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Book
xiii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
"Game analysis allows us to understand games better, providing insight into the player-game relationship, the construction of the game, and its sociocultural relevance. As the field of game studies grows, videogame writing is evolving from the mere evaluation of gameplay, graphics, sound, and replayablity, to more reflective writing that manages to convey the complexity of a game and the way it is played in a cultural context. Introduction to Game Analysis serves as an accessible guide to analyzing games using strategies borrowed from textual analysis. Clara Fernández-Vara's concise primer provides instruction on the basic building blocks of game analysis--examination of context, content and reception, and formal qualities--as well as the vocabulary necessary for talking about videogames' distinguishing characteristics. Examples are drawn from a range of games, both digital and non-digital--from Bioshock and World of Warcraft to Monopoly--and the book provides a variety of exercises and sample analyses, as well as a comprehensive ludography and glossary"-- Provided by publisher.
"Game analysis allows us to understand games better, providing insight into the player-game relationship, the construction of the game, and its sociocultural relevance. As the field of game studies grows, videogame writing is evolving from the mere evaluation of gameplay, graphics, sound, and replayablity, to more reflective writing that manages to convey the complexity of a game and the way it is played in a cultural context. Introduction to Game Analysis serves as an accessible guide to analyzing games using strategies borrowed from textual analysis. Clara Fernández-Vara's concise primer provides instruction on the basic building blocks of game analysis--examination of context, content and reception, and formal qualities--as well as the vocabulary necessary for talking about videogames' distinguishing characteristics. Examples are drawn from a range of games, both digital and non-digital--from Bioshock and World of Warcraft to Monopoly--and the book provides a variety of exercises and sample analyses, as well as a comprehensive ludography and glossary"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
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GV1469.15 .F46 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 217 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Videogames as avant-garde art
  • Radical formal
  • Radical political
  • Complicit formal
  • Complicit political
  • Narrative formal
  • Narrative political.
  • Videogames as avant-garde art
  • Radical formal
  • Radical political
  • Complicit formal
  • Complicit political
  • Narrative formal
  • Narrative political.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
QA76.76 .C672 S35 2014 Unknown
Book
184 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
"Game studies is a rapidly developing field across the world, with a growing number of dedicated courses addressing video games and digital play as significant phenomena in contemporary everyday life and media cultures. Seth Giddings looks to fill a gap by focusing on the relationship between the actual and virtual worlds of play in everyday life. He addresses both the continuities and differences between digital play and longer-established modes of play. The 'gameworlds' title indicates both the virtual world designed into the videogame and the wider environments in which play is manifested: social relationships between players; hardware and software; between the virtual worlds of the game and the media universes they extend (e.g. Poke; mon, Harry Potter, Lego, Star Wars); and the gameworlds generated by children's imaginations and creativity (through talk and role-play, drawings and outdoor play). The gameworld raises questions about who, and what, is in play. Drawing on recent theoretical work in science and technology studies, games studies and new media studies, a key theme is the material and embodied character of these gameworlds and their components (players' bodies, computer hardware, toys, virtual physics, and the physical environment). Building on detailed small-scale ethnographic case studies, Gameworlds is the first book to explore the nature of play in the virtual worlds of video games and how this play relates to, and crosses over into, everyday play in the actual world"-- Provided by publisher.
"Game studies is a rapidly developing field across the world, with a growing number of dedicated courses addressing video games and digital play as significant phenomena in contemporary everyday life and media cultures. Seth Giddings looks to fill a gap by focusing on the relationship between the actual and virtual worlds of play in everyday life. He addresses both the continuities and differences between digital play and longer-established modes of play. The 'gameworlds' title indicates both the virtual world designed into the videogame and the wider environments in which play is manifested: social relationships between players; hardware and software; between the virtual worlds of the game and the media universes they extend (e.g. Poke; mon, Harry Potter, Lego, Star Wars); and the gameworlds generated by children's imaginations and creativity (through talk and role-play, drawings and outdoor play). The gameworld raises questions about who, and what, is in play. Drawing on recent theoretical work in science and technology studies, games studies and new media studies, a key theme is the material and embodied character of these gameworlds and their components (players' bodies, computer hardware, toys, virtual physics, and the physical environment). Building on detailed small-scale ethnographic case studies, Gameworlds is the first book to explore the nature of play in the virtual worlds of video games and how this play relates to, and crosses over into, everyday play in the actual world"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .S52 G53 2014 Unknown
Book
x, 317 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
" Video games have long been seen as the exclusive territory of young, heterosexual white males. In a media landscape dominated by such gamers, players who do not fit this mold, including women, people of color, and LGBT people, are often brutalized in forums and in public channels in online play. Discussion of representation of such groups in games has frequently been limited and cursory. In contrast, Gaming at the Edge builds on feminist, queer, and postcolonial theories of identity and draws on qualitative audience research methods to make sense of how representation comes to matter. In Gaming at the Edge, Adrienne Shaw argues that video game players experience race, gender, and sexuality concurrently. She asks: How do players identify with characters? How do they separate identification and interactivity? What is the role of fantasy in representation? What is the importance of understanding market logic? In addressing these questions Shaw reveals how representation comes to matter to participants and offers a perceptive consideration of the high stakes in politics of representation debates. Putting forth a framework for talking about representation, difference, and diversity in an era in which user-generated content, individualized media consumption, and the blurring of producer/consumer roles has lessened the utility of traditional models of media representation analysis, Shaw finds new insight on the edge of media consumption with the invisible, marginalized gamers who are surprising in both their numbers and their influence in mainstream gamer culture. "-- Provided by publisher.
" Video games have long been seen as the exclusive territory of young, heterosexual white males. In a media landscape dominated by such gamers, players who do not fit this mold, including women, people of color, and LGBT people, are often brutalized in forums and in public channels in online play. Discussion of representation of such groups in games has frequently been limited and cursory. In contrast, Gaming at the Edge builds on feminist, queer, and postcolonial theories of identity and draws on qualitative audience research methods to make sense of how representation comes to matter. In Gaming at the Edge, Adrienne Shaw argues that video game players experience race, gender, and sexuality concurrently. She asks: How do players identify with characters? How do they separate identification and interactivity? What is the role of fantasy in representation? What is the importance of understanding market logic? In addressing these questions Shaw reveals how representation comes to matter to participants and offers a perceptive consideration of the high stakes in politics of representation debates. Putting forth a framework for talking about representation, difference, and diversity in an era in which user-generated content, individualized media consumption, and the blurring of producer/consumer roles has lessened the utility of traditional models of media representation analysis, Shaw finds new insight on the edge of media consumption with the invisible, marginalized gamers who are surprising in both their numbers and their influence in mainstream gamer culture. "-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.17 .S63 S53 2014 Unavailable In process Request
Book
xvii, 229 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Setting the stage: the emergence of playful organizations
  • Unfolding the concept and its potential: the playful organization ideal-type
  • Previous studies re-examined: have playful organizations already emerged?
  • An online gamer speaks out: playful organizations in Eve Online
  • Let's ask our panel: Dutch online gamers on their communities
  • Building an un-/comfortable bridge: Dutch online gamers on their work organizations
  • Food for thought: the emergence of playful organizations uncovered and critiqued.
"Online Gaming and Playful Organization explores the cultural impact of gaming on organizations. While gaming is typically a form of entertainment, this book argues that gaming communities can function as a useful analogue for work organizations because both are comprised of diverse members who must communicate and collaborate to solve complex problems. By examining the impact of gaming beyond its own context, this book argues that one can apply numerous lessons from the virtual world of online games to the "real" world of businesses, schools, and other professional communities. Most notably, it articulates the concept of playful organizations, defined as organizations in which the ability to play has become so institutionalized that it is spontaneous, creative, and enjoyable. Based on original research, Online Gaming and Playful Organization establishes an interdisciplinary framework for further conceptual and empirical investigation into this topic, with the dual goals of a better understanding of the role of online games and virtual worlds, and of the possible structural and cultural transformation of public and private organizations. "-- Provided by publisher.
  • Setting the stage: the emergence of playful organizations
  • Unfolding the concept and its potential: the playful organization ideal-type
  • Previous studies re-examined: have playful organizations already emerged?
  • An online gamer speaks out: playful organizations in Eve Online
  • Let's ask our panel: Dutch online gamers on their communities
  • Building an un-/comfortable bridge: Dutch online gamers on their work organizations
  • Food for thought: the emergence of playful organizations uncovered and critiqued.
"Online Gaming and Playful Organization explores the cultural impact of gaming on organizations. While gaming is typically a form of entertainment, this book argues that gaming communities can function as a useful analogue for work organizations because both are comprised of diverse members who must communicate and collaborate to solve complex problems. By examining the impact of gaming beyond its own context, this book argues that one can apply numerous lessons from the virtual world of online games to the "real" world of businesses, schools, and other professional communities. Most notably, it articulates the concept of playful organizations, defined as organizations in which the ability to play has become so institutionalized that it is spontaneous, creative, and enjoyable. Based on original research, Online Gaming and Playful Organization establishes an interdisciplinary framework for further conceptual and empirical investigation into this topic, with the dual goals of a better understanding of the role of online games and virtual worlds, and of the possible structural and cultural transformation of public and private organizations. "-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.15 .W37 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (114 pages)
  • Front Cover; Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; Foreword: Dismantling the Master's (Virtual) House: One Avatar at a Time; Works Cited; Introduction; I.1 Xbox as a Mediated Console Multiplayer Environment; I.1.1 Features of Xbox/Xbox Live; I.2 Communication and Conflict in Xbox Live; I.3 The Marginalized as Gamer; I.3.1 "Girl Gamers"; I.3.2 Gamers of Color; I: The Games; 1 Video Games as Ideological Projects; 1.1 Race and Gender as Ideology; 1.2 Video Game Narrative; 1.2.1 Ideology and Hegemony
  • 1.2.2 Examining Hegemonic Whiteness1.2.3 "Othering" Whiteness; 1.2.4 Hegemonic Masculinity; 1.2.5 Marginalized Masculinities; 1.3 Conclusion; 2 Racing and Gendering the Game; 2.1 The White Messiah in the Shooter; 2.2 Racialized Representations Within Other Genres; 2.3 Hegemonic Imagery in Fighting Genres; 2.4 Gendered Depictions Within Video Games; 2.5 Conclusion; II: The Gaming Space; 3 Deviant Acts: Racism and Sexism in Virtual Gaming Communities; 3.1 Deviant Behavior in Virtual Communities; 3.1.1 Types of Gamers in Virtual Communities; 3.1.2 Griefing; 3.1.3 Flaming
  • 3.2 Online Disinhibition3.2.1 Dissociative Anonymity; 3.2.2 Asynchronicity; 3.2.3 Solipsistic Introjection; 3.2.4 Dissociative Imagination; 3.2.5 Minimization of Status and Authority; 3.3 Linguistic Profiling: The Origin of Deviance in Xbox Live; 3.4 The Process Leading to Racism; 4 Deviant Bodies: Racism, Sexism, and Intersecting Oppressions; 4.1 Deviant Bodies, Racism, and Xbox Live; 4.2 Punishing Blackness in Popular Media; 4.2.1 The Resistant Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.2 The Self-Made Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.3 The Black Rage Paradigm; 4.2.4 The Plantation Patriarchy Paradigm
  • 4.3 Intersecting Identities and Intersecting Oppressions4.3.1 Black Women and Intersectionality; 4.3.2 Latina and Chicana Identity Development and Oppression; III: The Solutions; 5 Deviant Bodies Resisting Deviant Acts; 5.1 Information Communication Technology and Women Organizing Online; 5.2 Examining the Organized Efforts of Women in Xbox Live; 5.2.1 Resource Mobilization Theory; 5.2.2 Applying Habitus to Marginalized Gamers in Xbox; 5.3 Conclusion; 6 Virtual Tools in the Virtual House?; 6.1 Black Feminist Thought in the Digital Era; 6.2 Effecting Change in Xbox Live; Bibliography
Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live: Theoretical Criminology from the Virtual Margins provides a much-needed theoretical framework for examining deviant behavior and deviant bodies within one of the largest virtual gaming communities-Xbox Live. Previous research on video games has focused mostly on violence and examining violent behavior resulting from consuming this medium. This limited scope has skewed criminologists' understanding of video games and video game culture. Xbox Live has proven to be more than just a gaming platform for users. It has evolved into a multimedi.
  • Front Cover; Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; Foreword: Dismantling the Master's (Virtual) House: One Avatar at a Time; Works Cited; Introduction; I.1 Xbox as a Mediated Console Multiplayer Environment; I.1.1 Features of Xbox/Xbox Live; I.2 Communication and Conflict in Xbox Live; I.3 The Marginalized as Gamer; I.3.1 "Girl Gamers"; I.3.2 Gamers of Color; I: The Games; 1 Video Games as Ideological Projects; 1.1 Race and Gender as Ideology; 1.2 Video Game Narrative; 1.2.1 Ideology and Hegemony
  • 1.2.2 Examining Hegemonic Whiteness1.2.3 "Othering" Whiteness; 1.2.4 Hegemonic Masculinity; 1.2.5 Marginalized Masculinities; 1.3 Conclusion; 2 Racing and Gendering the Game; 2.1 The White Messiah in the Shooter; 2.2 Racialized Representations Within Other Genres; 2.3 Hegemonic Imagery in Fighting Genres; 2.4 Gendered Depictions Within Video Games; 2.5 Conclusion; II: The Gaming Space; 3 Deviant Acts: Racism and Sexism in Virtual Gaming Communities; 3.1 Deviant Behavior in Virtual Communities; 3.1.1 Types of Gamers in Virtual Communities; 3.1.2 Griefing; 3.1.3 Flaming
  • 3.2 Online Disinhibition3.2.1 Dissociative Anonymity; 3.2.2 Asynchronicity; 3.2.3 Solipsistic Introjection; 3.2.4 Dissociative Imagination; 3.2.5 Minimization of Status and Authority; 3.3 Linguistic Profiling: The Origin of Deviance in Xbox Live; 3.4 The Process Leading to Racism; 4 Deviant Bodies: Racism, Sexism, and Intersecting Oppressions; 4.1 Deviant Bodies, Racism, and Xbox Live; 4.2 Punishing Blackness in Popular Media; 4.2.1 The Resistant Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.2 The Self-Made Masculinity Paradigm; 4.2.3 The Black Rage Paradigm; 4.2.4 The Plantation Patriarchy Paradigm
  • 4.3 Intersecting Identities and Intersecting Oppressions4.3.1 Black Women and Intersectionality; 4.3.2 Latina and Chicana Identity Development and Oppression; III: The Solutions; 5 Deviant Bodies Resisting Deviant Acts; 5.1 Information Communication Technology and Women Organizing Online; 5.2 Examining the Organized Efforts of Women in Xbox Live; 5.2.1 Resource Mobilization Theory; 5.2.2 Applying Habitus to Marginalized Gamers in Xbox; 5.3 Conclusion; 6 Virtual Tools in the Virtual House?; 6.1 Black Feminist Thought in the Digital Era; 6.2 Effecting Change in Xbox Live; Bibliography
Race, Gender, and Deviance in Xbox Live: Theoretical Criminology from the Virtual Margins provides a much-needed theoretical framework for examining deviant behavior and deviant bodies within one of the largest virtual gaming communities-Xbox Live. Previous research on video games has focused mostly on violence and examining violent behavior resulting from consuming this medium. This limited scope has skewed criminologists' understanding of video games and video game culture. Xbox Live has proven to be more than just a gaming platform for users. It has evolved into a multimedi.
Book
xxiv, 88 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .V56 G73 2014 Unknown
Book
xxiv, 518 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
"The number of publications dealing with video game studies has exploded over the course of the last decade, but the field has not yet produced a comprehensive reference work. The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies, by well-known video game scholars Mark Wolf and Bernard Perron, aims to address the on-going theoretical and methodological development of game studies, providing students, scholars, and game designers with a definitive look at contemporary video game studies. Features include: -comprehensive and interdisciplinary models and approaches for analyzing video games; -new perspectives on video games both as art form and cultural phenomenon; -explorations of technical and creative dimensions of video games; -accounts of the economical, political, social, and cultural dynamics of video games"-- Provided by publisher.
"The number of publications dealing with video game studies has exploded over the course of the last decade, but the field has not yet produced a comprehensive reference work. The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies, by well-known video game scholars Mark Wolf and Bernard Perron, aims to address the on-going theoretical and methodological development of game studies, providing students, scholars, and game designers with a definitive look at contemporary video game studies. Features include: -comprehensive and interdisciplinary models and approaches for analyzing video games; -new perspectives on video games both as art form and cultural phenomenon; -explorations of technical and creative dimensions of video games; -accounts of the economical, political, social, and cultural dynamics of video games"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .R67 2014 Unknown
Book
viii, 219 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .S52 K57 2013 Unknown
Book
121 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
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GV1469.35 .G738 M38 2013 Unknown
Book
xxxii, 274 pages ; 23 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
GV1469.3 .L33 2013 Unknown
Book
79 pages : colored illustrations ; 27 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
HN90 .V5 V56 2013 Unknown
Book
xi, 255 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
Following the first appearance of arcade video games in 1971 and home video game systems in 1972, the commercial video game market was exuberant with fast-paced innovation and profit. New games, gaming systems, and technologies flooded into the market until around 1983, when sales of home game systems dropped, thousands of arcades closed, and major video game makers suffered steep losses or left the market altogether. In Before the Crash: Early Video Game History, editor Mark J. P. Wolf assembles essays that examine the fleeting golden age of video games, an era sometimes overlooked for older games' lack of availability or their perceived "primitiveness" when compared to contemporary video games. In twelve chapters, contributors consider much of what was going on during the pre-crash era: arcade games, home game consoles, home computer games, handheld games, and even early online games. The technologies of early video games are investigated, as well as the cultural context of the early period-from aesthetic, economic, industrial, and legal perspectives. Since the video game industry and culture got their start and found their form in this era, these years shaped much of what video games would come to be. This volume of early history, then, not only helps readers to understand the pre-crash era, but also reveals much about the present state of the industry. Before the Crash will give readers a thorough overview of the early days of video games along with a sense of the optimism, enthusiasm, and excitement of those times. Students and teachers of media studies will enjoy this compelling volume.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Following the first appearance of arcade video games in 1971 and home video game systems in 1972, the commercial video game market was exuberant with fast-paced innovation and profit. New games, gaming systems, and technologies flooded into the market until around 1983, when sales of home game systems dropped, thousands of arcades closed, and major video game makers suffered steep losses or left the market altogether. In Before the Crash: Early Video Game History, editor Mark J. P. Wolf assembles essays that examine the fleeting golden age of video games, an era sometimes overlooked for older games' lack of availability or their perceived "primitiveness" when compared to contemporary video games. In twelve chapters, contributors consider much of what was going on during the pre-crash era: arcade games, home game consoles, home computer games, handheld games, and even early online games. The technologies of early video games are investigated, as well as the cultural context of the early period-from aesthetic, economic, industrial, and legal perspectives. Since the video game industry and culture got their start and found their form in this era, these years shaped much of what video games would come to be. This volume of early history, then, not only helps readers to understand the pre-crash era, but also reveals much about the present state of the industry. Before the Crash will give readers a thorough overview of the early days of video games along with a sense of the optimism, enthusiasm, and excitement of those times. Students and teachers of media studies will enjoy this compelling volume.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .B44 2012 Unknown
Book
183 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1. Videogames are Disappearing Chapter 2. New Games Chapter 3. Old Games Chapter 4. Game(play) Preservation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Despite record sales and an ever-growing global industry, the simple fact is that videogames are disappearing. Most obviously, the physical deterioration of discs, cartridges, consoles and controllers means that the data and devices will crumble to dust and eventually will be lost forever. However, there is more to the disappearance of videogames than plastic corrosion and bit rot. Best Before examines how the videogames industry's retail, publishing, technology design, advertising and marketing practices actively produce obsolescence, wearing out and retiring old games to make way for the always new, just out of reach, 'coming soon' title and 'next generation' platform. Set against the context of material deterioration and the discursive production of obsolescence, Best Before examines the conceptual and practical challenges faced within the nascent field of game preservation. Understanding videogames as rich, complex and mutable texts and experiences that are supported and sustained by cultures of gameplay and fandom, Best Before considers how - and even whether - we might preserve and present games for future generations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1. Videogames are Disappearing Chapter 2. New Games Chapter 3. Old Games Chapter 4. Game(play) Preservation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Despite record sales and an ever-growing global industry, the simple fact is that videogames are disappearing. Most obviously, the physical deterioration of discs, cartridges, consoles and controllers means that the data and devices will crumble to dust and eventually will be lost forever. However, there is more to the disappearance of videogames than plastic corrosion and bit rot. Best Before examines how the videogames industry's retail, publishing, technology design, advertising and marketing practices actively produce obsolescence, wearing out and retiring old games to make way for the always new, just out of reach, 'coming soon' title and 'next generation' platform. Set against the context of material deterioration and the discursive production of obsolescence, Best Before examines the conceptual and practical challenges faced within the nascent field of game preservation. Understanding videogames as rich, complex and mutable texts and experiences that are supported and sustained by cultures of gameplay and fandom, Best Before considers how - and even whether - we might preserve and present games for future generations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .N46 2012 Unknown
Book
x, 204 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
The Nintendo Wii, introduced in 2006, helped usher in a moment of retro-reinvention in video game play. This hugely popular console system, codenamed Revolution during development, signaled a turn away from fully immersive, time-consuming MMORPGs or forty-hour FPS games and back toward family fun in the living room. Players using the wireless motion-sensitive controller (the Wii Remote, or "Wiimote") play with their whole bodies, waving, swinging, swaying. The mimetic interface shifts attention from what's on the screen to what's happening in physical space. This book describes the Wii's impact in technological, social, and cultural terms, examining the Wii as a system of interrelated hardware and software that was consciously designed to promote social play in physical space. Each chapter of Codename Revolution focuses on a major component of the Wii as a platform: the console itself, designed to be low-powered and nimble; the iconic Wii Remote; Wii Fit Plus, and its controller, the Wii Balance Board; the Wii Channels interface and Nintendo's distribution system; and the Wii as a social platform that not only affords multiplayer options but also encourages social interaction in shared physical space. Finally, the authors connect the Wii's revolution in mimetic interface gaming--which eventually led to the release of Sony's Move and Microsoft's Kinect--to some of the economic and technological conditions that influence the possibility of making something new in this arena of computing and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Nintendo Wii, introduced in 2006, helped usher in a moment of retro-reinvention in video game play. This hugely popular console system, codenamed Revolution during development, signaled a turn away from fully immersive, time-consuming MMORPGs or forty-hour FPS games and back toward family fun in the living room. Players using the wireless motion-sensitive controller (the Wii Remote, or "Wiimote") play with their whole bodies, waving, swinging, swaying. The mimetic interface shifts attention from what's on the screen to what's happening in physical space. This book describes the Wii's impact in technological, social, and cultural terms, examining the Wii as a system of interrelated hardware and software that was consciously designed to promote social play in physical space. Each chapter of Codename Revolution focuses on a major component of the Wii as a platform: the console itself, designed to be low-powered and nimble; the iconic Wii Remote; Wii Fit Plus, and its controller, the Wii Balance Board; the Wii Channels interface and Nintendo's distribution system; and the Wii as a social platform that not only affords multiplayer options but also encourages social interaction in shared physical space. Finally, the authors connect the Wii's revolution in mimetic interface gaming--which eventually led to the release of Sony's Move and Microsoft's Kinect--to some of the economic and technological conditions that influence the possibility of making something new in this arena of computing and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.17 .S63 J66 2012 Unknown
Book
181 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.35 .A87 C66 2012 Unknown
Book
270 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Préface / Gilles Brougére -- Prologue : entretiens avec des joueurs -- Jeux vidéo : la fabrication d'une culture -- L'invention d'un loisir : université, guerre froide et science-fiction -- Sports et fantasy anglo-saxonnes : diversification de la culture vidéoludique -- Jouet, culture enfantine et jeu vidéo -- Sociologie des pratiques vidéoludiques -- "Pratiques savantes et pratiques vulgaires" : distinctions vidéoludiques -- La légitimation du jeu vidéo -- Mondes du jeu : la fabrication d'un public -- De la culture enfantine aux pratiques adultes : la perspective des sciences du jeu -- Démographie des mondes virtuels -- Des MUD à World of Warcraft -- World of Warcraft : présentation générale -- Frontières du jeu : les frontières de la langue -- Jeunes adultes citadins -- Classes moyennes salariées -- Étudiants, lycéens, collégiens -- Sans activité rémunérée : chômage, retraites, maternité, arrêts maladie, handicaps... -- Mondes virtuels et situations familiales -- Goûts, pratiques et préférences culturelles : jeu, livres, films, musique et cinéma -- La fantasy : culture dominante -- La population des joueurs de MMO : différences et répétitions -- Des histoires partagées d'apprentissage : player versus environment -- Un monde de cueilleur/chasseur : chasse, "pex", nature et traditions ludiques -- Des sociabilités contraintes par un dispositif -- Des mondes sans fins? -- Équipement, boots et theorycrafting : à la recherche de la distinction -- Des explorateurs immobiles : une expérience du voyage -- Apprentissages par frayage : imitation, observation, imprégnation -- Apprentissages guidés : conseil, tutorat, mentorat -- Apprentissage par la guilde : un compagnonnage numérique -- Les guildes comme communautés de pratique : des histoires d'apprentissage -- Apprentissages hors ligne -- Des pédagogies différenciées -- L'expérience de la fiction : quêtes, fanfictions, machinimas -- Des "ludo-narrations" : les quêtes -- Background et storyline : des joueurs/lecteurs -- Stratégie industrielle et saturation marketing -- Les produits dérivés comme exhausteurs de jeu : les fans -- Des joueurs/auteurs de fiction -- Des contributions à une culture ludique : le recyclage tolkienien -- Parodies et caricatures : une culture populaire -- Apprentissages collatéraux -- Sports, jeux de bagarres et expériences agonistiques : le PVP -- Un monde en guerre -- Teamplay, gameplay et apprentissage "par corps" -- Les teams fixes : l'expérience sportive -- Chahuts, combats de masse et inégalités ludiques -- Insulte, fanfaronnade et provocation : relâchement du contrôle social -- "L'affaire Ulcan" : rupture de cadre -- Jeu et second degré -- Un chaos réglementé -- À la recherche du beau jeu, du beau geste, du beau combat -- Goûts, dégoûts et habitus (vidéo) ludiques -- À la recherche de l'expérience optimale : entre ennui et plaisir -- Des expériences agonistiques -- Fabriquer, acheter, vendre des biens virtuels : le craft -- Artisans du numérique -- Fart de jouer en faisant tout autre chose -- Apprentissages fortuits et savoirs minuscules -- Le jeu : une affaire d'agencement -- Traders du numérique : l'expérience de la bourse
  • Escroqueries, vols et autres délits virtuels -- Quand le symbolique devient économique -- Un jeu sérieux? -- De la différence entre simuler et jouer : un jeu de la marchande (néo)libérale -- Des expériences identitaires : jeux de poupées, déguisements, carnaval et roleplay -- Un jeu de poupées virtuelles : réflexivité sur le genre -- Sexisme vidéoludique et stéréotypes de genre : le point de vue des joueuses -- Des esthétiques en jeu -- Jeux de faire semblant : le roleplay -- Mariages virtuels -- Enterrements virtuels -- Du déguisement virtuel au cosplay IRL -- Des mondes carnavalesques -- Habitus vidéoludiques -- Corps de substitution ou corps-jouets -- Les joueurs et leurs avatars : des rapports différenciés -- Les MMO comme expérience identitaire : l'apprentissage des stéréotypes de genre -- Des expériences sociales : communautés et sociabilités virtuelles -- Formation des guildes de joueurs -- Intégrer une guilde de joueurs : organisation, fonctionnement et netiquette -- Vie ludique et vie privée -- Identité réelle, identité ludique et identité supposée : l'art de deviner l'autre -- Les rencontres IRL : l'intrusion de la vraie vie -- "Mais t'es une fille ?" : des expériences sociologiques -- Mixité sociale et ludophilie -- Agrégations homogènes, homophilie et affinités électives -- Comment penser ces communautés virtuelles ? -- Vie et mort des guildes : l'espérance de vie communautaire -- Expériences sociales et communautaires -- Les mondes virtuels dans l'espace social : expériences et apprentissages situés -- Harry (11 ans), chef de guilde : le jeu vidéo comme passion -- Pierre (19 ans), sans activité : le jeu vidéo comme moratoire -- Yves (43 ans), "boulot de merde" : le MMO comme exutoire -- Lucie (27 ans) : "pro-sociale" et "mariée" -- Alexandre (35 ans) "joueur de jeu de rôle" -- Robin (26 ans) : des sociabilités à domicile -- Sonia (33 ans) : l'exception qui confirme la règle -- Ayhan (47 ans), Milo (10 ans) et Martial (26 ans) : "accrocs" -- Un loisir invasif ou symbiotique -- École, travail, sommeil : domestiquer le jeu -- Les mondes virtuels au sein du couple : libertés individuelles et logiques de vie à deux -- Parents, enfants et jeux vidéo -- "Addiction", "dépendance", "aliénation", "jeu excessif"... quand les joueurs en parlent -- Les adieux au jeu -- Expériences et apprentissages -- Conclusion : L'expérience virtuelle.
"Décriés comme des espaces d'aliénation ou célébrés comme de nouvelles utopies culturelles et artistiques, le succès relativement récent, en France, des mondes virtuels, tels que World of Warcraft ou Second Life, suscite aujourd'hui un grand nombre d'interrogations autour, par exemple, de la distinction entre réel et virtuel et du risque, selon certains, d'une confusion des genres : des joueurs se marient "pour de faux", de "vraies" funérailles sont célébrées, des manifestations politiques virtuelles sont organisées... La thèse de "l'escapisme" (de la fuite du réel) est parfois formulée. Plus présente encore dans la littérature mais aussi dans le monde politique, éducatif et médical, la question de l'"addiction aux jeu vidéo" ou de la "cyberdépendance" est fréquemment abordée. Par des sujets de reportages édifiants, les médias se sont emparés de façon spectaculaire de ces nouvelles pratiques de jeu sur Internet autour de leurs méfaits, réels ou supposés. En s'affranchissant d'un certain nombre de paniques morales au profit d'une analyse empirique des pratiques, cet ouvrage propose une ethnographie des mondes virtuels et des habitants qui les fréquentent. Qui sont les joueurs? Quel âge ont-ils? Combien de temps jouent-ils ? À quels types d'activité s'adonnent-ils ? De quelles natures sont les relations tissées dans ces univers? Au-delà d'un simple mais nécessaire compte-rendu sociologique, cet ouvrage a pour ambition d'analyser la notion d'expérience virtuelle, entendue comme ce que ces mondes numériques "font et font faire" à leurs habitants, comment ils sont vécus, quelles significations ils produisent, quels savoirs et compétences ils mobilisent. Derrière l'analyse de ces univers virtuels, la relation entre jeu et apprentissages informels est ainsi interrogée."--P. [4] of cover.
  • Préface / Gilles Brougére -- Prologue : entretiens avec des joueurs -- Jeux vidéo : la fabrication d'une culture -- L'invention d'un loisir : université, guerre froide et science-fiction -- Sports et fantasy anglo-saxonnes : diversification de la culture vidéoludique -- Jouet, culture enfantine et jeu vidéo -- Sociologie des pratiques vidéoludiques -- "Pratiques savantes et pratiques vulgaires" : distinctions vidéoludiques -- La légitimation du jeu vidéo -- Mondes du jeu : la fabrication d'un public -- De la culture enfantine aux pratiques adultes : la perspective des sciences du jeu -- Démographie des mondes virtuels -- Des MUD à World of Warcraft -- World of Warcraft : présentation générale -- Frontières du jeu : les frontières de la langue -- Jeunes adultes citadins -- Classes moyennes salariées -- Étudiants, lycéens, collégiens -- Sans activité rémunérée : chômage, retraites, maternité, arrêts maladie, handicaps... -- Mondes virtuels et situations familiales -- Goûts, pratiques et préférences culturelles : jeu, livres, films, musique et cinéma -- La fantasy : culture dominante -- La population des joueurs de MMO : différences et répétitions -- Des histoires partagées d'apprentissage : player versus environment -- Un monde de cueilleur/chasseur : chasse, "pex", nature et traditions ludiques -- Des sociabilités contraintes par un dispositif -- Des mondes sans fins? -- Équipement, boots et theorycrafting : à la recherche de la distinction -- Des explorateurs immobiles : une expérience du voyage -- Apprentissages par frayage : imitation, observation, imprégnation -- Apprentissages guidés : conseil, tutorat, mentorat -- Apprentissage par la guilde : un compagnonnage numérique -- Les guildes comme communautés de pratique : des histoires d'apprentissage -- Apprentissages hors ligne -- Des pédagogies différenciées -- L'expérience de la fiction : quêtes, fanfictions, machinimas -- Des "ludo-narrations" : les quêtes -- Background et storyline : des joueurs/lecteurs -- Stratégie industrielle et saturation marketing -- Les produits dérivés comme exhausteurs de jeu : les fans -- Des joueurs/auteurs de fiction -- Des contributions à une culture ludique : le recyclage tolkienien -- Parodies et caricatures : une culture populaire -- Apprentissages collatéraux -- Sports, jeux de bagarres et expériences agonistiques : le PVP -- Un monde en guerre -- Teamplay, gameplay et apprentissage "par corps" -- Les teams fixes : l'expérience sportive -- Chahuts, combats de masse et inégalités ludiques -- Insulte, fanfaronnade et provocation : relâchement du contrôle social -- "L'affaire Ulcan" : rupture de cadre -- Jeu et second degré -- Un chaos réglementé -- À la recherche du beau jeu, du beau geste, du beau combat -- Goûts, dégoûts et habitus (vidéo) ludiques -- À la recherche de l'expérience optimale : entre ennui et plaisir -- Des expériences agonistiques -- Fabriquer, acheter, vendre des biens virtuels : le craft -- Artisans du numérique -- Fart de jouer en faisant tout autre chose -- Apprentissages fortuits et savoirs minuscules -- Le jeu : une affaire d'agencement -- Traders du numérique : l'expérience de la bourse
  • Escroqueries, vols et autres délits virtuels -- Quand le symbolique devient économique -- Un jeu sérieux? -- De la différence entre simuler et jouer : un jeu de la marchande (néo)libérale -- Des expériences identitaires : jeux de poupées, déguisements, carnaval et roleplay -- Un jeu de poupées virtuelles : réflexivité sur le genre -- Sexisme vidéoludique et stéréotypes de genre : le point de vue des joueuses -- Des esthétiques en jeu -- Jeux de faire semblant : le roleplay -- Mariages virtuels -- Enterrements virtuels -- Du déguisement virtuel au cosplay IRL -- Des mondes carnavalesques -- Habitus vidéoludiques -- Corps de substitution ou corps-jouets -- Les joueurs et leurs avatars : des rapports différenciés -- Les MMO comme expérience identitaire : l'apprentissage des stéréotypes de genre -- Des expériences sociales : communautés et sociabilités virtuelles -- Formation des guildes de joueurs -- Intégrer une guilde de joueurs : organisation, fonctionnement et netiquette -- Vie ludique et vie privée -- Identité réelle, identité ludique et identité supposée : l'art de deviner l'autre -- Les rencontres IRL : l'intrusion de la vraie vie -- "Mais t'es une fille ?" : des expériences sociologiques -- Mixité sociale et ludophilie -- Agrégations homogènes, homophilie et affinités électives -- Comment penser ces communautés virtuelles ? -- Vie et mort des guildes : l'espérance de vie communautaire -- Expériences sociales et communautaires -- Les mondes virtuels dans l'espace social : expériences et apprentissages situés -- Harry (11 ans), chef de guilde : le jeu vidéo comme passion -- Pierre (19 ans), sans activité : le jeu vidéo comme moratoire -- Yves (43 ans), "boulot de merde" : le MMO comme exutoire -- Lucie (27 ans) : "pro-sociale" et "mariée" -- Alexandre (35 ans) "joueur de jeu de rôle" -- Robin (26 ans) : des sociabilités à domicile -- Sonia (33 ans) : l'exception qui confirme la règle -- Ayhan (47 ans), Milo (10 ans) et Martial (26 ans) : "accrocs" -- Un loisir invasif ou symbiotique -- École, travail, sommeil : domestiquer le jeu -- Les mondes virtuels au sein du couple : libertés individuelles et logiques de vie à deux -- Parents, enfants et jeux vidéo -- "Addiction", "dépendance", "aliénation", "jeu excessif"... quand les joueurs en parlent -- Les adieux au jeu -- Expériences et apprentissages -- Conclusion : L'expérience virtuelle.
"Décriés comme des espaces d'aliénation ou célébrés comme de nouvelles utopies culturelles et artistiques, le succès relativement récent, en France, des mondes virtuels, tels que World of Warcraft ou Second Life, suscite aujourd'hui un grand nombre d'interrogations autour, par exemple, de la distinction entre réel et virtuel et du risque, selon certains, d'une confusion des genres : des joueurs se marient "pour de faux", de "vraies" funérailles sont célébrées, des manifestations politiques virtuelles sont organisées... La thèse de "l'escapisme" (de la fuite du réel) est parfois formulée. Plus présente encore dans la littérature mais aussi dans le monde politique, éducatif et médical, la question de l'"addiction aux jeu vidéo" ou de la "cyberdépendance" est fréquemment abordée. Par des sujets de reportages édifiants, les médias se sont emparés de façon spectaculaire de ces nouvelles pratiques de jeu sur Internet autour de leurs méfaits, réels ou supposés. En s'affranchissant d'un certain nombre de paniques morales au profit d'une analyse empirique des pratiques, cet ouvrage propose une ethnographie des mondes virtuels et des habitants qui les fréquentent. Qui sont les joueurs? Quel âge ont-ils? Combien de temps jouent-ils ? À quels types d'activité s'adonnent-ils ? De quelles natures sont les relations tissées dans ces univers? Au-delà d'un simple mais nécessaire compte-rendu sociologique, cet ouvrage a pour ambition d'analyser la notion d'expérience virtuelle, entendue comme ce que ces mondes numériques "font et font faire" à leurs habitants, comment ils sont vécus, quelles significations ils produisent, quels savoirs et compétences ils mobilisent. Derrière l'analyse de ces univers virtuels, la relation entre jeu et apprentissages informels est ainsi interrogée."--P. [4] of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
GV1469.17 .S63 B47 2012 Available
Book
xxi, 464 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. Games as Designed Experience: 1. Videogames as designed experience: section one Kurt Squire-- 2. Designed cultures Kurt Squire-- 3. Theme is not meaning: who decides what a game is about? Soren Johnson-- 4. Our cheatin' hearts Soren Johnson-- 5. Playing the odds Soren Johnson-- 6. Nurturing lateral leaps in game design Nathan McKenzie-- 7. Uncharted 2: among thieves - how to become a hero Drew Davidson and Richard Lemarchand-- 8. Interview with harmonix Greg Lopiccolo, Kurt Squire and Sarah Chu-- 9. Yomi: spies of the mind David Sirlin-- Part II. Games as Emergent Culture: 10. Videogames as emergent culture: section two Constance Steinkuehler-- 11. Nurturing affinity spaces and game-based learning James Paul Gee and Elisabeth Hayes-- 12. Apprenticeship in massively multiplayer online games Constance Steinkuehler and Yoonsin Oh-- 13. Theorycrafting: the art and science of using numbers to interpret the world Trina Choontanom and Bonnie Nardi-- 14. Culture and community in a virtual world for young children Rebecca W. Black and Stephanie M. Reich-- 15. Culture vs. architecture: second life, sociality, and the human Thomas M. Malaby-- 16. Participatory media spaces: a design perspective on learning with media and technology in the twenty-first century Erica Rosenfeld Halverson-- Part III. Games as a Twenty-First-Century Curriculum: 17. Videogames as a twenty-first-century curriculum: section three Sasha Barab-- 18. Prediction and explanation as design mechanics in conceptually integrated digital games to help players articulate the tacit understandings they build through gameplay Douglas B. Clark and Mario Martinez-Garza-- 19. Game-based curricula, personal engagement, and the modern prometheus design project Sasha Barab, Patrick Pettyjohn, Melissa Gresalfi and Maria Solomou-- 20. Discovering familiar places: learning through mobile place-based games Bob Coulter, Eric Klopfer, Josh Sheldon and Judy Perry-- 21. Developing game fluencies with scratch: realizing game design as an artistic process Yasmin B. Kafai and Kyle A. Peppler-- 22. 'Freakin' hard': game design and issue literacy Colleen Macklin and John Sharp-- 23. Models of situated action: computer games and the problem of transfer David Williamson Shaffer.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This volume is the first reader on video games and learning of its kind. Covering game design, game culture and games as twenty-first-century pedagogy, it demonstrates the depth and breadth of scholarship on games and learning to date. The chapters represent some of the most influential thinkers, designers and writers in the emerging field of games and learning - including James Paul Gee, Soren Johnson, Eric Klopfer, Colleen Macklin, Thomas Malaby, Bonnie Nardi, David Sirlin and others. Together, their work functions both as an excellent introduction to the field of games and learning and as a powerful argument for the use of games in formal and informal learning environments in a digital age.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Games as Designed Experience: 1. Videogames as designed experience: section one Kurt Squire-- 2. Designed cultures Kurt Squire-- 3. Theme is not meaning: who decides what a game is about? Soren Johnson-- 4. Our cheatin' hearts Soren Johnson-- 5. Playing the odds Soren Johnson-- 6. Nurturing lateral leaps in game design Nathan McKenzie-- 7. Uncharted 2: among thieves - how to become a hero Drew Davidson and Richard Lemarchand-- 8. Interview with harmonix Greg Lopiccolo, Kurt Squire and Sarah Chu-- 9. Yomi: spies of the mind David Sirlin-- Part II. Games as Emergent Culture: 10. Videogames as emergent culture: section two Constance Steinkuehler-- 11. Nurturing affinity spaces and game-based learning James Paul Gee and Elisabeth Hayes-- 12. Apprenticeship in massively multiplayer online games Constance Steinkuehler and Yoonsin Oh-- 13. Theorycrafting: the art and science of using numbers to interpret the world Trina Choontanom and Bonnie Nardi-- 14. Culture and community in a virtual world for young children Rebecca W. Black and Stephanie M. Reich-- 15. Culture vs. architecture: second life, sociality, and the human Thomas M. Malaby-- 16. Participatory media spaces: a design perspective on learning with media and technology in the twenty-first century Erica Rosenfeld Halverson-- Part III. Games as a Twenty-First-Century Curriculum: 17. Videogames as a twenty-first-century curriculum: section three Sasha Barab-- 18. Prediction and explanation as design mechanics in conceptually integrated digital games to help players articulate the tacit understandings they build through gameplay Douglas B. Clark and Mario Martinez-Garza-- 19. Game-based curricula, personal engagement, and the modern prometheus design project Sasha Barab, Patrick Pettyjohn, Melissa Gresalfi and Maria Solomou-- 20. Discovering familiar places: learning through mobile place-based games Bob Coulter, Eric Klopfer, Josh Sheldon and Judy Perry-- 21. Developing game fluencies with scratch: realizing game design as an artistic process Yasmin B. Kafai and Kyle A. Peppler-- 22. 'Freakin' hard': game design and issue literacy Colleen Macklin and John Sharp-- 23. Models of situated action: computer games and the problem of transfer David Williamson Shaffer.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This volume is the first reader on video games and learning of its kind. Covering game design, game culture and games as twenty-first-century pedagogy, it demonstrates the depth and breadth of scholarship on games and learning to date. The chapters represent some of the most influential thinkers, designers and writers in the emerging field of games and learning - including James Paul Gee, Soren Johnson, Eric Klopfer, Colleen Macklin, Thomas Malaby, Bonnie Nardi, David Sirlin and others. Together, their work functions both as an excellent introduction to the field of games and learning and as a powerful argument for the use of games in formal and informal learning environments in a digital age.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.3 .G423 2012 Unknown
Book
vii, 428 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction - Things That Go Boom: From Guns to Griefing -- Gerald Voorhees, Josh Call and Katie Whitlock I. Tutorial Chapter 1: BattleZone and the Origins of First-Person Shooting Games -- Mark JP Wolf Chapter 2: Call to Action, Invitation to Play: The Immediacy of the Caricature in Team Fortress 2 -- James Manning Chapter 3: I Am a Gun: The Avatar and Avatarness in the FPS -- Victor Navarro Chapter 4: Monsters, Nazis and Tangos: The Normalization of the First-Person Shooter -- Gerald Voorhees Chapter 5: The Shameful Trinity: Game Studies, Empire, and the Cognitariat -- Toby Miller II. Campaign Chapter 6: Bigger, Better, Stronger, Faster: Disposable Bodies and Cyborg Construction -- Josh Call Chapter 7: Hatched from the Veins in Your Arms": Movement, Ontology and First-Person Gameplay in BioShock -- Gwyneth Peaty Chapter 8: Meat Chunks in the Metro: The Apocalyptic Soul of the Ukrainian Shooter -- Dan Pinchbeck Chapter 9: More Bang For Your Buck -- Hardware Hacking, Real Money Trade and Transgressive Play within Console Based First Person Shooters --Alan Meades Chapter 10: 'Tips and tricks to take your game to the next level': Expertise and Identity in FPS Games --Daniel Ashton & James Newman III. Multiplayer Chapter 11: 'A Silent Team is a Dead Team': Communicative Norms in Team-based Halo 3 Play -- Nick Taylor Chapter 12: Challenging the Rules and Roles of Gaming: Griefing as Rhetorical Tactic -- Evan Snider, Tim Lockridge & Dan Lawson Chapter 13: The Best Possible Story? Learning about WWII from FPS Video Games -- Stephanie Fisher Chapter 14: Taking Aim at Sexual Harassment: Feminized Performances of Hegemonic Masculinity in the First-Person Shooter Hey Baby -- Jessy Ohl & Aaron Duncan Chapter 15: Invigorating Play: The Role of Affect in Online Multiplayer FPS Games -- Chris Moore Chapter 16: Repelling the Invasion of the 'Other': Post-Apocalyptic Alien Shooter Videogames Addressing Contemporary Cultural Attitudes -- Ryan Lizardi Chapter 17: Face to Face: Humanizing the Digital Display in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 -- Timothy Welsh About the Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Known for their visibility and tendency to generate controversy, first-person shooter (FPS) games are cultural icons and powder-kegs in American society. Contributors will examine a range of FPS games such as the Doom, Half-Life, System Shock, Deus Ex, Halo, Medal of Honor and Call of Duty franchises. By applying and enriching a broad range of perspectives, this volume will address the cultural relevance and place of the genre in game studies, game theory and the cultures of game players. Guns, Grenades, and Grunts gathers scholars from all disciplines to bring the weight of contemporary social theory and media criticism to bear on the public controversy and intellectual investigation of first-person shooter games. As a genre, FPS games have helped shepherd the game industry from the early days of shareware distribution and underground gaming clans to contemporary multimillion dollar production budgets, Hollywood-style launches, downloadable content and worldwide professional gaming leagues. The FPS has been and will continue to be a staple of the game market.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction - Things That Go Boom: From Guns to Griefing -- Gerald Voorhees, Josh Call and Katie Whitlock I. Tutorial Chapter 1: BattleZone and the Origins of First-Person Shooting Games -- Mark JP Wolf Chapter 2: Call to Action, Invitation to Play: The Immediacy of the Caricature in Team Fortress 2 -- James Manning Chapter 3: I Am a Gun: The Avatar and Avatarness in the FPS -- Victor Navarro Chapter 4: Monsters, Nazis and Tangos: The Normalization of the First-Person Shooter -- Gerald Voorhees Chapter 5: The Shameful Trinity: Game Studies, Empire, and the Cognitariat -- Toby Miller II. Campaign Chapter 6: Bigger, Better, Stronger, Faster: Disposable Bodies and Cyborg Construction -- Josh Call Chapter 7: Hatched from the Veins in Your Arms": Movement, Ontology and First-Person Gameplay in BioShock -- Gwyneth Peaty Chapter 8: Meat Chunks in the Metro: The Apocalyptic Soul of the Ukrainian Shooter -- Dan Pinchbeck Chapter 9: More Bang For Your Buck -- Hardware Hacking, Real Money Trade and Transgressive Play within Console Based First Person Shooters --Alan Meades Chapter 10: 'Tips and tricks to take your game to the next level': Expertise and Identity in FPS Games --Daniel Ashton & James Newman III. Multiplayer Chapter 11: 'A Silent Team is a Dead Team': Communicative Norms in Team-based Halo 3 Play -- Nick Taylor Chapter 12: Challenging the Rules and Roles of Gaming: Griefing as Rhetorical Tactic -- Evan Snider, Tim Lockridge & Dan Lawson Chapter 13: The Best Possible Story? Learning about WWII from FPS Video Games -- Stephanie Fisher Chapter 14: Taking Aim at Sexual Harassment: Feminized Performances of Hegemonic Masculinity in the First-Person Shooter Hey Baby -- Jessy Ohl & Aaron Duncan Chapter 15: Invigorating Play: The Role of Affect in Online Multiplayer FPS Games -- Chris Moore Chapter 16: Repelling the Invasion of the 'Other': Post-Apocalyptic Alien Shooter Videogames Addressing Contemporary Cultural Attitudes -- Ryan Lizardi Chapter 17: Face to Face: Humanizing the Digital Display in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 -- Timothy Welsh About the Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Known for their visibility and tendency to generate controversy, first-person shooter (FPS) games are cultural icons and powder-kegs in American society. Contributors will examine a range of FPS games such as the Doom, Half-Life, System Shock, Deus Ex, Halo, Medal of Honor and Call of Duty franchises. By applying and enriching a broad range of perspectives, this volume will address the cultural relevance and place of the genre in game studies, game theory and the cultures of game players. Guns, Grenades, and Grunts gathers scholars from all disciplines to bring the weight of contemporary social theory and media criticism to bear on the public controversy and intellectual investigation of first-person shooter games. As a genre, FPS games have helped shepherd the game industry from the early days of shareware distribution and underground gaming clans to contemporary multimillion dollar production budgets, Hollywood-style launches, downloadable content and worldwide professional gaming leagues. The FPS has been and will continue to be a staple of the game market.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GV1469.34 .V56 G86 2012 Unknown

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