the case of qualitative research in education - Patti Lather The Issue of Quality in Qualitative Research - Martyn Hammersley Systematic Research Synthesis to Inform Policy, Practice and Democratic Debate - David Gough and Diana Elbourne 'Clarity Bordering on Stupidity': Where's the quality in systematic review? - Maggie MacLure Synthesis Through Meta-Ethnography: Paradoxes, enhancements and possibilities - Lynn Doyle How Can Systematic Reviews Incorporate Qualitative Research? A critical perspective - Mary Dixon-Woods et al Building Confidence in Qualitative Research: Engaging the demands of policy - Harry Torrance.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This four-volume set is part of the "Fundamentals of Applied Research" series and sits alongside Stephen Gorard's major reference collection "Quantitative Research Methods in Education". It brings together seminal and cutting edge articles on qualitative research internationally, and shows how the field has developed in influence in recent years. The use of qualitative research methods in educational research has a long and distinguished history, both in the UK and internationally. Importantly, this major reference collection reviews the ongoing debates and various issues about qualitative methods and the contribution they make to understanding educational issues. The set also comprises a timely analysis of the contribution which qualitative methods have made and can continue to make to understanding educational issues. The volumes review the methodological arguments for using qualitative methods, including critiques and rejoinders; place these arguments in appropriate historical and epistemological contexts with respect to the development of qualitative methods in congruent disciplines including anthropology, psychology and sociology; and identify key examples of leading substantive work which illustrate the various issues at stake and the major achievements of qualitative inquiry in education. Each volume includes an original introduction written by the Harry Torrance, a key figure in the field of education research methods, delineating the theme for the volume and the importance of the contribution of the individual papers and the volume as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • VOLUME ONE: THEORETICAL ORIGINS OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION Part A: Theoretical Tributaries from Anthropology, Sociology and Social Psychology Thick Description: Towards an interpretive theory of culture - Clifford Geertz Extracts from Symbolic Interactionism: perspective and method - Herbert Blumer Extracts from Collected Papers 1: The problems of social reality - Alfred Schutz Extracts from Studies in Ethnomethodology - Harold Garfinkel Extracts from The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life - Erving Goffman Part B: Case Study, Ethnography and Evaluation Extracts from Boys in White: Student culture in medical school - Howard Becker, Blanche Geer, Everett Hughes and Anselm Strauss Extracts from The Man in the Principal's Office - Harry Wolcott Structuring School Structure - Hugh Mehan Extracts from Social Relations in a Secondary School - David Hargreaves Extracts from 'Problems of Sociological Fieldwork: A review of the methodology of Hightown Grammar' - Colin Lacey Extracts from Beachside Comprehensive - Stephen Ball The Countenance of Educational Evaluation - Robert Stake Evaluation and the Control of Education - Barry MacDonald The Conduct of Educational Case Study: Ethics, theory and procedures - Rob Walker The Study Method in Social Inquiry - Robert Stake The Imagination of the Case and the Invention of the Study - Stephen Kemmis Evaluation as Illumination: A new approach to the study of innovatory programmes - Malcolm Parlett and David Hamilton The Teacher as Researcher - Lawrence Stenhouse Extracts from Fourth Generation Evaluation - Egon Guba and Yvonna Lincoln The Deliberative Democratic View - Ernest House and Kenneth Howe Qualitative Research Traditions: A review - Evelyn Jacob Qualitative Research Traditions: A British response to Jacob - Paul Atkinson, Sara Delamont and Martyn Hammersley Critical Ethnography in Education: Origins, current status and new directions - Gary Anderson VOLUME TWO: LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS - ADDITIONAL THEORETICAL TRIBUTARIES AND METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Part A: Other Contributory Social Scientific Traditions Extracts from Class, Codes and Control - Basil Bernstein Extracts from 'The Forms of Capital' - Pierre Bourdieu Extracts from 'An Approach to the Study of Curricula as Socially Organised Knowledge' - Michael Young Feminisms and Education - Gaby Weiner Extracts from Common Knowledge: The development of understanding in the classroom - Derek Edwards and Neil Mercer Text and Discourse in Education: An introduction to critical discourse analysis - Allan Luke Thinking and Learning in Social Context - Barbara Rogoff Extracts from Situated Learning: Legitimate peripheral participation - Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger Extracts from Discourse and Cognition - Derek Edwards Beyond Developmentalism - Valerie Walkerdine Part B: Developing the Political, Ethical, Epistemological and Emancipatory Implications of Qualitative Approaches Extracts from Action Research for Educational Change - John Elliott Research as Praxis - Patti Lather Post-Structural Feminism in Education: An overview - Elizabeth Adams St.Pierre The Problem of Speaking for Others - Linda Alcoff Transformative Approaches to Student Voice: Theoretical underpinnings, recalcitrant realities - Michael Fielding Silence Speaks: Whiteness revealed in the absence of voice - Lisa Mazzei Disability Research and the 'Researcher Template': Reflections on grounded subjectivity in ethnographic research - Dan Goodley Gazing with Intent: Ethnographic practice in classrooms - Tuula Gordon et al What's Race Got to Do with It? Critical Race Theory's conflicts with and connections to qualitative research methodology and epistemology - Laurence Parker and Marvin Lynn Writing the 'Wrongs' of Fieldwork: Confronting our own research writing dilemmas in urban ethnographies - Michelle Fine and Lois Weis On Tricky Ground: Researching the native in the age of uncertainty - Linda Tuhiwai Smith Rhizovocality - Alecia Youngblood Jackson Extracts from Performance Ethnography: Critical pedagogy and the politics of culture - Norman Denzin The Bone in the Throat: Some uncertain thoughts on baroque method - Maggie MacLure VOLUME THREE: KEY SUBSTANTIVE FIELDS AND TOPICS OF INQUIRY IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Part A: Social Scientific Topics and Issues Extracts from Life in Classrooms - Philip Jackson A Model of Classroom Coping Strategies - Andrew Pollard Coping at School through Humour - Peter Woods Extracts from Learning to Labour: How working class kids get working class jobs - Paul Willis Deadlier than the Male? Girls' conformity and deviance in school - Lewes Davies Cherokee School Society and the Intercultural Classroom - Robert Dumont and Murray Wax Empowerment and Cultural Conflict: Navajo parents and the schooling of their children - Donna Deyhle The Silenced Dialogue: Power and pedagogy in educating other people's children - Lisa Delpit Beyond the White Norm: The use of qualitative methods in the study of black youth's schooling in England - Mairtin Mac an Ghaill Flexible Identities: Exploring race and gender issues among a group of immigrant pupils in an inner-city comprehensive school - Naz Rassool Who is 'Us'? Students negotiating discourses of racism and national indentification in Australia - Julie McLeod and Lyn Yates I Don't Need This: Acts of transgression by students with special educational needs - Julie Allan Sex-Gender-Sexuality: How sex, gender and sexuality constellations are constituted in secondary school - Deborah Youdell Becoming Schoolgirls: The ambivalent project of subjectification - Bronwyn Davies et al The Question of Belief: Writing post-structural ethnography - Deborah Britzman Part B: Investigating Education Policy and Practice Extracts from The Man in the Principal's Office - Harry Wolcott The Reconstruction of Primary Teachers' Identities - Peter Woods and Bob Jeffrey Good School/Bad School: Paradox and fabrication - Stephen Ball "I'll be a Nothing": Structure, agency and the construction of identity through assessment - Diane Reay and Dylan Wiliam Extracts from High Stakes Education - Pauline Lipman Investigating Formative Classroom Assessment - Harry Torrance and John Pryor Education Change over Time? The sustainability and nonsustainability of three decades of secondary school change and continuity - Andy Hargreaves and Ivor Goodson VOLUME FOUR: CONTEMPORARY METHODS, ISSUES AND DEBATES IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION - ETHICS, SCIENCE, POLICY AND POLITICS Extracts from Action Research: A methodology for change and development - Bridget Somekh Representing Teachers - Ivor Goodson Storying Schools: Issues around attempts to create a sense of feel and place in narrative research writing - Pat Sikes Visual Methods and the Visual Culture of Schools - Jon Prosser Multimodal Ethnography - Bella Dicks et al Ethnography and Data Re-use: Issues of context and hypertext - Bella Dicks et al Multiple Methods in Qualitative Research with Children: More insight or just more? - Philip Darbyshire, Colin MacDougal and Wendy Schiller Developing an Emancipatory Research Agenda: Possibilities and dilemmas - Len Barton Ethics, Institutional Review Boards and the Changing Face of Educational Research - Kenneth Howe and Katharine Dougherty Qualitative Research and Institutional Review Boards - Yvonna Lincoln and William Tierney Ethics and Ethnography - Paul Atkinson Research Ethical Guidelines and Anonymity - Geoffrey Walford Rethinking Ethics Review as Institutional Discourse - Christine Halse and Anne Honey 'Caught in the Act': Ethics committee review and researching the sexual culture of schools - Louisa Allen 'Reading' the Nursery Classroom: A Foucauldian perspective - Liz Jones and Tony Brown Deterritorializations: Putting postmodernism to work on teacher education and inclusion - Julie Allan Beyond 'Emotional Literacy' in Feminist and Educational Research - Erica Burman Scientific Culture and Educational Research - Michael Feuer, Lisa Towne and Richard Shavelson Culture, Rigor and Science in Educational Research - Frederick Erickson and Kris Gutierrez This IS your Father's Paradigm: Government intrusion and the case of qualitative research in education - Patti Lather The Issue of Quality in Qualitative Research - Martyn Hammersley Systematic Research Synthesis to Inform Policy, Practice and Democratic Debate - David Gough and Diana Elbourne 'Clarity Bordering on Stupidity': Where's the quality in systematic review? - Maggie MacLure Synthesis Through Meta-Ethnography: Paradoxes, enhancements and possibilities - Lynn Doyle How Can Systematic Reviews Incorporate Qualitative Research? A critical perspective - Mary Dixon-Woods et al Building Confidence in Qualitative Research: Engaging the demands of policy - Harry Torrance.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This four-volume set is part of the "Fundamentals of Applied Research" series and sits alongside Stephen Gorard's major reference collection "Quantitative Research Methods in Education". It brings together seminal and cutting edge articles on qualitative research internationally, and shows how the field has developed in influence in recent years. The use of qualitative research methods in educational research has a long and distinguished history, both in the UK and internationally. Importantly, this major reference collection reviews the ongoing debates and various issues about qualitative methods and the contribution they make to understanding educational issues. The set also comprises a timely analysis of the contribution which qualitative methods have made and can continue to make to understanding educational issues. The volumes review the methodological arguments for using qualitative methods, including critiques and rejoinders; place these arguments in appropriate historical and epistemological contexts with respect to the development of qualitative methods in congruent disciplines including anthropology, psychology and sociology; and identify key examples of leading substantive work which illustrate the various issues at stake and the major achievements of qualitative inquiry in education. Each volume includes an original introduction written by the Harry Torrance, a key figure in the field of education research methods, delineating the theme for the volume and the importance of the contribution of the individual papers and the volume as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LB1028 .Q357 2010 V.1 Unknown
LB1028 .Q357 2010 V.2 Unknown
LB1028 .Q357 2010 V.3 Unknown
LB1028 .Q357 2010 V.4 Unknown
Book
xviii, 412 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword: Contribution to Teacher Education Marilyn Cochran-Smith Foreword: Contribution to Social Studies Stephanie van Hover and Keith C. Barton Foreword: Contribution to Multicultural Pedagogy Alexandra C. Rolfsmeyer and Adam J. Greteman Introduction: How to Use This Book Elizabeth E. Heilman Section 1: Purposes, Beliefs, and Contexts in Social Studies Education Introduction by Elizabeth Heilman 1. Developing a Pedagogic Creed through Critical, Social Reflection William Gaudelli 2. The Metaphors We Teach By Margaret Crocco 3. Exploring Three Orientations to Social Studies Thomas Fallace 4. My Pedagogic Creed as Foundation Ronald Evans 5. The Social Studies Topical Index Paul Robinson 6. Exploring Taylorism and its Continued Influence on Work and Schooling E. Wayne Ross 7. Purposes, Possibilities and Complexities of Teaching Secondary Social Studies Hilary Conklin 8. Four Way Street: Curriculum, Pedagogy, Content and Purpose to Advance the Common Good Dave Powell and Todd Hawley Section 2: Democratic Values and Government Introduction by Aaron Bodle and Elizabeth E. Heilman 9. Those Pesky Little Words: How to Teach Abstract Civic Concepts. Barbara Slater Stern 10. Understanding and Teaching "Core" Democratic Concepts Elizabeth E. Heilman 11. Studying Authority in a Secondary Teacher Education Class Judith L. Pace 12. Using Children's Books to Explore Power, Tyranny and Justice Rich Gibson and E. Wayne Ross 13. Learning to Teach the Cultures, Covenants and Controversies of Universal Human Rights John Myers 14. Feelings Exploration in Social Justice Education Jeff Passe 15. Teaching Procedural Democracy in the Classroom David Vawter 16. Preparing Teachers and Educating Citizens: The Simulated Congressional Hearing Terrence C. Mason and Jennifer Ponder 17. Service Learning Field Placements as Community Based Instruction/Action Brian Sevier Section 3: Evidence and Interpretation in History Introduction by Brenda Trofanenko and Matthew T. Missias 18. Generating Effective Teaching through Primary Sources Theresa McCormick 19. Incorporating Archives in Social Studies Methods Frans H. Doppen 20. Historical Perspective, Causality and Significance: The Historical Scene Investigation Project Kathleen Owings Swan, Kathi Kern, and Mark Hofer 21. Writing from Visual Prompts: Animating Imagination for Social Studies and Diversity Education Donald S. Blumenfeld-Jones 22. Using Content Resources to Analyze a Historical Decision Scott Alan Metzger 23. The First Day of Class: Developing an Awareness of Inference in History and Culture David Hicks and Melissa Lisanti 24. Gazing on the Past: Examining the Pedagogical Purposes of Public History Brenda Trofanenko Section 4: History in Social Context Introduction by Matthew T. Missias and Morgan Ott 25. The Nature of Evidence and Interpretation in History Scott W. Dewitt 26. A Boston Massacre in Room 202: Understanding the Construction of Historical Narratives Timothy D. Slekar 27. Oral Histories in Social Education Edric Johnson 28. Designing an Interactive Learning Center Museum in the School Context Hilary Landorf and Ethan Lowenstein 29. Scaffolding Conceptual Reasoning about History David Gerwin 30. Teaching Historical Understanding with Christopher Columbus Benjamin Justice 31. Addressing Subjectivity in Historical Thinking: Who was Christopher Columbus? Jennifer Hauver James Section 5: Perspective Consciousness about Identity, Power and Culture Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 32. Exploring Identity, Commonality and Difference Tracy Rock 33. Who Are We? Exploring Our Class as a Cultural Demographic John Hoge 34. It's all in your name: Seeing ourselves in historical and cultural context Ozlem Sensoy 35. Seeing the Hidden Curricula of Social Spaces and Places Elizabeth E. Heilman 36. Teaching from a critical global perspective: Investigating Power and Marginalization Binaya Subedi 37. The Family History Project: Uncovering the Personal as Political Nancye McCrary 38. Who Has a Good Family? Exploring Beliefs and Prejudices About Family Structures Tammy Turner-Vorbeck 39. Representation, Power and Stereotyping: A Lesson on Indigenous People and Sports Mascots Glenabah Martinez 40. Breaking down barriers, constructing connections: Strategies for connecting "us" to "them" Heather Sadlier 41. A Meeting On the Congo: Race, Voice and Representation Merry Merryfield 42. Implicating Race in Students' Learning How to Teach History Avner Segall Section 6: Local and Global Communities and Economies Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 43. Social Studies is Everywhere: Developing Social Scientist Sensitivities Janet Alleman 44. Understanding Personal Choice and Structured Inequality as Aspects of Family Finance Diane S. Illig 45. The Race to the Bottom: An Introduction to Textile Manufacturing and Working Conditions in the Global Economy Peter Moran 46. Examining Privilege in Globalization Sandra Schmidt 47. Teaching Global Education in Seemingly Regional and National Curriculum Elizabeth E. Heilman 48. "Baltimore and the World" Project: The Intersection of Local and Global Issues Todd Kenreich 49. Teaching Current Events from a Global Perspective Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker 50. Environment toxins near and far: Health and civic responsibility David Hursh, Camille Martina and Michael Fantauzzo Section 7: Current Events and Controversies Introduction by Elizabeth E. Heilman and Katie Gjerpen 51. Teaching Student Teachers to Examine How Their Political Views Inform Their Teaching Diana Hess 52. Preparing Future Teachers and Citizens to Address Controversial Issues: The Four Corner Debate Thomas H. Levine 53. Good Discussions Don't Just Happen: Verbal Questioning Skills Kenneth E. Vogler 54. Getting Students to Actively Follow the News Deborah Byrnes 55. Teaching about Disasters Reported in the News Brian Lanahan 56. Issues-Centered Social Studies Unit Sampler Kim Koeppen 57. The "Daily Dilemma": Sharing Power with a Purpose Beth Rubin 58. Encouraging Transformative Understanding of Controversial Social Issues Bruna Grimberg 59. Social Studies Methods, Purpose, and the Execution Class Todd Dinkelman Section 8: Using a Range of Resources Introduction: Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 60. Modeling with Matryoshkas: Connecting Curriculum, Community, and Culture in the Classroom Nancy P. Gallavan and Ellen Kottler 61. Motivating for Inquiry and Civic Participation through Primary Sources About Historical Peers Eula Fresch 62. Incorporating Visual Learning in the Classroom Brooke Orr and Signia Warner 63. Textbook Analysis: Using James Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me in Teacher Education Mara Dodge 64. Teaching with and about Maps Avner Segall 65. Reinventing the Field Trip: Pre-Service Teachers Explore Museums and Historic Sites Alan Marcus 66. Socratic Seminar: A Model for Film Discussion in the Social Studies Jeremy D. Stoddard 67. Not Playing Around: Teaching Role Plays in Social Education Wayne Au 68. Using Multicultural Literature in Teaching for Social Justice Sung Choon Park and Cynthia A. Tyson 69. Voices of our community: Making Connections through Digital Stories Elizabeth K. Wilson and Vivian Harris Wright 70. Modeling Technology-Based Social Studies Instruction: A Simulated WebQuest Christy G. Keeler Section 9: Instruction and Designing Curriculum Introduction: Elizabeth E. Heilman and Mark Kissling 71. Providing Elementary Teachers with Experience of Children's Thinking in Social Studies Keith Barton 72. What to Teach, When and Why: Masterful Curriculum Unit Planning Elizabeth E. Heilman 73. The Modeling Approach to Social Studies Teacher Education Michael Marino and Benjamin M. Jacobs 74. Instructional Planning and Practice through Micro-teaching Anne-lise Halvorsen 75. Approaching Curriculum Units as Terrains and Systems to Explore Paul Skilton-Sylvester 76. Teaching Teachers to Teach for Understanding in Social Studies Methods Classes John Gunn 77. Teaching Students to Use the Inquiry Method James Hartwick 78. Comparing Visions: Do Our State Standards Align with the National Standards? Barbara Foulks Boyd 79. Reflections on Learners and Learning in Early Field Experiences for Secondary Social Studies Susan B. Serota and Linda Bennett 80. Creating Units to Create Meaning out of Social Studies Content Audrey Rogers 81. Using Narrative to Reflect on the Process of Curriculum Enactment Gail Hickey Conclusion: The present and future of Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: A Critical Review Susan Adler Won Pyo Hong Appendices Elizabeth E. Heilman Appendix 1: Planning Instruction with Learning Disabilities in Mind Appendix 2: Building a Repertoire of Instructional Strategies Appendix 3: Reading and Comprehension Teaching Methods Contributor Biographies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The preparation of teachers, especially as they get ready to teach social studies and social science in our schools and colleges, is crucial not only to the project of good education, but even more broadly, to the cultivation of healthy democracy and the growth of the nation's citizens. This book features the ideas from 78 of our nation's most thoughtful teacher educators reflecting on their best practices and offering specific strategies through which future teachers learn to teach. The essays in this volume illuminate how future teachers wrestle with high-minded questions pertaining to the sociocultural, philosophical and historical aspects of education, but they also explain how to teach day to day skills such as lesson planning and meeting national standards. Sections in this book are arranged by both disciplinary organization and approach or activity. Each section is rich and coherent and is introduced with a scholarly essay that both provides a theoretical overview, analysis, and explication of this aspect of teacher education and scaffolds as well as introduces for the reader the essays to come. Each essay is coded to key words, to the level at which the lesson can be used, and to both NCSS and NCATE standards, for quick reference in classroom planning as well as institutional development and implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Foreword: Contribution to Teacher Education Marilyn Cochran-Smith Foreword: Contribution to Social Studies Stephanie van Hover and Keith C. Barton Foreword: Contribution to Multicultural Pedagogy Alexandra C. Rolfsmeyer and Adam J. Greteman Introduction: How to Use This Book Elizabeth E. Heilman Section 1: Purposes, Beliefs, and Contexts in Social Studies Education Introduction by Elizabeth Heilman 1. Developing a Pedagogic Creed through Critical, Social Reflection William Gaudelli 2. The Metaphors We Teach By Margaret Crocco 3. Exploring Three Orientations to Social Studies Thomas Fallace 4. My Pedagogic Creed as Foundation Ronald Evans 5. The Social Studies Topical Index Paul Robinson 6. Exploring Taylorism and its Continued Influence on Work and Schooling E. Wayne Ross 7. Purposes, Possibilities and Complexities of Teaching Secondary Social Studies Hilary Conklin 8. Four Way Street: Curriculum, Pedagogy, Content and Purpose to Advance the Common Good Dave Powell and Todd Hawley Section 2: Democratic Values and Government Introduction by Aaron Bodle and Elizabeth E. Heilman 9. Those Pesky Little Words: How to Teach Abstract Civic Concepts. Barbara Slater Stern 10. Understanding and Teaching "Core" Democratic Concepts Elizabeth E. Heilman 11. Studying Authority in a Secondary Teacher Education Class Judith L. Pace 12. Using Children's Books to Explore Power, Tyranny and Justice Rich Gibson and E. Wayne Ross 13. Learning to Teach the Cultures, Covenants and Controversies of Universal Human Rights John Myers 14. Feelings Exploration in Social Justice Education Jeff Passe 15. Teaching Procedural Democracy in the Classroom David Vawter 16. Preparing Teachers and Educating Citizens: The Simulated Congressional Hearing Terrence C. Mason and Jennifer Ponder 17. Service Learning Field Placements as Community Based Instruction/Action Brian Sevier Section 3: Evidence and Interpretation in History Introduction by Brenda Trofanenko and Matthew T. Missias 18. Generating Effective Teaching through Primary Sources Theresa McCormick 19. Incorporating Archives in Social Studies Methods Frans H. Doppen 20. Historical Perspective, Causality and Significance: The Historical Scene Investigation Project Kathleen Owings Swan, Kathi Kern, and Mark Hofer 21. Writing from Visual Prompts: Animating Imagination for Social Studies and Diversity Education Donald S. Blumenfeld-Jones 22. Using Content Resources to Analyze a Historical Decision Scott Alan Metzger 23. The First Day of Class: Developing an Awareness of Inference in History and Culture David Hicks and Melissa Lisanti 24. Gazing on the Past: Examining the Pedagogical Purposes of Public History Brenda Trofanenko Section 4: History in Social Context Introduction by Matthew T. Missias and Morgan Ott 25. The Nature of Evidence and Interpretation in History Scott W. Dewitt 26. A Boston Massacre in Room 202: Understanding the Construction of Historical Narratives Timothy D. Slekar 27. Oral Histories in Social Education Edric Johnson 28. Designing an Interactive Learning Center Museum in the School Context Hilary Landorf and Ethan Lowenstein 29. Scaffolding Conceptual Reasoning about History David Gerwin 30. Teaching Historical Understanding with Christopher Columbus Benjamin Justice 31. Addressing Subjectivity in Historical Thinking: Who was Christopher Columbus? Jennifer Hauver James Section 5: Perspective Consciousness about Identity, Power and Culture Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 32. Exploring Identity, Commonality and Difference Tracy Rock 33. Who Are We? Exploring Our Class as a Cultural Demographic John Hoge 34. It's all in your name: Seeing ourselves in historical and cultural context Ozlem Sensoy 35. Seeing the Hidden Curricula of Social Spaces and Places Elizabeth E. Heilman 36. Teaching from a critical global perspective: Investigating Power and Marginalization Binaya Subedi 37. The Family History Project: Uncovering the Personal as Political Nancye McCrary 38. Who Has a Good Family? Exploring Beliefs and Prejudices About Family Structures Tammy Turner-Vorbeck 39. Representation, Power and Stereotyping: A Lesson on Indigenous People and Sports Mascots Glenabah Martinez 40. Breaking down barriers, constructing connections: Strategies for connecting "us" to "them" Heather Sadlier 41. A Meeting On the Congo: Race, Voice and Representation Merry Merryfield 42. Implicating Race in Students' Learning How to Teach History Avner Segall Section 6: Local and Global Communities and Economies Introduction by Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 43. Social Studies is Everywhere: Developing Social Scientist Sensitivities Janet Alleman 44. Understanding Personal Choice and Structured Inequality as Aspects of Family Finance Diane S. Illig 45. The Race to the Bottom: An Introduction to Textile Manufacturing and Working Conditions in the Global Economy Peter Moran 46. Examining Privilege in Globalization Sandra Schmidt 47. Teaching Global Education in Seemingly Regional and National Curriculum Elizabeth E. Heilman 48. "Baltimore and the World" Project: The Intersection of Local and Global Issues Todd Kenreich 49. Teaching Current Events from a Global Perspective Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker 50. Environment toxins near and far: Health and civic responsibility David Hursh, Camille Martina and Michael Fantauzzo Section 7: Current Events and Controversies Introduction by Elizabeth E. Heilman and Katie Gjerpen 51. Teaching Student Teachers to Examine How Their Political Views Inform Their Teaching Diana Hess 52. Preparing Future Teachers and Citizens to Address Controversial Issues: The Four Corner Debate Thomas H. Levine 53. Good Discussions Don't Just Happen: Verbal Questioning Skills Kenneth E. Vogler 54. Getting Students to Actively Follow the News Deborah Byrnes 55. Teaching about Disasters Reported in the News Brian Lanahan 56. Issues-Centered Social Studies Unit Sampler Kim Koeppen 57. The "Daily Dilemma": Sharing Power with a Purpose Beth Rubin 58. Encouraging Transformative Understanding of Controversial Social Issues Bruna Grimberg 59. Social Studies Methods, Purpose, and the Execution Class Todd Dinkelman Section 8: Using a Range of Resources Introduction: Ramona Fruja Amthor and Elizabeth E. Heilman 60. Modeling with Matryoshkas: Connecting Curriculum, Community, and Culture in the Classroom Nancy P. Gallavan and Ellen Kottler 61. Motivating for Inquiry and Civic Participation through Primary Sources About Historical Peers Eula Fresch 62. Incorporating Visual Learning in the Classroom Brooke Orr and Signia Warner 63. Textbook Analysis: Using James Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me in Teacher Education Mara Dodge 64. Teaching with and about Maps Avner Segall 65. Reinventing the Field Trip: Pre-Service Teachers Explore Museums and Historic Sites Alan Marcus 66. Socratic Seminar: A Model for Film Discussion in the Social Studies Jeremy D. Stoddard 67. Not Playing Around: Teaching Role Plays in Social Education Wayne Au 68. Using Multicultural Literature in Teaching for Social Justice Sung Choon Park and Cynthia A. Tyson 69. Voices of our community: Making Connections through Digital Stories Elizabeth K. Wilson and Vivian Harris Wright 70. Modeling Technology-Based Social Studies Instruction: A Simulated WebQuest Christy G. Keeler Section 9: Instruction and Designing Curriculum Introduction: Elizabeth E. Heilman and Mark Kissling 71. Providing Elementary Teachers with Experience of Children's Thinking in Social Studies Keith Barton 72. What to Teach, When and Why: Masterful Curriculum Unit Planning Elizabeth E. Heilman 73. The Modeling Approach to Social Studies Teacher Education Michael Marino and Benjamin M. Jacobs 74. Instructional Planning and Practice through Micro-teaching Anne-lise Halvorsen 75. Approaching Curriculum Units as Terrains and Systems to Explore Paul Skilton-Sylvester 76. Teaching Teachers to Teach for Understanding in Social Studies Methods Classes John Gunn 77. Teaching Students to Use the Inquiry Method James Hartwick 78. Comparing Visions: Do Our State Standards Align with the National Standards? Barbara Foulks Boyd 79. Reflections on Learners and Learning in Early Field Experiences for Secondary Social Studies Susan B. Serota and Linda Bennett 80. Creating Units to Create Meaning out of Social Studies Content Audrey Rogers 81. Using Narrative to Reflect on the Process of Curriculum Enactment Gail Hickey Conclusion: The present and future of Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Diversity Education: A Critical Review Susan Adler Won Pyo Hong Appendices Elizabeth E. Heilman Appendix 1: Planning Instruction with Learning Disabilities in Mind Appendix 2: Building a Repertoire of Instructional Strategies Appendix 3: Reading and Comprehension Teaching Methods Contributor Biographies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The preparation of teachers, especially as they get ready to teach social studies and social science in our schools and colleges, is crucial not only to the project of good education, but even more broadly, to the cultivation of healthy democracy and the growth of the nation's citizens. This book features the ideas from 78 of our nation's most thoughtful teacher educators reflecting on their best practices and offering specific strategies through which future teachers learn to teach. The essays in this volume illuminate how future teachers wrestle with high-minded questions pertaining to the sociocultural, philosophical and historical aspects of education, but they also explain how to teach day to day skills such as lesson planning and meeting national standards. Sections in this book are arranged by both disciplinary organization and approach or activity. Each section is rich and coherent and is introduced with a scholarly essay that both provides a theoretical overview, analysis, and explication of this aspect of teacher education and scaffolds as well as introduces for the reader the essays to come. Each essay is coded to key words, to the level at which the lesson can be used, and to both NCSS and NCATE standards, for quick reference in classroom planning as well as institutional development and implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
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LB1584 .S6369 2010 Unknown

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