Search results

100 results

View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
xiii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
"Game analysis allows us to understand games better, providing insight into the player-game relationship, the construction of the game, and its sociocultural relevance. As the field of game studies grows, videogame writing is evolving from the mere evaluation of gameplay, graphics, sound, and replayablity, to more reflective writing that manages to convey the complexity of a game and the way it is played in a cultural context. Introduction to Game Analysis serves as an accessible guide to analyzing games using strategies borrowed from textual analysis. Clara Fernández-Vara's concise primer provides instruction on the basic building blocks of game analysis--examination of context, content and reception, and formal qualities--as well as the vocabulary necessary for talking about videogames' distinguishing characteristics. Examples are drawn from a range of games, both digital and non-digital--from Bioshock and World of Warcraft to Monopoly--and the book provides a variety of exercises and sample analyses, as well as a comprehensive ludography and glossary"-- Provided by publisher.
"Game analysis allows us to understand games better, providing insight into the player-game relationship, the construction of the game, and its sociocultural relevance. As the field of game studies grows, videogame writing is evolving from the mere evaluation of gameplay, graphics, sound, and replayablity, to more reflective writing that manages to convey the complexity of a game and the way it is played in a cultural context. Introduction to Game Analysis serves as an accessible guide to analyzing games using strategies borrowed from textual analysis. Clara Fernández-Vara's concise primer provides instruction on the basic building blocks of game analysis--examination of context, content and reception, and formal qualities--as well as the vocabulary necessary for talking about videogames' distinguishing characteristics. Examples are drawn from a range of games, both digital and non-digital--from Bioshock and World of Warcraft to Monopoly--and the book provides a variety of exercises and sample analyses, as well as a comprehensive ludography and glossary"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.15 .F46 2015 Unknown
Book
251 pages ; 24 cm.
  • The name of the game is jocktronics : sport and masculinity in early video games / Michael Z. Newman
  • Madden men : masculinity, race, and the marketing of a video game franchise / Thomas P. Oates
  • Neoliberal masculinity : the government of play and masculinity in e-sports / Gerald Voorhees
  • The social and gender in fantasy sports leagues / Luke Howie and Perri Campbell
  • Domesticating sports : the Wii, the Mii, and Nintendo's postfeminist subject / Renee M. Powers and Robert Alan Brookey
  • Avastars : the encoding of fame within sport digital games / Steven Conway
  • Keeping it real : sports video game advertising and the fan-consumer
  • Cory Hillman and Michael L. Butterworth
  • Exploiting nationalism and banal cosmopolitanism : EA's FIFA World Cup 2010 / Andrew Baerg
  • Ideology, it's in the game : selective simulation in EA Sports' NCAA Football / Meredith M. Bagley and Ian Summers
  • Yes Wii can or can Wii? : theorizing the possibilities of video games as health disparity intervention / David J. Leonard, Sarah Ullrich-French, and Thomas G. Power.
  • The name of the game is jocktronics : sport and masculinity in early video games / Michael Z. Newman
  • Madden men : masculinity, race, and the marketing of a video game franchise / Thomas P. Oates
  • Neoliberal masculinity : the government of play and masculinity in e-sports / Gerald Voorhees
  • The social and gender in fantasy sports leagues / Luke Howie and Perri Campbell
  • Domesticating sports : the Wii, the Mii, and Nintendo's postfeminist subject / Renee M. Powers and Robert Alan Brookey
  • Avastars : the encoding of fame within sport digital games / Steven Conway
  • Keeping it real : sports video game advertising and the fan-consumer
  • Cory Hillman and Michael L. Butterworth
  • Exploiting nationalism and banal cosmopolitanism : EA's FIFA World Cup 2010 / Andrew Baerg
  • Ideology, it's in the game : selective simulation in EA Sports' NCAA Football / Meredith M. Bagley and Ian Summers
  • Yes Wii can or can Wii? : theorizing the possibilities of video games as health disparity intervention / David J. Leonard, Sarah Ullrich-French, and Thomas G. Power.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .S52 P53 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 217 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Videogames as avant-garde art
  • Radical formal
  • Radical political
  • Complicit formal
  • Complicit political
  • Narrative formal
  • Narrative political.
  • Videogames as avant-garde art
  • Radical formal
  • Radical political
  • Complicit formal
  • Complicit political
  • Narrative formal
  • Narrative political.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
QA76.76 .C672 S35 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (370 pages) : illustrations
Book
184 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
"Game studies is a rapidly developing field across the world, with a growing number of dedicated courses addressing video games and digital play as significant phenomena in contemporary everyday life and media cultures. Seth Giddings looks to fill a gap by focusing on the relationship between the actual and virtual worlds of play in everyday life. He addresses both the continuities and differences between digital play and longer-established modes of play. The 'gameworlds' title indicates both the virtual world designed into the videogame and the wider environments in which play is manifested: social relationships between players; hardware and software; between the virtual worlds of the game and the media universes they extend (e.g. Poke; mon, Harry Potter, Lego, Star Wars); and the gameworlds generated by children's imaginations and creativity (through talk and role-play, drawings and outdoor play). The gameworld raises questions about who, and what, is in play. Drawing on recent theoretical work in science and technology studies, games studies and new media studies, a key theme is the material and embodied character of these gameworlds and their components (players' bodies, computer hardware, toys, virtual physics, and the physical environment). Building on detailed small-scale ethnographic case studies, Gameworlds is the first book to explore the nature of play in the virtual worlds of video games and how this play relates to, and crosses over into, everyday play in the actual world"-- Provided by publisher.
"Game studies is a rapidly developing field across the world, with a growing number of dedicated courses addressing video games and digital play as significant phenomena in contemporary everyday life and media cultures. Seth Giddings looks to fill a gap by focusing on the relationship between the actual and virtual worlds of play in everyday life. He addresses both the continuities and differences between digital play and longer-established modes of play. The 'gameworlds' title indicates both the virtual world designed into the videogame and the wider environments in which play is manifested: social relationships between players; hardware and software; between the virtual worlds of the game and the media universes they extend (e.g. Poke; mon, Harry Potter, Lego, Star Wars); and the gameworlds generated by children's imaginations and creativity (through talk and role-play, drawings and outdoor play). The gameworld raises questions about who, and what, is in play. Drawing on recent theoretical work in science and technology studies, games studies and new media studies, a key theme is the material and embodied character of these gameworlds and their components (players' bodies, computer hardware, toys, virtual physics, and the physical environment). Building on detailed small-scale ethnographic case studies, Gameworlds is the first book to explore the nature of play in the virtual worlds of video games and how this play relates to, and crosses over into, everyday play in the actual world"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .S52 G53 2014 Unknown
Book
x, 317 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
" Video games have long been seen as the exclusive territory of young, heterosexual white males. In a media landscape dominated by such gamers, players who do not fit this mold, including women, people of color, and LGBT people, are often brutalized in forums and in public channels in online play. Discussion of representation of such groups in games has frequently been limited and cursory. In contrast, Gaming at the Edge builds on feminist, queer, and postcolonial theories of identity and draws on qualitative audience research methods to make sense of how representation comes to matter. In Gaming at the Edge, Adrienne Shaw argues that video game players experience race, gender, and sexuality concurrently. She asks: How do players identify with characters? How do they separate identification and interactivity? What is the role of fantasy in representation? What is the importance of understanding market logic? In addressing these questions Shaw reveals how representation comes to matter to participants and offers a perceptive consideration of the high stakes in politics of representation debates. Putting forth a framework for talking about representation, difference, and diversity in an era in which user-generated content, individualized media consumption, and the blurring of producer/consumer roles has lessened the utility of traditional models of media representation analysis, Shaw finds new insight on the edge of media consumption with the invisible, marginalized gamers who are surprising in both their numbers and their influence in mainstream gamer culture. "-- Provided by publisher.
" Video games have long been seen as the exclusive territory of young, heterosexual white males. In a media landscape dominated by such gamers, players who do not fit this mold, including women, people of color, and LGBT people, are often brutalized in forums and in public channels in online play. Discussion of representation of such groups in games has frequently been limited and cursory. In contrast, Gaming at the Edge builds on feminist, queer, and postcolonial theories of identity and draws on qualitative audience research methods to make sense of how representation comes to matter. In Gaming at the Edge, Adrienne Shaw argues that video game players experience race, gender, and sexuality concurrently. She asks: How do players identify with characters? How do they separate identification and interactivity? What is the role of fantasy in representation? What is the importance of understanding market logic? In addressing these questions Shaw reveals how representation comes to matter to participants and offers a perceptive consideration of the high stakes in politics of representation debates. Putting forth a framework for talking about representation, difference, and diversity in an era in which user-generated content, individualized media consumption, and the blurring of producer/consumer roles has lessened the utility of traditional models of media representation analysis, Shaw finds new insight on the edge of media consumption with the invisible, marginalized gamers who are surprising in both their numbers and their influence in mainstream gamer culture. "-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
HAS New Books (Lane Room) Find it
GV1469.17 .S63 S53 2014 Unknown
Book
xvii, 229 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Setting the stage: the emergence of playful organizations
  • Unfolding the concept and its potential: the playful organization ideal-type
  • Previous studies re-examined: have playful organizations already emerged?
  • An online gamer speaks out: playful organizations in Eve Online
  • Let's ask our panel: Dutch online gamers on their communities
  • Building an un-/comfortable bridge: Dutch online gamers on their work organizations
  • Food for thought: the emergence of playful organizations uncovered and critiqued.
"Online Gaming and Playful Organization explores the cultural impact of gaming on organizations. While gaming is typically a form of entertainment, this book argues that gaming communities can function as a useful analogue for work organizations because both are comprised of diverse members who must communicate and collaborate to solve complex problems. By examining the impact of gaming beyond its own context, this book argues that one can apply numerous lessons from the virtual world of online games to the "real" world of businesses, schools, and other professional communities. Most notably, it articulates the concept of playful organizations, defined as organizations in which the ability to play has become so institutionalized that it is spontaneous, creative, and enjoyable. Based on original research, Online Gaming and Playful Organization establishes an interdisciplinary framework for further conceptual and empirical investigation into this topic, with the dual goals of a better understanding of the role of online games and virtual worlds, and of the possible structural and cultural transformation of public and private organizations. "-- Provided by publisher.
  • Setting the stage: the emergence of playful organizations
  • Unfolding the concept and its potential: the playful organization ideal-type
  • Previous studies re-examined: have playful organizations already emerged?
  • An online gamer speaks out: playful organizations in Eve Online
  • Let's ask our panel: Dutch online gamers on their communities
  • Building an un-/comfortable bridge: Dutch online gamers on their work organizations
  • Food for thought: the emergence of playful organizations uncovered and critiqued.
"Online Gaming and Playful Organization explores the cultural impact of gaming on organizations. While gaming is typically a form of entertainment, this book argues that gaming communities can function as a useful analogue for work organizations because both are comprised of diverse members who must communicate and collaborate to solve complex problems. By examining the impact of gaming beyond its own context, this book argues that one can apply numerous lessons from the virtual world of online games to the "real" world of businesses, schools, and other professional communities. Most notably, it articulates the concept of playful organizations, defined as organizations in which the ability to play has become so institutionalized that it is spontaneous, creative, and enjoyable. Based on original research, Online Gaming and Playful Organization establishes an interdisciplinary framework for further conceptual and empirical investigation into this topic, with the dual goals of a better understanding of the role of online games and virtual worlds, and of the possible structural and cultural transformation of public and private organizations. "-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.15 .W37 2014 Unknown
Book
158 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
In process Request
GV1469.3 .P68 2014 Available On order
Book
1 online resource (114 pages)
  • Front Cover; Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; Foreword: Dismantling the Master's (Virtual) House: One Avatar at a Time; Works Cited; Introduction; I.1 Xbox as a Mediated Console Multiplayer Environment; I.1.1 Features of Xbox/Xbox Live; I.2 Communication and Conflict in Xbox Live; I.3 The Marginalized as Gamer; I.3.1 "Girl Gamers"; I.3.2 Gamers of Color; I: The Games; 1 Video Games as Ideological Projects; 1.1 Race and Gender as Ideology; 1.2 Video Game Narrative; 1.2.1 Ideology and Hegemony
  • 1.2.2 Examining Hegemonic Whiteness1.2.3 "Othering" Whiteness; 1.2.4 Hegemonic Masculinity; 1.2.5 Marginalized Masculinities; 1.3 Conclusion; 2 Racing and Gendering the Game; 2.1 The White Messiah in the Shooter; 2.2 Racialized Representations Within Other Genres; 2.3 Hegemonic Imagery in Fighting Genres; 2.4 Gendered Depictions Within Video Games; 2.5 Conclusion; II: The Gaming Space; 3 Deviant Acts: Racism and Sexism in Virtual Gaming Communities; 3.1 Deviant Behavior in Virtual Communities; 3.1.1 Types of Gamers in Virtual Communities; 3.1.2 Griefing; 3.1.3 Flaming
  • 3.2 Online Disinhibition3.2.1 Dissociative Anonymity; 3.2.2 Asynchronicity; 3.2.3 Solipsistic Introjection; 3.2.4 Dissociative Imagination; 3.2.5 Minimization of Status and Authority; 3.3 Linguistic Profiling: The Origin of Deviance in Xbox Live; 3.4 The Process Leading to Racism; 4 Deviant Bodies: Racism, Sexism, and Intersecting Oppressions; 4.1 Deviant Bodies, Racism, and Xbox Live; 4.2 Punishing Blackness in Popular Media; 4.2.1 The Resistant Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.2 The Self-Made Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.3 The Black Rage Paradigm; 4.2.4 The Plantation Patriarchy Paradigm
  • 4.3 Intersecting Identities and Intersecting Oppressions4.3.1 Black Women and Intersectionality; 4.3.2 Latina and Chicana Identity Development and Oppression; III: The Solutions; 5 Deviant Bodies Resisting Deviant Acts; 5.1 Information Communication Technology and Women Organizing Online; 5.2 Examining the Organized Efforts of Women in Xbox Live; 5.2.1 Resource Mobilization Theory; 5.2.2 Applying Habitus to Marginalized Gamers in Xbox; 5.3 Conclusion; 6 Virtual Tools in the Virtual House?; 6.1 Black Feminist Thought in the Digital Era; 6.2 Effecting Change in Xbox Live; Bibliography
Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live: Theoretical Criminology from the Virtual Margins provides a much-needed theoretical framework for examining deviant behavior and deviant bodies within one of the largest virtual gaming communities-Xbox Live. Previous research on video games has focused mostly on violence and examining violent behavior resulting from consuming this medium. This limited scope has skewed criminologists' understanding of video games and video game culture. Xbox Live has proven to be more than just a gaming platform for users. It has evolved into a multimedi.
  • Front Cover; Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; Foreword: Dismantling the Master's (Virtual) House: One Avatar at a Time; Works Cited; Introduction; I.1 Xbox as a Mediated Console Multiplayer Environment; I.1.1 Features of Xbox/Xbox Live; I.2 Communication and Conflict in Xbox Live; I.3 The Marginalized as Gamer; I.3.1 "Girl Gamers"; I.3.2 Gamers of Color; I: The Games; 1 Video Games as Ideological Projects; 1.1 Race and Gender as Ideology; 1.2 Video Game Narrative; 1.2.1 Ideology and Hegemony
  • 1.2.2 Examining Hegemonic Whiteness1.2.3 "Othering" Whiteness; 1.2.4 Hegemonic Masculinity; 1.2.5 Marginalized Masculinities; 1.3 Conclusion; 2 Racing and Gendering the Game; 2.1 The White Messiah in the Shooter; 2.2 Racialized Representations Within Other Genres; 2.3 Hegemonic Imagery in Fighting Genres; 2.4 Gendered Depictions Within Video Games; 2.5 Conclusion; II: The Gaming Space; 3 Deviant Acts: Racism and Sexism in Virtual Gaming Communities; 3.1 Deviant Behavior in Virtual Communities; 3.1.1 Types of Gamers in Virtual Communities; 3.1.2 Griefing; 3.1.3 Flaming
  • 3.2 Online Disinhibition3.2.1 Dissociative Anonymity; 3.2.2 Asynchronicity; 3.2.3 Solipsistic Introjection; 3.2.4 Dissociative Imagination; 3.2.5 Minimization of Status and Authority; 3.3 Linguistic Profiling: The Origin of Deviance in Xbox Live; 3.4 The Process Leading to Racism; 4 Deviant Bodies: Racism, Sexism, and Intersecting Oppressions; 4.1 Deviant Bodies, Racism, and Xbox Live; 4.2 Punishing Blackness in Popular Media; 4.2.1 The Resistant Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.2 The Self-Made Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.3 The Black Rage Paradigm; 4.2.4 The Plantation Patriarchy Paradigm
  • 4.3 Intersecting Identities and Intersecting Oppressions4.3.1 Black Women and Intersectionality; 4.3.2 Latina and Chicana Identity Development and Oppression; III: The Solutions; 5 Deviant Bodies Resisting Deviant Acts; 5.1 Information Communication Technology and Women Organizing Online; 5.2 Examining the Organized Efforts of Women in Xbox Live; 5.2.1 Resource Mobilization Theory; 5.2.2 Applying Habitus to Marginalized Gamers in Xbox; 5.3 Conclusion; 6 Virtual Tools in the Virtual House?; 6.1 Black Feminist Thought in the Digital Era; 6.2 Effecting Change in Xbox Live; Bibliography
Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live: Theoretical Criminology from the Virtual Margins provides a much-needed theoretical framework for examining deviant behavior and deviant bodies within one of the largest virtual gaming communities-Xbox Live. Previous research on video games has focused mostly on violence and examining violent behavior resulting from consuming this medium. This limited scope has skewed criminologists' understanding of video games and video game culture. Xbox Live has proven to be more than just a gaming platform for users. It has evolved into a multimedi.
Book
xxiv, 88 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .V56 G73 2014 Unknown
Book
xxiv, 518 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS 1. Artifact (Olli Sotamaa) 2. Artificial Intelligence (Robin Johnson) 3. Controllers (Sheila C. Murphy) 4. Emulation (Simon Dor) 5. Interface (Vincent Mauger) 6. Platforms (Bobby Schweizer) 7. Resolution (Mark J. P. Wolf) FORMAL ASPECTS 8. Art and Aesthetics (Grant Tavinor) 9. Color (Simon Niedenthal) 10. Conventions (Bernard Perron) 11. Design (Richard Rouse III) 12. Dimensionality (John Sharp) 13. Levels (Martin Picard) 14. Perspective (John Sharp) 15. Sound (Mark Grimshaw) 16. Worlds (Mark J. P. Wolf) PLAYFULNESS ASPECTS 17. Casualness (Julia Raz) 18. Challenge (Robert Furze) 19. Cheating (Mia Consalvo) 20. Competition / Co-operation (Emma Witkowski) 21. Conflict (Marko Siitonen) 22. Interactivity (Lori Landay) 23. Ludology (Espen Aarseth) 24. Objectives (Louis-Martin Guay) 25. Players / Gamers (Frederic Clement) 26. Repetition (Christopher Hanson) 27. Single-player / Multiplayer (Daniel Joseph & Lee Knuttila) GENERIC ASPECTS 28. Action (Dominic Arsenault) 29. Adventure (Clara Fernandez-Vara) 30. Role-playing (Andrew Burn) 31. Shooting (Gerald Voorhees) 32. Simulation (Seth Giddings) 33. Sports Games (Andrew Baerg) 34. Strategy (Simon Dor) CULTURAL ASPECTS 35. Convergence (Robert Alan Brookey) 36. Culture (Frans Mayra) 37. Cut-scenes (Rune Klevjer) 38. Death (Karin Wenz) 39. Education (Rick Ferdig) 40. Media Ecology (Kevin Schut) 41. Research (David Myers) 42. Retrogaming (Michael Thomasson) 43. Violence (Peter Krapp) SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS 44. Characters (Jessica Aldred) 45. Community (Carly Kocurek) 46. Femininity (Carrie Heeter) 47. Masculinity (Michael Z. Newman & John Vanderhoef) 48. Performance (Michael Nitsche) 49. Race (Anna Everett) 50. Sociology (Andras Lukacs) PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECTS 51. Cognition (Andreas Gregerson) 52. Emergence (Joris Dormans) 53. Fiction (Grant Tavinor) 54. Ideology (Mark Hayse) 55. Immersion (Carl Therrien) 56. Meaning (Christopher A. Paul) 57. Ethics (Mark Hayse) 58. Narratology (Dominic Arsenault) 59. Ontology (Espen Aarseth) 60. Transcendence (Mark Hayse).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The number of publications dealing with video game studies has exploded over the course of the last decade, but the field has produced few comprehensive reference works. The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies, compiled by well-known video game scholars Mark J. P. Wolf and Bernard Perron, aims to address the ongoing theoretical and methodological development of game studies, providing students, scholars, and game designers with a definitive look at contemporary video game studies. Features include: comprehensive and interdisciplinary models and approaches for analyzing video games; new perspectives on video games both as art form and cultural phenomenon; explorations of the technical and creative dimensions of video games; accounts of the political, social, and cultural dynamics of video games. Each essay provides a lively and succinct summary of its target area, quickly bringing the reader up-to-date on the pertinent issues surrounding each aspect of the field, including references for further reading. Together, they provide an overview of the present state of game studies that will undoubtedly prove invaluable to student, scholar, and designer alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS 1. Artifact (Olli Sotamaa) 2. Artificial Intelligence (Robin Johnson) 3. Controllers (Sheila C. Murphy) 4. Emulation (Simon Dor) 5. Interface (Vincent Mauger) 6. Platforms (Bobby Schweizer) 7. Resolution (Mark J. P. Wolf) FORMAL ASPECTS 8. Art and Aesthetics (Grant Tavinor) 9. Color (Simon Niedenthal) 10. Conventions (Bernard Perron) 11. Design (Richard Rouse III) 12. Dimensionality (John Sharp) 13. Levels (Martin Picard) 14. Perspective (John Sharp) 15. Sound (Mark Grimshaw) 16. Worlds (Mark J. P. Wolf) PLAYFULNESS ASPECTS 17. Casualness (Julia Raz) 18. Challenge (Robert Furze) 19. Cheating (Mia Consalvo) 20. Competition / Co-operation (Emma Witkowski) 21. Conflict (Marko Siitonen) 22. Interactivity (Lori Landay) 23. Ludology (Espen Aarseth) 24. Objectives (Louis-Martin Guay) 25. Players / Gamers (Frederic Clement) 26. Repetition (Christopher Hanson) 27. Single-player / Multiplayer (Daniel Joseph & Lee Knuttila) GENERIC ASPECTS 28. Action (Dominic Arsenault) 29. Adventure (Clara Fernandez-Vara) 30. Role-playing (Andrew Burn) 31. Shooting (Gerald Voorhees) 32. Simulation (Seth Giddings) 33. Sports Games (Andrew Baerg) 34. Strategy (Simon Dor) CULTURAL ASPECTS 35. Convergence (Robert Alan Brookey) 36. Culture (Frans Mayra) 37. Cut-scenes (Rune Klevjer) 38. Death (Karin Wenz) 39. Education (Rick Ferdig) 40. Media Ecology (Kevin Schut) 41. Research (David Myers) 42. Retrogaming (Michael Thomasson) 43. Violence (Peter Krapp) SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS 44. Characters (Jessica Aldred) 45. Community (Carly Kocurek) 46. Femininity (Carrie Heeter) 47. Masculinity (Michael Z. Newman & John Vanderhoef) 48. Performance (Michael Nitsche) 49. Race (Anna Everett) 50. Sociology (Andras Lukacs) PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECTS 51. Cognition (Andreas Gregerson) 52. Emergence (Joris Dormans) 53. Fiction (Grant Tavinor) 54. Ideology (Mark Hayse) 55. Immersion (Carl Therrien) 56. Meaning (Christopher A. Paul) 57. Ethics (Mark Hayse) 58. Narratology (Dominic Arsenault) 59. Ontology (Espen Aarseth) 60. Transcendence (Mark Hayse).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The number of publications dealing with video game studies has exploded over the course of the last decade, but the field has produced few comprehensive reference works. The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies, compiled by well-known video game scholars Mark J. P. Wolf and Bernard Perron, aims to address the ongoing theoretical and methodological development of game studies, providing students, scholars, and game designers with a definitive look at contemporary video game studies. Features include: comprehensive and interdisciplinary models and approaches for analyzing video games; new perspectives on video games both as art form and cultural phenomenon; explorations of the technical and creative dimensions of video games; accounts of the political, social, and cultural dynamics of video games. Each essay provides a lively and succinct summary of its target area, quickly bringing the reader up-to-date on the pertinent issues surrounding each aspect of the field, including references for further reading. Together, they provide an overview of the present state of game studies that will undoubtedly prove invaluable to student, scholar, and designer alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .R67 2014 Unknown
Book
viii, 219 pages ; 21 cm.
  • Contents Acknowledgements Introduction Chapter one: Computer games in social theory 1. Gaming and the social imaginary 2. The gamer as a streamlined self 3. Social theory and critique Chapter two: Lineages of the computer game 1. The revival of play 2. Technology and the dialectic of invention 3. Artistic critique and the transformation of computing Chapter three: The formation of gaming culture 1. From games as technology to the discovery of gameplay 2. The authentic gamer 3. Gaming s constitutive ambivalence Chapter four: Technology and power 1. Organising an industry 2. Globalisation and cultures of production 3. Technology, power and resistance Chapter five: The phenakisticon 1. MMPGs in recognition-theoretic perspective 2. The limitations of engineered sociability 3. Gamification and the diminution of gameplay Chapter six: Aesthetics and politics 1. The aesthetic dimension 2. Art, play and critique 3. Critical gaming? Notes References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In this compelling book, Graeme Kirkpatrick argues that computer games have fundamentally altered the relation of self and society in the digital age. Tracing the origins of gaming to the revival of play in the 1960s counter culture, Computer Games and the Social Imaginary describes how the energies of that movement transformed computer technology from something ugly and machine-like into a world of colour and 'fun'. In the process, play with computers became computer gaming -- a new cultural practice with its own values. From the late 1980s gaming became a resource for people to draw upon as they faced the challenges of life in a new, globalizing digital economy. Gamer identity furnishes a revivified capitalism with compliant and 'streamlined' workers, but at times gaming culture also challenges the corporations that control game production. Analysing topics such as the links between technology and power, the formation of gaming culture and the subjective impact of play with computer games, this insightful text will be of great interest to students and scholars of digital media, games studies and the information society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Contents Acknowledgements Introduction Chapter one: Computer games in social theory 1. Gaming and the social imaginary 2. The gamer as a streamlined self 3. Social theory and critique Chapter two: Lineages of the computer game 1. The revival of play 2. Technology and the dialectic of invention 3. Artistic critique and the transformation of computing Chapter three: The formation of gaming culture 1. From games as technology to the discovery of gameplay 2. The authentic gamer 3. Gaming s constitutive ambivalence Chapter four: Technology and power 1. Organising an industry 2. Globalisation and cultures of production 3. Technology, power and resistance Chapter five: The phenakisticon 1. MMPGs in recognition-theoretic perspective 2. The limitations of engineered sociability 3. Gamification and the diminution of gameplay Chapter six: Aesthetics and politics 1. The aesthetic dimension 2. Art, play and critique 3. Critical gaming? Notes References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In this compelling book, Graeme Kirkpatrick argues that computer games have fundamentally altered the relation of self and society in the digital age. Tracing the origins of gaming to the revival of play in the 1960s counter culture, Computer Games and the Social Imaginary describes how the energies of that movement transformed computer technology from something ugly and machine-like into a world of colour and 'fun'. In the process, play with computers became computer gaming -- a new cultural practice with its own values. From the late 1980s gaming became a resource for people to draw upon as they faced the challenges of life in a new, globalizing digital economy. Gamer identity furnishes a revivified capitalism with compliant and 'streamlined' workers, but at times gaming culture also challenges the corporations that control game production. Analysing topics such as the links between technology and power, the formation of gaming culture and the subjective impact of play with computer games, this insightful text will be of great interest to students and scholars of digital media, games studies and the information society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .S52 K57 2013 Unknown
Book
121 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.35 .G738 M38 2013 Unknown
Book
xxxii, 274 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Foreword-- Henry Jenkins 1. Learning and Video Games 2. Entertainment and Education Platforms 3. Intelligent Objects 4. Interpreting Their Messages 5. Arguments in Virtual and Real Worlds 6. Learning to Create 7. Art and Video Games 8. Story Telling 9. Virtual Spaces and Avatars 10. New Heroes and Heroines.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Packed with critical analysis and real-life examples, this book explores how video games can cultivate learning. Lacasa takes several commercial video games and shows how they can be used both in and out of the classroom to teach initiative and problem-solving, encourage creativity, promote literacy, and develop reasoning skills. The result of almost ten years spent discovering video games, learning to play, conversing with their designers and distributors, and working in the classroom with young people and teachers, Lacasa's work uncovers the educational value already present in commercial video games and shows how to integrate games for learning purposes into the curriculum. It is invaluable for anyone wishing to discover the cultural and educational value of this new form of entertainment in an interdisciplinary environment in which psychology, sociology, art, literature, graphic design, and computer programming are all present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Foreword-- Henry Jenkins 1. Learning and Video Games 2. Entertainment and Education Platforms 3. Intelligent Objects 4. Interpreting Their Messages 5. Arguments in Virtual and Real Worlds 6. Learning to Create 7. Art and Video Games 8. Story Telling 9. Virtual Spaces and Avatars 10. New Heroes and Heroines.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Packed with critical analysis and real-life examples, this book explores how video games can cultivate learning. Lacasa takes several commercial video games and shows how they can be used both in and out of the classroom to teach initiative and problem-solving, encourage creativity, promote literacy, and develop reasoning skills. The result of almost ten years spent discovering video games, learning to play, conversing with their designers and distributors, and working in the classroom with young people and teachers, Lacasa's work uncovers the educational value already present in commercial video games and shows how to integrate games for learning purposes into the curriculum. It is invaluable for anyone wishing to discover the cultural and educational value of this new form of entertainment in an interdisciplinary environment in which psychology, sociology, art, literature, graphic design, and computer programming are all present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
GV1469.3 .L33 2013 Unknown
Book
79 pages : colored illustrations ; 27 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
HN90 .V5 V56 2013 Unknown
Book
xv, 217 pages ; 24 cm
  • Down the rabbit hole
  • From the coin-op to the console: how did we get here?
  • Let the games begin: competitive video gaming and the birth of the cyberathlete
  • Alphabet soup: MMOs, MUDs, and RPGs, D&D in the twenty-first century
  • No console required: casual games (or, gaming for the rest of us)
  • Dressed for the symphony: video games take center stage
  • From the flat screen to the big screen: video games invade Hollywood
  • Virtual life
  • And we are merely players: video games and society
  • Games for health
  • War games: combat evolved
  • It's William Gibson's world, we're just living in it.
"From school lunchrooms to the White House press room, video games are an integral part of our popular culture, and the industry behind them touches all aspects of our lives, gamer and non-gamer alike. Business and entertainment, health and medicine, politics and war, social interaction and education, all fall under its influence. This book tells the story of a formerly fringe enterprise that, when few were paying attention, exploded into a multi-billion dollar industry affecting the very way we live. The author paints a thorough and vivid picture of the video game industry, illuminating the various, and often bizarre, ways it is changing how we work, play and live. He brings readers along on his own journey of discovery, from the back room of a small Irish pub where members of the second-largest industry enclave meet each month, to a university clinic where the Wii is being used to treat Parkinson's sufferers, and everywhere in between. The book is more than just a story about video games, though. It is the story of an awakening, of a realization that a childhood pastime has exploded into a thriving enterprise, one rooted in entertainment but whose tendrils reach into virtually all aspects of life and society."--Publisher information.
  • Down the rabbit hole
  • From the coin-op to the console: how did we get here?
  • Let the games begin: competitive video gaming and the birth of the cyberathlete
  • Alphabet soup: MMOs, MUDs, and RPGs, D&D in the twenty-first century
  • No console required: casual games (or, gaming for the rest of us)
  • Dressed for the symphony: video games take center stage
  • From the flat screen to the big screen: video games invade Hollywood
  • Virtual life
  • And we are merely players: video games and society
  • Games for health
  • War games: combat evolved
  • It's William Gibson's world, we're just living in it.
"From school lunchrooms to the White House press room, video games are an integral part of our popular culture, and the industry behind them touches all aspects of our lives, gamer and non-gamer alike. Business and entertainment, health and medicine, politics and war, social interaction and education, all fall under its influence. This book tells the story of a formerly fringe enterprise that, when few were paying attention, exploded into a multi-billion dollar industry affecting the very way we live. The author paints a thorough and vivid picture of the video game industry, illuminating the various, and often bizarre, ways it is changing how we work, play and live. He brings readers along on his own journey of discovery, from the back room of a small Irish pub where members of the second-largest industry enclave meet each month, to a university clinic where the Wii is being used to treat Parkinson's sufferers, and everywhere in between. The book is more than just a story about video games, though. It is the story of an awakening, of a realization that a childhood pastime has exploded into a thriving enterprise, one rooted in entertainment but whose tendrils reach into virtually all aspects of life and society."--Publisher information.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .G74 2013 Unknown
Book
xi, 255 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
Following the first appearance of arcade video games in 1971 and home video game systems in 1972, the commercial video game market was exuberant with fast-paced innovation and profit. New games, gaming systems, and technologies flooded into the market until around 1983, when sales of home game systems dropped, thousands of arcades closed, and major video game makers suffered steep losses or left the market altogether. In Before the Crash: Early Video Game History, editor Mark J. P. Wolf assembles essays that examine the fleeting golden age of video games, an era sometimes overlooked for older games' lack of availability or their perceived "primitiveness" when compared to contemporary video games. In twelve chapters, contributors consider much of what was going on during the pre-crash era: arcade games, home game consoles, home computer games, handheld games, and even early online games. The technologies of early video games are investigated, as well as the cultural context of the early period-from aesthetic, economic, industrial, and legal perspectives. Since the video game industry and culture got their start and found their form in this era, these years shaped much of what video games would come to be. This volume of early history, then, not only helps readers to understand the pre-crash era, but also reveals much about the present state of the industry. Before the Crash will give readers a thorough overview of the early days of video games along with a sense of the optimism, enthusiasm, and excitement of those times. Students and teachers of media studies will enjoy this compelling volume.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Following the first appearance of arcade video games in 1971 and home video game systems in 1972, the commercial video game market was exuberant with fast-paced innovation and profit. New games, gaming systems, and technologies flooded into the market until around 1983, when sales of home game systems dropped, thousands of arcades closed, and major video game makers suffered steep losses or left the market altogether. In Before the Crash: Early Video Game History, editor Mark J. P. Wolf assembles essays that examine the fleeting golden age of video games, an era sometimes overlooked for older games' lack of availability or their perceived "primitiveness" when compared to contemporary video games. In twelve chapters, contributors consider much of what was going on during the pre-crash era: arcade games, home game consoles, home computer games, handheld games, and even early online games. The technologies of early video games are investigated, as well as the cultural context of the early period-from aesthetic, economic, industrial, and legal perspectives. Since the video game industry and culture got their start and found their form in this era, these years shaped much of what video games would come to be. This volume of early history, then, not only helps readers to understand the pre-crash era, but also reveals much about the present state of the industry. Before the Crash will give readers a thorough overview of the early days of video games along with a sense of the optimism, enthusiasm, and excitement of those times. Students and teachers of media studies will enjoy this compelling volume.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .B44 2012 Unknown
Book
183 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1. Videogames are Disappearing Chapter 2. New Games Chapter 3. Old Games Chapter 4. Game(play) Preservation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Despite record sales and an ever-growing global industry, the simple fact is that videogames are disappearing. Most obviously, the physical deterioration of discs, cartridges, consoles and controllers means that the data and devices will crumble to dust and eventually will be lost forever. However, there is more to the disappearance of videogames than plastic corrosion and bit rot. Best Before examines how the videogames industry's retail, publishing, technology design, advertising and marketing practices actively produce obsolescence, wearing out and retiring old games to make way for the always new, just out of reach, 'coming soon' title and 'next generation' platform. Set against the context of material deterioration and the discursive production of obsolescence, Best Before examines the conceptual and practical challenges faced within the nascent field of game preservation. Understanding videogames as rich, complex and mutable texts and experiences that are supported and sustained by cultures of gameplay and fandom, Best Before considers how - and even whether - we might preserve and present games for future generations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1. Videogames are Disappearing Chapter 2. New Games Chapter 3. Old Games Chapter 4. Game(play) Preservation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Despite record sales and an ever-growing global industry, the simple fact is that videogames are disappearing. Most obviously, the physical deterioration of discs, cartridges, consoles and controllers means that the data and devices will crumble to dust and eventually will be lost forever. However, there is more to the disappearance of videogames than plastic corrosion and bit rot. Best Before examines how the videogames industry's retail, publishing, technology design, advertising and marketing practices actively produce obsolescence, wearing out and retiring old games to make way for the always new, just out of reach, 'coming soon' title and 'next generation' platform. Set against the context of material deterioration and the discursive production of obsolescence, Best Before examines the conceptual and practical challenges faced within the nascent field of game preservation. Understanding videogames as rich, complex and mutable texts and experiences that are supported and sustained by cultures of gameplay and fandom, Best Before considers how - and even whether - we might preserve and present games for future generations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .N46 2012 Unknown
Book
x, 204 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
The Nintendo Wii, introduced in 2006, helped usher in a moment of retro-reinvention in video game play. This hugely popular console system, codenamed Revolution during development, signaled a turn away from fully immersive, time-consuming MMORPGs or forty-hour FPS games and back toward family fun in the living room. Players using the wireless motion-sensitive controller (the Wii Remote, or "Wiimote") play with their whole bodies, waving, swinging, swaying. The mimetic interface shifts attention from what's on the screen to what's happening in physical space. This book describes the Wii's impact in technological, social, and cultural terms, examining the Wii as a system of interrelated hardware and software that was consciously designed to promote social play in physical space. Each chapter of Codename Revolution focuses on a major component of the Wii as a platform: the console itself, designed to be low-powered and nimble; the iconic Wii Remote; Wii Fit Plus, and its controller, the Wii Balance Board; the Wii Channels interface and Nintendo's distribution system; and the Wii as a social platform that not only affords multiplayer options but also encourages social interaction in shared physical space. Finally, the authors connect the Wii's revolution in mimetic interface gaming--which eventually led to the release of Sony's Move and Microsoft's Kinect--to some of the economic and technological conditions that influence the possibility of making something new in this arena of computing and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Nintendo Wii, introduced in 2006, helped usher in a moment of retro-reinvention in video game play. This hugely popular console system, codenamed Revolution during development, signaled a turn away from fully immersive, time-consuming MMORPGs or forty-hour FPS games and back toward family fun in the living room. Players using the wireless motion-sensitive controller (the Wii Remote, or "Wiimote") play with their whole bodies, waving, swinging, swaying. The mimetic interface shifts attention from what's on the screen to what's happening in physical space. This book describes the Wii's impact in technological, social, and cultural terms, examining the Wii as a system of interrelated hardware and software that was consciously designed to promote social play in physical space. Each chapter of Codename Revolution focuses on a major component of the Wii as a platform: the console itself, designed to be low-powered and nimble; the iconic Wii Remote; Wii Fit Plus, and its controller, the Wii Balance Board; the Wii Channels interface and Nintendo's distribution system; and the Wii as a social platform that not only affords multiplayer options but also encourages social interaction in shared physical space. Finally, the authors connect the Wii's revolution in mimetic interface gaming--which eventually led to the release of Sony's Move and Microsoft's Kinect--to some of the economic and technological conditions that influence the possibility of making something new in this arena of computing and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.17 .S63 J66 2012 Unknown

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Search all fields

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website