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Book
xi, 135 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Lesson 1: Writing Clearly Lesson 2: Adding Emphasis Lesson 3: Writing Concisely, With Some Spice Lesson 4: The Art of Fine Paragraphs Lesson 5: Framing an Introduction Lesson 6: Reporting Results Lesson 7: Discussing Your Findings.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In Writing for Psychologists veteran teacher, author, and editor Rob Kail provides straightforward and hands-on strategies for effective scientific writing. In a series of seven lessons that have each been extensively class-tested, Kail provides writing instruction interspersed with exercises and activities. The lessons move from the basics of writing clearly and concisely through the steps of creating a full research report with a discussion of findings. This first-of-its-kind guidebook emphasizes the importance of writing effectively for today's students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Lesson 1: Writing Clearly Lesson 2: Adding Emphasis Lesson 3: Writing Concisely, With Some Spice Lesson 4: The Art of Fine Paragraphs Lesson 5: Framing an Introduction Lesson 6: Reporting Results Lesson 7: Discussing Your Findings.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In Writing for Psychologists veteran teacher, author, and editor Rob Kail provides straightforward and hands-on strategies for effective scientific writing. In a series of seven lessons that have each been extensively class-tested, Kail provides writing instruction interspersed with exercises and activities. The lessons move from the basics of writing clearly and concisely through the steps of creating a full research report with a discussion of findings. This first-of-its-kind guidebook emphasizes the importance of writing effectively for today's students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
BF76 .K35 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 252 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
T10.65 .G3 W37 2014 Available
Book
p. ; cm.
"Direct from IBM's own content design experts, this guide shows you how to design product interfaces and technical information that always place users front and center. This edition has been fully revised to help you consistently deliver the right content at the right time. You'll master today's best practices to apply nine essential characteristics of high-quality technical information: accuracy, clarity, completeness, concreteness, organization, retrievability, style, task orientation, and visual effectiveness. Coverage includes: Advocating for users throughout the entire product development process -- Delivering information in an ordered manner by following progressive disclosure techniques -- Optimizing content so that users can find it from anywhere -- Streamlining information for mobile delivery -- Helping users right where they are. Whether you're a writer, editor, information architect, user experience professional, or reviewer, this book shows you how to create great technical information, from the product design to the user interface, topics, and other media."
"Direct from IBM's own content design experts, this guide shows you how to design product interfaces and technical information that always place users front and center. This edition has been fully revised to help you consistently deliver the right content at the right time. You'll master today's best practices to apply nine essential characteristics of high-quality technical information: accuracy, clarity, completeness, concreteness, organization, retrievability, style, task orientation, and visual effectiveness. Coverage includes: Advocating for users throughout the entire product development process -- Delivering information in an ordered manner by following progressive disclosure techniques -- Optimizing content so that users can find it from anywhere -- Streamlining information for mobile delivery -- Helping users right where they are. Whether you're a writer, editor, information architect, user experience professional, or reviewer, this book shows you how to create great technical information, from the product design to the user interface, topics, and other media."
Book
xxv, 190 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Reproducible Research Literature Good and Bad Practices Barriers A First Look Setup Minimal Examples Quick Reporting Extracting R Code Editors RStudio LYX Emacs/ESS Other Editors Document Formats Input Syntax Document Formats Output Renderers R Scripts Text Output Inline Output Chunk Output Tables Themes Graphics Graphical Devices Plot Recording Plot Rearrangement Plot Size in Output Extra Output Options The tikz Device Figure Environment Figure Path Cache Implementation Write Cache When to Update Cache Side Effects Chunk Dependencies Cross Reference 79 Chunk Reference Code Externalization Child Documents Hooks Chunk Hooks Examples Language Engines Design Languages and Tools Tricks and Solutions Chunk Options Package Options Typesetting Utilities Debugging Multilingual Support Publishing Reports RStudio Pandoc HTML5 Slides Jekyll WordPress Applications Homework Web Site and Blogging Package Vignettes Books Other Tools Sweave Other R Packages Python Packages More Tools Internals Documentation Closures Implementation A.4 Syntax Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The cut-and-paste approach to writing statistical reports is not only tedious and laborious, but also can be harmful to scientific research, because it is inconvenient to reproduce the results. Dynamic Documents with R and knitr introduces a new approach via dynamic documents, i.e. integrating computing directly with reporting. A comprehensive guide to the R package knitr, the book covers examples, document editors, basic usage, detailed explanations of a wide range of options, tricks and solutions, extensions, and complete applications of this package. The book provides an overview of dynamic documents, introducing the idea of literate programming. It then explains the importance of dynamic documents to scientific research and its impact on reproducible research. Building on this, the author covers basic concepts, common text editors that support knitr, and the syntax for different document formats such as LaTeX, HTML, and Markdown before going on to discuss core functionality, how to control text and graphics output, caching mechanisms that can reduce computation time, and reuse of source code. He then explores advanced topics such as chunk hooks, integrating other languages such as Python and awk into one report in the knitr framework, and useful tricks that make it easier to write documents with knitr. Discussions of how to publish reports in a variety of formats, applications, and other tools complete the coverage. Suitable for both beginners and advanced users, this book shows you how to write reports in simple languages such as Markdown. The reports range from homework, projects, exams, books, blogs, and web pages to any documents related to statistical graphics, computing, and data analysis. While familiarity with LaTeX and HTML is helpful, the book requires no prior experience with advanced programs or languages. For beginners, the text provides enough features to get started on basic applications. For power users, the last several chapters enable an understanding of the extensibility of the knitr package.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction Reproducible Research Literature Good and Bad Practices Barriers A First Look Setup Minimal Examples Quick Reporting Extracting R Code Editors RStudio LYX Emacs/ESS Other Editors Document Formats Input Syntax Document Formats Output Renderers R Scripts Text Output Inline Output Chunk Output Tables Themes Graphics Graphical Devices Plot Recording Plot Rearrangement Plot Size in Output Extra Output Options The tikz Device Figure Environment Figure Path Cache Implementation Write Cache When to Update Cache Side Effects Chunk Dependencies Cross Reference 79 Chunk Reference Code Externalization Child Documents Hooks Chunk Hooks Examples Language Engines Design Languages and Tools Tricks and Solutions Chunk Options Package Options Typesetting Utilities Debugging Multilingual Support Publishing Reports RStudio Pandoc HTML5 Slides Jekyll WordPress Applications Homework Web Site and Blogging Package Vignettes Books Other Tools Sweave Other R Packages Python Packages More Tools Internals Documentation Closures Implementation A.4 Syntax Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The cut-and-paste approach to writing statistical reports is not only tedious and laborious, but also can be harmful to scientific research, because it is inconvenient to reproduce the results. Dynamic Documents with R and knitr introduces a new approach via dynamic documents, i.e. integrating computing directly with reporting. A comprehensive guide to the R package knitr, the book covers examples, document editors, basic usage, detailed explanations of a wide range of options, tricks and solutions, extensions, and complete applications of this package. The book provides an overview of dynamic documents, introducing the idea of literate programming. It then explains the importance of dynamic documents to scientific research and its impact on reproducible research. Building on this, the author covers basic concepts, common text editors that support knitr, and the syntax for different document formats such as LaTeX, HTML, and Markdown before going on to discuss core functionality, how to control text and graphics output, caching mechanisms that can reduce computation time, and reuse of source code. He then explores advanced topics such as chunk hooks, integrating other languages such as Python and awk into one report in the knitr framework, and useful tricks that make it easier to write documents with knitr. Discussions of how to publish reports in a variety of formats, applications, and other tools complete the coverage. Suitable for both beginners and advanced users, this book shows you how to write reports in simple languages such as Markdown. The reports range from homework, projects, exams, books, blogs, and web pages to any documents related to statistical graphics, computing, and data analysis. While familiarity with LaTeX and HTML is helpful, the book requires no prior experience with advanced programs or languages. For beginners, the text provides enough features to get started on basic applications. For power users, the last several chapters enable an understanding of the extensibility of the knitr package.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Math & Statistics Library
Status of items at Math & Statistics Library
Math & Statistics Library Status
Stacks
QA276.4 .X54 2014 Unknown
Book
xii, 338 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Overview of Book-- Literature Survey-- References-- Materials and Methods/Experimental Methods-- Results-- Discussion and Conclusions-- Introduction-- Title and Abstract-- Numbers, Errors and Statistics-- Figures and Tables-- Layout-- The Other Bits-- Other People's Work-- Proof Reading, Printing and Submission-- The Viva and Thereafter-- Supervision-- Getting Organized-- Use of English and Scientific Writing-- Appendices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is a step by step illustrated guide to planning and writing dissertations and theses for undergraduate and graduate science students. Topics covered include advice on writing each section of a thesis as well as general discussions on collecting and organizing references, keeping records, presenting data, interacting with a supervisor and avoiding academic misconduct. Recommendations about how to use word processors and other software packages effectively are included, as well as advice on the use of other resources. A concise summary of important points of English grammar is given, along with appendices listing frequently confused words and wordy phrases to avoid. Further appendices are provided, including one on SI units. The aim is to provide an easy-to-read guide that gives students practical advice about all aspects of writing a science thesis or dissertation, starting from writing a thesis plan and finishing with the viva and corrections to the thesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Overview of Book-- Literature Survey-- References-- Materials and Methods/Experimental Methods-- Results-- Discussion and Conclusions-- Introduction-- Title and Abstract-- Numbers, Errors and Statistics-- Figures and Tables-- Layout-- The Other Bits-- Other People's Work-- Proof Reading, Printing and Submission-- The Viva and Thereafter-- Supervision-- Getting Organized-- Use of English and Scientific Writing-- Appendices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is a step by step illustrated guide to planning and writing dissertations and theses for undergraduate and graduate science students. Topics covered include advice on writing each section of a thesis as well as general discussions on collecting and organizing references, keeping records, presenting data, interacting with a supervisor and avoiding academic misconduct. Recommendations about how to use word processors and other software packages effectively are included, as well as advice on the use of other resources. A concise summary of important points of English grammar is given, along with appendices listing frequently confused words and wordy phrases to avoid. Further appendices are provided, including one on SI units. The aim is to provide an easy-to-read guide that gives students practical advice about all aspects of writing a science thesis or dissertation, starting from writing a thesis plan and finishing with the viva and corrections to the thesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
T11 .H582 2014 Unknown
Book
xviii, 445 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Engineering Library (Terman)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Stacks
T11 .T295 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (1 v.) : ill.
  • 1. Engineers and Writing 1 Engineers Write a Lot 2 Engineers Write Many Kinds of Documents 4 Successful Engineering Careers Require Strong Writing Skills5 Engineers Can Learn to Write Well 6 Noise and the Communication Process 7 Controlling the Writing System 9 Exercises 11 Bibliography 11 2. Eliminating Sporadic Noise in Engineering Writing12 Spelling and Spell Checkers 13 Punctuation 13 Traditional Sentence Errors 21 Technical Usage 29 Edit, Edit, Edit 38 Exercises 38 Bibliography 39 3. Guidelines for Writing Noise-Free Engineering Documents40 Focus on Why You Are Writing 41 Focus on Your Readers 42 Satisfy Document Specifications 43 Get to the Point 44 Provide Accurate Information 45 Present Your Material Logically 45 Explain the Technical to Nonspecialists 46 Make Your Ideas Accessible 48 Use Efficient Wording 52 Format Your Pages Carefully 60 Express Yourself Clearly 61 Manage Your Time Efficiently 66 Edit at Different Levels 67 Share the Load: Write as a Team 68 Exercises 71 Bibliography 71 4. Letters, Memoranda, Email, and Other Media for Engineers72 Which to Use? 73 Writing Style for Business Correspondence 76 Communication Strategies for Tricky Situations 77 Business Letters: Components and Format 78 Business Memoranda 82 Email: Functions, Style, Format 85 New Internet Media 87 Exercises 89 Bibliography 90 5. Writing Common Engineering Documents 91 Some Preliminaries 92 Inspection and Trip Reports 94 Research, Laboratory, and Field Reports 95 Specifications 98 Proposals 102 Progress Reports 105 Instructions 109 Recommendation Reports 114 Exercises 118 Bibliography 118 6. Writing Research and Design Reports 119 Engineering Research Reports 119 Engineering Design Reports 130 General Report Design and Format 131 Generating Portable Document Files 133 Using CMS and Other Applications for Team Reports 135 Exercises 136 Bibliography 137 7. Constructing Engineering Tables and Graphics 138 Tables 138 Charts and Graphs 142 Illustrations 145 Graphics and Tables: Guidelines 146 Exercises 147 Bibliography 148 8. Accessing Engineering Information 149 Basic Search Strategies 150 Sources of Engineering Information 154 Internet Engineering Information Resources 172 Internet Search Tools 174 Exercises 176 Bibliography 177 9. Engineering Your Speaking 178 Preparing the Presentation 179 Delivering the Presentation 190 Presenting as a Team 195 Checklist for Oral Presentations 196 Listening to Presentations 198 The Importance of Informal Communication 198 Exercises 199 Bibliography 200 10. Writing to Get an Engineering Job 201 How to Write an Engineering Resume 202 How to Write an Application Letter 214 How to Write a Follow-Up Letter 226 Exercises 228 Bibliography 228 11. Ethics and Documentation in Engineering Writing229 Engineering Ethics 229 The Ethics of Honest Research 235 Exercises 243 Bibliography 243 12. Engineering Your Online Reputation 244 Introduction to Social Media Management 244 Creating a WordPress Blog 247 Building a Facebook Page for a Business 250 Using Twitter to Connect and Share Information 256 Generating Your Interactive Resume on LinkedIn 259 Targeting Experts with Google+ 263 Bibliography 266 Index 267.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Written for engineers, this book provides more than technicalknow-how and focuses on how to be an effective communicator. Thisnew edition helps to eliminate the glitches that trip up the busyreader or listener, causing annoyance, confusion, ormisunderstanding so that their writing and speech are crystalclear. This text also focuses on the technical writing and speakingissues encountered in day to day work, writing reports, businessletter, memoranda, proposals, emails, presentations, and more. Thenew edition includes new coverage of social media, includingcoverage of popular forms, best practices, dangers and ethics ofusing social media, and expanded coverage of informalcommunication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Engineers and Writing 1 Engineers Write a Lot 2 Engineers Write Many Kinds of Documents 4 Successful Engineering Careers Require Strong Writing Skills5 Engineers Can Learn to Write Well 6 Noise and the Communication Process 7 Controlling the Writing System 9 Exercises 11 Bibliography 11 2. Eliminating Sporadic Noise in Engineering Writing12 Spelling and Spell Checkers 13 Punctuation 13 Traditional Sentence Errors 21 Technical Usage 29 Edit, Edit, Edit 38 Exercises 38 Bibliography 39 3. Guidelines for Writing Noise-Free Engineering Documents40 Focus on Why You Are Writing 41 Focus on Your Readers 42 Satisfy Document Specifications 43 Get to the Point 44 Provide Accurate Information 45 Present Your Material Logically 45 Explain the Technical to Nonspecialists 46 Make Your Ideas Accessible 48 Use Efficient Wording 52 Format Your Pages Carefully 60 Express Yourself Clearly 61 Manage Your Time Efficiently 66 Edit at Different Levels 67 Share the Load: Write as a Team 68 Exercises 71 Bibliography 71 4. Letters, Memoranda, Email, and Other Media for Engineers72 Which to Use? 73 Writing Style for Business Correspondence 76 Communication Strategies for Tricky Situations 77 Business Letters: Components and Format 78 Business Memoranda 82 Email: Functions, Style, Format 85 New Internet Media 87 Exercises 89 Bibliography 90 5. Writing Common Engineering Documents 91 Some Preliminaries 92 Inspection and Trip Reports 94 Research, Laboratory, and Field Reports 95 Specifications 98 Proposals 102 Progress Reports 105 Instructions 109 Recommendation Reports 114 Exercises 118 Bibliography 118 6. Writing Research and Design Reports 119 Engineering Research Reports 119 Engineering Design Reports 130 General Report Design and Format 131 Generating Portable Document Files 133 Using CMS and Other Applications for Team Reports 135 Exercises 136 Bibliography 137 7. Constructing Engineering Tables and Graphics 138 Tables 138 Charts and Graphs 142 Illustrations 145 Graphics and Tables: Guidelines 146 Exercises 147 Bibliography 148 8. Accessing Engineering Information 149 Basic Search Strategies 150 Sources of Engineering Information 154 Internet Engineering Information Resources 172 Internet Search Tools 174 Exercises 176 Bibliography 177 9. Engineering Your Speaking 178 Preparing the Presentation 179 Delivering the Presentation 190 Presenting as a Team 195 Checklist for Oral Presentations 196 Listening to Presentations 198 The Importance of Informal Communication 198 Exercises 199 Bibliography 200 10. Writing to Get an Engineering Job 201 How to Write an Engineering Resume 202 How to Write an Application Letter 214 How to Write a Follow-Up Letter 226 Exercises 228 Bibliography 228 11. Ethics and Documentation in Engineering Writing229 Engineering Ethics 229 The Ethics of Honest Research 235 Exercises 243 Bibliography 243 12. Engineering Your Online Reputation 244 Introduction to Social Media Management 244 Creating a WordPress Blog 247 Building a Facebook Page for a Business 250 Using Twitter to Connect and Share Information 256 Generating Your Interactive Resume on LinkedIn 259 Targeting Experts with Google+ 263 Bibliography 266 Index 267.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Written for engineers, this book provides more than technicalknow-how and focuses on how to be an effective communicator. Thisnew edition helps to eliminate the glitches that trip up the busyreader or listener, causing annoyance, confusion, ormisunderstanding so that their writing and speech are crystalclear. This text also focuses on the technical writing and speakingissues encountered in day to day work, writing reports, businessletter, memoranda, proposals, emails, presentations, and more. Thenew edition includes new coverage of social media, includingcoverage of popular forms, best practices, dangers and ethics ofusing social media, and expanded coverage of informalcommunication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
viii, 212 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Acknowledgments-- 2. Introduction, aims and scope-- 3. Lexical bundles in native and non-native scientific writing-- 4. Theory and applications of phraseology and lexical bundles-- 5. Investigating lexical bundles in biomedical research writing-- 6. Target bundles: Frequency, structure and functions-- 7. Target bundles in non-native expert scientific writing-- 8. Part 2-- 9. Pedagogical applications of the study-- 10. Pedagogical utility of the list of target bundles-- 11. Specific activities for the teaching of lexical bundles in scientific discourse-- 12. Conclusions and recommendations-- 13. References-- 14. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book presents an investigation of lexical bundles in native and non-native scientific writing in English, whose aim is to produce a frequency-derived, statistically- and qualitatively-refined list of the most pedagogically useful lexical bundles in scientific prose: one that can be sorted and filtered by frequency, key word, structure and function, and includes contextual information such as variations, authentic examples and usage notes. The first part of the volumediscusses the creation of this list based on a multimillion-word corpus of biomedical research writing and reveals the structure and functions of lexical bundles and their role in effective scientific communication. A comparative analysis of a non-native corpus highlights non-native scientists' difficulties in employing lexical bundles. The second part of the volume explores pedagogical applications and provides a series of teaching activities that illustrate how EAP teachers or materials designers can use the list of lexical bundles in their practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Acknowledgments-- 2. Introduction, aims and scope-- 3. Lexical bundles in native and non-native scientific writing-- 4. Theory and applications of phraseology and lexical bundles-- 5. Investigating lexical bundles in biomedical research writing-- 6. Target bundles: Frequency, structure and functions-- 7. Target bundles in non-native expert scientific writing-- 8. Part 2-- 9. Pedagogical applications of the study-- 10. Pedagogical utility of the list of target bundles-- 11. Specific activities for the teaching of lexical bundles in scientific discourse-- 12. Conclusions and recommendations-- 13. References-- 14. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book presents an investigation of lexical bundles in native and non-native scientific writing in English, whose aim is to produce a frequency-derived, statistically- and qualitatively-refined list of the most pedagogically useful lexical bundles in scientific prose: one that can be sorted and filtered by frequency, key word, structure and function, and includes contextual information such as variations, authentic examples and usage notes. The first part of the volumediscusses the creation of this list based on a multimillion-word corpus of biomedical research writing and reveals the structure and functions of lexical bundles and their role in effective scientific communication. A comparative analysis of a non-native corpus highlights non-native scientists' difficulties in employing lexical bundles. The second part of the volume explores pedagogical applications and provides a series of teaching activities that illustrate how EAP teachers or materials designers can use the list of lexical bundles in their practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
P158.25 .S25 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource.
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
Book
online resource (xiv, 116 pages)
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
SPRINGER Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xvii, 204 pages) : color illustrations.
  • Some writing tips.- Essential dictionary I.- Essential dictionary II.- Mathematical sentences.- Describing functions.- Writing well.- Forms of argument.- Induction.- Existence and definitions.- Writing a thesis.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book teaches the art of writing mathematics, an essential -and difficult- skill for any mathematics student. The book begins with an informal introduction on basic writing principles and a review of the essential dictionary for mathematics. Writing techniques are developed gradually, from the small to the large: words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, to end with short compositions. These may represent the introduction of a concept, the abstract of a presentation or the proof of a theorem. Along the way the student will learn how to establish a coherent notation, mix words and symbols effectively, write neat formulae, and structure a definition. Some elements of logic and all common methods of proofs are featured, including various versions of induction and existence proofs. The book concludes with advice on specific aspects of thesis writing (choosing of a title, composing an abstract, compiling a bibliography) illustrated by large number of real-life examples. Many exercises are included; over 150 of them have complete solutions, to facilitate self-study. Mathematical Writing will be of interest to all mathematics students who want to raise the quality of their coursework, reports, exams, and dissertations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Some writing tips.- Essential dictionary I.- Essential dictionary II.- Mathematical sentences.- Describing functions.- Writing well.- Forms of argument.- Induction.- Existence and definitions.- Writing a thesis.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book teaches the art of writing mathematics, an essential -and difficult- skill for any mathematics student. The book begins with an informal introduction on basic writing principles and a review of the essential dictionary for mathematics. Writing techniques are developed gradually, from the small to the large: words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, to end with short compositions. These may represent the introduction of a concept, the abstract of a presentation or the proof of a theorem. Along the way the student will learn how to establish a coherent notation, mix words and symbols effectively, write neat formulae, and structure a definition. Some elements of logic and all common methods of proofs are featured, including various versions of induction and existence proofs. The book concludes with advice on specific aspects of thesis writing (choosing of a title, composing an abstract, compiling a bibliography) illustrated by large number of real-life examples. Many exercises are included; over 150 of them have complete solutions, to facilitate self-study. Mathematical Writing will be of interest to all mathematics students who want to raise the quality of their coursework, reports, exams, and dissertations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
v, 288 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Why is it so hard to write and evaluate writing on the Internet?
  • Anything can be a text
  • A tool called genre
  • What does it mean to publish?
  • Theory behind usability studies
  • Proposing a new approach to content evaluation
  • Writing persuasion-centric content
  • Writing quality-centric content
  • Writing user-centric content
  • Professional writer in an agile environment
  • The future-if there be such.
This book presents an altogether new approach to writing and evaluating writing in digital media. It suggests that usability theory provides few tools for evaluating content, because usability theory assumes only one kind of writing on the Internet. The author suggests three models: user-centric (usability model), persuasion-centric (encouraging the reader to linger and be persuaded--Canon camera ads), and quality-centric (encouraging the reader to linger and learn or be entertained because of the quality of the writing--NASA.gov and YouTube). Designed for professional writers and writing students, this text provides a rubric for writing in digital media, but more importantly, it provides a rubric and vocabulary for identifying and explaining problems in copy that already exists. The Internet has become a pastiche of cut-and-paste content, often placed by non-writers to fill space for no particular reason or by computers with no oversight from humans (e.g., Amazon.com). Because these snippets are typically on topic (but often for the wrong purpose or audience), professional writers have difficulty identifying the problems and an even harder time explaining them. Finding an effective tool for identifying and explaining problems in digital content becomes a particularly important problem as writers increasingly struggle with growing complications in complex information systems (systems that create and manage their own content with little human intervention). Being able to look at a body of copy and immediately see that it is problematic is an important skill that is lacking in a surprising number of professional writers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Why is it so hard to write and evaluate writing on the Internet?
  • Anything can be a text
  • A tool called genre
  • What does it mean to publish?
  • Theory behind usability studies
  • Proposing a new approach to content evaluation
  • Writing persuasion-centric content
  • Writing quality-centric content
  • Writing user-centric content
  • Professional writer in an agile environment
  • The future-if there be such.
This book presents an altogether new approach to writing and evaluating writing in digital media. It suggests that usability theory provides few tools for evaluating content, because usability theory assumes only one kind of writing on the Internet. The author suggests three models: user-centric (usability model), persuasion-centric (encouraging the reader to linger and be persuaded--Canon camera ads), and quality-centric (encouraging the reader to linger and learn or be entertained because of the quality of the writing--NASA.gov and YouTube). Designed for professional writers and writing students, this text provides a rubric for writing in digital media, but more importantly, it provides a rubric and vocabulary for identifying and explaining problems in copy that already exists. The Internet has become a pastiche of cut-and-paste content, often placed by non-writers to fill space for no particular reason or by computers with no oversight from humans (e.g., Amazon.com). Because these snippets are typically on topic (but often for the wrong purpose or audience), professional writers have difficulty identifying the problems and an even harder time explaining them. Finding an effective tool for identifying and explaining problems in digital content becomes a particularly important problem as writers increasingly struggle with growing complications in complex information systems (systems that create and manage their own content with little human intervention). Being able to look at a body of copy and immediately see that it is problematic is an important skill that is lacking in a surprising number of professional writers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
PN171 .O55 H34 2014 Available
Book
xv, 332 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface-- Part I. Basics: 1. Writing a scientific article and getting it published-- 2. Speaking about your work-- 3. Making and displaying a scientific poster-- 4. Scientific authorship-- Part II. Improving: 5. Style in writing-- 6. Frequently misused words and technical terms-- 7. Quantitative matters-- 8. Managing error-- 9. Data interrelations-- 10. Tables and figures: the evidence-- 11. Citing and referencing-- 12. Bibliography and references-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Want to learn how to present your research successfully? This practical guide for students and postdoctoral scholars offers a unique step-by-step approach to help you avoid the worst, yet most common, mistakes in biology communication. Covering irritants such as sins of ambiguity, circumlocution, inconsistency, vagueness and verbosity, misuse of words and quantitative matters, it also provides guidance to design your next piece of work effectively. Learn how to write scientific articles and get them published, prepare posters and talks that will capture your audience and develop a critical attitude towards your own work as well as that of your colleagues. With numerous practical examples, comparisons among disciplines, valuable tips and real-life anecdotes, this must-read guide will be a valuable resource to both new graduate students and their supervisors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface-- Part I. Basics: 1. Writing a scientific article and getting it published-- 2. Speaking about your work-- 3. Making and displaying a scientific poster-- 4. Scientific authorship-- Part II. Improving: 5. Style in writing-- 6. Frequently misused words and technical terms-- 7. Quantitative matters-- 8. Managing error-- 9. Data interrelations-- 10. Tables and figures: the evidence-- 11. Citing and referencing-- 12. Bibliography and references-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Want to learn how to present your research successfully? This practical guide for students and postdoctoral scholars offers a unique step-by-step approach to help you avoid the worst, yet most common, mistakes in biology communication. Covering irritants such as sins of ambiguity, circumlocution, inconsistency, vagueness and verbosity, misuse of words and quantitative matters, it also provides guidance to design your next piece of work effectively. Learn how to write scientific articles and get them published, prepare posters and talks that will capture your audience and develop a critical attitude towards your own work as well as that of your colleagues. With numerous practical examples, comparisons among disciplines, valuable tips and real-life anecdotes, this must-read guide will be a valuable resource to both new graduate students and their supervisors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH304 .C685 2014 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
QH304 .C685 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xv, 258 pages).
  • 1. Science Communication Research: Themes and Challenges Massimiano Bucchi and Brian Trench 2. Popular Science Books: From Public Education to Science Bestsellers Alice Bell and Jon Turney 3. Science Journalism: Prospects in the Digital Age Sharon Dunwoody 4. Science Museums and Centres: Evolution and Contemporary Trends Bernard Schiele 5. Public Relations in Science: Managing the Trust Portfolio Rick E. Borchelt and Kristian H. Nielsen 6. Scientists as Public Experts: Expectations and Responsibilities Hans Peter Peters 7. Scientists in Popular Culture: the Making of Celebrities Declan Fahy and Bruce Lewenstein 8. Science and Technology In Film: Themes and Representations David A. Kirby 9. Environmentalists as Communicators of Science: Advocates and Critics Steven Yearley 10. Publics and Their Participation in Science and Technology: Changing Roles, Blurring Boundaries Edna F. Einsiedel 11. Public Understanding of Science: Survey Research Around the World Martin W. Bauer and Bankole A. Falade 12. Risk, Science and Public Communication: Third-Order Thinking About Scientific Culture Alan Irwin 13. Engaging in Science Policy Controversies: Insights From the US Climate Change Debate Matthew C. Nisbet 14. Communicating the Social Sciences: a Specific Challenge? Angela Cassidy 15. Health Campaign Research: Enduring Challenges and New Developments Robert A. Logan 16. Global Spread of Science Communication: Institutions and Practices Across Continents Brian Trench and Massimiano Bucchi, with Latifah Amin, Gultekin Cakmakci, Bankole A. Falade, Arko Olesk, Carmelo Polino 17. Assessing the Impact of Science Communication: Approaches to Evaluation Federico Neresini and Giuseppe Pellegrini.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Communicating science and technology is a high priority of many research and policy institutions, a concern of many other private and public bodies, and an established subject of training and education. Over the past few decades, the field has developed and expanded significantly, both in terms of professional practice and in terms of research and reflection. The Routledge Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology provides a state-of-the-art review of this fast-growing and increasingly important area, through an examination of the research on the main actors, issues, and arenas involved. In this brand-new revised edition, the book brings the reviews up-to-date and deepens the analysis. As well as substantial reworking of many chapters, it gives more attention to digital media and the global aspects of science communication, with the inclusion of four new chapters. Several new contributors are added to leading mass-communication scholars, sociologists, public-relations practitioners, science writers, and others featured herein. With key questions for further discussion highlighted in each chapter, the handbook is a student-friendly resource and its scope and expert contributors mean it is also ideal for both practitioners and professionals working in the field. Combining the perspectives of different disciplines and of different geographical and cultural contexts, this original text provides an interdisciplinary and global approach to the public communication of science and technology. It is a valuable resource for students, researchers, educators, and professionals in media and journalism, sociology, the history of science, and science and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Science Communication Research: Themes and Challenges Massimiano Bucchi and Brian Trench 2. Popular Science Books: From Public Education to Science Bestsellers Alice Bell and Jon Turney 3. Science Journalism: Prospects in the Digital Age Sharon Dunwoody 4. Science Museums and Centres: Evolution and Contemporary Trends Bernard Schiele 5. Public Relations in Science: Managing the Trust Portfolio Rick E. Borchelt and Kristian H. Nielsen 6. Scientists as Public Experts: Expectations and Responsibilities Hans Peter Peters 7. Scientists in Popular Culture: the Making of Celebrities Declan Fahy and Bruce Lewenstein 8. Science and Technology In Film: Themes and Representations David A. Kirby 9. Environmentalists as Communicators of Science: Advocates and Critics Steven Yearley 10. Publics and Their Participation in Science and Technology: Changing Roles, Blurring Boundaries Edna F. Einsiedel 11. Public Understanding of Science: Survey Research Around the World Martin W. Bauer and Bankole A. Falade 12. Risk, Science and Public Communication: Third-Order Thinking About Scientific Culture Alan Irwin 13. Engaging in Science Policy Controversies: Insights From the US Climate Change Debate Matthew C. Nisbet 14. Communicating the Social Sciences: a Specific Challenge? Angela Cassidy 15. Health Campaign Research: Enduring Challenges and New Developments Robert A. Logan 16. Global Spread of Science Communication: Institutions and Practices Across Continents Brian Trench and Massimiano Bucchi, with Latifah Amin, Gultekin Cakmakci, Bankole A. Falade, Arko Olesk, Carmelo Polino 17. Assessing the Impact of Science Communication: Approaches to Evaluation Federico Neresini and Giuseppe Pellegrini.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Communicating science and technology is a high priority of many research and policy institutions, a concern of many other private and public bodies, and an established subject of training and education. Over the past few decades, the field has developed and expanded significantly, both in terms of professional practice and in terms of research and reflection. The Routledge Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology provides a state-of-the-art review of this fast-growing and increasingly important area, through an examination of the research on the main actors, issues, and arenas involved. In this brand-new revised edition, the book brings the reviews up-to-date and deepens the analysis. As well as substantial reworking of many chapters, it gives more attention to digital media and the global aspects of science communication, with the inclusion of four new chapters. Several new contributors are added to leading mass-communication scholars, sociologists, public-relations practitioners, science writers, and others featured herein. With key questions for further discussion highlighted in each chapter, the handbook is a student-friendly resource and its scope and expert contributors mean it is also ideal for both practitioners and professionals working in the field. Combining the perspectives of different disciplines and of different geographical and cultural contexts, this original text provides an interdisciplinary and global approach to the public communication of science and technology. It is a valuable resource for students, researchers, educators, and professionals in media and journalism, sociology, the history of science, and science and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
ebrary Access limited to 3 simultaneous users.
Book
1 online resource (xxiv, 215 pages).
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xv, 722 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Publishing fundamentals
  • Elements of a scientific publication
  • Publication policies and practices
  • The basics of copyright
  • General style conventions
  • Alphabets, symbols, and signs
  • Punctuation and related marks
  • Spelling, word formation and division, plurals, and possessives
  • Prose style and word choice
  • Names and personal designations
  • Capitalization
  • Type styles, excerpts, quotations, and ellipses
  • Abbreviations
  • Numbers, units, mathematical expressions, and statistics
  • Time, dates, and age measurements
  • Geographic designations
  • Special scientific conventions
  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Subatomic particles, chemical elements, and related notations
  • Chemical formulas and names
  • Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics
  • Analytical chemistry
  • Drugs and pharmacokinetics
  • Genes, chromosomes, and related molecules
  • Taxonomy and nomenclature
  • Structure and function
  • Disease names
  • The earth
  • Astronomical objects and time systems
  • Technical elements of publications
  • Journal style and format
  • Published media
  • References
  • Accessories to text: tables, figures, and indexes
  • Typography and manuscript preparation
  • Proof correction.
For more than fifty years, authors, editors, and publishers in the scientific community have turned to Scientific Style and Format for authoritative recommendations on all matters of writing style and citation. Developed by the Council of Science Editors (CSE), the leading professional association in science publishing, this indispensable guide encompasses all areas of the sciences. Now in its eighth edition, it has been fully revised to reflect today's best practices in scientific publishing. Scientific Style and Format citation style has been comprehensively reorganized, and its style recommendations have been updated to align with the advice of authoritative international bodies. Also new to the eighth edition are guidelines and examples for citing online images and information graphics, podcasts and webcasts, online videos, blogs, social networking sites, and e-books. Style instructions for physics, chemistry, genetics, biological sciences, and astronomy have been adjusted to reflect developments in each field. The coverage of numbers, units, mathematical expressions, and statistics has been revised and now includes more information on managing tables, figures, and indexes. Additionally, a full discussion of plagiarism and other aspects of academic integrity is incorporated, along with a complete treatment of developments in copyright law, including Creative Commons. For the first time in its history, Scientific Style and Format will be available simultaneously in print and online. Online subscribers will receive access to full-text searches of the new edition and other online tools, as well as the popular Chicago Manual of Style Online forum, a community discussion board for editors and authors. Whether online or in print, the eighth edition of Scientific Style and Format remains the essential resource for those writing, editing, and publishing in the scientific community.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Publishing fundamentals
  • Elements of a scientific publication
  • Publication policies and practices
  • The basics of copyright
  • General style conventions
  • Alphabets, symbols, and signs
  • Punctuation and related marks
  • Spelling, word formation and division, plurals, and possessives
  • Prose style and word choice
  • Names and personal designations
  • Capitalization
  • Type styles, excerpts, quotations, and ellipses
  • Abbreviations
  • Numbers, units, mathematical expressions, and statistics
  • Time, dates, and age measurements
  • Geographic designations
  • Special scientific conventions
  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Subatomic particles, chemical elements, and related notations
  • Chemical formulas and names
  • Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics
  • Analytical chemistry
  • Drugs and pharmacokinetics
  • Genes, chromosomes, and related molecules
  • Taxonomy and nomenclature
  • Structure and function
  • Disease names
  • The earth
  • Astronomical objects and time systems
  • Technical elements of publications
  • Journal style and format
  • Published media
  • References
  • Accessories to text: tables, figures, and indexes
  • Typography and manuscript preparation
  • Proof correction.
For more than fifty years, authors, editors, and publishers in the scientific community have turned to Scientific Style and Format for authoritative recommendations on all matters of writing style and citation. Developed by the Council of Science Editors (CSE), the leading professional association in science publishing, this indispensable guide encompasses all areas of the sciences. Now in its eighth edition, it has been fully revised to reflect today's best practices in scientific publishing. Scientific Style and Format citation style has been comprehensively reorganized, and its style recommendations have been updated to align with the advice of authoritative international bodies. Also new to the eighth edition are guidelines and examples for citing online images and information graphics, podcasts and webcasts, online videos, blogs, social networking sites, and e-books. Style instructions for physics, chemistry, genetics, biological sciences, and astronomy have been adjusted to reflect developments in each field. The coverage of numbers, units, mathematical expressions, and statistics has been revised and now includes more information on managing tables, figures, and indexes. Additionally, a full discussion of plagiarism and other aspects of academic integrity is incorporated, along with a complete treatment of developments in copyright law, including Creative Commons. For the first time in its history, Scientific Style and Format will be available simultaneously in print and online. Online subscribers will receive access to full-text searches of the new edition and other online tools, as well as the popular Chicago Manual of Style Online forum, a community discussion board for editors and authors. Whether online or in print, the eighth edition of Scientific Style and Format remains the essential resource for those writing, editing, and publishing in the scientific community.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Reference (non-circulating)
T11 .S386 2014 In-library use
Book
1 online resource (xii, 142 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Part 1: Essentials for Good Writing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Organization of a Research Paper: The IMRAD Format
  • 3. Tables and Figures
  • 4. The "Nuts and Bolts": Numbers, Units, Dates, Abbreviations, Nomenclature
  • Part 2: English: The International Language of Science
  • 5. Words
  • 6. Sentences
  • Part 3: Manuscript: Preparation, Submission, and Follow-up
  • 7. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 8. Dealing with the Journal
  • Part 4: Oral and Poster Presentations
  • 9. Oral Presentations
  • 10. Poster Presentations.
Perhaps there is no dearth of books, reference manuals, and internet sources on scientific writing. Given, however, that different fields have different conventions for writing style, we have found it difficult to recommend a specific book or source material as the go to guide to young scientists in agriculture and natural resources. Having been involved as authors, reviewers, and editors of various journals and publications during the past few decades, we have come to the conclusion that writing a scientific paper is a tedious task for not only us, but most writers. While that is true even for experienced writers, it is a sort of nightmare for the early career professionals such as students, trainees, scientists, and scholars in agriculture and natural resources, especially when their first language of communication is not English. Their trials, tribulations, and frustrations are compounded by the severe pressure they experience from the increasing importance attached to authoring scientific publications (in English). This book is targeted mainly to that group. The ten short chapters of the book are organized in four parts. The first, Essentials for good writing, contains four chapters that emphasize the importance of publishing research results, review briefly the various types of scientific publications and other important features of scientific writing. The second part that includes two chapters deals with the use and misuse of English as the international language of science. Manuscript preparation and submission is the scope of the third part that also has two chapters. Part 4 is about communication of research results through oral and poster presentations to the peer groups at conferences and meetings. Finally, a list of references and recommended reading is included.
  • Part 1: Essentials for Good Writing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Organization of a Research Paper: The IMRAD Format
  • 3. Tables and Figures
  • 4. The "Nuts and Bolts": Numbers, Units, Dates, Abbreviations, Nomenclature
  • Part 2: English: The International Language of Science
  • 5. Words
  • 6. Sentences
  • Part 3: Manuscript: Preparation, Submission, and Follow-up
  • 7. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 8. Dealing with the Journal
  • Part 4: Oral and Poster Presentations
  • 9. Oral Presentations
  • 10. Poster Presentations.
Perhaps there is no dearth of books, reference manuals, and internet sources on scientific writing. Given, however, that different fields have different conventions for writing style, we have found it difficult to recommend a specific book or source material as the go to guide to young scientists in agriculture and natural resources. Having been involved as authors, reviewers, and editors of various journals and publications during the past few decades, we have come to the conclusion that writing a scientific paper is a tedious task for not only us, but most writers. While that is true even for experienced writers, it is a sort of nightmare for the early career professionals such as students, trainees, scientists, and scholars in agriculture and natural resources, especially when their first language of communication is not English. Their trials, tribulations, and frustrations are compounded by the severe pressure they experience from the increasing importance attached to authoring scientific publications (in English). This book is targeted mainly to that group. The ten short chapters of the book are organized in four parts. The first, Essentials for good writing, contains four chapters that emphasize the importance of publishing research results, review briefly the various types of scientific publications and other important features of scientific writing. The second part that includes two chapters deals with the use and misuse of English as the international language of science. Manuscript preparation and submission is the scope of the third part that also has two chapters. Part 4 is about communication of research results through oral and poster presentations to the peer groups at conferences and meetings. Finally, a list of references and recommended reading is included.
Book
xxiv, 728 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • CHAPTER 1. PRELUDE -- 1.1 Importance of Writing in Science -- 1.2 About Readers -- 1.3 About Writers -- 1.4 About This Book -- 1.5 Design of This Book -- PART I. SCIENTIFIC WRITING PRINCIPLES: STYLE AND COMPOSITION -- CHAPTER 2. INDIVIDUAL WORDS -- 2.1 The Central Principle -- 2.2 Word Choice -- 2.3 Word Choice-Special Cases -- 2.4 Redundancies and Jargon -- 2.5 Abbreviations -- 2.6 Nomenclature and Terminology -- 2.7 Dictionaries -- CHAPTER 3. WORD LOCATION -- 3.1 Readers' Expectations -- 3.2 Competition for Emphasis -- 3.3 Placement of Words -- CHAPTER 4. TECHNICAL SENTENCES -- 4.1 Grammar and Technical Style -- 4.2 Person -- 4.3 Voice -- 4.4 Tense -- 4.5 Sentence Length -- 4.6 Verbs and Action -- 4.7 Noun Clusters -- 4.8 Pronouns -- 4.9 Lists and Comparisons -- 4.10 Faulty Comparisons -- 4.11 Common Errors -- CHAPTER 5. SPECIAL ESL GRAMMAR PROBLEMS -- 5.1 Prepositions -- 5.2 Articles -- 5.3 Verbs -- 5.4 Adjectives and Adverbs -- 5.5 Nouns and Pronouns -- 5.6 Grammar References -- CHAPTER 6. FROM SENTENCES TO PARAGRAPHS -- 6.1 Paragraph Structure -- 6.2 Paragraph Organization -- 6.3 Paragraph Coherence -- 6.4 Condensing -- PART II. PLANNING AND LAYING THE FOUNDATION -- CHAPTER 7. THE FIRST DRAFT -- 7.1 The Writing Process -- 7.2 Prewriting -- 7.3 Authorship -- 7.4 Drafting a Manuscript -- 7.5 Outlining and Composing a Manuscript -- 7.6 Writer's Block? -- 7.7 For ESL Authors -- 7.8 Outside Help -- CHAPTER 8. REFERENCES AND PLAGIARISM -- 8.1 About References -- 8.2 Selecting References -- 8.3 Managing References -- 8.4 Text Citations -- 8.5 Plagiarism -- 8.6 Paraphrasing -- 8.7 References Within a Scientific Paper -- 8.8 The Reference List -- 8.9 Common Reference Styles -- 8.10 Citing the Internet -- 8.11 Footnotes and Endnotes -- 8.12 Acknowledgments -- CHAPTER 9. FIGURES AND TABLES -- 9.1 General Guidelines -- 9.2 Importance of Formatting and Placement of Information -- 9.3 Figure or Table? -- 9.4 General Information on Figures -- 9.5 Types of Figures -- 9.6 Formatting Graphs -- 9.7 Examples of Graphs -- 9.8 Figure Legends -- 9.9 General Information on Tables -- 9.10 Formatting Tables -- * 9.11 Basics of Statistical Analysis -- * 9.12 Useful Resources for Statistical Analysis -- 9.13 Other Kinds of Supplementary Information: Formulas, Equations, Proofs, and Algorithms -- PART III. MANUSCRIPTS: RESEARCH PAPERS AND REVIEW ARTICLES -- A. RESEARCH PAPERS -- CHAPTER 10. THE INTRODUCTION -- 10.1 Overall -- 10.2 Content and Organization -- 10.3 Elements of the Introduction -- 10.4 Special Case: Introductions for Descriptive Papers -- 10.5 Important Writing Principles for the Introduction -- 10.6 Signals for the Reader -- 10.7 Common Problems of Introductions -- 10.8 Sample Introductions -- 10.9 Revising the Introduction -- CHAPTER 11. MATERIALS AND METHODS SECTION -- 11.1 Overall -- 11.2 Content -- 11.3 Organization -- 11.4 Important Writing Principles for Materials and Methods -- 11.5 Ethical Conduct -- 11.6 Common Problems of Materials and Methods Section -- 11.7 Sample Materials and Methods Sections -- 11.8 Revising the Materials and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 12. RESULTS -- 12.1 Overall -- 12.2 Content -- 12.3 Organization -- 12.4 Important Writing Principles for the Results -- 12.5 Signals for the Reader -- 12.6 Common Problems of the Results Section -- 12.7 Sample Results Sections -- 12.8 Revising the Results Section -- CHAPTER 13. DISCUSSION -- 13.1 Overall -- 13.2 Content -- 13.3 Organization -- 13.4 First Paragraph -- 13.5 Middle Paragraphs -- 13.6 Last Paragraph -- 13.7 Important Writing Principles for the Discussion -- 13.8 Signals for the Reader -- 13.9 An Alternative: Results and Discussion -- 13.10 Common Problems of the Discussion -- 13.11 Sample Discussions -- 13.12 Revising the Discussion -- CHAPTER 14. ABSTRACT -- 14.1 Overall -- 14.2 Content -- 14.3 Organization -- 14.4 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 14.5 Signals for the Reader -- 14.6 Common Problems of the Abstract -- 14.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 14.8 Revising the Abstract -- CHAPTER 15. TITLES, TITLE PAGES, AND KEY WORDS -- 15.1 Overall -- 15.2 Strong Titles -- 15.3 The Title Page -- 15.4 Running Title -- 15.5 Key Words -- 15.6 Revising the Title -- CHAPTER 16. REVISING AND REVIEWING A MANUSCRIPT -- 16.1 Revising the First Draft -- 16.2 Subsequent Drafts -- 16.3 Reviewing a Manuscript -- CHAPTER 17. FINAL VERSION, SUBMISSION, AND PEER REVIEW -- 17.1 General Advice on the Final Version -- 17.2 Submitting the Manuscript -- 17.3 Writing a Cover Letter -- 17.4 The Review Process -- 17.5 Letter from the Editor -- 17.6 Resubmission -- 17.7 Paper Accepted -- B. REVIEW ARTICLES -- CHAPTER 18. REVIEW ARTICLES -- 18.1 Overall -- 18.2 Content -- 18.3 Organization -- 18.4 Abstract of a Review Article -- 18.5 Introduction of a Review Article -- 18.6 Main Analysis Section of a Review Article -- 18.7 Conclusion of a Review Article -- 18.8 References -- 18.9 Signals for the Reader -- 18.10 Coherence -- 18.11 Common Problems of Review Articles -- 18.12 Revising the Review Article -- PART IV. GRANT PROPOSALS -- CHAPTER 19. PROPOSAL WRITING -- 19.1 General -- 19.2 Types of Proposals -- 19.3 Choosing a Sponsoring Agency -- 19.4 Federal Agencies -- 19.5 Private Foundations -- 19.6 Corporations and Other Funders -- 19.7 Preliminary Steps to Writing a Proposal -- 19.8 Online Resources -- 19.9 Starting to Write a Grant -- 19.10 Interacting With the Funder -- CHAPTER 20. LETTERS OF INQUIRY AND PREPROPOSALS -- 20.1 General -- 20.2 Content and Organization -- 20.3 Abstract/Overview -- 20.4 Introduction/Background -- 20.5 Statement of Need -- 20.6 Objective and Specific Aims -- 20.7 Strategy and Goals -- 20.8 Leadership and Organization -- 20.9 Budget -- 20.10 Impact and Significance -- 20.11 Cover Letter -- 20.12 Verbal Proposals -- 20.13 LOI Outlines -- 20.14 Revising an LOI/Preproposal -- CHAPTER 21. ABSTRACT AND SPECIFIC AIMS -- 21.1 Overall -- 21.2 Abstract -- 21.3 Specific Aims -- 21.4 Significance and Impact -- 21.5 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 21.6 Signals for the Reader -- 21.7 Common Problems -- 21.8 Reasons for Rejection -- 21.9 Revising the Abstract and Specific Aims -- CHAPTER 22. BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE -- 22.1 Overall -- 22.2 Emphasis, Organization, and Length -- 22.3 References -- 22.4 Elements of the Section -- * 22.5 Sample Significance Section for Federal Grants -- 22.6 Signals for the Reader -- 22.7 Coherence -- 22.8 Common Problems -- 22.9 Revising the Background and Significance Section -- * CHAPTER 23. INNOVATION -- 23.1 Content -- 23.2 Organization -- 23.3 Signals for the Reader -- 23.4 Common Problems -- 23.5 Revising the Innovation Section -- CHAPTER 24. PRELIMINARY RESULTS -- 24.1 General Content -- 24.2 Organization -- 24.3 Important Writing Principles -- 24.4 Signals for Preliminary Results -- 24.5 Common Problems of Preliminary Results -- 24.6 Revising the Preliminary Results -- CHAPTER 25. APPROACH/RESEARCH DESIGN -- 25.1 Overall -- 25.2 Content -- 25.3 Organization -- 25.4 Closing Paragraph -- 25.5 Signals for the Reader -- 25.6 Common Problems -- 25.7 Revising the Research Design and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 26. BUDGET AND OTHER SPECIAL PROPOSAL SECTIONS -- 26.1 Budget -- 26.2 Other Special Proposal Sections -- CHAPTER 27. REVISING AND SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL -- 27.1 General -- 27.2 Before Sending Out the Proposal -- 27.3 Revising the Proposal -- 27.4 Submitting the Proposal -- 27.5 Being Reviewed -- 27.6 Site Visits -- *27.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 27.8 If Your Proposal Is Rejected -- 27.9 Resubmission of a Proposal -- 27.10 If Your Proposal Is Funded -- PART V. POSTERS AND PRESENTATIONS -- CHAPTER 28. POSTERS AND CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS -- 28.1 Function and General Overview -- 28.2 Content -- 28.3 Organization -- 28.4 Sections of a Poster -- 28.5 Photos, Figures, and Tables -- 28.6 Resources for Preparing and Presenting a Poster -- *28.7 Revising a Poster -- 28.8 Presenting the Poster -- 28.9 Sample Posters -- 28.10 Checklist for a Poster -- 28.11 Conference Abstracts -- CHAPTER 29. ORAL PRESENTATIONS -- 29.1 Before the Talk -- 29.2 Content and Organization of a Scientific Talk -- 29.3 Visual Aids -- 29.4 Preparing for a Talk -- 29.5 Giving the Talk -- 29.6 Voice and Delivery -- 29.7 Vocabulary and Style -- 29.8 Body Actions and Motions -- 29.9 At the End of the Presentation -- 29.10 Questions and Answers -- 29.11 Other Speech Forms -- *29.12 Resources -- 29.13 Checklist for an Oral Presentation -- PART VI. JOB APPLICATIONS -- CHAPTER 30. WRITING FOR JOB APPLICATIONS -- 30.1 Overall -- 30.2 Curricula Vitae (CVs) and Resumes -- 30.3 Cover Letters -- 30.4 Accompanying Documents -- 30.5 Research Statements -- 30.6 Teaching Statements -- 30.7 Resources -- 30.8 Letters of Recommendation -- 30.9 Checklist for the Job Application -- APPENDIX A: COMMONLY CONFUSED AND MISUSED WORDS -- * APPENDIX B: TIPS ON MS WORD -- * APPENDIX C: TIPS ON MS EXCEL -- * APPENDIX D: TIPS ON MS POWERPOINT -- * APPENDIX E: MS OFFICE CHEAT SHEET.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations, Second Edition, serves as a comprehensive <"one-stop>" reference guide to scientific writing and communication. The second edition of Angelika Hofmann's successful text covers all the areas of scientific communication that a scientist needs to know and master in order to successfully promote his or her research and career. This unique "all-in-one" handbook begins with a discussion of the basic principles of scientific writing style and composition and then applies these principles to writing research papers, review articles, grant proposals, research statements, and resumes, as well as to preparing academic presentations and posters. Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations has been used successfully for a number of years in courses on scientific writing at various universities and institutes worldwide. Readers of the second edition will find numerous new examples and exercises, many with an expanded interdisciplinary focus. Every major section of the text has been updated, with new sections on writing mechanics, expanded coverage of grant writing (including the latest need-to-know information on writing successful federal grants), more advice on preparing posters, conference presentations, and job resumes, and a new set of <"Top 20 Tips>" quick-reference appendices for using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The new second edition of this handbook shows readers how to write clearly and how to recognize shortcomings in their own writing. The book targets a broad audience ranging from upper-level undergraduate students to graduate students, from postdoctoral fellows and faculty to fully fledged researchers. It does so not only by providing crucial knowledge about the structure and delivery of written material but also by explaining how readers go about reading. The level of presentation is geared for those looking to improve their writing without having to read many different books on the subject. Although the second edition of Papers, Proposals, and Presentations can be used as a textbook, it is structured such that it is equally self-explanatory, allowing readers to understand how to write publications or proposals and to present scientific talks without having to take a class.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • CHAPTER 1. PRELUDE -- 1.1 Importance of Writing in Science -- 1.2 About Readers -- 1.3 About Writers -- 1.4 About This Book -- 1.5 Design of This Book -- PART I. SCIENTIFIC WRITING PRINCIPLES: STYLE AND COMPOSITION -- CHAPTER 2. INDIVIDUAL WORDS -- 2.1 The Central Principle -- 2.2 Word Choice -- 2.3 Word Choice-Special Cases -- 2.4 Redundancies and Jargon -- 2.5 Abbreviations -- 2.6 Nomenclature and Terminology -- 2.7 Dictionaries -- CHAPTER 3. WORD LOCATION -- 3.1 Readers' Expectations -- 3.2 Competition for Emphasis -- 3.3 Placement of Words -- CHAPTER 4. TECHNICAL SENTENCES -- 4.1 Grammar and Technical Style -- 4.2 Person -- 4.3 Voice -- 4.4 Tense -- 4.5 Sentence Length -- 4.6 Verbs and Action -- 4.7 Noun Clusters -- 4.8 Pronouns -- 4.9 Lists and Comparisons -- 4.10 Faulty Comparisons -- 4.11 Common Errors -- CHAPTER 5. SPECIAL ESL GRAMMAR PROBLEMS -- 5.1 Prepositions -- 5.2 Articles -- 5.3 Verbs -- 5.4 Adjectives and Adverbs -- 5.5 Nouns and Pronouns -- 5.6 Grammar References -- CHAPTER 6. FROM SENTENCES TO PARAGRAPHS -- 6.1 Paragraph Structure -- 6.2 Paragraph Organization -- 6.3 Paragraph Coherence -- 6.4 Condensing -- PART II. PLANNING AND LAYING THE FOUNDATION -- CHAPTER 7. THE FIRST DRAFT -- 7.1 The Writing Process -- 7.2 Prewriting -- 7.3 Authorship -- 7.4 Drafting a Manuscript -- 7.5 Outlining and Composing a Manuscript -- 7.6 Writer's Block? -- 7.7 For ESL Authors -- 7.8 Outside Help -- CHAPTER 8. REFERENCES AND PLAGIARISM -- 8.1 About References -- 8.2 Selecting References -- 8.3 Managing References -- 8.4 Text Citations -- 8.5 Plagiarism -- 8.6 Paraphrasing -- 8.7 References Within a Scientific Paper -- 8.8 The Reference List -- 8.9 Common Reference Styles -- 8.10 Citing the Internet -- 8.11 Footnotes and Endnotes -- 8.12 Acknowledgments -- CHAPTER 9. FIGURES AND TABLES -- 9.1 General Guidelines -- 9.2 Importance of Formatting and Placement of Information -- 9.3 Figure or Table? -- 9.4 General Information on Figures -- 9.5 Types of Figures -- 9.6 Formatting Graphs -- 9.7 Examples of Graphs -- 9.8 Figure Legends -- 9.9 General Information on Tables -- 9.10 Formatting Tables -- * 9.11 Basics of Statistical Analysis -- * 9.12 Useful Resources for Statistical Analysis -- 9.13 Other Kinds of Supplementary Information: Formulas, Equations, Proofs, and Algorithms -- PART III. MANUSCRIPTS: RESEARCH PAPERS AND REVIEW ARTICLES -- A. RESEARCH PAPERS -- CHAPTER 10. THE INTRODUCTION -- 10.1 Overall -- 10.2 Content and Organization -- 10.3 Elements of the Introduction -- 10.4 Special Case: Introductions for Descriptive Papers -- 10.5 Important Writing Principles for the Introduction -- 10.6 Signals for the Reader -- 10.7 Common Problems of Introductions -- 10.8 Sample Introductions -- 10.9 Revising the Introduction -- CHAPTER 11. MATERIALS AND METHODS SECTION -- 11.1 Overall -- 11.2 Content -- 11.3 Organization -- 11.4 Important Writing Principles for Materials and Methods -- 11.5 Ethical Conduct -- 11.6 Common Problems of Materials and Methods Section -- 11.7 Sample Materials and Methods Sections -- 11.8 Revising the Materials and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 12. RESULTS -- 12.1 Overall -- 12.2 Content -- 12.3 Organization -- 12.4 Important Writing Principles for the Results -- 12.5 Signals for the Reader -- 12.6 Common Problems of the Results Section -- 12.7 Sample Results Sections -- 12.8 Revising the Results Section -- CHAPTER 13. DISCUSSION -- 13.1 Overall -- 13.2 Content -- 13.3 Organization -- 13.4 First Paragraph -- 13.5 Middle Paragraphs -- 13.6 Last Paragraph -- 13.7 Important Writing Principles for the Discussion -- 13.8 Signals for the Reader -- 13.9 An Alternative: Results and Discussion -- 13.10 Common Problems of the Discussion -- 13.11 Sample Discussions -- 13.12 Revising the Discussion -- CHAPTER 14. ABSTRACT -- 14.1 Overall -- 14.2 Content -- 14.3 Organization -- 14.4 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 14.5 Signals for the Reader -- 14.6 Common Problems of the Abstract -- 14.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 14.8 Revising the Abstract -- CHAPTER 15. TITLES, TITLE PAGES, AND KEY WORDS -- 15.1 Overall -- 15.2 Strong Titles -- 15.3 The Title Page -- 15.4 Running Title -- 15.5 Key Words -- 15.6 Revising the Title -- CHAPTER 16. REVISING AND REVIEWING A MANUSCRIPT -- 16.1 Revising the First Draft -- 16.2 Subsequent Drafts -- 16.3 Reviewing a Manuscript -- CHAPTER 17. FINAL VERSION, SUBMISSION, AND PEER REVIEW -- 17.1 General Advice on the Final Version -- 17.2 Submitting the Manuscript -- 17.3 Writing a Cover Letter -- 17.4 The Review Process -- 17.5 Letter from the Editor -- 17.6 Resubmission -- 17.7 Paper Accepted -- B. REVIEW ARTICLES -- CHAPTER 18. REVIEW ARTICLES -- 18.1 Overall -- 18.2 Content -- 18.3 Organization -- 18.4 Abstract of a Review Article -- 18.5 Introduction of a Review Article -- 18.6 Main Analysis Section of a Review Article -- 18.7 Conclusion of a Review Article -- 18.8 References -- 18.9 Signals for the Reader -- 18.10 Coherence -- 18.11 Common Problems of Review Articles -- 18.12 Revising the Review Article -- PART IV. GRANT PROPOSALS -- CHAPTER 19. PROPOSAL WRITING -- 19.1 General -- 19.2 Types of Proposals -- 19.3 Choosing a Sponsoring Agency -- 19.4 Federal Agencies -- 19.5 Private Foundations -- 19.6 Corporations and Other Funders -- 19.7 Preliminary Steps to Writing a Proposal -- 19.8 Online Resources -- 19.9 Starting to Write a Grant -- 19.10 Interacting With the Funder -- CHAPTER 20. LETTERS OF INQUIRY AND PREPROPOSALS -- 20.1 General -- 20.2 Content and Organization -- 20.3 Abstract/Overview -- 20.4 Introduction/Background -- 20.5 Statement of Need -- 20.6 Objective and Specific Aims -- 20.7 Strategy and Goals -- 20.8 Leadership and Organization -- 20.9 Budget -- 20.10 Impact and Significance -- 20.11 Cover Letter -- 20.12 Verbal Proposals -- 20.13 LOI Outlines -- 20.14 Revising an LOI/Preproposal -- CHAPTER 21. ABSTRACT AND SPECIFIC AIMS -- 21.1 Overall -- 21.2 Abstract -- 21.3 Specific Aims -- 21.4 Significance and Impact -- 21.5 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 21.6 Signals for the Reader -- 21.7 Common Problems -- 21.8 Reasons for Rejection -- 21.9 Revising the Abstract and Specific Aims -- CHAPTER 22. BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE -- 22.1 Overall -- 22.2 Emphasis, Organization, and Length -- 22.3 References -- 22.4 Elements of the Section -- * 22.5 Sample Significance Section for Federal Grants -- 22.6 Signals for the Reader -- 22.7 Coherence -- 22.8 Common Problems -- 22.9 Revising the Background and Significance Section -- * CHAPTER 23. INNOVATION -- 23.1 Content -- 23.2 Organization -- 23.3 Signals for the Reader -- 23.4 Common Problems -- 23.5 Revising the Innovation Section -- CHAPTER 24. PRELIMINARY RESULTS -- 24.1 General Content -- 24.2 Organization -- 24.3 Important Writing Principles -- 24.4 Signals for Preliminary Results -- 24.5 Common Problems of Preliminary Results -- 24.6 Revising the Preliminary Results -- CHAPTER 25. APPROACH/RESEARCH DESIGN -- 25.1 Overall -- 25.2 Content -- 25.3 Organization -- 25.4 Closing Paragraph -- 25.5 Signals for the Reader -- 25.6 Common Problems -- 25.7 Revising the Research Design and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 26. BUDGET AND OTHER SPECIAL PROPOSAL SECTIONS -- 26.1 Budget -- 26.2 Other Special Proposal Sections -- CHAPTER 27. REVISING AND SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL -- 27.1 General -- 27.2 Before Sending Out the Proposal -- 27.3 Revising the Proposal -- 27.4 Submitting the Proposal -- 27.5 Being Reviewed -- 27.6 Site Visits -- *27.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 27.8 If Your Proposal Is Rejected -- 27.9 Resubmission of a Proposal -- 27.10 If Your Proposal Is Funded -- PART V. POSTERS AND PRESENTATIONS -- CHAPTER 28. POSTERS AND CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS -- 28.1 Function and General Overview -- 28.2 Content -- 28.3 Organization -- 28.4 Sections of a Poster -- 28.5 Photos, Figures, and Tables -- 28.6 Resources for Preparing and Presenting a Poster -- *28.7 Revising a Poster -- 28.8 Presenting the Poster -- 28.9 Sample Posters -- 28.10 Checklist for a Poster -- 28.11 Conference Abstracts -- CHAPTER 29. ORAL PRESENTATIONS -- 29.1 Before the Talk -- 29.2 Content and Organization of a Scientific Talk -- 29.3 Visual Aids -- 29.4 Preparing for a Talk -- 29.5 Giving the Talk -- 29.6 Voice and Delivery -- 29.7 Vocabulary and Style -- 29.8 Body Actions and Motions -- 29.9 At the End of the Presentation -- 29.10 Questions and Answers -- 29.11 Other Speech Forms -- *29.12 Resources -- 29.13 Checklist for an Oral Presentation -- PART VI. JOB APPLICATIONS -- CHAPTER 30. WRITING FOR JOB APPLICATIONS -- 30.1 Overall -- 30.2 Curricula Vitae (CVs) and Resumes -- 30.3 Cover Letters -- 30.4 Accompanying Documents -- 30.5 Research Statements -- 30.6 Teaching Statements -- 30.7 Resources -- 30.8 Letters of Recommendation -- 30.9 Checklist for the Job Application -- APPENDIX A: COMMONLY CONFUSED AND MISUSED WORDS -- * APPENDIX B: TIPS ON MS WORD -- * APPENDIX C: TIPS ON MS EXCEL -- * APPENDIX D: TIPS ON MS POWERPOINT -- * APPENDIX E: MS OFFICE CHEAT SHEET.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations, Second Edition, serves as a comprehensive <"one-stop>" reference guide to scientific writing and communication. The second edition of Angelika Hofmann's successful text covers all the areas of scientific communication that a scientist needs to know and master in order to successfully promote his or her research and career. This unique "all-in-one" handbook begins with a discussion of the basic principles of scientific writing style and composition and then applies these principles to writing research papers, review articles, grant proposals, research statements, and resumes, as well as to preparing academic presentations and posters. Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations has been used successfully for a number of years in courses on scientific writing at various universities and institutes worldwide. Readers of the second edition will find numerous new examples and exercises, many with an expanded interdisciplinary focus. Every major section of the text has been updated, with new sections on writing mechanics, expanded coverage of grant writing (including the latest need-to-know information on writing successful federal grants), more advice on preparing posters, conference presentations, and job resumes, and a new set of <"Top 20 Tips>" quick-reference appendices for using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The new second edition of this handbook shows readers how to write clearly and how to recognize shortcomings in their own writing. The book targets a broad audience ranging from upper-level undergraduate students to graduate students, from postdoctoral fellows and faculty to fully fledged researchers. It does so not only by providing crucial knowledge about the structure and delivery of written material but also by explaining how readers go about reading. The level of presentation is geared for those looking to improve their writing without having to read many different books on the subject. Although the second edition of Papers, Proposals, and Presentations can be used as a textbook, it is structured such that it is equally self-explanatory, allowing readers to understand how to write publications or proposals and to present scientific talks without having to take a class.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Engineering Library (Terman), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Request at circulation desk
Q223 .H63 2014 Unknown On Reserve 3-day loan
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
Q223 .H63 2014 Unknown
ENGR-202W-01
Course
ENGR-202W-01 -- Technical Writing
Instructor(s)
Harrison, Kelly A.
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 218 pages) : illustrations.
  • A Note from the Series Editor xi Acknowledgments xiii Foreword xv Introduction 1 Understand our path to these techniques 1 Witness the change 2 Feel confident about these techniques 3 References 3 1 Heed the Pleas for Better Presentations 5 Know the enemy 6 Be an agent of change 8 Call a meeting instead of summoning a slide deck 8 Destroy the decks of drudgery 8 Learn communication lessons from past tragedies 9 Confront conventional poor practices 10 Consider slides as a two-part deliverable 11 Implement your own continuous improvement 12 References 12 Slide Rule #1 Revisit Presentation Assumptions 2 Apply Cognitive Science and Tell a Story 17 Change presentation practices using grounded research 17 Stay open to change 18 Revisit how a slide works 19 Design slides for audience s cognitive load 20 Lessen cognitive load with storytelling 24 Apply science and storytelling 27 References 27 3 Understand Audience Needs 29 Scope content toward identified purpose 29 Learn about your audience first 30 Determine the presentation s purpose 32 Examine the goals for a talk 33 Elevate the moment 33 Assess the audience 34 Prepare for a familiar audience 34 Prepare for an unfamiliar audience 35 Coping when your talk gets hijacked 37 Ditch the dumb it down attitude 38 Think of audience needs, not yours 42 Think about logistics 45 References 48 4 Challenge Your Organization s Culture of Text-HeavySlides 49 Understand the patterns origin 50 Stop assuming they want to read 50 Work toward fewer bullets, less text 51 Avoid using slides as teleprompters 53 Build information deliberately 54 Move beyond How many slides should I use? 54 Encourage better presentation practices 56 Create, compile, organize, and stabilize team presentations58 Work towards a change 60 References 60 Slide Rule #2 Write Sentence Headers 5 Clarify Topics with Full-Sentence Headers 65 Write full sentences for headers, avoiding fragments 65 Consider the case against fragmented headers 66 Deploy best practices for sentence headers 70 Expect immediate results 71 Write targeted headers 73 State a fact or explain a concept 74 Showcase an analysis 80 Transition to new information 84 Influence outcomes with headers 88 Frequently asked questions about sentence headers 88 References 91 Slide Rule #3 Use Targeted Visuals 6 Build Information Incrementally 95 Build something better than bullets 95 Devise methods that build information 97 Design with words to make bullet lovers happy 98 Solidify complex topics with refrains 99 Use refrain slides for meeting agendas 100 Create visuals for directed comprehension 103 Build out to drill down 107 7 Generate Quality Graphs 109 Portray complexity simply 110 Determine the right visual 111 Design reasonable pie charts 112 Design impactful bar charts and histograms 117 Design scatter XY charts and scatter plots 121 Craft line charts 127 Map out area graphs 128 Think through flow or process charts130 Address assorted other visual outputs 132 Graph ethically 133 Create accessible graphics 136 Frequently asked questions about graphs 138 References 139 Further reading 140 8 Picture the Possibilities 141 Center yourself 143 Manage image interpretation 143 Model accurately 143 Be ethical with visuals 149 Frequently asked questions about using pictures 150 References 151 9 Temper the Templates 153 See the possibilities in a template, branded or otherwise153 Discover and assess a branded template 154 Work with company templates 156 Devise solutions for problematic templates 156 Fix the template 162 Provide template guidance 164 Refine quad slides 165 Establish brand when there is no template 166 Slide Rule #4 Archive Details for Future Use 10 Make Slide Decks with Archival and Legacy Value175 Understand that slides have two lives 175 Start new best practices 177 Document ideas efficiently 178 Use the Notes or Presenter Notes feature 179 Get others to see your notes 180 Use hidden slides 181 Keep hidden slides ready 183 Make retrieval easy for everyone else 184 Embrace full documentation as part of workflow 187 References 188 11 Include More Than One Language 189 Know when English is not enough 189 Start with audience analysis 192 Anticipate formatting for translations 192 Deploy plain language 192 Write in one language and talk in another 195 Design split slides 195 Capture translation in notes 197 Translate toward clarity 197 Find resources 198 References 198 Slide Rule #5 Keep Looking Forward 12 Enact Organizational Change 203 Listen to the studies 203 Anticipate the stages of acceptance 204 Tally the results 207 Look for the opportunities 208 References 208 13 Thinking Through the Next Big Thing 209 See ahead 209 Play with Prezi 210 Use caution 211 Amaze with Autodesk 211 Apply apps 213 Remain diligent in your best practices 214 Index 215.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Drawing on the latest research in cognitive psychology combined with experience gained from years of successfully teaching high-level engineers, scientists, military people, and technical professionals, this book sets clear guidelines for presentation excellence. From planning for a variety of audiences (from the general public to non-technical high-influence leadership to other technical specialists) to archiving the slide deck as a living document in your organization, this full-color illustrated book will step engineering and technically oriented readers through their development as outstanding technical presenters.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A Note from the Series Editor xi Acknowledgments xiii Foreword xv Introduction 1 Understand our path to these techniques 1 Witness the change 2 Feel confident about these techniques 3 References 3 1 Heed the Pleas for Better Presentations 5 Know the enemy 6 Be an agent of change 8 Call a meeting instead of summoning a slide deck 8 Destroy the decks of drudgery 8 Learn communication lessons from past tragedies 9 Confront conventional poor practices 10 Consider slides as a two-part deliverable 11 Implement your own continuous improvement 12 References 12 Slide Rule #1 Revisit Presentation Assumptions 2 Apply Cognitive Science and Tell a Story 17 Change presentation practices using grounded research 17 Stay open to change 18 Revisit how a slide works 19 Design slides for audience s cognitive load 20 Lessen cognitive load with storytelling 24 Apply science and storytelling 27 References 27 3 Understand Audience Needs 29 Scope content toward identified purpose 29 Learn about your audience first 30 Determine the presentation s purpose 32 Examine the goals for a talk 33 Elevate the moment 33 Assess the audience 34 Prepare for a familiar audience 34 Prepare for an unfamiliar audience 35 Coping when your talk gets hijacked 37 Ditch the dumb it down attitude 38 Think of audience needs, not yours 42 Think about logistics 45 References 48 4 Challenge Your Organization s Culture of Text-HeavySlides 49 Understand the patterns origin 50 Stop assuming they want to read 50 Work toward fewer bullets, less text 51 Avoid using slides as teleprompters 53 Build information deliberately 54 Move beyond How many slides should I use? 54 Encourage better presentation practices 56 Create, compile, organize, and stabilize team presentations58 Work towards a change 60 References 60 Slide Rule #2 Write Sentence Headers 5 Clarify Topics with Full-Sentence Headers 65 Write full sentences for headers, avoiding fragments 65 Consider the case against fragmented headers 66 Deploy best practices for sentence headers 70 Expect immediate results 71 Write targeted headers 73 State a fact or explain a concept 74 Showcase an analysis 80 Transition to new information 84 Influence outcomes with headers 88 Frequently asked questions about sentence headers 88 References 91 Slide Rule #3 Use Targeted Visuals 6 Build Information Incrementally 95 Build something better than bullets 95 Devise methods that build information 97 Design with words to make bullet lovers happy 98 Solidify complex topics with refrains 99 Use refrain slides for meeting agendas 100 Create visuals for directed comprehension 103 Build out to drill down 107 7 Generate Quality Graphs 109 Portray complexity simply 110 Determine the right visual 111 Design reasonable pie charts 112 Design impactful bar charts and histograms 117 Design scatter XY charts and scatter plots 121 Craft line charts 127 Map out area graphs 128 Think through flow or process charts130 Address assorted other visual outputs 132 Graph ethically 133 Create accessible graphics 136 Frequently asked questions about graphs 138 References 139 Further reading 140 8 Picture the Possibilities 141 Center yourself 143 Manage image interpretation 143 Model accurately 143 Be ethical with visuals 149 Frequently asked questions about using pictures 150 References 151 9 Temper the Templates 153 See the possibilities in a template, branded or otherwise153 Discover and assess a branded template 154 Work with company templates 156 Devise solutions for problematic templates 156 Fix the template 162 Provide template guidance 164 Refine quad slides 165 Establish brand when there is no template 166 Slide Rule #4 Archive Details for Future Use 10 Make Slide Decks with Archival and Legacy Value175 Understand that slides have two lives 175 Start new best practices 177 Document ideas efficiently 178 Use the Notes or Presenter Notes feature 179 Get others to see your notes 180 Use hidden slides 181 Keep hidden slides ready 183 Make retrieval easy for everyone else 184 Embrace full documentation as part of workflow 187 References 188 11 Include More Than One Language 189 Know when English is not enough 189 Start with audience analysis 192 Anticipate formatting for translations 192 Deploy plain language 192 Write in one language and talk in another 195 Design split slides 195 Capture translation in notes 197 Translate toward clarity 197 Find resources 198 References 198 Slide Rule #5 Keep Looking Forward 12 Enact Organizational Change 203 Listen to the studies 203 Anticipate the stages of acceptance 204 Tally the results 207 Look for the opportunities 208 References 208 13 Thinking Through the Next Big Thing 209 See ahead 209 Play with Prezi 210 Use caution 211 Amaze with Autodesk 211 Apply apps 213 Remain diligent in your best practices 214 Index 215.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Drawing on the latest research in cognitive psychology combined with experience gained from years of successfully teaching high-level engineers, scientists, military people, and technical professionals, this book sets clear guidelines for presentation excellence. From planning for a variety of audiences (from the general public to non-technical high-influence leadership to other technical specialists) to archiving the slide deck as a living document in your organization, this full-color illustrated book will step engineering and technically oriented readers through their development as outstanding technical presenters.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)

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