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Book
xi, 135 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Writing clearly
  • Adding emphasis
  • Writing concisely, with some spice
  • The art of fine paragraphs
  • Framing an introduction
  • Reporting results
  • Discussing your findings
  • Epilogue: Submitting the manuscript for publication
  • Appendix: Writing a title, abstract, and method section.
  • Writing clearly
  • Adding emphasis
  • Writing concisely, with some spice
  • The art of fine paragraphs
  • Framing an introduction
  • Reporting results
  • Discussing your findings
  • Epilogue: Submitting the manuscript for publication
  • Appendix: Writing a title, abstract, and method section.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
BF76 .K35 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 252 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
T10.65 .G3 W37 2014 Available
Book
p. ; cm.
"Direct from IBM's own content design experts, this guide shows you how to design product interfaces and technical information that always place users front and center. This edition has been fully revised to help you consistently deliver the right content at the right time. You'll master today's best practices to apply nine essential characteristics of high-quality technical information: accuracy, clarity, completeness, concreteness, organization, retrievability, style, task orientation, and visual effectiveness. Coverage includes: Advocating for users throughout the entire product development process -- Delivering information in an ordered manner by following progressive disclosure techniques -- Optimizing content so that users can find it from anywhere -- Streamlining information for mobile delivery -- Helping users right where they are. Whether you're a writer, editor, information architect, user experience professional, or reviewer, this book shows you how to create great technical information, from the product design to the user interface, topics, and other media."
"Direct from IBM's own content design experts, this guide shows you how to design product interfaces and technical information that always place users front and center. This edition has been fully revised to help you consistently deliver the right content at the right time. You'll master today's best practices to apply nine essential characteristics of high-quality technical information: accuracy, clarity, completeness, concreteness, organization, retrievability, style, task orientation, and visual effectiveness. Coverage includes: Advocating for users throughout the entire product development process -- Delivering information in an ordered manner by following progressive disclosure techniques -- Optimizing content so that users can find it from anywhere -- Streamlining information for mobile delivery -- Helping users right where they are. Whether you're a writer, editor, information architect, user experience professional, or reviewer, this book shows you how to create great technical information, from the product design to the user interface, topics, and other media."
Book
xxv, 190 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: 2.1.Literature
  • 2.2.Good and Bad Practices
  • 2.3.Barriers
  • 3.1.Setup
  • 3.2.Minimal Examples
  • 3.2.1.An Example in LATEX
  • 3.2.2.An Example in Markdown
  • 3.3.Quick Reporting
  • 3.4.Extracting R Code
  • 4.1.RStudio
  • 4.2.LYX
  • 4.3.Emacs/ESS
  • 4.4.Other Editors
  • 5.1.Input Syntax
  • 5.1.1.Chunk Options
  • 5.1.2.Chunk Label
  • 5.1.3.Global Options
  • 5.1.4.Chunk Syntax
  • 5.2.Document Formats
  • 5.2.1.Markdown
  • 5.2.2.LATEX
  • 5.2.3.HTML
  • 5.2.4.reStructuredText
  • 5.2.5.Customization
  • 5.3.Output Renderers
  • 5.4.R Scripts
  • 6.1.Inline Output
  • 6.2.Chunk Output
  • 6.2.1.Chunk Evaluation
  • 6.2.2.Code Formatting
  • 6.2.3.Code Decoration
  • 6.2.4.Show/Hide Output
  • 6.3.Tables
  • 6.4.Themes
  • 7.1.Graphical Devices
  • 7.1.1.Custom Device
  • 7.1.2.Choose a Device
  • 7.1.3.Device Size
  • 7.1.4.More Device Options
  • 7.1.5.Encoding
  • 7.1.6.The Dingbats Font
  • 7.2.Plot Recording
  • 7.3.Plot Rearrangement
  • 7.3.1.Animation
  • 7.3.2.Alignment
  • 7.4.Plot Size in Output
  • 7.5.Extra Output Options
  • 7.6.The tikz Device
  • 7.7.Figure Environment
  • 7.8.Figure Path
  • 8.1.Implementation
  • 8.2.Write Cache
  • 8.3.When to Update Cache
  • 8.4.Side Effects
  • 8.5.Chunk Dependencies
  • 8.5.1.Manual Dependency
  • 8.5.2.Automatic Dependency
  • 9.1.Chunk Reference
  • 9.1.1.Embed Code Chunks
  • 9.1.2.Reuse Whole Chunks
  • 9.2.Code Externalization
  • 9.2.1.Labeled Chunks
  • 9.2.2.Line-based Chunks
  • 9.3.Child Documents
  • 9.3.1.Input Child Documents
  • 9.3.2.Child Documents as Templates
  • 9.3.3.Standalone Mode
  • 10.1.Chunk Hooks
  • 10.1.1.Create Chunk Hooks
  • 10.1.2.Trigger Chunk Hooks
  • 10.1.3.Hook Arguments
  • 10.1.4.Hooks and Chunk Options
  • 10.1.5.Write Output
  • 10.2.Examples
  • 10.2.1.Crop Plots
  • 10.2.2.rgl Plots
  • 10.2.3.Manually Save Plots
  • 10.2.4.Optimize PNG Plots
  • 10.2.5.Close an rgl Device
  • 10.2.6.WebGL
  • 11.1.Design
  • 11.1.1.The Engine Function
  • 11.1.2.Engine Options
  • 11.2.Languages and Tools
  • 11.2.1.C++
  • 11.2.2.Interpreted Languages
  • 11.2.3.TikZ
  • 11.2.4.Graphviz
  • 11.2.5.Highlight
  • 12.1.Chunk Options
  • 12.1.1.Option Aliases
  • 12.1.2.Option Templates
  • 12.1.3.Program Chunk Options
  • 12.1.4.Code in Appendix
  • 12.2.Package Options
  • 12.3.Typesetting
  • 12.3.1.Output Width
  • 12.3.2.Message Colors
  • 12.3.3.Box Padding
  • 12.3.4.Beamer
  • 12.3.5.Suppress Long Output
  • 12.3.6.Escape Special Characters
  • 12.3.7.The Example Environment
  • 12.4.Utilities
  • 12.4.1.R Package Citation
  • 12.4.2.Image URI
  • 12.4.3.Upload Images
  • 12.4.4.Compile Documents
  • 12.4.5.Construct Code Chunks
  • 12.4.6.Extract Source Code
  • 12.4.7.Reproducible Simulation
  • 12.4.8.R Documentation
  • 12.4.9.Rst2pdf
  • 12.4.10.Package Demos
  • 12.4.11.Pretty Printing
  • 12.4.12.A Macro Preprocessor
  • 12.5.Debugging
  • 12.6.Multilingual Support
  • 13.1.RStudio
  • 13.2.Pandoc
  • 13.3.HTML5 Slides
  • 13.4.Jekyll
  • 13.5.WordPress
  • 14.1.Homework
  • 14.2.Web Site and Blogging
  • 14.2.1.Vistat and Rcpp Gallery
  • 14.2.2.UCLA R Tutorial
  • 14.2.3.The cda and RHadoop Wiki
  • 14.2.4.The ggbio Package
  • 14.2.5.Geospatial Data in R and Beyond
  • 14.3.Package Vignettes
  • 14.3.1.PDF Vignette
  • 14.3.2.HTML Vignette
  • 14.4.Books
  • 14.4.1.This Book
  • 14.4.2.The Analysis of Data
  • 14.4.3.The Statistical Sleuth in R
  • 15.1.Sweave
  • 15.1.1.Syntax
  • 15.1.2.Options
  • 15.1.3.Problems
  • 15.2.Other R Packages
  • 15.3.Python Packages
  • 15.3.1.Dexy
  • 15.3.2.Python TEX
  • 15.3.3.IPython
  • 15.4.More Tools
  • 15.4.1.Org-mode
  • 15.4.2.SASweave
  • 15.4.3.Office
  • A.1.Documentation
  • A.2.Closures
  • A.3.Implementation
  • A.3.1.Parser
  • A.3.2.Chunk Hooks
  • A.3.3.Option Aliases
  • A.3.4.Cache
  • A.3.5.Compatibility with Sweave
  • A.3.6.Concordance
  • A.4.Syntax.
"Suitable for both beginners and advanced users, this book shows you how to write reports in simple languages such as Markdown. The reports range from homework, projects, exams, books, blogs, and web pages to any documents related to statistical graphics, computing, and data analysis. While familiarity with LaTeX and HTML is helpful, the book requires no prior experience with advanced programs or languages. For beginners, the text provides enough features to get started on basic applications. For power users, the last several chapters enable an understanding of the extensibility of the knitr package."-- Provided by publisher.
"Preface We import a dataset into a statistical software package, run a procedure to get all results, then copy and paste selected pieces into a typesetting program, add a few descriptions and finish a report. This is a common practice of writing statistical reports. There are obvious dangers and disadvantages in this process: 1. it is error-prone due to too much manual work; 2. it requires lots of human efforts to do tedious jobs such as copying results across documents; 3. the workflow is barely recordable especially when it involves GUI (Graphical User Interface) operations, therefore it is difficult to reproduce; 4. a tiny change of the data source in the future will require the author(s) to go through the same procedure again, which can take nearly the same amount of time and effort; 5. the analysis and writing are separate, so close attention has to be paid to the synchronization of the two parts; In fact, a report can be generated dynamically from program code. Just like a software package has its source code, a dynamic document is the source code of a report. It is a combination of computer code and the corresponding narratives. When we compile the dynamic document, the program code in it is executed and replaced with the output; we get a final report by mixing the code output with the narratives. Because we only manage the source code, we are free of all the possible problems above. For example, we can change a single parameter in the source code, and get a different report on the fly."-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: 2.1.Literature
  • 2.2.Good and Bad Practices
  • 2.3.Barriers
  • 3.1.Setup
  • 3.2.Minimal Examples
  • 3.2.1.An Example in LATEX
  • 3.2.2.An Example in Markdown
  • 3.3.Quick Reporting
  • 3.4.Extracting R Code
  • 4.1.RStudio
  • 4.2.LYX
  • 4.3.Emacs/ESS
  • 4.4.Other Editors
  • 5.1.Input Syntax
  • 5.1.1.Chunk Options
  • 5.1.2.Chunk Label
  • 5.1.3.Global Options
  • 5.1.4.Chunk Syntax
  • 5.2.Document Formats
  • 5.2.1.Markdown
  • 5.2.2.LATEX
  • 5.2.3.HTML
  • 5.2.4.reStructuredText
  • 5.2.5.Customization
  • 5.3.Output Renderers
  • 5.4.R Scripts
  • 6.1.Inline Output
  • 6.2.Chunk Output
  • 6.2.1.Chunk Evaluation
  • 6.2.2.Code Formatting
  • 6.2.3.Code Decoration
  • 6.2.4.Show/Hide Output
  • 6.3.Tables
  • 6.4.Themes
  • 7.1.Graphical Devices
  • 7.1.1.Custom Device
  • 7.1.2.Choose a Device
  • 7.1.3.Device Size
  • 7.1.4.More Device Options
  • 7.1.5.Encoding
  • 7.1.6.The Dingbats Font
  • 7.2.Plot Recording
  • 7.3.Plot Rearrangement
  • 7.3.1.Animation
  • 7.3.2.Alignment
  • 7.4.Plot Size in Output
  • 7.5.Extra Output Options
  • 7.6.The tikz Device
  • 7.7.Figure Environment
  • 7.8.Figure Path
  • 8.1.Implementation
  • 8.2.Write Cache
  • 8.3.When to Update Cache
  • 8.4.Side Effects
  • 8.5.Chunk Dependencies
  • 8.5.1.Manual Dependency
  • 8.5.2.Automatic Dependency
  • 9.1.Chunk Reference
  • 9.1.1.Embed Code Chunks
  • 9.1.2.Reuse Whole Chunks
  • 9.2.Code Externalization
  • 9.2.1.Labeled Chunks
  • 9.2.2.Line-based Chunks
  • 9.3.Child Documents
  • 9.3.1.Input Child Documents
  • 9.3.2.Child Documents as Templates
  • 9.3.3.Standalone Mode
  • 10.1.Chunk Hooks
  • 10.1.1.Create Chunk Hooks
  • 10.1.2.Trigger Chunk Hooks
  • 10.1.3.Hook Arguments
  • 10.1.4.Hooks and Chunk Options
  • 10.1.5.Write Output
  • 10.2.Examples
  • 10.2.1.Crop Plots
  • 10.2.2.rgl Plots
  • 10.2.3.Manually Save Plots
  • 10.2.4.Optimize PNG Plots
  • 10.2.5.Close an rgl Device
  • 10.2.6.WebGL
  • 11.1.Design
  • 11.1.1.The Engine Function
  • 11.1.2.Engine Options
  • 11.2.Languages and Tools
  • 11.2.1.C++
  • 11.2.2.Interpreted Languages
  • 11.2.3.TikZ
  • 11.2.4.Graphviz
  • 11.2.5.Highlight
  • 12.1.Chunk Options
  • 12.1.1.Option Aliases
  • 12.1.2.Option Templates
  • 12.1.3.Program Chunk Options
  • 12.1.4.Code in Appendix
  • 12.2.Package Options
  • 12.3.Typesetting
  • 12.3.1.Output Width
  • 12.3.2.Message Colors
  • 12.3.3.Box Padding
  • 12.3.4.Beamer
  • 12.3.5.Suppress Long Output
  • 12.3.6.Escape Special Characters
  • 12.3.7.The Example Environment
  • 12.4.Utilities
  • 12.4.1.R Package Citation
  • 12.4.2.Image URI
  • 12.4.3.Upload Images
  • 12.4.4.Compile Documents
  • 12.4.5.Construct Code Chunks
  • 12.4.6.Extract Source Code
  • 12.4.7.Reproducible Simulation
  • 12.4.8.R Documentation
  • 12.4.9.Rst2pdf
  • 12.4.10.Package Demos
  • 12.4.11.Pretty Printing
  • 12.4.12.A Macro Preprocessor
  • 12.5.Debugging
  • 12.6.Multilingual Support
  • 13.1.RStudio
  • 13.2.Pandoc
  • 13.3.HTML5 Slides
  • 13.4.Jekyll
  • 13.5.WordPress
  • 14.1.Homework
  • 14.2.Web Site and Blogging
  • 14.2.1.Vistat and Rcpp Gallery
  • 14.2.2.UCLA R Tutorial
  • 14.2.3.The cda and RHadoop Wiki
  • 14.2.4.The ggbio Package
  • 14.2.5.Geospatial Data in R and Beyond
  • 14.3.Package Vignettes
  • 14.3.1.PDF Vignette
  • 14.3.2.HTML Vignette
  • 14.4.Books
  • 14.4.1.This Book
  • 14.4.2.The Analysis of Data
  • 14.4.3.The Statistical Sleuth in R
  • 15.1.Sweave
  • 15.1.1.Syntax
  • 15.1.2.Options
  • 15.1.3.Problems
  • 15.2.Other R Packages
  • 15.3.Python Packages
  • 15.3.1.Dexy
  • 15.3.2.Python TEX
  • 15.3.3.IPython
  • 15.4.More Tools
  • 15.4.1.Org-mode
  • 15.4.2.SASweave
  • 15.4.3.Office
  • A.1.Documentation
  • A.2.Closures
  • A.3.Implementation
  • A.3.1.Parser
  • A.3.2.Chunk Hooks
  • A.3.3.Option Aliases
  • A.3.4.Cache
  • A.3.5.Compatibility with Sweave
  • A.3.6.Concordance
  • A.4.Syntax.
"Suitable for both beginners and advanced users, this book shows you how to write reports in simple languages such as Markdown. The reports range from homework, projects, exams, books, blogs, and web pages to any documents related to statistical graphics, computing, and data analysis. While familiarity with LaTeX and HTML is helpful, the book requires no prior experience with advanced programs or languages. For beginners, the text provides enough features to get started on basic applications. For power users, the last several chapters enable an understanding of the extensibility of the knitr package."-- Provided by publisher.
"Preface We import a dataset into a statistical software package, run a procedure to get all results, then copy and paste selected pieces into a typesetting program, add a few descriptions and finish a report. This is a common practice of writing statistical reports. There are obvious dangers and disadvantages in this process: 1. it is error-prone due to too much manual work; 2. it requires lots of human efforts to do tedious jobs such as copying results across documents; 3. the workflow is barely recordable especially when it involves GUI (Graphical User Interface) operations, therefore it is difficult to reproduce; 4. a tiny change of the data source in the future will require the author(s) to go through the same procedure again, which can take nearly the same amount of time and effort; 5. the analysis and writing are separate, so close attention has to be paid to the synchronization of the two parts; In fact, a report can be generated dynamically from program code. Just like a software package has its source code, a dynamic document is the source code of a report. It is a combination of computer code and the corresponding narratives. When we compile the dynamic document, the program code in it is executed and replaced with the output; we get a final report by mixing the code output with the narratives. Because we only manage the source code, we are free of all the possible problems above. For example, we can change a single parameter in the source code, and get a different report on the fly."-- Provided by publisher.
Math & Statistics Library
Status of items at Math & Statistics Library
Math & Statistics Library Status
Stacks
QA276.4 .X54 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource.
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
Book
online resource (xiv, 116 pages)
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
  • Good versus Poor Scientific Writing: an orientation
  • Words and Units: orthography and Punctuation
  • Forming Sentences: grammar
  • Putting it Nicely: Style
  • Redundancy and Jargon: Focusing on the essentials
  • Quoting Published Material: Reference Formats
  • Avoiding Discrimination: ethics of Scientific Writing
  • Sticking to your word: Plagiarism
  • Structuring Scientific Texts: getting the Story out.
This self-help guide is intended for scientists and medical professionals and students who wish to improve their scientific writing skills. Exercises invite the reader to practice the most important aspects of scientific writing. Although the book addresses certain issues more troublesome to scientific communicators of a non-English language origin, the guide will be of equal benefit to those whose first language is English. If you want not only to write but to write well, this book is for you. This second edition takes into account new developments in the area of scientific communication. In particular, the importance of authenticity is addressed, drawing attention to the sensitive issue of plagiarism in scientific texts.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
SPRINGER Unknown
Book
v, 288 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Why is it so hard to write and evaluate writing on the Internet?
  • Anything can be a text
  • A tool called genre
  • What does it mean to publish?
  • Theory behind usability studies
  • Proposing a new approach to content evaluation
  • Writing persuasion-centric content
  • Writing quality-centric content
  • Writing user-centric content
  • Professional writer in an agile environment
  • The future-if there be such.
The vast majority of Internet management comes at the hands of information technologists, information architects, and content managers. This book is specifically designed to place you, the professional writer, in their midst while giving you skills they lack. This book is designed to give you the vocabulary, theoretical foundation, and professional skills to compete with them at their technological level, giving you an understanding of Internet content (as opposed to structure) well beyond theirs. The book is divided into three sections: why writing is so bad on the Internet, where excellent writing occurs on the Internet, and how to bring your refined writing skills to the Internet. It provides you with a good overview of the problems writers face along with effective solutions to those problems. The book is not a list of recipes. It is a carefully crafted series of arguments that provide you with the theoretical foundation to make strategic decisions and the practical skills to make the decisions happen. With this in mind, this book should be read from beginning to end and never piecemeal.
  • Why is it so hard to write and evaluate writing on the Internet?
  • Anything can be a text
  • A tool called genre
  • What does it mean to publish?
  • Theory behind usability studies
  • Proposing a new approach to content evaluation
  • Writing persuasion-centric content
  • Writing quality-centric content
  • Writing user-centric content
  • Professional writer in an agile environment
  • The future-if there be such.
The vast majority of Internet management comes at the hands of information technologists, information architects, and content managers. This book is specifically designed to place you, the professional writer, in their midst while giving you skills they lack. This book is designed to give you the vocabulary, theoretical foundation, and professional skills to compete with them at their technological level, giving you an understanding of Internet content (as opposed to structure) well beyond theirs. The book is divided into three sections: why writing is so bad on the Internet, where excellent writing occurs on the Internet, and how to bring your refined writing skills to the Internet. It provides you with a good overview of the problems writers face along with effective solutions to those problems. The book is not a list of recipes. It is a carefully crafted series of arguments that provide you with the theoretical foundation to make strategic decisions and the practical skills to make the decisions happen. With this in mind, this book should be read from beginning to end and never piecemeal.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
PN171 .O55 H34 2014 Available
Book
1 online resource (xv, 258 pages).
ebrary Access limited to 3 simultaneous users.
Book
1 online resource.
"This book is a guide to technical writing, presented in a systematic framework that mirrors the logic associated with the scientific process itself. Other English books merely define concepts and provide rules; this one explains the reasoning behind the rules. Other writing books for scientists and engineers focus primarily on how to gather and organize materials; this one focuses primarily on how to compose a readable sentence. The approach should be satisfying not only to scientists and engineers, but also to anyone who once took a grammar course but can't remember the rules--because there was no exposure to underlying principles"-- Provided by publisher.
"This book is a guide to technical writing, presented in a systematic framework that mirrors the logic associated with the scientific process itself. Other English books merely define concepts and provide rules; this one explains the reasoning behind the rules. Other writing books for scientists and engineers focus primarily on how to gather and organize materials; this one focuses primarily on how to compose a readable sentence. The approach should be satisfying not only to scientists and engineers, but also to anyone who once took a grammar course but can't remember the rules--because there was no exposure to underlying principles"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
1 online resource (xxiv, 215 pages).
"This book is a guide to technical writing, presented in a systematic framework that mirrors the logic associated with the scientific process itself. Other English books merely define concepts and provide rules; this one explains the reasoning behind the rules. Other writing books for scientists and engineers focus primarily on how to gather and organize materials; this one focuses primarily on how to compose a readable sentence. The approach should be satisfying not only to scientists and engineers, but also to anyone who once took a grammar course but can't remember the rules--because there was no exposure to underlying principles"-- Provided by publisher.
"This book is a guide to technical writing, presented in a systematic framework that mirrors the logic associated with the scientific process itself. Other English books merely define concepts and provide rules; this one explains the reasoning behind the rules. Other writing books for scientists and engineers focus primarily on how to gather and organize materials; this one focuses primarily on how to compose a readable sentence. The approach should be satisfying not only to scientists and engineers, but also to anyone who once took a grammar course but can't remember the rules--because there was no exposure to underlying principles"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
xv, 722 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Publishing fundamentals
  • Elements of a scientific publication
  • Publication policies and practices
  • The basics of copyright
  • General style conventions
  • Alphabets, symbols, and signs
  • Punctuation and related marks
  • Spelling, word formation and division, plurals, and possessives
  • Prose style and word choice
  • Names and personal designations
  • Capitalization
  • Type styles, excerpts, quotations, and ellipses
  • Abbreviations
  • Numbers, units, mathematical expressions, and statistics
  • Time, dates, and age measurements
  • Geographic designations
  • Special scientific conventions
  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Subatomic particles, chemical elements, and related notations
  • Chemical formulas and names
  • Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics
  • Analytical chemistry
  • Drugs and pharmacokinetics
  • Genes, chromosomes, and related molecules
  • Taxonomy and nomenclature
  • Structure and function
  • Disease names
  • The earth
  • Astronomical objects and time systems
  • Technical elements of publications
  • Journal style and format
  • Published media
  • References
  • Accessories to text: tables, figures, and indexes
  • Typography and manuscript preparation
  • Proof correction.
  • Publishing fundamentals
  • Elements of a scientific publication
  • Publication policies and practices
  • The basics of copyright
  • General style conventions
  • Alphabets, symbols, and signs
  • Punctuation and related marks
  • Spelling, word formation and division, plurals, and possessives
  • Prose style and word choice
  • Names and personal designations
  • Capitalization
  • Type styles, excerpts, quotations, and ellipses
  • Abbreviations
  • Numbers, units, mathematical expressions, and statistics
  • Time, dates, and age measurements
  • Geographic designations
  • Special scientific conventions
  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Subatomic particles, chemical elements, and related notations
  • Chemical formulas and names
  • Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics
  • Analytical chemistry
  • Drugs and pharmacokinetics
  • Genes, chromosomes, and related molecules
  • Taxonomy and nomenclature
  • Structure and function
  • Disease names
  • The earth
  • Astronomical objects and time systems
  • Technical elements of publications
  • Journal style and format
  • Published media
  • References
  • Accessories to text: tables, figures, and indexes
  • Typography and manuscript preparation
  • Proof correction.
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Reference (non-circulating)
T11 .S386 2014 In-library use
Book
1 online resource (xii, 142 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Part 1: Essentials for Good Writing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Organization of a Research Paper: The IMRAD Format
  • 3. Tables and Figures
  • 4. The "Nuts and Bolts": Numbers, Units, Dates, Abbreviations, Nomenclature
  • Part 2: English: The International Language of Science
  • 5. Words
  • 6. Sentences
  • Part 3: Manuscript: Preparation, Submission, and Follow-up
  • 7. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 8. Dealing with the Journal
  • Part 4: Oral and Poster Presentations
  • 9. Oral Presentations
  • 10. Poster Presentations.
Perhaps there is no dearth of books, reference manuals, and internet sources on scientific writing. Given, however, that different fields have different conventions for writing style, we have found it difficult to recommend a specific book or source material as the go to guide to young scientists in agriculture and natural resources. Having been involved as authors, reviewers, and editors of various journals and publications during the past few decades, we have come to the conclusion that writing a scientific paper is a tedious task for not only us, but most writers. While that is true even for experienced writers, it is a sort of nightmare for the early career professionals such as students, trainees, scientists, and scholars in agriculture and natural resources, especially when their first language of communication is not English. Their trials, tribulations, and frustrations are compounded by the severe pressure they experience from the increasing importance attached to authoring scientific publications (in English). This book is targeted mainly to that group. The ten short chapters of the book are organized in four parts. The first, Essentials for good writing, contains four chapters that emphasize the importance of publishing research results, review briefly the various types of scientific publications and other important features of scientific writing. The second part that includes two chapters deals with the use and misuse of English as the international language of science. Manuscript preparation and submission is the scope of the third part that also has two chapters. Part 4 is about communication of research results through oral and poster presentations to the peer groups at conferences and meetings. Finally, a list of references and recommended reading is included.
  • Part 1: Essentials for Good Writing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Organization of a Research Paper: The IMRAD Format
  • 3. Tables and Figures
  • 4. The "Nuts and Bolts": Numbers, Units, Dates, Abbreviations, Nomenclature
  • Part 2: English: The International Language of Science
  • 5. Words
  • 6. Sentences
  • Part 3: Manuscript: Preparation, Submission, and Follow-up
  • 7. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 8. Dealing with the Journal
  • Part 4: Oral and Poster Presentations
  • 9. Oral Presentations
  • 10. Poster Presentations.
Perhaps there is no dearth of books, reference manuals, and internet sources on scientific writing. Given, however, that different fields have different conventions for writing style, we have found it difficult to recommend a specific book or source material as the go to guide to young scientists in agriculture and natural resources. Having been involved as authors, reviewers, and editors of various journals and publications during the past few decades, we have come to the conclusion that writing a scientific paper is a tedious task for not only us, but most writers. While that is true even for experienced writers, it is a sort of nightmare for the early career professionals such as students, trainees, scientists, and scholars in agriculture and natural resources, especially when their first language of communication is not English. Their trials, tribulations, and frustrations are compounded by the severe pressure they experience from the increasing importance attached to authoring scientific publications (in English). This book is targeted mainly to that group. The ten short chapters of the book are organized in four parts. The first, Essentials for good writing, contains four chapters that emphasize the importance of publishing research results, review briefly the various types of scientific publications and other important features of scientific writing. The second part that includes two chapters deals with the use and misuse of English as the international language of science. Manuscript preparation and submission is the scope of the third part that also has two chapters. Part 4 is about communication of research results through oral and poster presentations to the peer groups at conferences and meetings. Finally, a list of references and recommended reading is included.
Book
xxiv, 728 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Engineering Library (Terman), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Stacks
Q223 .H63 2014 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
Q223 .H63 2014 Unavailable At bindery Request
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 218 pages) : illustrations.
"Drawing on the latest research in cognitive psychology combined with experience gained from years of successfully teaching high-level engineers, scientists, military people, and technical professionals, this book sets clear guidelines for presentation excellence. From planning for a variety of audiences (from the general public to non-technical high-influence leadership to other technical specialists) to archiving the slide deck as a living document in your organization, this full-color illustrated book will step engineering and technically oriented readers through their development as outstanding technical presenters"-- Provided by publisher.
"Drawing on the latest research in cognitive psychology combined with experience gained from years of successfully teaching high-level engineers, scientists, military people, and technical professionals, this book sets clear guidelines for presentation excellence. From planning for a variety of audiences (from the general public to non-technical high-influence leadership to other technical specialists) to archiving the slide deck as a living document in your organization, this full-color illustrated book will step engineering and technically oriented readers through their development as outstanding technical presenters"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 218 pages) : illustrations.
"Drawing on the latest research in cognitive psychology combined with experience gained from years of successfully teaching high-level engineers, scientists, military people, and technical professionals, this book sets clear guidelines for presentation excellence. From planning for a variety of audiences (from the general public to non-technical high-influence leadership to other technical specialists) to archiving the slide deck as a living document in your organization, this full-color illustrated book will step engineering and technically oriented readers through their development as outstanding technical presenters"-- Provided by publisher.
"Drawing on the latest research in cognitive psychology combined with experience gained from years of successfully teaching high-level engineers, scientists, military people, and technical professionals, this book sets clear guidelines for presentation excellence. From planning for a variety of audiences (from the general public to non-technical high-influence leadership to other technical specialists) to archiving the slide deck as a living document in your organization, this full-color illustrated book will step engineering and technically oriented readers through their development as outstanding technical presenters"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
ix, 242 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
Biology Library (Falconer), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH315 .J64 2014 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
QH315 .J64 2014 Unavailable At bindery Request
Book
xii, 260 pages ; 21 cm
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Request at circulation desk
PE1421 .W545 2014 Unknown On Reserve 4-hour loan
EDUC-292-01
Course
EDUC-292-01 -- Academic Writing for Clarity and Grace
Instructor(s)
Labaree, David F.
Book
p. ; cm.
This is a job performance aid for writing and organizing all kinds of training, maintenance, and operational-support materials for screen and print. Written for new and experienced technical writers, it presents case studies of the developmental processes for choosing appropriate ways to present all types of instruction and decision-support information with style. Topics include: protecting your intellectual property; package and equipment labeling; punctuation and grammar; word selection and creation, and much more. -- Edited summary from book.
This is a job performance aid for writing and organizing all kinds of training, maintenance, and operational-support materials for screen and print. Written for new and experienced technical writers, it presents case studies of the developmental processes for choosing appropriate ways to present all types of instruction and decision-support information with style. Topics include: protecting your intellectual property; package and equipment labeling; punctuation and grammar; word selection and creation, and much more. -- Edited summary from book.

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