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139 leaves
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B741 .Z53 1993 Available
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xxvi, 494 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • General editors' preface. Notes on contributors Chronology. Introduction C.C.W. Taylor 1. The polis and its culture Robin Osborne 2. The Ionians Malcolm Schofield 3. Heraclitus Catherine Osborne 4. Pythagoreans and Eleatics Edward Hussey 5. Empedocles M.R. Wright 6. Anaxagoras and the Atomists C.C.W. Taylor 7. The Sophists G.B. Kerferd 8. Greek arithmetic, geometry, and harmonics: Thales to Plato Ian Mueller 9. Socrates and the beginnings of moral philosophy Hugh H. Benson 10. Plato: metaphysics and epistemology Robert Heinaman 11. Plato: ethics and politics A.W. Price 12. Plato: aesthetics and psychology Christopher Rowe Index locorum. Index of names Index of subjects. Glossary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Volume 1 of the Routledge History of Philosophy covers one of the most remarkable periods in human thought. In the space of two and a half centuries, philosophy developed from quasi-mythological speculation to a state in which many of the most fundamental questions about the universe, the mind and human conduct had been vigorously pursued, and some of the most enduring masterworks of Western thought had been written. Supplemented with a chronology, a glossary of technical terms and an extensive bibliography, this volume will prove an invaluable and comprehensive guide to the beginnings of philosophy. R.G. Osborne, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, M. Schofield, University of Cambridge, Catherine Osborne, University of Wales, E.L. Hussey, University of Oxford, M.R. Wrig.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • General editors' preface. Notes on contributors Chronology. Introduction C.C.W. Taylor 1. The polis and its culture Robin Osborne 2. The Ionians Malcolm Schofield 3. Heraclitus Catherine Osborne 4. Pythagoreans and Eleatics Edward Hussey 5. Empedocles M.R. Wright 6. Anaxagoras and the Atomists C.C.W. Taylor 7. The Sophists G.B. Kerferd 8. Greek arithmetic, geometry, and harmonics: Thales to Plato Ian Mueller 9. Socrates and the beginnings of moral philosophy Hugh H. Benson 10. Plato: metaphysics and epistemology Robert Heinaman 11. Plato: ethics and politics A.W. Price 12. Plato: aesthetics and psychology Christopher Rowe Index locorum. Index of names Index of subjects. Glossary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Volume 1 of the Routledge History of Philosophy covers one of the most remarkable periods in human thought. In the space of two and a half centuries, philosophy developed from quasi-mythological speculation to a state in which many of the most fundamental questions about the universe, the mind and human conduct had been vigorously pursued, and some of the most enduring masterworks of Western thought had been written. Supplemented with a chronology, a glossary of technical terms and an extensive bibliography, this volume will prove an invaluable and comprehensive guide to the beginnings of philosophy. R.G. Osborne, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, M. Schofield, University of Cambridge, Catherine Osborne, University of Wales, E.L. Hussey, University of Oxford, M.R. Wrig.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B162.9 .F76 1997 Unknown
B162.9 .F76 1997 Unknown
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xxxiii, 510 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Part 1: Arab/Jewish philosophy 1. From the beginnings to Avicenna M.J. Jolivet, Sorbonne, Paris University 2 . Averroes A.L. Ivry, New York University 3. Jewish philosophy C. Sirat, CNRSIR, Paris Part 2: Western philosophy, 900-1200 4. The intellectual context: monasteries, palace schools, cathedral schools, schools in the early Twelfth century Paris R. McKitterick, Newnham College, Cambridge 5. Eriugena: his background and influence, Anselm and the Platonic tradition in the 10th and 11th centuries S. Gersh, University of Notre Dame 6. 1100-1150 J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge 7. 1150-1200 J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge Western philosophy, 1200-1350 8. The intellectual context: universities, the study of Aristotle, the arts faculties and the theology faculties, theology as a subject S.F. Brown, Boston College 9. Metaphysics and science in 1300: William of Auvergne, Grosseteste, Roger Bacon S. Marrone, Tufts University 10. Aquinas B. Davies, Blackfriars Priory, Oxford 11. Aquinas's theological contemporaries: Bonaventure and Albert the Great J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge 12. The Arts Faculty: Boethius of Dacia, Siger of Brabant S. Ebbesen, Institut fur Middlelalderfilologi, Njalsgade 13. Henry of Ghent and Duns Scotus S.D. Dumont, Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, Toronto 14. Paris, 1308-50 (Peter Aureol, Radulphus Brito, Burley, Buridan) S.F. Brown, Boston College 15. Oxford, 1310-40 (Harclay, Ockham, Campsall, Adam Wodeham, Robert Holcot, Kilvington, Bradwardine) K.H. Tachau, University of Iowa 16. The reception of Oxford thought in Paris (Bernard of Arezzo, Nicholas Autrecourt, Gregory of Rimini, Ockhamism) K.H. Tachau, University of Iowa Part 4 Scholasticism at the end of the Middle Ages, 1350-1550 17. Later medieval logic P.V. Spade, Indiana University 18. 1350-1500 M. Kaluza Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 19. Suarez (and late scholasticism) J.J.E. Gracia, University at Buffalo Epilogue: the variety of later medieval thought J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Volume III is devoted to the Middle Ages. It considers the rich traditions of Arab, Jewish and Latin philosophy, which began to flourish in the ninth century and continued in the Latin west, until the early seventeenth century. Among the philosophers treated in detail are Avicenna and Averroes, Maimonides, Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Grosseteste, Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, Peter Aureoli, William of Ockham, Wyclif and Suarez. An introductory chapter discusses Boethius, the late antique thinker who was enormously influential in the medieval Latin west. Special attention has been given to many lesser-known, but important figures in each period, as well as to medieval logic and to the cultural context of medieval philosophy, both in Islam and the Christian west. This volume provides a comprehensive analysis of the key areas of medieval philosophy by the experts in each field. It offers fresh perspectives on a complex and rapidly changing area of research, in which Arab and Jewish philosophy are considered in their own right, rather than as sources for Latin thinkers, and the thirteenth century (the time of Aquinas) is not viewed as dominating the earlier and later parts of the period. S. Brown, Boston College, Massachusetts, USA, Fr. B. Davies, S. Dumont, Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, Toronto, Canada, S. Ebbesen, Institut for Graesk og Latin.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part 1: Arab/Jewish philosophy 1. From the beginnings to Avicenna M.J. Jolivet, Sorbonne, Paris University 2 . Averroes A.L. Ivry, New York University 3. Jewish philosophy C. Sirat, CNRSIR, Paris Part 2: Western philosophy, 900-1200 4. The intellectual context: monasteries, palace schools, cathedral schools, schools in the early Twelfth century Paris R. McKitterick, Newnham College, Cambridge 5. Eriugena: his background and influence, Anselm and the Platonic tradition in the 10th and 11th centuries S. Gersh, University of Notre Dame 6. 1100-1150 J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge 7. 1150-1200 J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge Western philosophy, 1200-1350 8. The intellectual context: universities, the study of Aristotle, the arts faculties and the theology faculties, theology as a subject S.F. Brown, Boston College 9. Metaphysics and science in 1300: William of Auvergne, Grosseteste, Roger Bacon S. Marrone, Tufts University 10. Aquinas B. Davies, Blackfriars Priory, Oxford 11. Aquinas's theological contemporaries: Bonaventure and Albert the Great J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge 12. The Arts Faculty: Boethius of Dacia, Siger of Brabant S. Ebbesen, Institut fur Middlelalderfilologi, Njalsgade 13. Henry of Ghent and Duns Scotus S.D. Dumont, Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, Toronto 14. Paris, 1308-50 (Peter Aureol, Radulphus Brito, Burley, Buridan) S.F. Brown, Boston College 15. Oxford, 1310-40 (Harclay, Ockham, Campsall, Adam Wodeham, Robert Holcot, Kilvington, Bradwardine) K.H. Tachau, University of Iowa 16. The reception of Oxford thought in Paris (Bernard of Arezzo, Nicholas Autrecourt, Gregory of Rimini, Ockhamism) K.H. Tachau, University of Iowa Part 4 Scholasticism at the end of the Middle Ages, 1350-1550 17. Later medieval logic P.V. Spade, Indiana University 18. 1350-1500 M. Kaluza Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 19. Suarez (and late scholasticism) J.J.E. Gracia, University at Buffalo Epilogue: the variety of later medieval thought J. Marenbon, Trinity College, Cambridge.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Volume III is devoted to the Middle Ages. It considers the rich traditions of Arab, Jewish and Latin philosophy, which began to flourish in the ninth century and continued in the Latin west, until the early seventeenth century. Among the philosophers treated in detail are Avicenna and Averroes, Maimonides, Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Grosseteste, Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, Peter Aureoli, William of Ockham, Wyclif and Suarez. An introductory chapter discusses Boethius, the late antique thinker who was enormously influential in the medieval Latin west. Special attention has been given to many lesser-known, but important figures in each period, as well as to medieval logic and to the cultural context of medieval philosophy, both in Islam and the Christian west. This volume provides a comprehensive analysis of the key areas of medieval philosophy by the experts in each field. It offers fresh perspectives on a complex and rapidly changing area of research, in which Arab and Jewish philosophy are considered in their own right, rather than as sources for Latin thinkers, and the thirteenth century (the time of Aquinas) is not viewed as dominating the earlier and later parts of the period. S. Brown, Boston College, Massachusetts, USA, Fr. B. Davies, S. Dumont, Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, Toronto, Canada, S. Ebbesen, Institut for Graesk og Latin.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B721 .M453 1998 In-library use
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B721 .M453 1998 Unknown
Book
457 p.
  • Introduction: Prof. David Furley , Dept. of Classics, Princeton University, 1. Aristotle's Philosophy of Nature, David Furley, 2. Aristotle: Logic and Metaphysics, Prof. Alan Code, Dept. of Philosophy, Ohio State University, 3.Aristotle: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Mind, Prof. David Gallop, 4. Aristotle: Ethics, Dr Roger Crisp, St Annes College, Oxford University, Politics, Dr Robert Sharples, Depts. of Greek and Latin, University College London, 5. The Peripatetic School, Dr Robert Sharples, Depts. of Greek and Latin, University College London, 6.Epicureanism, Dr Stephen Everson, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Michigan, 7. Stoicism, Prof. Brad Inwood, Dept. of Classics, University of Toronto, 8. Ancient Scepticism, Prof. Michael Frede, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Oxford, 9. Hellenistic Mathematical Sciences, Dr Alan Bowen, Institute for Research in Classical Philosophy and Science, Princeton, 10. Hellenistic Biological Sciences, Prof. R. D. Hankinson, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Texas at Austin, 11. Neo-Platonism, Prof. Eyjolfur Emilsson, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Iceland, Iceland, 12. Augustine, Prof. G. J. P. O'Daly, Dept. of Latin, University College London.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This volume provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the key areas of late Greek and early Christian Philosophy, written by experts in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: Prof. David Furley , Dept. of Classics, Princeton University, 1. Aristotle's Philosophy of Nature, David Furley, 2. Aristotle: Logic and Metaphysics, Prof. Alan Code, Dept. of Philosophy, Ohio State University, 3.Aristotle: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Mind, Prof. David Gallop, 4. Aristotle: Ethics, Dr Roger Crisp, St Annes College, Oxford University, Politics, Dr Robert Sharples, Depts. of Greek and Latin, University College London, 5. The Peripatetic School, Dr Robert Sharples, Depts. of Greek and Latin, University College London, 6.Epicureanism, Dr Stephen Everson, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Michigan, 7. Stoicism, Prof. Brad Inwood, Dept. of Classics, University of Toronto, 8. Ancient Scepticism, Prof. Michael Frede, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Oxford, 9. Hellenistic Mathematical Sciences, Dr Alan Bowen, Institute for Research in Classical Philosophy and Science, Princeton, 10. Hellenistic Biological Sciences, Prof. R. D. Hankinson, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Texas at Austin, 11. Neo-Platonism, Prof. Eyjolfur Emilsson, Dept. of Philosophy, University of Iceland, Iceland, 12. Augustine, Prof. G. J. P. O'Daly, Dept. of Latin, University College London.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This volume provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the key areas of late Greek and early Christian Philosophy, written by experts in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B505 .F76 1999 Unknown
Book
xxvi, 494 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • General editors' preface. Notes on contributors Chronology. Introduction C.C.W. Taylor 1. The polis and its culture Robin Osborne 2. The Ionians Malcolm Schofield 3. Heraclitus Catherine Osborne 4. Pythagoreans and Eleatics Edward Hussey 5. Empedocles M.R. Wright 6. Anaxagoras and the Atomists C.C.W. Taylor 7. The Sophists G.B. Kerferd 8. Greek arithmetic, geometry, and harmonics: Thales to Plato Ian Mueller 9. Socrates and the beginnings of moral philosophy Hugh H. Benson 10. Plato: metaphysics and epistemology Robert Heinaman 11. Plato: ethics and politics A.W. Price 12. Plato: aesthetics and psychology Christopher Rowe Index locorum. Index of names Index of subjects. Glossary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Volume 1 of the Routledge History of Philosophy covers one of the most remarkable periods in human thought. In the space of two and a half centuries, philosophy developed from quasi-mythological speculation to a state in which many of the most fundamental questions about the universe, the mind and human conduct had been vigorously pursued, and some of the most enduring masterworks of Western thought had been written. Supplemented with a chronology, a glossary of technical terms and an extensive bibliography, this volume will prove an invaluable and comprehensive guide to the beginnings of philosophy. R.G. Osborne, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, M. Schofield, University of Cambridge, Catherine Osborne, University of Wales, E.L. Hussey, University of Oxford, M.R. Wrig.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • General editors' preface. Notes on contributors Chronology. Introduction C.C.W. Taylor 1. The polis and its culture Robin Osborne 2. The Ionians Malcolm Schofield 3. Heraclitus Catherine Osborne 4. Pythagoreans and Eleatics Edward Hussey 5. Empedocles M.R. Wright 6. Anaxagoras and the Atomists C.C.W. Taylor 7. The Sophists G.B. Kerferd 8. Greek arithmetic, geometry, and harmonics: Thales to Plato Ian Mueller 9. Socrates and the beginnings of moral philosophy Hugh H. Benson 10. Plato: metaphysics and epistemology Robert Heinaman 11. Plato: ethics and politics A.W. Price 12. Plato: aesthetics and psychology Christopher Rowe Index locorum. Index of names Index of subjects. Glossary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Volume 1 of the Routledge History of Philosophy covers one of the most remarkable periods in human thought. In the space of two and a half centuries, philosophy developed from quasi-mythological speculation to a state in which many of the most fundamental questions about the universe, the mind and human conduct had been vigorously pursued, and some of the most enduring masterworks of Western thought had been written. Supplemented with a chronology, a glossary of technical terms and an extensive bibliography, this volume will prove an invaluable and comprehensive guide to the beginnings of philosophy. R.G. Osborne, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, M. Schofield, University of Cambridge, Catherine Osborne, University of Wales, E.L. Hussey, University of Oxford, M.R. Wrig.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B187.5 .R68 1997 In-library use
Book
xxxi, 466 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
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B804 .P538 1997 In-library use
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B804 .P538 1997 Unknown
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iv, 395 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
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B1302 .E65 B68 1996 In-library use
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B1302 .E65 B68 1996 Unknown
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xxxviii, 461 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
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Q174.8 .P55 1996 In-library use
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Q174.8 .P55 1996 Unknown
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xliii, 524 p. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. The beginnings of phenomenology: Husserl and his predecessors Richard Cobb-Stevens, Boston College 2. Philosophy of existence 1: Heidegger Jacques Taminiaux, University of Louvain, Belgium 3. Philosophy of existence 2: Sartre Thomas Flynn, Emory University 4. Philosophy of existence 3: Merleau-Ponty Bernard Cullen, Queen's University, Belfast 5. Philosophies of religion: Jaspers, Marcel, Levinas William Desmond, Loyola College 6. Philosophies of science: Mach, Duhem, Bachelard Babette Babich, Fordham University 7. Philosophies of Marxism: Gramsci, Lukacs, Benjamin, Althusser Michael Kelly, University of Southampton 8. Critical theory: from Adorno to Habermas David Rasmussen, Boston College 9. Hermeneutics: Gadamer, Ricoeur Gary Madison, McMaster University 10. Italian idealism and after: Croce, Gentile, Vattimo Giacomo Rinaldi, University of Urbino, Italy 11. French structuralism and after: Barthes, Lacan, Levi-Strauss, Foucault Hugh Silverman, State University of New York at Stony Brook 12. French feminism and after: de Beauvoir, Kristeva, Irigaray, Cixious Alison Ainley, Oxford Brookes University 13. Deconstruction Simon Critchley, Essex University 14. Derrida Timothy Mooney, Essex University 15. Postmodernist theory: Lyotard, Baudrillard Thomas Docherty, Trinity College, Dublin.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Continental philosophy, as it has emerged in the twentieth century, is less a seamless fabric than a patchquilt of diverse strands. Phenomenology, hermeneutics, existentialism, structuralism, critical theory, deconstruction - these are some of the salient movements which have developed in continental Europe between 1900 and the 1990's, though their influence is by no means confined to geographic location. Continental thought has proved highly exportable, circulating far beyond the frontiers of Europe to provoke strong responses in the intellectual world at large. The fifteen articles in this volume outline and assess some of the issues and experiments of continental philosophy. The first five span the twin movements of phenomenology and existentialism, running from Husserl and Heidegger to Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Levinas. Subsequent essays deal with specific currents of continental thought in such areas as science, Marxism, linguistics, politics, aesthetics, feminism and hermeneutics. A final chapter on postmodernism highlights the manner in which so many concerns of continental thought culminate in a radical anti-foundationalism. This volume provides a broad, scholarly introduction to this period for students of philosophy and related disciplines, as well as some original interpretations of these authors. It includes a glossary of technical terms and a chronological tube of philosophical, scientific and other cultural events.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. The beginnings of phenomenology: Husserl and his predecessors Richard Cobb-Stevens, Boston College 2. Philosophy of existence 1: Heidegger Jacques Taminiaux, University of Louvain, Belgium 3. Philosophy of existence 2: Sartre Thomas Flynn, Emory University 4. Philosophy of existence 3: Merleau-Ponty Bernard Cullen, Queen's University, Belfast 5. Philosophies of religion: Jaspers, Marcel, Levinas William Desmond, Loyola College 6. Philosophies of science: Mach, Duhem, Bachelard Babette Babich, Fordham University 7. Philosophies of Marxism: Gramsci, Lukacs, Benjamin, Althusser Michael Kelly, University of Southampton 8. Critical theory: from Adorno to Habermas David Rasmussen, Boston College 9. Hermeneutics: Gadamer, Ricoeur Gary Madison, McMaster University 10. Italian idealism and after: Croce, Gentile, Vattimo Giacomo Rinaldi, University of Urbino, Italy 11. French structuralism and after: Barthes, Lacan, Levi-Strauss, Foucault Hugh Silverman, State University of New York at Stony Brook 12. French feminism and after: de Beauvoir, Kristeva, Irigaray, Cixious Alison Ainley, Oxford Brookes University 13. Deconstruction Simon Critchley, Essex University 14. Derrida Timothy Mooney, Essex University 15. Postmodernist theory: Lyotard, Baudrillard Thomas Docherty, Trinity College, Dublin.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Continental philosophy, as it has emerged in the twentieth century, is less a seamless fabric than a patchquilt of diverse strands. Phenomenology, hermeneutics, existentialism, structuralism, critical theory, deconstruction - these are some of the salient movements which have developed in continental Europe between 1900 and the 1990's, though their influence is by no means confined to geographic location. Continental thought has proved highly exportable, circulating far beyond the frontiers of Europe to provoke strong responses in the intellectual world at large. The fifteen articles in this volume outline and assess some of the issues and experiments of continental philosophy. The first five span the twin movements of phenomenology and existentialism, running from Husserl and Heidegger to Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Levinas. Subsequent essays deal with specific currents of continental thought in such areas as science, Marxism, linguistics, politics, aesthetics, feminism and hermeneutics. A final chapter on postmodernism highlights the manner in which so many concerns of continental thought culminate in a radical anti-foundationalism. This volume provides a broad, scholarly introduction to this period for students of philosophy and related disciplines, as well as some original interpretations of these authors. It includes a glossary of technical terms and a chronological tube of philosophical, scientific and other cultural events.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B804 .T884 1994 In-library use
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B804 .T884 1994 Unknown
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xxv, 408 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. From Leibniz to Kant Lewis White Beck, University of Rochester 2. Kant's copernican revolution Daniel Bonevac, University of Texas at Austin 3. Kant's moral philosophy Don Becker, University of Texas at Austin 4. Kant: Critique of Judgment Patrick Gardiner, Magdalen College, Oxford 5. Fichte and Schelling: the jena period Dan Breazeale, University of Kentucky 6. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit Robert C.Solomon, University of Texas at Austin 7. Hegel's logic and philosophy of mind Willem deVries, University of New Hampshire 8. Hegel, spirit, and politics Leo Rauch, Babson College 9. The young Hegelians, Feuerbach and Marx Robert Nola, University of Auckland 10. Arthur Schopenhauer Kathleen M.Higgins, University of Texas at Austin 11. Kierkegaard's speculative despair Judith Butler, Johns Hopkins University.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The turn of the 19th century marked an explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, by Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of "German Idealism", inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G.W.F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as those who reacted against Kant - Marx and Kierkegaard, for example. This volume traces the emergence of German Idealism from Kant and his predecessors through the first half of the 19th century, ending with the irrationalism of Kierkegaard. It provides a broad, scholarly introduction to this period for students of philosophy and related disciplines, as well as some original interpretations of these authors. Each chapter is written by a distinguished scholar in the field. A glossary of technical terms together with a chronological table of philosophical, scientific and other important cultural events are provided.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. From Leibniz to Kant Lewis White Beck, University of Rochester 2. Kant's copernican revolution Daniel Bonevac, University of Texas at Austin 3. Kant's moral philosophy Don Becker, University of Texas at Austin 4. Kant: Critique of Judgment Patrick Gardiner, Magdalen College, Oxford 5. Fichte and Schelling: the jena period Dan Breazeale, University of Kentucky 6. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit Robert C.Solomon, University of Texas at Austin 7. Hegel's logic and philosophy of mind Willem deVries, University of New Hampshire 8. Hegel, spirit, and politics Leo Rauch, Babson College 9. The young Hegelians, Feuerbach and Marx Robert Nola, University of Auckland 10. Arthur Schopenhauer Kathleen M.Higgins, University of Texas at Austin 11. Kierkegaard's speculative despair Judith Butler, Johns Hopkins University.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The turn of the 19th century marked an explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, by Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of "German Idealism", inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G.W.F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as those who reacted against Kant - Marx and Kierkegaard, for example. This volume traces the emergence of German Idealism from Kant and his predecessors through the first half of the 19th century, ending with the irrationalism of Kierkegaard. It provides a broad, scholarly introduction to this period for students of philosophy and related disciplines, as well as some original interpretations of these authors. Each chapter is written by a distinguished scholar in the field. A glossary of technical terms together with a chronological table of philosophical, scientific and other important cultural events are provided.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B2615 .A35 1993 In-library use
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B2615 .A35 1993 Unknown
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xxix, 444 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The philosophy of the Italian Renaissance Jill Kraye, University of London 2. Renaissance philosophy outside Italy Stuart Brown, The Open University 3. Science and mathematics from the Renaissance to Descartes George Mollard, University of Aberdeen 4. Francis Bacon and man's two-faced kingdom Antonio Perez-Ramos, University of Murcia, Spain 5. Descartes: methodology Stephen Gaukroger, University of Sydney 6. Descartes: metaphysics and philosophy of mind John Cottingham, University of Reading 7. Seventeenth century materialism: Gassendi and Hobbes T. Sorell, The Open University 8. Spinoza: metaphysics and knowledge G.H.R. Parkinson, University of Reading 9. The moral and political philosophy of Spinoza Hans W.Blom, Erasmus University 10. Occasionalism Daisie Radner, State University of New York at Buffalo 11. Leibniz: truth, knowledge and metaphysics Nicholas Jolley, University of California at San Diego.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The philosophy discussed in this volume covers a period of three hundred and fifty years, from the middle of the fourteenth century to the early years of the eighteenth century: the birth of modern philosophy. The chief topics are Renaissance philosophy and seventeenth century rationalism - in particular Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz. The volume does not deal with these movements exclusively, but places them within a wider intellectual context. It considers the scholastic thought with which Renaissance philosophy interacted; it also considers the thought of seventeenth century philosophers such as Bacon, Hobbes and Gassendi, who were not rationalists but whose thought elicited responses from the rationalists. It considers, too, the important topic of the rise of modern science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and its relations to the philosophy of the period. This volume provides a broad, scholarly introduction to this period for students of philosophy and related disciplines, as well as some original interpretations of these authors. It includes a glossary of technical terms and a chronological table of philosophical, scientific and other cultural events.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. The philosophy of the Italian Renaissance Jill Kraye, University of London 2. Renaissance philosophy outside Italy Stuart Brown, The Open University 3. Science and mathematics from the Renaissance to Descartes George Mollard, University of Aberdeen 4. Francis Bacon and man's two-faced kingdom Antonio Perez-Ramos, University of Murcia, Spain 5. Descartes: methodology Stephen Gaukroger, University of Sydney 6. Descartes: metaphysics and philosophy of mind John Cottingham, University of Reading 7. Seventeenth century materialism: Gassendi and Hobbes T. Sorell, The Open University 8. Spinoza: metaphysics and knowledge G.H.R. Parkinson, University of Reading 9. The moral and political philosophy of Spinoza Hans W.Blom, Erasmus University 10. Occasionalism Daisie Radner, State University of New York at Buffalo 11. Leibniz: truth, knowledge and metaphysics Nicholas Jolley, University of California at San Diego.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The philosophy discussed in this volume covers a period of three hundred and fifty years, from the middle of the fourteenth century to the early years of the eighteenth century: the birth of modern philosophy. The chief topics are Renaissance philosophy and seventeenth century rationalism - in particular Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz. The volume does not deal with these movements exclusively, but places them within a wider intellectual context. It considers the scholastic thought with which Renaissance philosophy interacted; it also considers the thought of seventeenth century philosophers such as Bacon, Hobbes and Gassendi, who were not rationalists but whose thought elicited responses from the rationalists. It considers, too, the important topic of the rise of modern science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and its relations to the philosophy of the period. This volume provides a broad, scholarly introduction to this period for students of philosophy and related disciplines, as well as some original interpretations of these authors. It includes a glossary of technical terms and a chronological table of philosophical, scientific and other cultural events.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B770 .R38 1993 In-library use
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B770 .R38 1993 Unknown
Book
466 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The early utilitarians: James Mill and Bentham G.L. Williams, University of Sheffield 2. Whewell's philosophy of science and ethics Struan Jacobs, Deakins University 3. J.S. Mill: ethics and politics R.F. Khan, Monash University 4. J.S. Mill: logic and metaphysics John Skorupski, University of St Andrews 5. Sidgwick's ethics C.A.J. Coady, University of Melbourne 6. Comte and positivism Robert Brown, Australian National University 7. Nietzsche Robin Small, Monash University 8. Dilthey Michael Lessnoff, Glasgow University 9. Logic and the philosophy of mathematics in the 19th century J.C. Stillwell, Monash University 10. 19th century philosophy of biology Jagdish Hattiangadi, York University, Canada 11. 19th century philosophy of psychology Edward S. Reed, Franklin and Marshall College 12. American pragmatism: Peirce Cheryl Misak, University of Toronto 13. American pragmatism: James J.E. Tiles, University of Hawaii at Manoa 14. Green and Bosanquet Gerald F. Gaus, University of Minnesota 15. Bradley T.L.S. Sprigge, University of Edinburgh.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The nineteenth century was a period of intense intellectual activity with major advances being made in the sciences, in mathematics and in psychology, which gradually established itself as a discipline independent of philosophy. Philosophical disputes arose about the nature of scientific method and about whether, or to what extent, the understanding of human conduct and human society required the adoption of the methods of observation and experiment common to the natural sciences. Different philosophical theories about the nature of reality, the foundations of knowledge and of morality, and the limits of individual freedom were systematically developed, and many such theories are still very much alive in contemporary philosophical debates. The philosophers discussed in this volume include those belonging to both the 'analytical' and the 'continental' traditions, as well as the now influential American pragmatists. Each chapter is written by a different author who presents the issues in the context of the period in which they arose, while also keeping an eye on their relevance to current philosophical interests. A few philosophers are discussed in more than one chapter, in different but mutually illuminating contexts. Each chapter in The Nineteenth Century is self-contained and makes a distinctive contribution to a set of philosophical problems. This volume provides a broad, scholarly introduction to nineteenth-century philosophy. It also contains a glossary of philosophical terms and a chronological table of philosophical and cultural events. n.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. The early utilitarians: James Mill and Bentham G.L. Williams, University of Sheffield 2. Whewell's philosophy of science and ethics Struan Jacobs, Deakins University 3. J.S. Mill: ethics and politics R.F. Khan, Monash University 4. J.S. Mill: logic and metaphysics John Skorupski, University of St Andrews 5. Sidgwick's ethics C.A.J. Coady, University of Melbourne 6. Comte and positivism Robert Brown, Australian National University 7. Nietzsche Robin Small, Monash University 8. Dilthey Michael Lessnoff, Glasgow University 9. Logic and the philosophy of mathematics in the 19th century J.C. Stillwell, Monash University 10. 19th century philosophy of biology Jagdish Hattiangadi, York University, Canada 11. 19th century philosophy of psychology Edward S. Reed, Franklin and Marshall College 12. American pragmatism: Peirce Cheryl Misak, University of Toronto 13. American pragmatism: James J.E. Tiles, University of Hawaii at Manoa 14. Green and Bosanquet Gerald F. Gaus, University of Minnesota 15. Bradley T.L.S. Sprigge, University of Edinburgh.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The nineteenth century was a period of intense intellectual activity with major advances being made in the sciences, in mathematics and in psychology, which gradually established itself as a discipline independent of philosophy. Philosophical disputes arose about the nature of scientific method and about whether, or to what extent, the understanding of human conduct and human society required the adoption of the methods of observation and experiment common to the natural sciences. Different philosophical theories about the nature of reality, the foundations of knowledge and of morality, and the limits of individual freedom were systematically developed, and many such theories are still very much alive in contemporary philosophical debates. The philosophers discussed in this volume include those belonging to both the 'analytical' and the 'continental' traditions, as well as the now influential American pragmatists. Each chapter is written by a different author who presents the issues in the context of the period in which they arose, while also keeping an eye on their relevance to current philosophical interests. A few philosophers are discussed in more than one chapter, in different but mutually illuminating contexts. Each chapter in The Nineteenth Century is self-contained and makes a distinctive contribution to a set of philosophical problems. This volume provides a broad, scholarly introduction to nineteenth-century philosophy. It also contains a glossary of philosophical terms and a chronological table of philosophical and cultural events. n.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
InfoCenter (non-circulating) Find it
B803 .N55 1994 In-library use
Stacks Find it
B803 .N55 1994 Unknown
Book
xii, 934 p. ; 24 cm.
  • What is Jewish Philosophy? Daniel H. Frank Foundations and First Principles. The Bible as a Source for Philosophical Reflection Shalom Carmy and David Shatz Hellenistic Jewish Philosophy David Winston The Talmud as a Source for Philosophical Reflection David Novak Medieval Jewish Philosophy. The Nature of Medieval Jewish Philosophy Alexander Broadie The Islamic Social and Cultural Context Steven M. Wasserstrom Kalam in Medieval Jewish Philosophy Haggai Ben-Shammai Medieval Jewish Neoplatonism T. M. Rudavsky Judah Halevi Lenn E. Goodman Medieval Jewish Aristotelianism: Introduction Norbert M. Samuelson Moses Maimonides Howard Kreisel Maimonides and Aquinas Alexander Broadie The Social and Cultural Context: Thirteenth to Fifteeth Centuries Marc Saperstein The Maimonidean Controversy Idit Dobbs-Weinstein Hebrew Philosophy in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries Charles H. Manekin Levi ben Gershom (Gersonides) Seymour Feldman Chasdai Crescas Daniel J. Lasker Medieval and Renaissance Jewish Political Philosophy Abraham Melamed Jewish Mysticism: A Philosophical Overview Elliot R. Wolfson Jewish Philosophy on the Eve of Modernity Hava Tirosh-Rothschild Modern Jewish Philosophy. The Nature of Modern Jewish Philosophy Ze'ev Levy The Social and Cultural Context: Seventeenth Century Europe Elisheva Carlebach The Jewish Community of Amsterdam Richard H. Popkin Spinoza Seymour Feldman The Social and Cultural Context: Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment Lois C. Dubin Mendelssohn Michael L. Morgan Nineteenth-Century German Reform Philosophy Mordecai Finley The Ideology of Wissenschaft des Judentums David N. Myers Samson Raphael Hirsch Harry Lesser Traditional Reactions to Modern Jewish Reform: The Paradigm of German Orthodoxy David Ellenson Contemporary Jewish Philosophy. Jewish Nationalism Ze'ev Levy Zionism Ze'ev Levy Jewish Neokantianism: Hermann Cohen Kenneth Seeskin Jewish Existentialism: Buber, Rosenzwieg and Soloveitchik Oliver Leaman Leo Strauss Kenneth Hart Green The Shoah Steven T. Katz Postmodern Jewish Philosophy Richard A. Cohen Jewish Feminist Thought Judith Plaskow The Future of Jewish Philosophy Oliver Leaman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
There exists a particularly rich tradition of Jewish philosophy, and this volume presents a view of the field as a whole. Although there are books that detail the history of Jewish philosophy, this is the first time a volume has been prepared by a variety of authors for this purpose. The advantages of this are that they bring with them a variety of perspectives and range of ideas which goes to make up a unique approach to the nature and content of Jewish philosophy. Thirty-five authors, from Britain, Canada, Israel, and the United States cover the whole breadth of Jewish philosophy, concentrating upon the philosophical interest of the ideas themselves. No attempt has been made to deal with every single Jewish philosopher, but the major schools of thought and controversy are thoroughly dealt with in this collection, and useful bibliographical information is supplied by the individual authors. The discussion ranges from the Bible itself to postmodern trends, from the thought of Moses Maimonides to those who discuss the nature of the Holocaust. The links between Jewish philosophy and its wider cultural context emerge, so that an accurate view of the place of Jewish philosophy in the development of philosophy itself emerges. There is nowhere at present that the reader interested in exploring the whole scope and variety of Jewish philosophy can go, and there has long been the need for an edition like this that brings together experts in the field who write clearly and with philosophical acuity on their particular topics. This volume is likely to be a vital research tool for those interested in Jewish philosophy for some time to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • What is Jewish Philosophy? Daniel H. Frank Foundations and First Principles. The Bible as a Source for Philosophical Reflection Shalom Carmy and David Shatz Hellenistic Jewish Philosophy David Winston The Talmud as a Source for Philosophical Reflection David Novak Medieval Jewish Philosophy. The Nature of Medieval Jewish Philosophy Alexander Broadie The Islamic Social and Cultural Context Steven M. Wasserstrom Kalam in Medieval Jewish Philosophy Haggai Ben-Shammai Medieval Jewish Neoplatonism T. M. Rudavsky Judah Halevi Lenn E. Goodman Medieval Jewish Aristotelianism: Introduction Norbert M. Samuelson Moses Maimonides Howard Kreisel Maimonides and Aquinas Alexander Broadie The Social and Cultural Context: Thirteenth to Fifteeth Centuries Marc Saperstein The Maimonidean Controversy Idit Dobbs-Weinstein Hebrew Philosophy in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries Charles H. Manekin Levi ben Gershom (Gersonides) Seymour Feldman Chasdai Crescas Daniel J. Lasker Medieval and Renaissance Jewish Political Philosophy Abraham Melamed Jewish Mysticism: A Philosophical Overview Elliot R. Wolfson Jewish Philosophy on the Eve of Modernity Hava Tirosh-Rothschild Modern Jewish Philosophy. The Nature of Modern Jewish Philosophy Ze'ev Levy The Social and Cultural Context: Seventeenth Century Europe Elisheva Carlebach The Jewish Community of Amsterdam Richard H. Popkin Spinoza Seymour Feldman The Social and Cultural Context: Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment Lois C. Dubin Mendelssohn Michael L. Morgan Nineteenth-Century German Reform Philosophy Mordecai Finley The Ideology of Wissenschaft des Judentums David N. Myers Samson Raphael Hirsch Harry Lesser Traditional Reactions to Modern Jewish Reform: The Paradigm of German Orthodoxy David Ellenson Contemporary Jewish Philosophy. Jewish Nationalism Ze'ev Levy Zionism Ze'ev Levy Jewish Neokantianism: Hermann Cohen Kenneth Seeskin Jewish Existentialism: Buber, Rosenzwieg and Soloveitchik Oliver Leaman Leo Strauss Kenneth Hart Green The Shoah Steven T. Katz Postmodern Jewish Philosophy Richard A. Cohen Jewish Feminist Thought Judith Plaskow The Future of Jewish Philosophy Oliver Leaman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
There exists a particularly rich tradition of Jewish philosophy, and this volume presents a view of the field as a whole. Although there are books that detail the history of Jewish philosophy, this is the first time a volume has been prepared by a variety of authors for this purpose. The advantages of this are that they bring with them a variety of perspectives and range of ideas which goes to make up a unique approach to the nature and content of Jewish philosophy. Thirty-five authors, from Britain, Canada, Israel, and the United States cover the whole breadth of Jewish philosophy, concentrating upon the philosophical interest of the ideas themselves. No attempt has been made to deal with every single Jewish philosopher, but the major schools of thought and controversy are thoroughly dealt with in this collection, and useful bibliographical information is supplied by the individual authors. The discussion ranges from the Bible itself to postmodern trends, from the thought of Moses Maimonides to those who discuss the nature of the Holocaust. The links between Jewish philosophy and its wider cultural context emerge, so that an accurate view of the place of Jewish philosophy in the development of philosophy itself emerges. There is nowhere at present that the reader interested in exploring the whole scope and variety of Jewish philosophy can go, and there has long been the need for an edition like this that brings together experts in the field who write clearly and with philosophical acuity on their particular topics. This volume is likely to be a vital research tool for those interested in Jewish philosophy for some time to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B154 .H57 1997 Unknown
Book
2 v. (xx, 1211 p.) ; 24 cm.
Islamic philosophy has often been treated as mainly of historical interest, belonging to the history of ideas rather than to philosophy. This volume challenges this belief. The Routledge History of Islamic Philosophy is made up entirely of new essays by a distinguished list of writers. They provide detailed discussions of the most important thinkers and the key concepts in Islamic philosophy, from earliest times right up to the present day, as well as a series of discussions of the cultural and religious background. Fifty authors from over sixteen different countries have contributed to this volume, and they were chosen not only for their particular expertise but also in order to allow a wide variety of views to be represented. No interpretation of Islamic philosophy has been excluded and an accurate indication of the state of the art is presented through the contributions of the authors as a whole. This is an unusually wide-ranging collection: it includes analysis of Arabic, Persian, Indian, Jewish, Turkish and South East Asian philosophy, together with extensive discussions of relevant areas of Greek and Western philosophy. An important but so far little understood philosophical tradition is clearly and thoroughly explored in this volume. Islamic philosophy comes to be seen as a continuing and lively philosophical activity, one which is just as capable of asking relevant questions today as it was in the past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Islamic philosophy has often been treated as mainly of historical interest, belonging to the history of ideas rather than to philosophy. This volume challenges this belief. The Routledge History of Islamic Philosophy is made up entirely of new essays by a distinguished list of writers. They provide detailed discussions of the most important thinkers and the key concepts in Islamic philosophy, from earliest times right up to the present day, as well as a series of discussions of the cultural and religious background. Fifty authors from over sixteen different countries have contributed to this volume, and they were chosen not only for their particular expertise but also in order to allow a wide variety of views to be represented. No interpretation of Islamic philosophy has been excluded and an accurate indication of the state of the art is presented through the contributions of the authors as a whole. This is an unusually wide-ranging collection: it includes analysis of Arabic, Persian, Indian, Jewish, Turkish and South East Asian philosophy, together with extensive discussions of relevant areas of Greek and Western philosophy. An important but so far little understood philosophical tradition is clearly and thoroughly explored in this volume. Islamic philosophy comes to be seen as a continuing and lively philosophical activity, one which is just as capable of asking relevant questions today as it was in the past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B741 .H58 1996 PT.1 Unknown
B741 .H58 1996 PT.2 Unknown
Book
xii, 631 p. ; 26 cm.
  • Preface Contributors Methodological Issues Concerning Chinese Philosophy: A Theme Introduction Bo Mou Part 1: Identity of Chinese Philosophy 1. Emergence of the History of Chinese Philosophy Antonio S. Cua Part 2. Classical Chinese Philosophy (I): Pre-Han Period 2. The Yi-Jing and the Yin-Yang Ways of Thinking Chung-ying Cheng 3. Classical Confucianism (1): Confucius and the Lun-Yu Edward Slingerland 4. The Mohist School Christopher J. Fraser 5. School of Names Yiu-ming Fung 6. Classical Confucianism (2): Meng Zi and Xun Zi Kim-chong Chong 7. Daoism (1): Lao Zi and the Dao-De-Jing Xiaogan Liu 8. Daoism (2): Zhuang Zi and the Zhuang-Zi Vincent Shen Part 3: Classical Chinese Philosophy (II): From Han Through Tang 9. Han Thought Yiu-ming Fung 10. Neo-Daoism Alan K. L. Chan 11. Chinese Buddhism Whalen Lai Part 4: Classical Chinese Philosophy (III): From Song Through Early Qing 12. Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (1): From Cheng Yi to Zhu Xi Shu-hsien Liu 13. Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (2): From Lu Jiuyuan to Wang Yang-ming Shu-hsien Liu 14. Philosophical Development in Late Ming and Early Qing Chung-yi Cheng Part 5: Modern Chinese Philosophy: From Late Qing Through 21th Century 15. Enlightenment Movement: Introducing Western Thoughts and Early Engagement Attempts Xinyan Jiang 16. Development of Dialectical Materialism in China Chenshan Tian 17. Modern Neo-Confucian Movement Sor-hoon Tan 18. Constructive Engagement of Chinese and Western Philosophy: A Contemporary Trend Towards World Philosophy Bo Mou Appendixes Chronology of Philosophers Note on Transcription Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The History of Chinese Philosophy is a comprehensive and authoritative examination of the movements and thinkers that have shaped Chinese philosophy over the last three thousand years. An outstanding team of international contributors provide seventeen accessible entries organised into five clear parts: Identity of Chinese Philosophy Classical Chinese Philosophy (I): Pre-Han Period Classical Chinese Philosophy (II): From Han Through Tang Classical Chinese Philosophy (III): From Song Through Early Qing Modern Chinese Philosophy: From Late Qing Through 21st Century This outstanding collection is essential reading for students of Chinese philosophy, and will be of interest to those seeking to explore the lasting significance this rich and complex philosophical tradition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface Contributors Methodological Issues Concerning Chinese Philosophy: A Theme Introduction Bo Mou Part 1: Identity of Chinese Philosophy 1. Emergence of the History of Chinese Philosophy Antonio S. Cua Part 2. Classical Chinese Philosophy (I): Pre-Han Period 2. The Yi-Jing and the Yin-Yang Ways of Thinking Chung-ying Cheng 3. Classical Confucianism (1): Confucius and the Lun-Yu Edward Slingerland 4. The Mohist School Christopher J. Fraser 5. School of Names Yiu-ming Fung 6. Classical Confucianism (2): Meng Zi and Xun Zi Kim-chong Chong 7. Daoism (1): Lao Zi and the Dao-De-Jing Xiaogan Liu 8. Daoism (2): Zhuang Zi and the Zhuang-Zi Vincent Shen Part 3: Classical Chinese Philosophy (II): From Han Through Tang 9. Han Thought Yiu-ming Fung 10. Neo-Daoism Alan K. L. Chan 11. Chinese Buddhism Whalen Lai Part 4: Classical Chinese Philosophy (III): From Song Through Early Qing 12. Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (1): From Cheng Yi to Zhu Xi Shu-hsien Liu 13. Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (2): From Lu Jiuyuan to Wang Yang-ming Shu-hsien Liu 14. Philosophical Development in Late Ming and Early Qing Chung-yi Cheng Part 5: Modern Chinese Philosophy: From Late Qing Through 21th Century 15. Enlightenment Movement: Introducing Western Thoughts and Early Engagement Attempts Xinyan Jiang 16. Development of Dialectical Materialism in China Chenshan Tian 17. Modern Neo-Confucian Movement Sor-hoon Tan 18. Constructive Engagement of Chinese and Western Philosophy: A Contemporary Trend Towards World Philosophy Bo Mou Appendixes Chronology of Philosophers Note on Transcription Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The History of Chinese Philosophy is a comprehensive and authoritative examination of the movements and thinkers that have shaped Chinese philosophy over the last three thousand years. An outstanding team of international contributors provide seventeen accessible entries organised into five clear parts: Identity of Chinese Philosophy Classical Chinese Philosophy (I): Pre-Han Period Classical Chinese Philosophy (II): From Han Through Tang Classical Chinese Philosophy (III): From Song Through Early Qing Modern Chinese Philosophy: From Late Qing Through 21st Century This outstanding collection is essential reading for students of Chinese philosophy, and will be of interest to those seeking to explore the lasting significance this rich and complex philosophical tradition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B5231 .H57 2009 Unknown

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