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Book
206 p. : ill (some col) ; 27 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
TR692 .B87X 2013 Unknown
Book
xiv, 165 pages : ill. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
TR510 .C38 2013 Available
Book
192 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
  • Setting out
  • Conquering the unknown
  • Picturing nature
  • Encounters and exchanges
  • Returns and reputations.
  • Setting out
  • Conquering the unknown
  • Picturing nature
  • Encounters and exchanges
  • Returns and reputations.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
TR820.5 .R93 2013 Unknown
Book
178 p. : ill ; 32 cm.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
TR647 .A23 2012 F Unknown
Book
xi, 265 p. : ill ; 27 cm.
"Examines three projects in late nineteenth-century scientific photography: the endeavors of Alphonse Bertillon, Francis Galton, and Etienne-Jules Marey. Develops new theoretical perspectives on the history of photographic technology, as well as the history of scientific imaging more generally"--Provided by publisher.
"Examines three projects in late nineteenth-century scientific photography: the endeavors of Alphonse Bertillon, Francis Galton, and Etienne-Jules Marey. Develops new theoretical perspectives on the history of photographic technology, as well as the history of scientific imaging more generally"--Provided by publisher.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
TR139 .E44 2012 Unknown
Book
x, 290 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
dx.doi.org Oxford Scholarship Online
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
TR210 .T36 2011 Unknown
Book
239 p. ; ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
TR692 .F68 2009 F Unknown
Book
82 p. : col. ill., ports. ; 27 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
QH46.5 .N39 2009 Unknown
Book
139 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Since the middle of the nineteenth century, the histories of science and photography are so closely related that it might very well be impossible for one to be told without the other. Not only was photography invented by scientists, both amateur and professional, it was presented, discussed and refined in the halls of some of the world's most prestigious scientific institutions. Photography acquired a scientific patina very early, borrowing terms, analogies, and metaphors from science, gaining its identity and reputation by close association with key scientific ideas and practices. But science also borrowed from photography - scientists relied on photography's ability to capture experimental results that would otherwise be impossible to record, and the resulting images helped to mould the early public perception of science in many crucial ways."Photography and Science" is a richly-illustrated introduction to this complex and fascinating interconnection, serving as both an introduction to photography's technical innovations, and also to some key concepts in the history of science. Kelley Wilder tackles the thorny debate over photography's 'success' in the sciences, its use in practical fields like medicine (the X-ray), and the relationship of scientific theory to art practice. Featuring around 80 illuminating photographs, many published here for the first time, this book is a thought-provoking, broad-based examination, and will be an essential addition to the bookshelves of scientists, photographers, and art-historians alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Since the middle of the nineteenth century, the histories of science and photography are so closely related that it might very well be impossible for one to be told without the other. Not only was photography invented by scientists, both amateur and professional, it was presented, discussed and refined in the halls of some of the world's most prestigious scientific institutions. Photography acquired a scientific patina very early, borrowing terms, analogies, and metaphors from science, gaining its identity and reputation by close association with key scientific ideas and practices. But science also borrowed from photography - scientists relied on photography's ability to capture experimental results that would otherwise be impossible to record, and the resulting images helped to mould the early public perception of science in many crucial ways."Photography and Science" is a richly-illustrated introduction to this complex and fascinating interconnection, serving as both an introduction to photography's technical innovations, and also to some key concepts in the history of science. Kelley Wilder tackles the thorny debate over photography's 'success' in the sciences, its use in practical fields like medicine (the X-ray), and the relationship of scientific theory to art practice. Featuring around 80 illuminating photographs, many published here for the first time, this book is a thought-provoking, broad-based examination, and will be an essential addition to the bookshelves of scientists, photographers, and art-historians alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
TR200 .W55 2009 Unavailable Assumed lost Request
TR200 .W55 2009 Unknown
Book
215 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.
"Brought to Light" invites readers to step back to a time when photography, X-rays, and movies were new, when forays into the world beneath the skin or the realm beyond our everyday vision captivated scientists and the public alike. In this book, accounts of scientific experimentation blend with stories of showmanship to reveal how developments in nineteenth-century technology could enlighten as well as frighten and amaze. Through a series of 200 vintage images, produced by photographers, scientists, and amateur inventors, this book ultimately traces the rise of popular science.The images demonstrate early experiments with microscopes, telescopes, electricity and magnetism, motion studies, X-rays and radiation, and spirit photography. We learn how these pictures circulated among the public, whether through the press, world's fairs, or theatres. What started out as scientific progress, however, often took on the trappings of magic and superstition, as photography was enlisted to offer visual evidence of clairvoyance, spirits, and other occult influences. With beautifully reproduced plates and engaging narratives, this book embodies the aesthetic pleasures and excitement of the tale it tells.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Brought to Light" invites readers to step back to a time when photography, X-rays, and movies were new, when forays into the world beneath the skin or the realm beyond our everyday vision captivated scientists and the public alike. In this book, accounts of scientific experimentation blend with stories of showmanship to reveal how developments in nineteenth-century technology could enlighten as well as frighten and amaze. Through a series of 200 vintage images, produced by photographers, scientists, and amateur inventors, this book ultimately traces the rise of popular science.The images demonstrate early experiments with microscopes, telescopes, electricity and magnetism, motion studies, X-rays and radiation, and spirit photography. We learn how these pictures circulated among the public, whether through the press, world's fairs, or theatres. What started out as scientific progress, however, often took on the trappings of magic and superstition, as photography was enlisted to offer visual evidence of clairvoyance, spirits, and other occult influences. With beautifully reproduced plates and engaging narratives, this book embodies the aesthetic pleasures and excitement of the tale it tells.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
TR692 .B76 2008 F Unknown
Book
140 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
TR710 .E84 2008 Available
Book
xi, 301 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
PROQUEST SAFARI Unknown
Book
ix, 301 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Book
ix, 294 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
In "Nature Exposed", Jennifer Tucker studies the intersecting trajectories of photography and modern science in late Victorian Britain. She examines the role of photograph as witness in scientific investigation and explores the interplay between photography and scientific authority. Almost immediately after the invention of photography in 1839, photographs were characterized as offering objective access to reality - unmediated by human agency, political ties, or philosophy. This mechanical objectivity supposedly eliminated judgment and interpretation in reporting and picturing scientific results. But photography is a labor-intensive process that allows for, and sometimes requires, manipulation. In the late nineteenth century, the nature of this new technology sparked a complex debate about scientific practices and the value of the photographic images in the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge. Recovering the controversies and commentary surrounding the early creation of scientific photography and drawing on a wide range of new sources and critical theories, Tucker establishes a greater understanding of the rich visual culture of Victorian science and alternative forms of knowledge, including psychical research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In "Nature Exposed", Jennifer Tucker studies the intersecting trajectories of photography and modern science in late Victorian Britain. She examines the role of photograph as witness in scientific investigation and explores the interplay between photography and scientific authority. Almost immediately after the invention of photography in 1839, photographs were characterized as offering objective access to reality - unmediated by human agency, political ties, or philosophy. This mechanical objectivity supposedly eliminated judgment and interpretation in reporting and picturing scientific results. But photography is a labor-intensive process that allows for, and sometimes requires, manipulation. In the late nineteenth century, the nature of this new technology sparked a complex debate about scientific practices and the value of the photographic images in the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge. Recovering the controversies and commentary surrounding the early creation of scientific photography and drawing on a wide range of new sources and critical theories, Tucker establishes a greater understanding of the rich visual culture of Victorian science and alternative forms of knowledge, including psychical research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
TR692 .T83 2005 Unknown
Book
49 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
US Federal Documents Find it
A 13.88:RMRS-GTR-145 Unknown
Book
49 p. : digital, PDF file.
Book
232 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
  • A cloud of uncertainty
  • Bugs in the machine
  • Anatomy without knives
  • Supersenses
  • Echoes in the ether
  • Our place in the cosmos
  • Beyond light.
What we see, even on the brightest summer's day, is only a fraction of what is really there. But we have been inventing new ways of seeing, delving ever deeper into the invisible world, for more then a century now. We can now 'see' heat, sound and all manner of exotic energies and radiations. We can look deep into our minds and witness fleeting thoughts. We can look back in time to the dawn of the universe and we can even see the particles that we think might be the fundamental building blocks of reality. And computer simulations powered by 21st-century mathematics are hinting that there are still greater truths to be glimpsed beyond the clumsy realms of light and matter. With over 100 incredible images that take us from inside the atom to the edge of our universe and beyond, this book explores our journey into worlds inaccessible to our natural senses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A cloud of uncertainty
  • Bugs in the machine
  • Anatomy without knives
  • Supersenses
  • Echoes in the ether
  • Our place in the cosmos
  • Beyond light.
What we see, even on the brightest summer's day, is only a fraction of what is really there. But we have been inventing new ways of seeing, delving ever deeper into the invisible world, for more then a century now. We can now 'see' heat, sound and all manner of exotic energies and radiations. We can look deep into our minds and witness fleeting thoughts. We can look back in time to the dawn of the universe and we can even see the particles that we think might be the fundamental building blocks of reality. And computer simulations powered by 21st-century mathematics are hinting that there are still greater truths to be glimpsed beyond the clumsy realms of light and matter. With over 100 incredible images that take us from inside the atom to the edge of our universe and beyond, this book explores our journey into worlds inaccessible to our natural senses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
TR692.5 .B545 2004 F Unknown
Book
328 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
Science and engineering research must be communicated within the research community and to the general public, and a crucial element of that communication is visual. In Envisioning Science, science photographer Felice Frankel provides a guide to creating dynamic and compelling photographs for journal submissions and for scientific presentations to funding agencies, investors and the general public. The book is organised from the large to the small, from pictures of new material and biological structures made with a camera and lens, to images made with a stereomicroscope, compound microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The text explains how to design, craft and execute effective images, SEMs, and diagrams while maintaining scientific integrity. Full-colour illustrations, including many instructional side-by-side comparisons, provide examples from the physical and biological sciences, biotechnology, nanotechnology, electrical engineering, materials science and mechanical engineering to encourage a new way to see and create images of science. After a brief historical overview by science educator Phylis Morrison, Frankel discusses technical issues and, just as important, her personal approach to creating images that are both scientifically informational and accessible. This is a handbook that should become a standard tool in all research laboratories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Science and engineering research must be communicated within the research community and to the general public, and a crucial element of that communication is visual. In Envisioning Science, science photographer Felice Frankel provides a guide to creating dynamic and compelling photographs for journal submissions and for scientific presentations to funding agencies, investors and the general public. The book is organised from the large to the small, from pictures of new material and biological structures made with a camera and lens, to images made with a stereomicroscope, compound microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The text explains how to design, craft and execute effective images, SEMs, and diagrams while maintaining scientific integrity. Full-colour illustrations, including many instructional side-by-side comparisons, provide examples from the physical and biological sciences, biotechnology, nanotechnology, electrical engineering, materials science and mechanical engineering to encourage a new way to see and create images of science. After a brief historical overview by science educator Phylis Morrison, Frankel discusses technical issues and, just as important, her personal approach to creating images that are both scientifically informational and accessible. This is a handbook that should become a standard tool in all research laboratories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
TR692 .F73 2002 Unknown
Book
xi, 124 p. : ill. ; 22 cm. + 1 lenticular screen.
The catalog of a photography exhibition held at Rochester Institute of Technology in the fall of 2002, featuring photographs and explanatory captions from photographers in all scientific disciplines.
The catalog of a photography exhibition held at Rochester Institute of Technology in the fall of 2002, featuring photographs and explanatory captions from photographers in all scientific disciplines.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
TR692 .I433 2002 Unknown
Book
443 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
TR10 .O74 2002 Available

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