Search results

802 results

View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
1 online resource.
  • An Introduction to Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry-- Direct Analysis in real time (DART(R))-- Ionization Mechanisms of Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART)-- Atmospheric Samples Analysis Probe (ASAP) Mass Spectrometry-- Ambient Analysis by Thermal Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization-- Low Temperature Plasma Probe-- Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA), the Plasma-based Source for your ADI-MS needs-- Spray Desorption Collection and DESI Mechanisms-- Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization-- Secondary Electrospray Ionization-- Probe Electrospray Ionization-- Desorption Electrospray Mass Spectrometry-- Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulization-- Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Mechanisms, Configurations and Imaging Applications-- Electrospray Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry-- Paper Spray-- Inlet and Vacuum Ionization from Ambient Conditions-- Enabling Automated Sample Analysis by Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) Mass Spectrometry-- Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LAESI(R)-MS): Ambient Ionization Technology for 2D and 3D Molecular Imaging-- Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry (LESA MS): Combining Liquid Extraction, Surface Profiling and Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry in One Novel Analysis Technique-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Ambient ionization has emerged as one of the hottest and fastest growing topics in mass spectrometry enabling sample analysis with minimal sample preparation. Introducing the subject and explaining the basic concepts and terminology, this book will provide a comprehensive, unique treatise devoted to the subject. Written by acknowledged experts, there are full descriptions on how new ionization techniques work, with an overview of their strengths, weaknesses and applications. This title will bring the reader right up to date, with both applications and theory, and will be suitable as a tutorial text for those starting in the field from a variety of disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • An Introduction to Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry-- Direct Analysis in real time (DART(R))-- Ionization Mechanisms of Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART)-- Atmospheric Samples Analysis Probe (ASAP) Mass Spectrometry-- Ambient Analysis by Thermal Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization-- Low Temperature Plasma Probe-- Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA), the Plasma-based Source for your ADI-MS needs-- Spray Desorption Collection and DESI Mechanisms-- Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization-- Secondary Electrospray Ionization-- Probe Electrospray Ionization-- Desorption Electrospray Mass Spectrometry-- Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulization-- Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Mechanisms, Configurations and Imaging Applications-- Electrospray Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry-- Paper Spray-- Inlet and Vacuum Ionization from Ambient Conditions-- Enabling Automated Sample Analysis by Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) Mass Spectrometry-- Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LAESI(R)-MS): Ambient Ionization Technology for 2D and 3D Molecular Imaging-- Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry (LESA MS): Combining Liquid Extraction, Surface Profiling and Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry in One Novel Analysis Technique-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Ambient ionization has emerged as one of the hottest and fastest growing topics in mass spectrometry enabling sample analysis with minimal sample preparation. Introducing the subject and explaining the basic concepts and terminology, this book will provide a comprehensive, unique treatise devoted to the subject. Written by acknowledged experts, there are full descriptions on how new ionization techniques work, with an overview of their strengths, weaknesses and applications. This title will bring the reader right up to date, with both applications and theory, and will be suitable as a tutorial text for those starting in the field from a variety of disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xxii, 378 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
  • List of Contributors XIII Preface XVII Abbreviations XIX 1 Introduction to Mass Spectrometry, a Tutorial 1 Wilfried M.A. Niessen and David Falck 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Figures of Merit 1 1.2.1 Introduction 1 1.2.2 Resolution 2 1.2.3 Mass Accuracy 4 1.2.4 General Data Acquisition in MS 5 1.3 Analyte Ionization 6 1.3.1 Introduction 6 1.3.2 Electrospray Ionization 8 1.3.3 Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization 10 1.3.4 Other Ionization Methods 10 1.3.5 Solvent and Sample Compatibility Issues 11 1.4 Mass Analyzer Building Blocks 12 1.4.1 Introduction 12 1.4.2 Quadrupole Mass Analyzer 13 1.4.3 Ion-Trap Mass Analyzer 13 1.4.4 Time-of-Flight Mass Analyzer 15 1.4.5 Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer 16 1.4.6 Orbitrap Mass Analyzer 17 1.4.7 Ion Detection 18 1.5 Tandem Mass Spectrometry 18 1.5.1 Introduction: Tandem-in-Time and Tandem-in-Space 18 1.5.2 Ion Dissociation Techniques 20 1.5.3 Tandem Quadrupole MS MS Instruments 21 1.5.4 Ion-Trap MSn Instruments 23 1.5.5 Tandem TOF (TOF TOF) Instruments 23 1.5.6 Hybrid Instruments (Q TOF, Q LIT, IT TOF) 24 1.5.7 MS MS and MSn in FT-ICR-MS 26 1.5.8 Orbitrap-Based Hybrid Systems 27 1.5.9 Ion-Mobility Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry 28 1.6 Data Interpretation and Analytical Strategies 30 1.6.1 Data Acquisition in MS Revisited 30 1.6.2 Quantitative Bioanalysis and Residue Analysis 31 1.6.3 Identification of Small-Molecule Known Unknowns 32 1.6.4 Identification of Drug Metabolites 33 1.6.5 Protein Molecular Weight Determination 37 1.6.6 Peptide Fragmentation and Sequencing 38 1.6.7 General Proteomics Strategies: Top-Down, Middle-Down, Bottom-Up 39 1.7 Conclusion and Perspectives 43 References 43 Part I Direct MS Based Affinity Techniques 55 2 Studying Protein Protein Interactions by Combining Native Mass Spectrometry and Chemical Cross-Linking 57 Michal Sharon and Andrea Sinz 2.1 Introduction 57 2.2 Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry 58 2.3 Native MS 59 2.3.1 Instrumentation for High-mass ion Detection 60 2.3.2 Defining the Exact Mass of the Composing Subunits 60 2.3.3 Analyzing the Intact Complex 61 2.4 Chemical Cross-linking MS 64 2.4.1 Types of Cross-linkers 64 2.4.2 MS/MS Cleavable Cross-linkers 66 2.4.3 Data Analysis 68 2.5 Value of Combining NativeMS with Chemical Cross-linkingMS 68 2.6 Regulating the Giant 69 2.7 Capturing Transient Interactions 70 2.8 An Integrative Approach for Obtaining Low-Resolution Structures of Native Protein Complexes 72 2.9 Future Directions 73 References 74 3 Native Mass Spectrometry Approaches Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry 81 Frederik Lermyte, Esther Marie Martin, Albert Konijnenberg, Filip Lemiere, and Frank Sobott 3.1 Introduction 81 3.2 Sample Preparation 82 3.3 Electrospray Ionization 84 3.4 Mass Analyzers and Tandem MS Approaches 88 3.5 Ion Mobility 90 3.6 Data Processing 95 3.7 Challenges and Future Perspectives 98 References 102 Part II LC MS Based with Indirect Assays 109 4 Methodologies for Effect-Directed Analysis: Environmental Applications, Food Analysis, and Drug Discovery 111 Willem Jonker, Marja Lamoree, Corine J. Houtman, and Jeroen Kool 4.1 Introduction 111 4.2 Principle of Traditional Effect-Directed Analysis 113 4.3 Sample Preparation 113 4.3.1 Environmental Analysis 113 4.3.2 Food Analysis 121 4.3.3 Drug Discovery 124 4.4 Fractionation for Bioassay Testing 126 4.4.1 Environmental Analysis 126 4.4.2 Food Analysis 130 4.4.3 Drug Discovery 131 4.5 Miscellaneous Approaches 133 4.6 Bioassay Testing 136 4.6.1 Environmental Analysis 136 4.6.2 Food Analysis 140 4.6.3 Drug Discovery 140 4.7 Identification and Confirmation Process 141 4.7.1 Instrumentation 141 4.7.2 Data Analysis 143 4.8 Conclusion and Perspectives 148 References 149 5 MS Binding Assays 165 Georg Hofner and Klaus T.Wanner 5.1 Introduction 165 5.2 MS Binding Assays Strategy 167 5.2.1 Analogies and Differences Compared to Radioligand Binding Assays 167 5.2.2 Fundamental Assay Considerations 169 5.2.3 Fundamental Analytical Considerations 170 5.3 Application of MS Binding Assays 171 5.3.1 MS Binding Assays for the GABA Transporter GAT1 171 5.3.2 MS Binding Assays for the Serotonin Transporter 183 5.3.3 MS Binding Assays Based on the Quantitation of the Nonbound Marker 187 5.3.4 Other Examples Following the Concept of MS Binding Assays 189 5.4 Summary and Perspectives 191 Acknowledgments 192 References 192 6 Metabolic Profiling Approaches for the Identification of Bioactive Metabolites in Plants 199 Emily Pipan and Angela I. Calderon 6.1 Introduction to Plant Metabolic Profiling 199 6.2 Sample Collection and Processing 200 6.3 Hyphenated Techniques 203 6.3.1 Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry 203 6.3.2 Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry 206 6.3.3 Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry 207 6.4 Mass Spectrometry 207 6.4.1 Time of Flight 208 6.4.2 Quadrupole Mass Filter 208 6.4.3 Ion Traps (Orbitrap and Linear Quadrupole (LTQ)) 209 6.4.4 Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry 210 6.4.5 Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry 210 6.5 Mass Spectrometric Imaging 210 6.5.1 MALDI-MS 211 6.5.2 SIMS-MS 212 6.5.3 DESI-MS 212 6.5.4 LAESI-MS 213 6.5.5 LDI-MS and Others for Imaging 213 6.6 Data Analysis 214 6.6.1 Data Processing 214 6.6.2 Data Analysis Methods 214 6.6.3 Databases 215 6.7 Future Perspectives 216 References 216 7 Antivenomics: A Proteomics Tool for Studying the Immunoreactivity of Antivenoms 227 Juan J. Calvete, Jose Maria Gutierrez, Libia Sanz, Davinia Pla, and Bruno Lomonte 7.1 Introduction 227 7.2 Challenge of Fighting Human Envenoming by Snakebites 227 7.3 Toolbox for Studying the Immunological Profile of Antivenoms 228 7.4 First-Generation Antivenomics 229 7.5 Snake Venomics 230 7.6 Second-Generation Antivenomics 232 7.7 Concluding Remarks 236 Acknowledgments 236 References 236 Part III Direct Pre- and On-Column Coupled Techniques 241 8 Frontal and Zonal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Mass Spectrometry 243 Nagendra S. Singh, Zhenjing Jiang, and Ruin Moaddel 8.1 Introduction 243 8.2 Frontal Affinity Chromatography 244 8.3 Staircase Method 247 8.4 Simultaneous Frontal Analysis of a Complex Mixture 249 8.5 Multiprotein Stationary Phase 252 8.6 Zonal Chromatography 253 8.7 Nonlinear Chromatography 260 Acknowledgments 265 References 265 9 Online Affinity Assessment and Immunoaffinity Sample Pretreatment in Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry 271 Rob Haselberg and Govert W. Somsen 9.1 Introduction 271 9.2 Capillary Electrophoresis 272 9.3 Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis 276 9.3.1 Dynamic Equilibrium ACE (Fast Complexation Kinetics) 276 9.3.2 Pre-Equilibrium ACE (Slow Complexation Kinetics) 279 9.3.3 Kinetic ACE (Intermediate Complexation Kinetics) 280 9.4 Immunoaffinity Capillary Electrophoresis 281 9.5 Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry 283 9.5.1 General Requirements for Effective CE MS Coupling 283 9.5.2 Specific Requirements for ACE MS and IA-CE-MS 284 9.6 Application of ACE MS 286 9.7 Applications of IA-CE MS 292 9.8 Conclusions 295 References 296 10 Label-Free Biosensor Affinity Analysis Coupled to Mass Spectrometry 299 David Bonnel, Dora Mehn, and Gerardo R. Marchesini 10.1 Introduction to MS-Coupled Biosensor Platforms 299 10.2 Strategies for Coupling Label-Free Analysis with Mass Spectrometry 301 10.2.1 On-Chip Approaches 301 10.2.2 Off-Chip Configurations 305 10.2.3 Chip Capture and Release Chromatography Electrospray-MS 306 10.3 New Sensor and MS Platforms, Opportunities for Integration 307 10.3.1 Imaging Nanoplasmonics 307 10.3.2 EvanescentWave SiliconWaveguides 308 10.3.3 New Trends in MS Matrix-Free Ion Sources 309 10.3.4 Tag-Mass 310 10.3.5 Integration 310 References 310 Part IV Direct Post Column Coupled Affinity Techniques 317 11 High-Resolution Screening: Post-Column Continuous-Flow Bioassays 319 David Falck, Wilfried M.A. Niessen, and Jeroen Kool 11.1 Introduction 319 11.1.1 Variants of On-line Post-Column Assays Using Mass Spectrometry 321 11.1.2 Targets and Analytes 328 11.2 The High-Resolution Screening Platform 330 11.2.1 Separation 330 11.2.2 Flow Splitting 334 11.2.3 Bioassay 336 11.2.4 MS Detection 340 11.3 Data Analysis 342 11.3.1 Differences between HRS and HTS 342 11.3.2 Validation 350 11.4 Conclusions and Perspectives 353 11.4.1 The Relation of On-line Post-Column Assays to Other Formats 353 11.4.2 Trends in High-Resolution Screening 354 11.4.3 Conclusions 357 References 358 12 Conclusions 365 Jeroen Kool Index 373.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This monograph reviews all relevant technologies based on mass spectrometry that are used to study or screen biological interactions in general. Arranged in three parts, the text begins by reviewing techniques nowadays almost considered classical, such as affinity chromatography and ultrafiltration, as well as the latest techniques. The second part focusses on all MS-based methods for the study of interactions of proteins with all classes of biomolecules. Besides pull down-based approaches, this section also emphasizes the use of ion mobility MS, capture-compound approaches, chemical proteomics and interactomics. The third and final part discusses other important technologies frequently employed in interaction studies, such as biosensors and microarrays. For pharmaceutical, analytical, protein, environmental and biochemists, as well as those working in pharmaceutical and analytical laboratories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Contributors XIII Preface XVII Abbreviations XIX 1 Introduction to Mass Spectrometry, a Tutorial 1 Wilfried M.A. Niessen and David Falck 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Figures of Merit 1 1.2.1 Introduction 1 1.2.2 Resolution 2 1.2.3 Mass Accuracy 4 1.2.4 General Data Acquisition in MS 5 1.3 Analyte Ionization 6 1.3.1 Introduction 6 1.3.2 Electrospray Ionization 8 1.3.3 Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization 10 1.3.4 Other Ionization Methods 10 1.3.5 Solvent and Sample Compatibility Issues 11 1.4 Mass Analyzer Building Blocks 12 1.4.1 Introduction 12 1.4.2 Quadrupole Mass Analyzer 13 1.4.3 Ion-Trap Mass Analyzer 13 1.4.4 Time-of-Flight Mass Analyzer 15 1.4.5 Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer 16 1.4.6 Orbitrap Mass Analyzer 17 1.4.7 Ion Detection 18 1.5 Tandem Mass Spectrometry 18 1.5.1 Introduction: Tandem-in-Time and Tandem-in-Space 18 1.5.2 Ion Dissociation Techniques 20 1.5.3 Tandem Quadrupole MS MS Instruments 21 1.5.4 Ion-Trap MSn Instruments 23 1.5.5 Tandem TOF (TOF TOF) Instruments 23 1.5.6 Hybrid Instruments (Q TOF, Q LIT, IT TOF) 24 1.5.7 MS MS and MSn in FT-ICR-MS 26 1.5.8 Orbitrap-Based Hybrid Systems 27 1.5.9 Ion-Mobility Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry 28 1.6 Data Interpretation and Analytical Strategies 30 1.6.1 Data Acquisition in MS Revisited 30 1.6.2 Quantitative Bioanalysis and Residue Analysis 31 1.6.3 Identification of Small-Molecule Known Unknowns 32 1.6.4 Identification of Drug Metabolites 33 1.6.5 Protein Molecular Weight Determination 37 1.6.6 Peptide Fragmentation and Sequencing 38 1.6.7 General Proteomics Strategies: Top-Down, Middle-Down, Bottom-Up 39 1.7 Conclusion and Perspectives 43 References 43 Part I Direct MS Based Affinity Techniques 55 2 Studying Protein Protein Interactions by Combining Native Mass Spectrometry and Chemical Cross-Linking 57 Michal Sharon and Andrea Sinz 2.1 Introduction 57 2.2 Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry 58 2.3 Native MS 59 2.3.1 Instrumentation for High-mass ion Detection 60 2.3.2 Defining the Exact Mass of the Composing Subunits 60 2.3.3 Analyzing the Intact Complex 61 2.4 Chemical Cross-linking MS 64 2.4.1 Types of Cross-linkers 64 2.4.2 MS/MS Cleavable Cross-linkers 66 2.4.3 Data Analysis 68 2.5 Value of Combining NativeMS with Chemical Cross-linkingMS 68 2.6 Regulating the Giant 69 2.7 Capturing Transient Interactions 70 2.8 An Integrative Approach for Obtaining Low-Resolution Structures of Native Protein Complexes 72 2.9 Future Directions 73 References 74 3 Native Mass Spectrometry Approaches Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry 81 Frederik Lermyte, Esther Marie Martin, Albert Konijnenberg, Filip Lemiere, and Frank Sobott 3.1 Introduction 81 3.2 Sample Preparation 82 3.3 Electrospray Ionization 84 3.4 Mass Analyzers and Tandem MS Approaches 88 3.5 Ion Mobility 90 3.6 Data Processing 95 3.7 Challenges and Future Perspectives 98 References 102 Part II LC MS Based with Indirect Assays 109 4 Methodologies for Effect-Directed Analysis: Environmental Applications, Food Analysis, and Drug Discovery 111 Willem Jonker, Marja Lamoree, Corine J. Houtman, and Jeroen Kool 4.1 Introduction 111 4.2 Principle of Traditional Effect-Directed Analysis 113 4.3 Sample Preparation 113 4.3.1 Environmental Analysis 113 4.3.2 Food Analysis 121 4.3.3 Drug Discovery 124 4.4 Fractionation for Bioassay Testing 126 4.4.1 Environmental Analysis 126 4.4.2 Food Analysis 130 4.4.3 Drug Discovery 131 4.5 Miscellaneous Approaches 133 4.6 Bioassay Testing 136 4.6.1 Environmental Analysis 136 4.6.2 Food Analysis 140 4.6.3 Drug Discovery 140 4.7 Identification and Confirmation Process 141 4.7.1 Instrumentation 141 4.7.2 Data Analysis 143 4.8 Conclusion and Perspectives 148 References 149 5 MS Binding Assays 165 Georg Hofner and Klaus T.Wanner 5.1 Introduction 165 5.2 MS Binding Assays Strategy 167 5.2.1 Analogies and Differences Compared to Radioligand Binding Assays 167 5.2.2 Fundamental Assay Considerations 169 5.2.3 Fundamental Analytical Considerations 170 5.3 Application of MS Binding Assays 171 5.3.1 MS Binding Assays for the GABA Transporter GAT1 171 5.3.2 MS Binding Assays for the Serotonin Transporter 183 5.3.3 MS Binding Assays Based on the Quantitation of the Nonbound Marker 187 5.3.4 Other Examples Following the Concept of MS Binding Assays 189 5.4 Summary and Perspectives 191 Acknowledgments 192 References 192 6 Metabolic Profiling Approaches for the Identification of Bioactive Metabolites in Plants 199 Emily Pipan and Angela I. Calderon 6.1 Introduction to Plant Metabolic Profiling 199 6.2 Sample Collection and Processing 200 6.3 Hyphenated Techniques 203 6.3.1 Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry 203 6.3.2 Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry 206 6.3.3 Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry 207 6.4 Mass Spectrometry 207 6.4.1 Time of Flight 208 6.4.2 Quadrupole Mass Filter 208 6.4.3 Ion Traps (Orbitrap and Linear Quadrupole (LTQ)) 209 6.4.4 Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry 210 6.4.5 Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry 210 6.5 Mass Spectrometric Imaging 210 6.5.1 MALDI-MS 211 6.5.2 SIMS-MS 212 6.5.3 DESI-MS 212 6.5.4 LAESI-MS 213 6.5.5 LDI-MS and Others for Imaging 213 6.6 Data Analysis 214 6.6.1 Data Processing 214 6.6.2 Data Analysis Methods 214 6.6.3 Databases 215 6.7 Future Perspectives 216 References 216 7 Antivenomics: A Proteomics Tool for Studying the Immunoreactivity of Antivenoms 227 Juan J. Calvete, Jose Maria Gutierrez, Libia Sanz, Davinia Pla, and Bruno Lomonte 7.1 Introduction 227 7.2 Challenge of Fighting Human Envenoming by Snakebites 227 7.3 Toolbox for Studying the Immunological Profile of Antivenoms 228 7.4 First-Generation Antivenomics 229 7.5 Snake Venomics 230 7.6 Second-Generation Antivenomics 232 7.7 Concluding Remarks 236 Acknowledgments 236 References 236 Part III Direct Pre- and On-Column Coupled Techniques 241 8 Frontal and Zonal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Mass Spectrometry 243 Nagendra S. Singh, Zhenjing Jiang, and Ruin Moaddel 8.1 Introduction 243 8.2 Frontal Affinity Chromatography 244 8.3 Staircase Method 247 8.4 Simultaneous Frontal Analysis of a Complex Mixture 249 8.5 Multiprotein Stationary Phase 252 8.6 Zonal Chromatography 253 8.7 Nonlinear Chromatography 260 Acknowledgments 265 References 265 9 Online Affinity Assessment and Immunoaffinity Sample Pretreatment in Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry 271 Rob Haselberg and Govert W. Somsen 9.1 Introduction 271 9.2 Capillary Electrophoresis 272 9.3 Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis 276 9.3.1 Dynamic Equilibrium ACE (Fast Complexation Kinetics) 276 9.3.2 Pre-Equilibrium ACE (Slow Complexation Kinetics) 279 9.3.3 Kinetic ACE (Intermediate Complexation Kinetics) 280 9.4 Immunoaffinity Capillary Electrophoresis 281 9.5 Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry 283 9.5.1 General Requirements for Effective CE MS Coupling 283 9.5.2 Specific Requirements for ACE MS and IA-CE-MS 284 9.6 Application of ACE MS 286 9.7 Applications of IA-CE MS 292 9.8 Conclusions 295 References 296 10 Label-Free Biosensor Affinity Analysis Coupled to Mass Spectrometry 299 David Bonnel, Dora Mehn, and Gerardo R. Marchesini 10.1 Introduction to MS-Coupled Biosensor Platforms 299 10.2 Strategies for Coupling Label-Free Analysis with Mass Spectrometry 301 10.2.1 On-Chip Approaches 301 10.2.2 Off-Chip Configurations 305 10.2.3 Chip Capture and Release Chromatography Electrospray-MS 306 10.3 New Sensor and MS Platforms, Opportunities for Integration 307 10.3.1 Imaging Nanoplasmonics 307 10.3.2 EvanescentWave SiliconWaveguides 308 10.3.3 New Trends in MS Matrix-Free Ion Sources 309 10.3.4 Tag-Mass 310 10.3.5 Integration 310 References 310 Part IV Direct Post Column Coupled Affinity Techniques 317 11 High-Resolution Screening: Post-Column Continuous-Flow Bioassays 319 David Falck, Wilfried M.A. Niessen, and Jeroen Kool 11.1 Introduction 319 11.1.1 Variants of On-line Post-Column Assays Using Mass Spectrometry 321 11.1.2 Targets and Analytes 328 11.2 The High-Resolution Screening Platform 330 11.2.1 Separation 330 11.2.2 Flow Splitting 334 11.2.3 Bioassay 336 11.2.4 MS Detection 340 11.3 Data Analysis 342 11.3.1 Differences between HRS and HTS 342 11.3.2 Validation 350 11.4 Conclusions and Perspectives 353 11.4.1 The Relation of On-line Post-Column Assays to Other Formats 353 11.4.2 Trends in High-Resolution Screening 354 11.4.3 Conclusions 357 References 358 12 Conclusions 365 Jeroen Kool Index 373.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This monograph reviews all relevant technologies based on mass spectrometry that are used to study or screen biological interactions in general. Arranged in three parts, the text begins by reviewing techniques nowadays almost considered classical, such as affinity chromatography and ultrafiltration, as well as the latest techniques. The second part focusses on all MS-based methods for the study of interactions of proteins with all classes of biomolecules. Besides pull down-based approaches, this section also emphasizes the use of ion mobility MS, capture-compound approaches, chemical proteomics and interactomics. The third and final part discusses other important technologies frequently employed in interaction studies, such as biosensors and microarrays. For pharmaceutical, analytical, protein, environmental and biochemists, as well as those working in pharmaceutical and analytical laboratories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QP519.7 .A535 2015 Unknown
Book
xviii, 606 p. : ill.
  • Liquid Chromatography-- UHPLC-- Sample Treatment-- Mass Spectrometry-- High Resolution Mass Spectrometry-- Sub-2mum Columns-- Core-Shell Columns-- Monolithic Columns, High-Temperature Liquid Chromatography-- HILIC-- Perfluorinated Stationary Phases-- Sample Treatment-- On-line SPE-- MIPs-- RAM-- Turbulent Flow Chromatography-- Ambient Source Ionization-- DESI-- DART-- DAPPI-- Quantification Aspects in MS-- Confirmation Aspects in MS-- Food Analysis-- Environmental Analysis-- Pesticides-- Polyphenolic Compounds-- Food Packaging Contaminants-- Perfluorinated Compounds-- Mycotoxins--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
There is a growing need for high-throughput separations in food and environmental research that are able to cope with the analysis of a large number of compounds in very complex matrices. Laboratories worldwide are now demanding fast and efficient analytical procedures with enough sensitivity, robustness, effectiveness and high resolution to be able to perform both qualitative and quantitative analysis while at the same time achieving cost-effective methodologies with reduced analysis times. Whereas the most common approach for solving many analytical problems has often been high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the recent use of fast or ultra-fast chromatographic methods for environmental and food analysis has increased the overall sample throughput and laboratory efficiency without loss (and even with an improvement) in the resolution obtained by conventional HPLC systems.This book brings together researchers at the top of their field from across the world to discuss and analyze recent advances in fast liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods for food and environmental analysis. It focuses on the development of the analytical method: sample preparation, chromatographic separation, mass spectrometry and, finally, confirmation and quantification aspects. These topics are addressed in three main parts. First, the most novel approaches to achieve fast and ultra-fast methods as well as the use of alternative and complementary stationary phases are described. In the second part, advances in fast LC-MS methods are addressed, focusing on novel treatment procedures coupled with LC-MS, new ionization sources, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and the problematic confirmation and quantification aspects in mass spectrometry. Finally, the third part is devoted to relevant LC-MS applications in food and environmental analysis and addresses the analysis of pesticides, mycotoxins, food packaging contaminants, perfluorinated compounds and polyphenolic compounds.This book brings together researchers working at the top of the field at universities and in industry from across the world to present the state-of-the-art in current research on food and environmental analysis. The scope of the book is intentionally broad and is aimed at worldwide analytical laboratories working in food and environmental applications as well as researchers in universities worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Liquid Chromatography-- UHPLC-- Sample Treatment-- Mass Spectrometry-- High Resolution Mass Spectrometry-- Sub-2mum Columns-- Core-Shell Columns-- Monolithic Columns, High-Temperature Liquid Chromatography-- HILIC-- Perfluorinated Stationary Phases-- Sample Treatment-- On-line SPE-- MIPs-- RAM-- Turbulent Flow Chromatography-- Ambient Source Ionization-- DESI-- DART-- DAPPI-- Quantification Aspects in MS-- Confirmation Aspects in MS-- Food Analysis-- Environmental Analysis-- Pesticides-- Polyphenolic Compounds-- Food Packaging Contaminants-- Perfluorinated Compounds-- Mycotoxins--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
There is a growing need for high-throughput separations in food and environmental research that are able to cope with the analysis of a large number of compounds in very complex matrices. Laboratories worldwide are now demanding fast and efficient analytical procedures with enough sensitivity, robustness, effectiveness and high resolution to be able to perform both qualitative and quantitative analysis while at the same time achieving cost-effective methodologies with reduced analysis times. Whereas the most common approach for solving many analytical problems has often been high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the recent use of fast or ultra-fast chromatographic methods for environmental and food analysis has increased the overall sample throughput and laboratory efficiency without loss (and even with an improvement) in the resolution obtained by conventional HPLC systems.This book brings together researchers at the top of their field from across the world to discuss and analyze recent advances in fast liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods for food and environmental analysis. It focuses on the development of the analytical method: sample preparation, chromatographic separation, mass spectrometry and, finally, confirmation and quantification aspects. These topics are addressed in three main parts. First, the most novel approaches to achieve fast and ultra-fast methods as well as the use of alternative and complementary stationary phases are described. In the second part, advances in fast LC-MS methods are addressed, focusing on novel treatment procedures coupled with LC-MS, new ionization sources, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and the problematic confirmation and quantification aspects in mass spectrometry. Finally, the third part is devoted to relevant LC-MS applications in food and environmental analysis and addresses the analysis of pesticides, mycotoxins, food packaging contaminants, perfluorinated compounds and polyphenolic compounds.This book brings together researchers working at the top of the field at universities and in industry from across the world to present the state-of-the-art in current research on food and environmental analysis. The scope of the book is intentionally broad and is aimed at worldwide analytical laboratories working in food and environmental applications as well as researchers in universities worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • Preface Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Devices, Methods, and Applications V.S. Sevastyanov General Characteristics of Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Determination of Isotopic Composition of Light Elements Improvement of Equipment for the Determination Isotope Ratios of Light Elements Mass Spectrometric Methods for Determining the Isotopic Composition of Light Elements Metrological Characteristics of Mass Spectrometry of Isotope Ratios The Effect of the Strength of the Analytical Signal on the Results of Measuring the Isotopic Composition of Light Elements Study of the Completeness of Combustion of Difficult to Oxidise Compounds Developing a New Method of Sample Preparation Based on Solid Electrolytes for Isotope Mass Spectrometric Analysis The Electrochemical Decomposition of Water using a Solid Electrolyte Based on Zirconium Dioxide to Determine the Isotopic Composition of Hydrogen The Distribution of the Isotopes of Light Elements in Various Objects Finding the Source of Drugs and Explosives The Effects of Isotope Fractionation and Accompanying Organic Synthesis Isotope Effects in Carbonaceous Chondrites Determination of the Isotopic Composition of Hydrogen and Oxygen of Water and Isotope Effects during Evaporation The Distribution of Carbon Isotopes in Complex Organic Compounds of Biological Origin (Oil and Hydrocarbon Gases) Determination of the Isotopic Composition of Carbon in the Collagen of Bones of Ancient Tombs Conclusions References Universal Method for Preparation of Liquid, Solid, and Gaseous Samples for Determining the Isotopic Composition of Carbon T.A. Velivetskaya, A. Ignat'ev, and S. Kiyashko Introduction The Experimental Part Equipment and Materials Combustion of Solid and Low-Volatility Liquid Samples to Determine the Isotopic Composition of Carbon Combustion of Volatile Liquids to Determine Carbon Isotopic Composition Combustion of Methane for the Determination of the Isotopic Composition of Carbon Results and Discussion Conclusions Literature Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry for Assessing the Metabolic Potential of Soil Microbiota A.M. Zyakun and O. Dilly Introduction Methods of Analysis of Microbial Activity in Soil Microbiological Method Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry in the Study of Substrate-Induced Respiration (SIR) Kinetics of CO2 Production during Substrate-Induced Respiration Characteristics of Carbon Isotopic Composition of Microbial Products Amount of Metabolic Carbon Dioxide and Characterization of Its Origin in the Soil Using the 13C/12C Ratios to Characterize the Activity of the Microbiota in Arable Soils Analyzed Soil Samples Mineralization of SOM and Exogenous Glucose Priming Effect (PE) of Glucose Estimate of the Duration of the Effect of the Exogenous Substrate on the Microbiota Conclusion References Study of the Isotopic Composition of Normal Alkanes of Continental Plants N.A. Pedentchouk Introduction The Experimental Part General Provisions Methodological Features of Analysis Results and Discussion Conclusion Literature Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectroscopy for Analysis of Tobacco A.B. Uryupin Literature Using Isotope Mass Ratio Spectrometry of Carbon in Doping Control T. Sobolevski, I.S. Prasolov, and G.M. Rodchenkov Introduction The Metabolism of Steroid Hormones The Experimental Part Equipment Reagents and Materials Sample Preparation Results and Discussion Literature Isolation Methods in Isotope Geochemistry of Noble Gases A.I. Buikin Introduction Stepwise Annealing Release of Gases by Heating with a Laser Beam The Stratified Oxidation Method Stepwise Fragmentation Conclusion Literature Using Laser Spectroscopy for Measuring the Ratios of Stable Isotopes V.S. Sevastyanov Introduction Absorption Spectroscopy Infrared Spectroscopy with Fourier Transform Non-Dispersive Absorption Spectroscopy Laser Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Laser On-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy New Methods and Results Conclusions Literature Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry of Light Gas-Forming Elements explores different methods of isotope analysis, including spark, secondary ion, laser, glow discharge, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. It explains how to evaluate the isotopic composition of light elements (H, C, N, O) in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples of organic and inorganic substances, as well as: Presents a universal, economical, simple, and rapid technique for sample preparation of organic substances to measure the isotopic composition of carbon Describes how to determine microbial mineralization of organic matter in soil and the effect of exogenous substrates on environmental sustainability Examines use of the isotopic composition of n-alkanes from continental vegetation to study the paleoclimate and plant physiology Proposes a systematic approach to identifying tobacco areas of origin and tobacco products based on data from the isotopic composition of light elements Discusses ways to detect doping drugs and suggests results assessment criteria based on determining reference intervals for endogenous markers Reviews methods of release of gases from inclusions of rocks and minerals for further implementation of isotope mass spectrometric analysis Considers use of optical isotope analyzers for determining the isotopic composition of carbon in CO2 and of hydrogen and oxygen in water Providing a complete picture of the latest advancements in the field, Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry of Light Gas-Forming Elements aids readers from a variety of disciplines in identifying the fundamental processes in biological, ecological, and geological systems and in revealing the subtle features of many physicochemical processes and chemical transformations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Devices, Methods, and Applications V.S. Sevastyanov General Characteristics of Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Determination of Isotopic Composition of Light Elements Improvement of Equipment for the Determination Isotope Ratios of Light Elements Mass Spectrometric Methods for Determining the Isotopic Composition of Light Elements Metrological Characteristics of Mass Spectrometry of Isotope Ratios The Effect of the Strength of the Analytical Signal on the Results of Measuring the Isotopic Composition of Light Elements Study of the Completeness of Combustion of Difficult to Oxidise Compounds Developing a New Method of Sample Preparation Based on Solid Electrolytes for Isotope Mass Spectrometric Analysis The Electrochemical Decomposition of Water using a Solid Electrolyte Based on Zirconium Dioxide to Determine the Isotopic Composition of Hydrogen The Distribution of the Isotopes of Light Elements in Various Objects Finding the Source of Drugs and Explosives The Effects of Isotope Fractionation and Accompanying Organic Synthesis Isotope Effects in Carbonaceous Chondrites Determination of the Isotopic Composition of Hydrogen and Oxygen of Water and Isotope Effects during Evaporation The Distribution of Carbon Isotopes in Complex Organic Compounds of Biological Origin (Oil and Hydrocarbon Gases) Determination of the Isotopic Composition of Carbon in the Collagen of Bones of Ancient Tombs Conclusions References Universal Method for Preparation of Liquid, Solid, and Gaseous Samples for Determining the Isotopic Composition of Carbon T.A. Velivetskaya, A. Ignat'ev, and S. Kiyashko Introduction The Experimental Part Equipment and Materials Combustion of Solid and Low-Volatility Liquid Samples to Determine the Isotopic Composition of Carbon Combustion of Volatile Liquids to Determine Carbon Isotopic Composition Combustion of Methane for the Determination of the Isotopic Composition of Carbon Results and Discussion Conclusions Literature Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry for Assessing the Metabolic Potential of Soil Microbiota A.M. Zyakun and O. Dilly Introduction Methods of Analysis of Microbial Activity in Soil Microbiological Method Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry in the Study of Substrate-Induced Respiration (SIR) Kinetics of CO2 Production during Substrate-Induced Respiration Characteristics of Carbon Isotopic Composition of Microbial Products Amount of Metabolic Carbon Dioxide and Characterization of Its Origin in the Soil Using the 13C/12C Ratios to Characterize the Activity of the Microbiota in Arable Soils Analyzed Soil Samples Mineralization of SOM and Exogenous Glucose Priming Effect (PE) of Glucose Estimate of the Duration of the Effect of the Exogenous Substrate on the Microbiota Conclusion References Study of the Isotopic Composition of Normal Alkanes of Continental Plants N.A. Pedentchouk Introduction The Experimental Part General Provisions Methodological Features of Analysis Results and Discussion Conclusion Literature Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectroscopy for Analysis of Tobacco A.B. Uryupin Literature Using Isotope Mass Ratio Spectrometry of Carbon in Doping Control T. Sobolevski, I.S. Prasolov, and G.M. Rodchenkov Introduction The Metabolism of Steroid Hormones The Experimental Part Equipment Reagents and Materials Sample Preparation Results and Discussion Literature Isolation Methods in Isotope Geochemistry of Noble Gases A.I. Buikin Introduction Stepwise Annealing Release of Gases by Heating with a Laser Beam The Stratified Oxidation Method Stepwise Fragmentation Conclusion Literature Using Laser Spectroscopy for Measuring the Ratios of Stable Isotopes V.S. Sevastyanov Introduction Absorption Spectroscopy Infrared Spectroscopy with Fourier Transform Non-Dispersive Absorption Spectroscopy Laser Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Laser On-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy New Methods and Results Conclusions Literature Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry of Light Gas-Forming Elements explores different methods of isotope analysis, including spark, secondary ion, laser, glow discharge, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. It explains how to evaluate the isotopic composition of light elements (H, C, N, O) in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples of organic and inorganic substances, as well as: Presents a universal, economical, simple, and rapid technique for sample preparation of organic substances to measure the isotopic composition of carbon Describes how to determine microbial mineralization of organic matter in soil and the effect of exogenous substrates on environmental sustainability Examines use of the isotopic composition of n-alkanes from continental vegetation to study the paleoclimate and plant physiology Proposes a systematic approach to identifying tobacco areas of origin and tobacco products based on data from the isotopic composition of light elements Discusses ways to detect doping drugs and suggests results assessment criteria based on determining reference intervals for endogenous markers Reviews methods of release of gases from inclusions of rocks and minerals for further implementation of isotope mass spectrometric analysis Considers use of optical isotope analyzers for determining the isotopic composition of carbon in CO2 and of hydrogen and oxygen in water Providing a complete picture of the latest advancements in the field, Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry of Light Gas-Forming Elements aids readers from a variety of disciplines in identifying the fundamental processes in biological, ecological, and geological systems and in revealing the subtle features of many physicochemical processes and chemical transformations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (viii, 71 pages) : illustrations.
  • General and most usual proteomics methods based on mass spectrometry analysis: Protein identification and protein quantification.- Direct analysis of tissues and body fluids.- Mass spectrometry in archaeology.- Determination and quantification of post-translational modifications.- Protein-Protein interaction determined by mass spectrometry.- Protein structure analysis.- Determination of protein function by mass spectrometry.- Computer-assisted data analysis and data mining for new applications.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The understanding of the events taking place in a cell, a biological fluid or in any biological system is the main goal of biology research. Many fields of research use different technology to assess those events. Mass spectrometry is one of those techniques and this undergoes constant evolution and adaptation to always enhance the accuracy of the information provided. Proteomics provides a large panel of data on protein identity and protein expression that were made possible by mass spectrometry. For several years now mass spectrometry has become central to performing proteomic research, however this powerful tool is under constant evolution to be more sensitive and more resolute. More importantly mass spectrometry became a field of research focusing on new applications. Indeed, the complexity in biological systems relies on the changes of expression of transcription of proteins but also on the post-translational modification of proteins, the structure of proteins and the interaction between proteins, amongst others. As of now, several investigations tried to improve the quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry, the determination of post-translational modifications, the protein-protein and protein-nucleic acids interaction or the proteins structures. This book is structured as follows: after a brief introduction of the usual and most popular applications for mass spectrometry in proteomics, the most recent research and developments in mass spectrometry-based methodologies will be explored.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • General and most usual proteomics methods based on mass spectrometry analysis: Protein identification and protein quantification.- Direct analysis of tissues and body fluids.- Mass spectrometry in archaeology.- Determination and quantification of post-translational modifications.- Protein-Protein interaction determined by mass spectrometry.- Protein structure analysis.- Determination of protein function by mass spectrometry.- Computer-assisted data analysis and data mining for new applications.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The understanding of the events taking place in a cell, a biological fluid or in any biological system is the main goal of biology research. Many fields of research use different technology to assess those events. Mass spectrometry is one of those techniques and this undergoes constant evolution and adaptation to always enhance the accuracy of the information provided. Proteomics provides a large panel of data on protein identity and protein expression that were made possible by mass spectrometry. For several years now mass spectrometry has become central to performing proteomic research, however this powerful tool is under constant evolution to be more sensitive and more resolute. More importantly mass spectrometry became a field of research focusing on new applications. Indeed, the complexity in biological systems relies on the changes of expression of transcription of proteins but also on the post-translational modification of proteins, the structure of proteins and the interaction between proteins, amongst others. As of now, several investigations tried to improve the quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry, the determination of post-translational modifications, the protein-protein and protein-nucleic acids interaction or the proteins structures. This book is structured as follows: after a brief introduction of the usual and most popular applications for mass spectrometry in proteomics, the most recent research and developments in mass spectrometry-based methodologies will be explored.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of contributors xi Foreword xiii Preface xv 1 Pesticide Chemistry and Risk Assessment 1 Despina Tsipi, Helen Botitsi, and Anastasios Economou 1.1 Introduction1 1.2 Pesticide Chemistry2 1.2.1 Historical Perspective2 1.2.2 Identity and Physicochemical Properties of Pesticides2 1.2.3 Pesticide Classification4 1.2.4 Modes of Action (MoA)5 1.3 Pesticide Metabolites and Transformation Products8 1.3.1 Biotransformation9 1.3.2 Environmental Fate13 1.4 Risk Assessment 14 1.4.1 Safety Factors 14 1.4.2 Ecological Risk Assessment for Pesticides 15 1.5 Dietary Exposure to Pesticides 17 1.5.1 Acute Exposure or Short Term Intake 18 1.5.2 Chronic Exposure or Long Term Intake 18 1.5.3 Cumulative Exposure to Multiple Substances 18 1.6 Pesticide Residues in Food 19 1.6.1 Maximum Residue Limits 19 1.6.2 Residue Definition 20 1.6.3 Reporting of Results 28 1.6.4 Residue Analysis 28 References 29 2 Legislation, Monitoring, and Analytical Quality Control for Pesticide Residues 35 Despina Tsipi, Helen Botitsi, and Anastasios Economou 2.1 Introduction 35 2.2 Food Safety 36 2.2.1 CAC of Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization 36 2.2.2 EU Legislation 36 2.2.3 US Food Regulations 40 2.3 Water Quality 44 2.3.1 WHO 44 2.3.2 EU Water Framework Directive 44 2.3.3 US EPA Legislation 46 2.4 Method Validation and Quality Control Procedures for Pesticide Residues Analysis 46 2.4.1 CAC Guidelines 46 2.4.2 EU Guidelines: SANCO Document 47 2.4.3 FDA and EPA Guidelines 48 References 50 3 Advanced Sample Preparation Techniques for MS Analysis 53 Yolanda Pico 3.1 Introduction 53 3.2 Conventional Extraction and Cleanup Procedures 54 3.2.1 LLE 54 3.2.2 SPE 61 3.2.3 MSPD 63 3.2.4 QuEChERS 63 3.3 Microextraction Techniques 65 3.3.1 Sorbent Based Microextraction Techniques 65 3.3.2 Liquid Based Microextraction Techniques 71 3.4 Alternative Extraction and Cleanup Procedures 73 3.4.1 Alternative Energy Sources to Enhance the Extraction 73 3.4.2 Coupled Column Liquid Chromatography (LC/PC, LC/LC Techniques) 79 3.4.3 Direct Analysis in Real Time 80 3.5 Conclusions 81 References 82 4 Recent Developments in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry 91 Kaushik Banerjee and Sagar Utture 4.1 Introduction 91 4.2 Advances in GC Separations 91 4.2.1 Multidimensional and Comprehensive Two Dimensional Gas Chromatography 92 4.2.2 Fast GC 94 4.2.3 LPGC 95 4.3 Mass Spectrometric Ionization Techniques 96 4.3.1 Electron Impact Ionization (EI) 97 4.3.2 CI (Positive/Negative Modes) 97 4.3.3 Atmospheric Pressure GC MS 98 4.4 Mass Analyzers Interfaced to GC 99 4.4.1 Quadrupole Mass Analyzer 100 4.4.2 Ion Trap Mass Analyzer 100 4.4.3 QqQ 100 4.4.4 TOF 102 4.5 Mass Spectral Libraries and Software Approaches in GC MS Analysis 103 4.6 Matrix Effects in GC MS Analysis 106 4.7 Conclusions and Perspectives 108 References 108 5 Recent Developments in Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry: Advances in Liquid Chromatographic Separations and Ionization Techniques/Interfaces 113 Alexandros G. Asimakopoulos, Anna Bletsou, Kurunthachalam Kannan, and Nikolaos S. Thomaidis 5.1 Introduction 113 5.2 Advances in Liquid Chromatographic Separations 114 5.2.1 Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography 116 5.2.2 Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography 117 5.3 Ionization Techniques/Interfaces 117 5.3.1 Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Techniques 118 5.3.2 Direct Electron Ionization 121 5.4 Ambient Ionization Techniques 122 5.4.1 DESI, Paper Spray, and Low Temperature Plasma Ambient Ionization 122 5.4.2 Direct Analysis in Real Time 124 5.4.3 Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Ionization 125 5.5 Summary 125 References 125 6 Recent Developments in Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry: Mass Detectors 131 Silvia Lacorte, Ana Aguera, Montserrat Cortina Puig, and Cristian Gomez Canela 6.1 Introduction: Mass Spectrometers 131 6.1.1 Triple Quadrupole Mass Analyzer 132 6.1.2 Quadrupole Ion Trap and Triple Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap 135 6.1.3 TOF Mass Analyzer 138 6.1.4 Hybrid TOF 140 6.1.5 Orbitrap Mass Analyzer 142 6.2 Comparison and Complementarities of Different Mass Analyzers in the LC-MS Analysis of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites 147 6.2.1 Dynamic Range 147 6.2.2 Scan Rate 147 6.2.3 LODs 148 6.2.4 Mass Accuracy 148 6.2.5 Resolution 149 6.2.6 Selectivity 149 6.2.7 Mass Range 150 6.2.8 Fragmentation 150 6.2.9 Identification Capabilities 150 6.2.10 Quantification 151 6.3 Use of Software Techniques and Spectral Libraries in LC MS 152 References 154 7 Matrix Effects in Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry 161 Helen Stahnke and Lutz Alder 7.1 Introduction 161 7.1.1 Some Definitions 161 7.1.2 Differences between Matrix Effects in GC and LC Methods 162 7.1.3 Differences between ESI and Other API Methods 162 7.1.4 A Typical Alarming Situation 163 7.2 Detection of Matrix Effects 164 7.2.1 Calibration in Solvent versus Matrix Matched Calibration 164 7.2.2 Postcolumn Infusion 165 7.2.3 Stable Isotope-Labeled Standards 166 7.3 Reduction of Matrix Effects 166 7.3.1 Change of LC Conditions 166 7.3.2 Change of MS Conditions 166 7.3.3 Better Cleanup 169 7.3.4 Backflush of LC Columns 170 7.3.5 Dilute-and-Shoot 171 7.4 Compensation of Matrix Effects 172 7.4.1 Internal standards (IS) 172 7.4.2 Matrix Matched Standards 174 7.4.3 Postcolumn Infusion 174 7.4.4 Standard Addition 175 7.5 An Attempt to Explain Matrix Effects 176 7.5.1 Substance Classes Causing Matrix Effects 176 7.5.2 Tentative Mechanisms of Matrix Effects 176 7.5.3 A Recent View on the Mechanism of Ion Suppression 178 References 180 8 Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pesticide Residues and Their Metabolites in Food Samples 187 Ana Lozano, ukasz Rajski, Maria del Mar Gomez Ramos, Carmen Ferrer, Maria D. Hernando, and Amadeo R. Fernandez Alba 8.1 Introduction 187 8.2 Application of LC QqQ MS/MS for the Targeted Analysis of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites in Food Samples 189 8.2.1 Sensitivity 192 8.2.2 Linearity 193 8.2.3 Matrix Effects 193 8.3 Application of LC Hrms to the Analysis of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites in Food Samples 195 8.3.1 Detection and Identification 195 8.3.2 Resolution 197 8.3.3 MS/MS Identification 200 8.3.4 Sensitivity 201 8.3.5 Linearity 201 8.3.6 Matrix Effect 202 8.4 Data Processing: Automated Database Searches 202 8.5 Conclusions and Future Developments 203 References 203 9 Application of LC MS/MS and LC TOF MS for the Identification of Pesticide Residues and Their Metabolites in Environmental Samples 207 Imma Ferrer and E. Michael Thurman 9.1 Introduction and Occurrence of Pesticides in Environmental Samples 207 9.2 State of the Art Techniques for the Identification of Pesticides and their Degradation Products 208 9.2.1 LC MS/MS for the Analysis of Target Compounds 208 9.2.2 LC TOF MS and LC QTOF MS for the Analysis of Target and Nontarget Compounds 209 9.3 Use of Accurate Mass Tools for the Identification of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites in Food and Water Samples 215 9.3.1 Molecular Features 215 9.3.2 Accurate Mass Filters and Isotopic Mass Defect 220 9.3.3 Diagnostic Ion Approach 221 9.3.4 Accurate Mass Databases 223 9.3.5 Accurate Mass Profiling 225 9.4 Conclusions 227 References 227 10 Mass Spectrometric Techniques for the Determination of Pesticide Transformation Products Formed by Advanced Oxidation Processes 231 Ioannis K. Konstantinou 10.1 Introduction 231 10.2 Sample Preparation 232 10.3 Hyphenated MS Techniques 237 10.3.1 Low Resolution Mass Spectrometry: Single Stage Quadrupole 238 10.3.2 Identification of Pesticide TPs by GC MS 238 10.3.3 Identification of Pesticide TPs by LC MS 240 10.3.4 Identification of Pesticide TPs by the Combination of GC MS and LC MS 241 10.4 Tandem MS 241 10.4.1 Identification of Pesticide TPs by QqQ MS 243 10.4.2 Identification of Pesticide TPs by IT MS 244 10.5 HRMS 249 10.5.1 Single Mass Analyzer 249 10.5.2 Hybrid HR Mass Spectrometers 255 10.6 Conclusions and Perspectives 256 References 259 Index 263.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Provides an overview of the use of mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of pesticide residues and their metabolites. * Presents state of the-art MS techniques for the identification of pesticides and their transformation products in food and environment * Covers important advances in MS techniques including MS instrumentation and chromatographic separations (e.g. UPLC, HILIC, comprehensive GCxGC) and applications * Illustrates the main sample preparation techniques (SPE, QuEChERS, microextraction) used in combination with MS for the analysis of pesticides * Describes various established and new ionization techniques as well as the main MS platforms, software tools and mass spectral libraries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of contributors xi Foreword xiii Preface xv 1 Pesticide Chemistry and Risk Assessment 1 Despina Tsipi, Helen Botitsi, and Anastasios Economou 1.1 Introduction1 1.2 Pesticide Chemistry2 1.2.1 Historical Perspective2 1.2.2 Identity and Physicochemical Properties of Pesticides2 1.2.3 Pesticide Classification4 1.2.4 Modes of Action (MoA)5 1.3 Pesticide Metabolites and Transformation Products8 1.3.1 Biotransformation9 1.3.2 Environmental Fate13 1.4 Risk Assessment 14 1.4.1 Safety Factors 14 1.4.2 Ecological Risk Assessment for Pesticides 15 1.5 Dietary Exposure to Pesticides 17 1.5.1 Acute Exposure or Short Term Intake 18 1.5.2 Chronic Exposure or Long Term Intake 18 1.5.3 Cumulative Exposure to Multiple Substances 18 1.6 Pesticide Residues in Food 19 1.6.1 Maximum Residue Limits 19 1.6.2 Residue Definition 20 1.6.3 Reporting of Results 28 1.6.4 Residue Analysis 28 References 29 2 Legislation, Monitoring, and Analytical Quality Control for Pesticide Residues 35 Despina Tsipi, Helen Botitsi, and Anastasios Economou 2.1 Introduction 35 2.2 Food Safety 36 2.2.1 CAC of Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization 36 2.2.2 EU Legislation 36 2.2.3 US Food Regulations 40 2.3 Water Quality 44 2.3.1 WHO 44 2.3.2 EU Water Framework Directive 44 2.3.3 US EPA Legislation 46 2.4 Method Validation and Quality Control Procedures for Pesticide Residues Analysis 46 2.4.1 CAC Guidelines 46 2.4.2 EU Guidelines: SANCO Document 47 2.4.3 FDA and EPA Guidelines 48 References 50 3 Advanced Sample Preparation Techniques for MS Analysis 53 Yolanda Pico 3.1 Introduction 53 3.2 Conventional Extraction and Cleanup Procedures 54 3.2.1 LLE 54 3.2.2 SPE 61 3.2.3 MSPD 63 3.2.4 QuEChERS 63 3.3 Microextraction Techniques 65 3.3.1 Sorbent Based Microextraction Techniques 65 3.3.2 Liquid Based Microextraction Techniques 71 3.4 Alternative Extraction and Cleanup Procedures 73 3.4.1 Alternative Energy Sources to Enhance the Extraction 73 3.4.2 Coupled Column Liquid Chromatography (LC/PC, LC/LC Techniques) 79 3.4.3 Direct Analysis in Real Time 80 3.5 Conclusions 81 References 82 4 Recent Developments in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry 91 Kaushik Banerjee and Sagar Utture 4.1 Introduction 91 4.2 Advances in GC Separations 91 4.2.1 Multidimensional and Comprehensive Two Dimensional Gas Chromatography 92 4.2.2 Fast GC 94 4.2.3 LPGC 95 4.3 Mass Spectrometric Ionization Techniques 96 4.3.1 Electron Impact Ionization (EI) 97 4.3.2 CI (Positive/Negative Modes) 97 4.3.3 Atmospheric Pressure GC MS 98 4.4 Mass Analyzers Interfaced to GC 99 4.4.1 Quadrupole Mass Analyzer 100 4.4.2 Ion Trap Mass Analyzer 100 4.4.3 QqQ 100 4.4.4 TOF 102 4.5 Mass Spectral Libraries and Software Approaches in GC MS Analysis 103 4.6 Matrix Effects in GC MS Analysis 106 4.7 Conclusions and Perspectives 108 References 108 5 Recent Developments in Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry: Advances in Liquid Chromatographic Separations and Ionization Techniques/Interfaces 113 Alexandros G. Asimakopoulos, Anna Bletsou, Kurunthachalam Kannan, and Nikolaos S. Thomaidis 5.1 Introduction 113 5.2 Advances in Liquid Chromatographic Separations 114 5.2.1 Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography 116 5.2.2 Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography 117 5.3 Ionization Techniques/Interfaces 117 5.3.1 Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Techniques 118 5.3.2 Direct Electron Ionization 121 5.4 Ambient Ionization Techniques 122 5.4.1 DESI, Paper Spray, and Low Temperature Plasma Ambient Ionization 122 5.4.2 Direct Analysis in Real Time 124 5.4.3 Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Ionization 125 5.5 Summary 125 References 125 6 Recent Developments in Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry: Mass Detectors 131 Silvia Lacorte, Ana Aguera, Montserrat Cortina Puig, and Cristian Gomez Canela 6.1 Introduction: Mass Spectrometers 131 6.1.1 Triple Quadrupole Mass Analyzer 132 6.1.2 Quadrupole Ion Trap and Triple Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap 135 6.1.3 TOF Mass Analyzer 138 6.1.4 Hybrid TOF 140 6.1.5 Orbitrap Mass Analyzer 142 6.2 Comparison and Complementarities of Different Mass Analyzers in the LC-MS Analysis of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites 147 6.2.1 Dynamic Range 147 6.2.2 Scan Rate 147 6.2.3 LODs 148 6.2.4 Mass Accuracy 148 6.2.5 Resolution 149 6.2.6 Selectivity 149 6.2.7 Mass Range 150 6.2.8 Fragmentation 150 6.2.9 Identification Capabilities 150 6.2.10 Quantification 151 6.3 Use of Software Techniques and Spectral Libraries in LC MS 152 References 154 7 Matrix Effects in Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry 161 Helen Stahnke and Lutz Alder 7.1 Introduction 161 7.1.1 Some Definitions 161 7.1.2 Differences between Matrix Effects in GC and LC Methods 162 7.1.3 Differences between ESI and Other API Methods 162 7.1.4 A Typical Alarming Situation 163 7.2 Detection of Matrix Effects 164 7.2.1 Calibration in Solvent versus Matrix Matched Calibration 164 7.2.2 Postcolumn Infusion 165 7.2.3 Stable Isotope-Labeled Standards 166 7.3 Reduction of Matrix Effects 166 7.3.1 Change of LC Conditions 166 7.3.2 Change of MS Conditions 166 7.3.3 Better Cleanup 169 7.3.4 Backflush of LC Columns 170 7.3.5 Dilute-and-Shoot 171 7.4 Compensation of Matrix Effects 172 7.4.1 Internal standards (IS) 172 7.4.2 Matrix Matched Standards 174 7.4.3 Postcolumn Infusion 174 7.4.4 Standard Addition 175 7.5 An Attempt to Explain Matrix Effects 176 7.5.1 Substance Classes Causing Matrix Effects 176 7.5.2 Tentative Mechanisms of Matrix Effects 176 7.5.3 A Recent View on the Mechanism of Ion Suppression 178 References 180 8 Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pesticide Residues and Their Metabolites in Food Samples 187 Ana Lozano, ukasz Rajski, Maria del Mar Gomez Ramos, Carmen Ferrer, Maria D. Hernando, and Amadeo R. Fernandez Alba 8.1 Introduction 187 8.2 Application of LC QqQ MS/MS for the Targeted Analysis of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites in Food Samples 189 8.2.1 Sensitivity 192 8.2.2 Linearity 193 8.2.3 Matrix Effects 193 8.3 Application of LC Hrms to the Analysis of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites in Food Samples 195 8.3.1 Detection and Identification 195 8.3.2 Resolution 197 8.3.3 MS/MS Identification 200 8.3.4 Sensitivity 201 8.3.5 Linearity 201 8.3.6 Matrix Effect 202 8.4 Data Processing: Automated Database Searches 202 8.5 Conclusions and Future Developments 203 References 203 9 Application of LC MS/MS and LC TOF MS for the Identification of Pesticide Residues and Their Metabolites in Environmental Samples 207 Imma Ferrer and E. Michael Thurman 9.1 Introduction and Occurrence of Pesticides in Environmental Samples 207 9.2 State of the Art Techniques for the Identification of Pesticides and their Degradation Products 208 9.2.1 LC MS/MS for the Analysis of Target Compounds 208 9.2.2 LC TOF MS and LC QTOF MS for the Analysis of Target and Nontarget Compounds 209 9.3 Use of Accurate Mass Tools for the Identification of Pesticide Residues and their Metabolites in Food and Water Samples 215 9.3.1 Molecular Features 215 9.3.2 Accurate Mass Filters and Isotopic Mass Defect 220 9.3.3 Diagnostic Ion Approach 221 9.3.4 Accurate Mass Databases 223 9.3.5 Accurate Mass Profiling 225 9.4 Conclusions 227 References 227 10 Mass Spectrometric Techniques for the Determination of Pesticide Transformation Products Formed by Advanced Oxidation Processes 231 Ioannis K. Konstantinou 10.1 Introduction 231 10.2 Sample Preparation 232 10.3 Hyphenated MS Techniques 237 10.3.1 Low Resolution Mass Spectrometry: Single Stage Quadrupole 238 10.3.2 Identification of Pesticide TPs by GC MS 238 10.3.3 Identification of Pesticide TPs by LC MS 240 10.3.4 Identification of Pesticide TPs by the Combination of GC MS and LC MS 241 10.4 Tandem MS 241 10.4.1 Identification of Pesticide TPs by QqQ MS 243 10.4.2 Identification of Pesticide TPs by IT MS 244 10.5 HRMS 249 10.5.1 Single Mass Analyzer 249 10.5.2 Hybrid HR Mass Spectrometers 255 10.6 Conclusions and Perspectives 256 References 259 Index 263.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Provides an overview of the use of mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of pesticide residues and their metabolites. * Presents state of the-art MS techniques for the identification of pesticides and their transformation products in food and environment * Covers important advances in MS techniques including MS instrumentation and chromatographic separations (e.g. UPLC, HILIC, comprehensive GCxGC) and applications * Illustrates the main sample preparation techniques (SPE, QuEChERS, microextraction) used in combination with MS for the analysis of pesticides * Describes various established and new ionization techniques as well as the main MS platforms, software tools and mass spectral libraries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xi, 213 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm.
  • Current status and future prospects of mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules / Victoria L. Brown and Lin He
  • Sample preparation for 3D SIMS chemical imaging of cells / Nicholas Winograd and Anna Bloom
  • TOF-SIMS imaging of lipids on rat brain sections / David Touboul and Alain Brunelle
  • MALDI-MS-assisted molecular imaging of metabolites in legume plants / Erin Gemperline and Lingjun Li
  • MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of lipids and primary metabolites on rat brain sections / David Touboul and Alain Brunelle
  • Multiplex MALDI-MS imaging of plant metabolites using a hybrid MS system / Andrew R. Korte [and 3 others]
  • DESI imaging of small molecules in biological tissues / Elaine C. Cabral and Demian R. Ifa
  • Desorption electrospray ionization imaging of small organics on mineral surfaces / Rachel V. Bennett and Facundo M. Fernández-- Imaging of plant materials using indirect desoprtion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry / Christian Janfelt
  • Imaging of lipids and metabolites using nanospray desorption electropray ionization mass spectrometry / Ingela Lanekoff and Julia Laskin
  • Electrospray laser desorption ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry for molecular imaging of small molecules on tissues / Min-Zong Huang, Siou-Sian Jhang, and Jentaie Shiea
  • Automated cell-by-cell tissue imaging and single-cell analysis for targeted morphologies by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry / Hang Li [and 4 others]
  • Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging / Sung-Gun Park and Kermit K. Murray
  • Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry : the role of fluorocarbons in metabolite analysis and yoctomole level sensitivity / Michael E. Kurczy [and 3 others]
  • Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) for molecular mapping of animal tissues / Tara N. Moening, Victoria L. Brown, and Lin He
  • Nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization for metabolite imaging / Michihiko Waki [and 4 others]
  • Matrix-enhanced surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ME-SALDI-MS) for mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules / Victoria L. Brown, Qiang Liu, and Lin He
  • Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry imaging of biological targets / Artem Akhmetov, Chhavi Bhardwaj, and Luke Hanley
  • Data processing and analysis for mass spectrometry imaging / Jiangjiang Liu, Xingchuang Xiong, and Zheng Ouyang.
Mass Spectroscopy Imaging (MSI) has emerged as an enabling technique to provide insight into the molecular entities within cells, tissues and whole-body samples and to understand inherent complexities within biological metabolomes. In Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules: Methods and Protocols, experts in the MSI field present techniques for 2D and 3D visualization and quantification of a wide array of small molecular species present in biologically relevant samples. Chapters provide detailed operational instructions from sample preparation to method selection, from comparative quantification to structural identification and from data collection to visualization of small molecule mapping in complex samples. Written in the successful Methods in Molecular Biology series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible protocols and notes on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and easily accessible, Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules: Methods and Protocols aims to bring the rapidly maturing methods of metabolic imaging to life science researchers and to minimize technical intimidation in adapting new technological platforms in biological research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Current status and future prospects of mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules / Victoria L. Brown and Lin He
  • Sample preparation for 3D SIMS chemical imaging of cells / Nicholas Winograd and Anna Bloom
  • TOF-SIMS imaging of lipids on rat brain sections / David Touboul and Alain Brunelle
  • MALDI-MS-assisted molecular imaging of metabolites in legume plants / Erin Gemperline and Lingjun Li
  • MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of lipids and primary metabolites on rat brain sections / David Touboul and Alain Brunelle
  • Multiplex MALDI-MS imaging of plant metabolites using a hybrid MS system / Andrew R. Korte [and 3 others]
  • DESI imaging of small molecules in biological tissues / Elaine C. Cabral and Demian R. Ifa
  • Desorption electrospray ionization imaging of small organics on mineral surfaces / Rachel V. Bennett and Facundo M. Fernández-- Imaging of plant materials using indirect desoprtion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry / Christian Janfelt
  • Imaging of lipids and metabolites using nanospray desorption electropray ionization mass spectrometry / Ingela Lanekoff and Julia Laskin
  • Electrospray laser desorption ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry for molecular imaging of small molecules on tissues / Min-Zong Huang, Siou-Sian Jhang, and Jentaie Shiea
  • Automated cell-by-cell tissue imaging and single-cell analysis for targeted morphologies by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry / Hang Li [and 4 others]
  • Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging / Sung-Gun Park and Kermit K. Murray
  • Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry : the role of fluorocarbons in metabolite analysis and yoctomole level sensitivity / Michael E. Kurczy [and 3 others]
  • Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) for molecular mapping of animal tissues / Tara N. Moening, Victoria L. Brown, and Lin He
  • Nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization for metabolite imaging / Michihiko Waki [and 4 others]
  • Matrix-enhanced surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ME-SALDI-MS) for mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules / Victoria L. Brown, Qiang Liu, and Lin He
  • Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry imaging of biological targets / Artem Akhmetov, Chhavi Bhardwaj, and Luke Hanley
  • Data processing and analysis for mass spectrometry imaging / Jiangjiang Liu, Xingchuang Xiong, and Zheng Ouyang.
Mass Spectroscopy Imaging (MSI) has emerged as an enabling technique to provide insight into the molecular entities within cells, tissues and whole-body samples and to understand inherent complexities within biological metabolomes. In Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules: Methods and Protocols, experts in the MSI field present techniques for 2D and 3D visualization and quantification of a wide array of small molecular species present in biologically relevant samples. Chapters provide detailed operational instructions from sample preparation to method selection, from comparative quantification to structural identification and from data collection to visualization of small molecule mapping in complex samples. Written in the successful Methods in Molecular Biology series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible protocols and notes on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and easily accessible, Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules: Methods and Protocols aims to bring the rapidly maturing methods of metabolic imaging to life science researchers and to minimize technical intimidation in adapting new technological platforms in biological research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH506 .M45 V.1203 Unknown
Book
xiv, 280 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Metabolomics in a Nutshell-- Sastia Prama Putri and Eiichiro Fukusaki Design of Metabolomics Experiment-- Sastia Prama Putri, Fumio Matsuda, and Takeshi Bamba Sample Preparation-- Yoshihiro Izumi, Walter A. Lavina, and Sastia Prama Putri Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis: Nontargeted Metabolomics Based on Scan Mode Analysis-- Hiroshi Tsugawa and Arjen Lommen LC/QqQ/MS Analysis: Widely Targeted Metabolomics on the Basis of Multiple Reaction Monitoring-- Fumio Matsuda and Hiroshi Tsugawa Statistical Analysis-- Hiroshi Tsugawa and Takeshi Bamba Case Studies-- Walter A. Lavina, Yusuke Fujieda, Udi Jumhawan, Sastia Prama Putri, and Eiichiro Fukusaki.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics: A Practical Guide is a simple, step-by-step reference for profiling metabolites in a target organism. It discusses optimization of sample preparation for urine, serum, blood, tissue, food, and plant and animal cell samples. Encompassing three different technical fields-biology, analytical chemistry, and informatics- mass spectrometry-based metabolomics can be challenging for biologists without special training in quantitative mass spectrometry. This book is designed to overcome this limitation by providing researchers with the knowledge they need to use metabolomics technology in their respective disciplines. The book summarizes all steps in metabolomics research, from experimental design to sample preparation, analytical procedures, and data analysis. Case studies are presented for easy understanding of the metabolomics workflow and its practical applications in different research fields. The book includes an in-house library and built-in software so that those new to the field can begin to analyze real data samples. In addition to being an excellent introductory text, the book also contains the latest advancements in this emerging field and can thus be a useful reference for metabolomics specialists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Metabolomics in a Nutshell-- Sastia Prama Putri and Eiichiro Fukusaki Design of Metabolomics Experiment-- Sastia Prama Putri, Fumio Matsuda, and Takeshi Bamba Sample Preparation-- Yoshihiro Izumi, Walter A. Lavina, and Sastia Prama Putri Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis: Nontargeted Metabolomics Based on Scan Mode Analysis-- Hiroshi Tsugawa and Arjen Lommen LC/QqQ/MS Analysis: Widely Targeted Metabolomics on the Basis of Multiple Reaction Monitoring-- Fumio Matsuda and Hiroshi Tsugawa Statistical Analysis-- Hiroshi Tsugawa and Takeshi Bamba Case Studies-- Walter A. Lavina, Yusuke Fujieda, Udi Jumhawan, Sastia Prama Putri, and Eiichiro Fukusaki.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics: A Practical Guide is a simple, step-by-step reference for profiling metabolites in a target organism. It discusses optimization of sample preparation for urine, serum, blood, tissue, food, and plant and animal cell samples. Encompassing three different technical fields-biology, analytical chemistry, and informatics- mass spectrometry-based metabolomics can be challenging for biologists without special training in quantitative mass spectrometry. This book is designed to overcome this limitation by providing researchers with the knowledge they need to use metabolomics technology in their respective disciplines. The book summarizes all steps in metabolomics research, from experimental design to sample preparation, analytical procedures, and data analysis. Case studies are presented for easy understanding of the metabolomics workflow and its practical applications in different research fields. The book includes an in-house library and built-in software so that those new to the field can begin to analyze real data samples. In addition to being an excellent introductory text, the book also contains the latest advancements in this emerging field and can thus be a useful reference for metabolomics specialists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QP171 .M37 2015 Unknown
Book
1 online resource.
  • Introduction-- Fatty Acids-- Bioactive Lipid Mediators-- Glycerolipids-- Glycerolphospholipids-- Sphingolipids-- Sterol Lipids-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The emerging field of lipidomics has been made possible because of advances in mass spectrometry, and in particular tandem mass spectrometry of lipid ions generated by electrospray ionization. The ability to carry out basic biochemical studies of lipids using electrospray ionization is predicated upon understanding the behaviour of lipid derived ions following collision induced decomposition and mechanisms of product ion formation. During the past 20 years, a wealth of information has been generated about lipid molecules that are now analysed by mass spectrometry, however there is no central source where one can obtain basic information about how these very diverse biomolecules behave following collisional activation. This book brings together, in one volume, this information so that investigators considering using tandem mass spectrometry to structurally characterize lipids or to quantitate their occurrence in a biological matrix, will have a convenient source to review mechanism of decomposition reactions related to the diversity of lipid structures. A separate chapter is devoted to each of seven major lipid classes including fatty acids, eicosanoids and bioactive lipid mediators, fatty acyl esters and amides, glycerol esters, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and steroids. Mechanistic details are provided for understanding the pathways of formation of major product ions and ions used for structural characterization. In most cases specific ancillary information has been critical to understand the pathways, including isotope labeling and high resolution analysis of precursor and product ions. For a few specific examples such data is missing and pathways are proposed as a means to initiate further mass spectral experiments to prove or disprove pathway hypotheses. While this work largely centres on the lipid biochemistry of animal (mammalian) systems, general principles can be taken from the specific examples and applied to lipid biochemistry found in plants, fungi, prokaryotes and archeal organisms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- Fatty Acids-- Bioactive Lipid Mediators-- Glycerolipids-- Glycerolphospholipids-- Sphingolipids-- Sterol Lipids-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The emerging field of lipidomics has been made possible because of advances in mass spectrometry, and in particular tandem mass spectrometry of lipid ions generated by electrospray ionization. The ability to carry out basic biochemical studies of lipids using electrospray ionization is predicated upon understanding the behaviour of lipid derived ions following collision induced decomposition and mechanisms of product ion formation. During the past 20 years, a wealth of information has been generated about lipid molecules that are now analysed by mass spectrometry, however there is no central source where one can obtain basic information about how these very diverse biomolecules behave following collisional activation. This book brings together, in one volume, this information so that investigators considering using tandem mass spectrometry to structurally characterize lipids or to quantitate their occurrence in a biological matrix, will have a convenient source to review mechanism of decomposition reactions related to the diversity of lipid structures. A separate chapter is devoted to each of seven major lipid classes including fatty acids, eicosanoids and bioactive lipid mediators, fatty acyl esters and amides, glycerol esters, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and steroids. Mechanistic details are provided for understanding the pathways of formation of major product ions and ions used for structural characterization. In most cases specific ancillary information has been critical to understand the pathways, including isotope labeling and high resolution analysis of precursor and product ions. For a few specific examples such data is missing and pathways are proposed as a means to initiate further mass spectral experiments to prove or disprove pathway hypotheses. While this work largely centres on the lipid biochemistry of animal (mammalian) systems, general principles can be taken from the specific examples and applied to lipid biochemistry found in plants, fungi, prokaryotes and archeal organisms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xvi, 600 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Mass spectrometry for proteomics-based investigation / Alisa G. Woods, Izabela Sokolowska, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Kelly Wormwood, Roshanak Aslebagh, Sapan Patel, and Costel C. Darie
  • MALDI profiling and applications in medicine / Ed Dudley
  • Simplifying the proteome: analytical strategies for improving peak capacity / Lee A. Gethings and Joanne B. Connolly
  • Quantitative shotgun proteomics with data-independent acquisition and traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry: a versatile tool in the life sciences / Lewis M. Brown
  • Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomics / Esthelle Hoedt, Guoan Zhang, and Thomas A. Neubert
  • Utility of computational structural biology in mass spectrometry / Urmi Roy, Alisa G. Woods, Izabela Sokolowska, and Costel C. Darie
  • Affinity-mass spectrometry approaches for elucidating structures and interactions of protein-ligand complexes / Brînduşa Alina Petre
  • Neurological analyses: focus on gangliosides and mass spectrometry / Alina D. Zamfir
  • Mass spectrometric analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein-protein interactions (PPIs) / Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Alisa G. Woods, and Costel C. Darie
  • Applications for mass spectrometry in the study of ion channel structure and function / Damien S.K. Samways
  • A mass spectrometry view of stable and transient protein interactions / Hanna G. Budayeva and Ileana M. Cristea
  • Mass spectrometry-based tissue imaging of small molecules / Carly N. Ferguson, Joseph W.M. Fowler, Jonathan F. Waxer, Richard A. Gatti, and Joseph A. Loo
  • Redox proteomics: from bench to bedside / Karina Ckless
  • Analysis of fluorinated proteins by mass spectrometry / Linda A. Luck
  • Mass spectrometry for proteomics-based investigation using the zebrafish vertebrate model system / Reshica Baral, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Costel C. Darie, and Kenneth N. Wallace
  • Mass spectrometry-based biomarkers in drug development / Ronald A. Miller and Daniel S. Spellman
  • Detection of biomedically relevant stilbenes from wines by mass spectrometry / Veronica Andrei, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Iuliana Mihai, Costel C. Darie, and Alina Vasilescu
  • Mass spectrometric DNA adduct quantification by multiple reaction monitoring and its future use for the molecular epidemiology of cancer / Bernhard H. Monien
  • Using breast milk to assess breast cancer risk: the role of mass spectrometry-based proteomics / Sallie S. Schneider, Roshanak Aslebagh, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Susan R. Sturgeon, Costel C. Darie, and Kathleen F. Arcaro
  • Cancer secretomes and their place in supplementing other hallmarks of cancer / Sapan Patel, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Costel C. Darie, and Bayard D. Clarkson
  • Thiostrepton, a natural compound that triggers heat shock response and apoptosis in human cancer cells: a proteomics investigation / Cristinel Sandu, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Costel C. Darie, and Hermann Steller
  • Using proteomics to unravel the mysterious steps of the HBV-life-cycle / Norica Branza-Nichita, Catalina Petrareanu, Catalin Lazar, Izabela Sokolowska, and Costel C. Darie
  • Oxidative stress and antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens: state of the art, methodologies, and future trends / Mouna Marrakchi, Xiaobo Liu, and Silvana Andreescu
  • Proteomic approaches to dissect neuronal signaling pathways / Heather L. Bowling and Katrin Deinhardt
  • Investigating a Novel Protein Using Mass Spectrometry: The Example of Tumor Differentiation Factor (TDF) / Alisa G. Woods, Izabela Sokolowska, Katrin Deinhardt, and Costel C. Darie
  • Mass spectrometry for the study of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders / Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Robert M. Dekroon, Mihaela Mocanu, Jeanne P. Ryan, Costel C. Darie, and Alisa G. Woods
  • Biomarkers in major depressive disorder: the role of mass spectrometry / Alisa G. Woods, Dan V. Iosifescu, and Costel C. Darie
  • Application of mass spectrometry to characterize localization and efficacy of nanoceria in vivo / Karin L. Heckman, Joseph Erlichman, Ken Reed, and Matthew Skeels
  • Bottlenecks in proteomics / Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Devon A. Shipp, and Costel C. Darie.
"This volume explores the use of mass spectrometry for biomedical applications. Chapters focus on specific therapeutic areas such as oncology, infectious disease and psychiatry. Additional chapters focus on methodology as well as new technologies and instrumentation. This volume provides readers with a comprehensive and informative manual that will allow them to appreciate mass spectrometry and proteomic research but also to initiate and improve their own work. Thus the book acts as a technical guide but also a conceptual guide to the newest information in this exciting field. Mass spectrometry is the central tool used in proteomic research today and is rapidly becoming indispensable to the biomedical scientist. With the completion of the human genome project and the genomic revolution, the proteomic revolution has followed closely behind. Understanding the human proteome has become critical to basic and clinical biomedical research and holds the promise of providing comprehensive understanding of human physiological processes. In addition, proteomics and mass spectrometry are bringing unprecedented biomarker discovery and are helping to personalize medicine"--Publisher's description.
  • Mass spectrometry for proteomics-based investigation / Alisa G. Woods, Izabela Sokolowska, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Kelly Wormwood, Roshanak Aslebagh, Sapan Patel, and Costel C. Darie
  • MALDI profiling and applications in medicine / Ed Dudley
  • Simplifying the proteome: analytical strategies for improving peak capacity / Lee A. Gethings and Joanne B. Connolly
  • Quantitative shotgun proteomics with data-independent acquisition and traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry: a versatile tool in the life sciences / Lewis M. Brown
  • Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomics / Esthelle Hoedt, Guoan Zhang, and Thomas A. Neubert
  • Utility of computational structural biology in mass spectrometry / Urmi Roy, Alisa G. Woods, Izabela Sokolowska, and Costel C. Darie
  • Affinity-mass spectrometry approaches for elucidating structures and interactions of protein-ligand complexes / Brînduşa Alina Petre
  • Neurological analyses: focus on gangliosides and mass spectrometry / Alina D. Zamfir
  • Mass spectrometric analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein-protein interactions (PPIs) / Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Alisa G. Woods, and Costel C. Darie
  • Applications for mass spectrometry in the study of ion channel structure and function / Damien S.K. Samways
  • A mass spectrometry view of stable and transient protein interactions / Hanna G. Budayeva and Ileana M. Cristea
  • Mass spectrometry-based tissue imaging of small molecules / Carly N. Ferguson, Joseph W.M. Fowler, Jonathan F. Waxer, Richard A. Gatti, and Joseph A. Loo
  • Redox proteomics: from bench to bedside / Karina Ckless
  • Analysis of fluorinated proteins by mass spectrometry / Linda A. Luck
  • Mass spectrometry for proteomics-based investigation using the zebrafish vertebrate model system / Reshica Baral, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Costel C. Darie, and Kenneth N. Wallace
  • Mass spectrometry-based biomarkers in drug development / Ronald A. Miller and Daniel S. Spellman
  • Detection of biomedically relevant stilbenes from wines by mass spectrometry / Veronica Andrei, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Iuliana Mihai, Costel C. Darie, and Alina Vasilescu
  • Mass spectrometric DNA adduct quantification by multiple reaction monitoring and its future use for the molecular epidemiology of cancer / Bernhard H. Monien
  • Using breast milk to assess breast cancer risk: the role of mass spectrometry-based proteomics / Sallie S. Schneider, Roshanak Aslebagh, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Susan R. Sturgeon, Costel C. Darie, and Kathleen F. Arcaro
  • Cancer secretomes and their place in supplementing other hallmarks of cancer / Sapan Patel, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Costel C. Darie, and Bayard D. Clarkson
  • Thiostrepton, a natural compound that triggers heat shock response and apoptosis in human cancer cells: a proteomics investigation / Cristinel Sandu, Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Costel C. Darie, and Hermann Steller
  • Using proteomics to unravel the mysterious steps of the HBV-life-cycle / Norica Branza-Nichita, Catalina Petrareanu, Catalin Lazar, Izabela Sokolowska, and Costel C. Darie
  • Oxidative stress and antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens: state of the art, methodologies, and future trends / Mouna Marrakchi, Xiaobo Liu, and Silvana Andreescu
  • Proteomic approaches to dissect neuronal signaling pathways / Heather L. Bowling and Katrin Deinhardt
  • Investigating a Novel Protein Using Mass Spectrometry: The Example of Tumor Differentiation Factor (TDF) / Alisa G. Woods, Izabela Sokolowska, Katrin Deinhardt, and Costel C. Darie
  • Mass spectrometry for the study of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders / Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Robert M. Dekroon, Mihaela Mocanu, Jeanne P. Ryan, Costel C. Darie, and Alisa G. Woods
  • Biomarkers in major depressive disorder: the role of mass spectrometry / Alisa G. Woods, Dan V. Iosifescu, and Costel C. Darie
  • Application of mass spectrometry to characterize localization and efficacy of nanoceria in vivo / Karin L. Heckman, Joseph Erlichman, Ken Reed, and Matthew Skeels
  • Bottlenecks in proteomics / Armand G. Ngounou Wetie, Devon A. Shipp, and Costel C. Darie.
"This volume explores the use of mass spectrometry for biomedical applications. Chapters focus on specific therapeutic areas such as oncology, infectious disease and psychiatry. Additional chapters focus on methodology as well as new technologies and instrumentation. This volume provides readers with a comprehensive and informative manual that will allow them to appreciate mass spectrometry and proteomic research but also to initiate and improve their own work. Thus the book acts as a technical guide but also a conceptual guide to the newest information in this exciting field. Mass spectrometry is the central tool used in proteomic research today and is rapidly becoming indispensable to the biomedical scientist. With the completion of the human genome project and the genomic revolution, the proteomic revolution has followed closely behind. Understanding the human proteome has become critical to basic and clinical biomedical research and holds the promise of providing comprehensive understanding of human physiological processes. In addition, proteomics and mass spectrometry are bringing unprecedented biomarker discovery and are helping to personalize medicine"--Publisher's description.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
SPRINGER Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 600 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics-based Investigation
  • MALDI profiling and applications in medicine
  • Simplifying the proteome: Analytical strategies for improving peak capacity
  • Quantitative Shotgun Proteomics with Data-Independent Acquisition and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Versatile Tool in the Life Sciences
  • Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) for Quantitative Proteomics
  • Utility of Computational Structural Biology in Mass Spectrometry
  • Affinity
  • Mass Spectrometry Approaches for Elucidating Structures and Interactions of Protein
  • Ligand Complexes
  • Neurological Analyses: Focus on Gangliosides and Mass Spectrometry
  • Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Post-translational Modifications (PTMs) and Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs)
  • Applications for Mass Spectrometry in the Study of Ion Channel Structure and Function
  • A Mass Spectrometry View of Stable and Transient Protein Interactions
  • Mass Spectrometry-Based Tissue Imaging of Small Molecules
  • Redox Proteomics: from Bench to Bedside
  • Analysis of Fluorinated Proteins by Mass Spectrometry
  • Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics-Based Investigation Using the Zebrafish Vertebrate Model System
  • Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarkers in Drug Development
  • Detection of Bio medically Relevant Stilbenes from Wines by Mass Spectrometry
  • Mass Spectrometric DNA Adduct Quantification by Multiple Reaction Monitoring and its Future Use for the Molecular Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Using Breast Milk to Assess Breast Cancer Risk: The Role of Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics
  • Cancer Secretomes and their Place in Supplementing other Hallmarks of Cancer
  • Thiostrepton, a Natural Compound that Triggers Heat Shock Response and Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cells: a Proteomics Investigation
  • Using Proteomics to Unravel the Mysterious Steps of the HBV life-cycle
  • Oxidative Stressand Antibiotic Resistancein Bacterial Pathogens: State of the Art, Methodologies and Future Trends
  • Proteomic Approaches to Dissect Neuronal Signalling Pathways
  • Investigating a Novel Protein Using Mass Spectrometry: the Example of Tumor Differentiation Factor (TDF)
  • Mass Spectrometry for the Study of Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
  • Biomarkers in Major Depressive Disorder: the Role of Mass Spectrometry
  • Application of Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Localization and Efficacy of Nanoceria in vivo
  • Bottlenecks in Proteomics.
This volume explores the use of mass spectrometry for biomedical applications. Chapters focus on specific therapeutic areas such as oncology, infectious disease and psychiatry. Additional chapters focus on methodology as well as new technologies and instrumentation. This volume provides readers with a comprehensive and informative manual that will allow them to appreciate mass spectrometry and proteomic research but also to initiate and improve their own work. Thus the book acts as a technical guide but also a conceptual guide to the newest information in this exciting field. Mass spectrometry is the central tool used in proteomic research today and is rapidly becoming indispensable to the biomedical scientist. With the completion of the human genome project and the genomic revolution, the proteomic revolution has followed closely behind. Understanding the human proteome has become critical to basic and clinical biomedical research and holds the promise of providing comprehensive understanding of human physiological processes. In addition, proteomics and mass spectrometry are bringing unprecedented biomarker discovery and are helping to personalize medicine.
  • Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics-based Investigation
  • MALDI profiling and applications in medicine
  • Simplifying the proteome: Analytical strategies for improving peak capacity
  • Quantitative Shotgun Proteomics with Data-Independent Acquisition and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Versatile Tool in the Life Sciences
  • Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) for Quantitative Proteomics
  • Utility of Computational Structural Biology in Mass Spectrometry
  • Affinity
  • Mass Spectrometry Approaches for Elucidating Structures and Interactions of Protein
  • Ligand Complexes
  • Neurological Analyses: Focus on Gangliosides and Mass Spectrometry
  • Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Post-translational Modifications (PTMs) and Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs)
  • Applications for Mass Spectrometry in the Study of Ion Channel Structure and Function
  • A Mass Spectrometry View of Stable and Transient Protein Interactions
  • Mass Spectrometry-Based Tissue Imaging of Small Molecules
  • Redox Proteomics: from Bench to Bedside
  • Analysis of Fluorinated Proteins by Mass Spectrometry
  • Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics-Based Investigation Using the Zebrafish Vertebrate Model System
  • Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarkers in Drug Development
  • Detection of Bio medically Relevant Stilbenes from Wines by Mass Spectrometry
  • Mass Spectrometric DNA Adduct Quantification by Multiple Reaction Monitoring and its Future Use for the Molecular Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Using Breast Milk to Assess Breast Cancer Risk: The Role of Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics
  • Cancer Secretomes and their Place in Supplementing other Hallmarks of Cancer
  • Thiostrepton, a Natural Compound that Triggers Heat Shock Response and Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cells: a Proteomics Investigation
  • Using Proteomics to Unravel the Mysterious Steps of the HBV life-cycle
  • Oxidative Stressand Antibiotic Resistancein Bacterial Pathogens: State of the Art, Methodologies and Future Trends
  • Proteomic Approaches to Dissect Neuronal Signalling Pathways
  • Investigating a Novel Protein Using Mass Spectrometry: the Example of Tumor Differentiation Factor (TDF)
  • Mass Spectrometry for the Study of Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
  • Biomarkers in Major Depressive Disorder: the Role of Mass Spectrometry
  • Application of Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Localization and Efficacy of Nanoceria in vivo
  • Bottlenecks in Proteomics.
This volume explores the use of mass spectrometry for biomedical applications. Chapters focus on specific therapeutic areas such as oncology, infectious disease and psychiatry. Additional chapters focus on methodology as well as new technologies and instrumentation. This volume provides readers with a comprehensive and informative manual that will allow them to appreciate mass spectrometry and proteomic research but also to initiate and improve their own work. Thus the book acts as a technical guide but also a conceptual guide to the newest information in this exciting field. Mass spectrometry is the central tool used in proteomic research today and is rapidly becoming indispensable to the biomedical scientist. With the completion of the human genome project and the genomic revolution, the proteomic revolution has followed closely behind. Understanding the human proteome has become critical to basic and clinical biomedical research and holds the promise of providing comprehensive understanding of human physiological processes. In addition, proteomics and mass spectrometry are bringing unprecedented biomarker discovery and are helping to personalize medicine.
Book
1 online resource (viii, 291 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Preface.- Biological agents and bioterrorism-- M. Bologna.- Immunological Defence Mechanisms against Biological Agents-- M. Bologna.- Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry: an overview-- G. Giorgi.- Modern Sample Preparation Techniques for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Analysis of Environmental Markers of Chemical Warfare Agents Use-- O. Terzic, P. de Voogt.- An Overview of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and some of its applications-- M.W. Duncan et al.- Field portable mass spectrometry-- S.A. Lammert.- MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry-- E.H. Seeley and R.M. Caprioli.- Bacterial Identification by Mass Spectrometry-- C.R. Cox, K.J. Voorhees.- Analysis of bio-nanoparticles by means of nano ES in combination with DMA and PDMA - intact viruses, virus-like-particles and vaccine particles-- G. Allmaier et al.- Mass spectrometric target analysis and proteomics in environmental toxicology-- K. J. Groha, M.J.-F. Suter.- Proteomics for the enhanced discovery of bacterial biomarkers-- E.M. Hartmann, J. Armengaud.- Laser-based detection of explosives and related compounds-- I. Malka et al.-Detection of Metals and Radionuclides using Rapid, On-site, Antibody-based Assays-- D.A. Blake, B.Ban.- Identification of Fraudulently Modified Foods-- G. Sindona.- Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of novel antineoplastic curcumin analogues-- H. Awad et al.- Glycoconjugate vaccines used for prevention from biological agents: Tandem mass spectrometric analysis-- F. Jahouh et al.- Nano-structured solids and heterogeneous catalysts for the selective decontamination of chemical warfare agents-- M. Guidotti and C. Evangelisti.- Strategic Missile Forces in Ukraine: Brief Survey of Past and Present Environmental Problems-- I. Winkler.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This NATO-ASI installment is designed to provide an advanced overview for doctoral and post-doctoral candidates of the state-of-the-art technologies for bio-detection. The main objective of the work aims at providing readers with the latest developments necessary to successfully understand the CBRN Agents and their associated biotechnologies. The core methods focused on are mass spectrometry (including chromatographic and electrophoretic separation) and comparisons to spectroscopic, immunological and molecular analysis of chemical, biological and nuclear agents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface.- Biological agents and bioterrorism-- M. Bologna.- Immunological Defence Mechanisms against Biological Agents-- M. Bologna.- Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry: an overview-- G. Giorgi.- Modern Sample Preparation Techniques for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Analysis of Environmental Markers of Chemical Warfare Agents Use-- O. Terzic, P. de Voogt.- An Overview of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and some of its applications-- M.W. Duncan et al.- Field portable mass spectrometry-- S.A. Lammert.- MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry-- E.H. Seeley and R.M. Caprioli.- Bacterial Identification by Mass Spectrometry-- C.R. Cox, K.J. Voorhees.- Analysis of bio-nanoparticles by means of nano ES in combination with DMA and PDMA - intact viruses, virus-like-particles and vaccine particles-- G. Allmaier et al.- Mass spectrometric target analysis and proteomics in environmental toxicology-- K. J. Groha, M.J.-F. Suter.- Proteomics for the enhanced discovery of bacterial biomarkers-- E.M. Hartmann, J. Armengaud.- Laser-based detection of explosives and related compounds-- I. Malka et al.-Detection of Metals and Radionuclides using Rapid, On-site, Antibody-based Assays-- D.A. Blake, B.Ban.- Identification of Fraudulently Modified Foods-- G. Sindona.- Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of novel antineoplastic curcumin analogues-- H. Awad et al.- Glycoconjugate vaccines used for prevention from biological agents: Tandem mass spectrometric analysis-- F. Jahouh et al.- Nano-structured solids and heterogeneous catalysts for the selective decontamination of chemical warfare agents-- M. Guidotti and C. Evangelisti.- Strategic Missile Forces in Ukraine: Brief Survey of Past and Present Environmental Problems-- I. Winkler.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This NATO-ASI installment is designed to provide an advanced overview for doctoral and post-doctoral candidates of the state-of-the-art technologies for bio-detection. The main objective of the work aims at providing readers with the latest developments necessary to successfully understand the CBRN Agents and their associated biotechnologies. The core methods focused on are mass spectrometry (including chromatographic and electrophoretic separation) and comparisons to spectroscopic, immunological and molecular analysis of chemical, biological and nuclear agents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xviii, 271 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Detection and Identification of Microbes Using Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Charles H. Wick Mass Analyzers and MS/MS Methods for Microbial Detection and Identification Michael F. Stanford Matching Mass Spectral Profiles of Biomarkers Michael F. Stanford Sequence Information Derived from Proteins or Nucleic Acids Samir V. Deshpande Collection and Processing of Microbial Samples Samir V. Deshpande Computer Software Used for Chemometric and Bioinformatics to Discriminate Microbes Samir V. Deshpande Applications Charles H. Wick Survey of Commercially Available MS-Based Platforms Suitable for Bacterial Detection and Identification Michael F. Stanford Current and Future Trends in Using MS for Microbial Detection and Identification Charles H. Wick References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
All microbes, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can be classified and identified by matching a few peptides known to be unique to each organism. Identifying Microbes by Mass Spectrometry Proteomics describes ways to identify microorganisms using powerful new techniques combining hardware and software and yielding highly accurate methods for detection, identification, and classification of microbes. This straightforward technology can be used to detect unknown and unsequenced microorganisms as well as microbes in complex environmental samples. This book reviews various mass analyzers used for detection and describes ionization methods frequently used for analysis of microbial constituents, a necessary step in the preparation of mass spectrometry (MS) samples. The text also discusses diverse processing methods, which are used to analyze MS files for matching mass spectral profiles, and examines protein and nucleic acid sequence-based methods capable of classification and identification of microbial agents. The book also covers sample collection methods and specific sample preparation techniques. The text addresses using computer software and bioinformatics approaches for data mining to discriminate microbes using mass spectrometry proteomics (MSP). It also discusses historical pattern recognition-based methods and other approaches such as analysis of pyrolysis products, chemical ionization (CI) of fatty acid methyl esters, and MALDI-MS. The text contains examples of the application of the MSP technique for microbe detection and includes a survey of suitable and commercially available MS-based platforms. Successful applications include the identification of unknown microbes in honey bees associated with colony collapse disorder and the analysis of virus strains from the 2009 influenza pandemic. The final chapter outlines future trends in these groundbreaking uses of MS techniques, which are fast, not limited by sample type, and show potential in answering complex environmental questions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Detection and Identification of Microbes Using Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Charles H. Wick Mass Analyzers and MS/MS Methods for Microbial Detection and Identification Michael F. Stanford Matching Mass Spectral Profiles of Biomarkers Michael F. Stanford Sequence Information Derived from Proteins or Nucleic Acids Samir V. Deshpande Collection and Processing of Microbial Samples Samir V. Deshpande Computer Software Used for Chemometric and Bioinformatics to Discriminate Microbes Samir V. Deshpande Applications Charles H. Wick Survey of Commercially Available MS-Based Platforms Suitable for Bacterial Detection and Identification Michael F. Stanford Current and Future Trends in Using MS for Microbial Detection and Identification Charles H. Wick References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
All microbes, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can be classified and identified by matching a few peptides known to be unique to each organism. Identifying Microbes by Mass Spectrometry Proteomics describes ways to identify microorganisms using powerful new techniques combining hardware and software and yielding highly accurate methods for detection, identification, and classification of microbes. This straightforward technology can be used to detect unknown and unsequenced microorganisms as well as microbes in complex environmental samples. This book reviews various mass analyzers used for detection and describes ionization methods frequently used for analysis of microbial constituents, a necessary step in the preparation of mass spectrometry (MS) samples. The text also discusses diverse processing methods, which are used to analyze MS files for matching mass spectral profiles, and examines protein and nucleic acid sequence-based methods capable of classification and identification of microbial agents. The book also covers sample collection methods and specific sample preparation techniques. The text addresses using computer software and bioinformatics approaches for data mining to discriminate microbes using mass spectrometry proteomics (MSP). It also discusses historical pattern recognition-based methods and other approaches such as analysis of pyrolysis products, chemical ionization (CI) of fatty acid methyl esters, and MALDI-MS. The text contains examples of the application of the MSP technique for microbe detection and includes a survey of suitable and commercially available MS-based platforms. Successful applications include the identification of unknown microbes in honey bees associated with colony collapse disorder and the analysis of virus strains from the 2009 influenza pandemic. The final chapter outlines future trends in these groundbreaking uses of MS techniques, which are fast, not limited by sample type, and show potential in answering complex environmental questions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QP519.9 .M3 I346 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • INTRODUCTION What is Mass? Fragmentation The Mass Spectrometer sample Introduction Ionization Mass Separation Resolution Ion Detection Data Presentation ELECTRON IONIZATION Ion Formation Types of Ions Molecular Ion Fragment Ion Multiply Charged Ion Molecular Ions Isotope Peaks Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Multiply Charged Ions Neutral Fragments Basic Mass Spectral Reactions Introduction Simple cleavage Multicenter fragmentations Expulsion of Stable Neutral Fragments Interpreting EI Mass Spectra ACCURATE MASS MEASUREMENT Introduction Mass Calibration Elemental Compositions Applications MODERN TECHNIQUES Introduction Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Introduction Applications Low Energy Ionization Low Electron Energy Field Ionization Fast Atom Bombardment Photoionization Chemical Ionization Electrospray Ionization Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Direct Analysis in Real Time Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Introduction Applications Appendix I Answers to Problems Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mass spectrometry has played an integral part in the study of organic molecular structures for more than 50 years, offering significant information from small amounts of sample. The mass spectrum produced by electron impact ionization presents a pattern of peaks that can often give definitive structural information about an unknown compound. Introductory Mass Spectrometry, Second Edition guides readers in the understanding and recognition of those patterns, discussing mass spectra in terms that are familiar to chemists. It provides a basis for chemists to interpret mass spectra to solve particular structural problems. The Second Edition has been updated with modern techniques and data handling. Beginning with an introduction to the principles and instrumentation, it then sequentially explains the processes that occur in the mass spectrometer following ionization. The book is unique in the large number of mass spectra presented and provides examples of mass spectra from a wide variety of organic chemicals, concentrating on the relationships between fragmentation patterns, common chemical reactions, and chemical structures. The book also discusses mass spectra obtained with softer ionization techniques, which provide definitive information regarding molecular weights. The text describes mass spectra produced by electron ionization, discussing how the spectral peak pattern relates to molecular structure. It details the use of high-resolution and accurate mass measurement to determine elemental composition of ions in order to identify unknown substances. The book also introduces some of the recent techniques that can be employed to extend the usefulness of mass spectrometry to high molecular weight substances and more polar substances. It includes examples and problems representing a cross section of organic chemistry to help readers integrate the principles presented.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • INTRODUCTION What is Mass? Fragmentation The Mass Spectrometer sample Introduction Ionization Mass Separation Resolution Ion Detection Data Presentation ELECTRON IONIZATION Ion Formation Types of Ions Molecular Ion Fragment Ion Multiply Charged Ion Molecular Ions Isotope Peaks Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Multiply Charged Ions Neutral Fragments Basic Mass Spectral Reactions Introduction Simple cleavage Multicenter fragmentations Expulsion of Stable Neutral Fragments Interpreting EI Mass Spectra ACCURATE MASS MEASUREMENT Introduction Mass Calibration Elemental Compositions Applications MODERN TECHNIQUES Introduction Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Introduction Applications Low Energy Ionization Low Electron Energy Field Ionization Fast Atom Bombardment Photoionization Chemical Ionization Electrospray Ionization Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Direct Analysis in Real Time Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Introduction Applications Appendix I Answers to Problems Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mass spectrometry has played an integral part in the study of organic molecular structures for more than 50 years, offering significant information from small amounts of sample. The mass spectrum produced by electron impact ionization presents a pattern of peaks that can often give definitive structural information about an unknown compound. Introductory Mass Spectrometry, Second Edition guides readers in the understanding and recognition of those patterns, discussing mass spectra in terms that are familiar to chemists. It provides a basis for chemists to interpret mass spectra to solve particular structural problems. The Second Edition has been updated with modern techniques and data handling. Beginning with an introduction to the principles and instrumentation, it then sequentially explains the processes that occur in the mass spectrometer following ionization. The book is unique in the large number of mass spectra presented and provides examples of mass spectra from a wide variety of organic chemicals, concentrating on the relationships between fragmentation patterns, common chemical reactions, and chemical structures. The book also discusses mass spectra obtained with softer ionization techniques, which provide definitive information regarding molecular weights. The text describes mass spectra produced by electron ionization, discussing how the spectral peak pattern relates to molecular structure. It details the use of high-resolution and accurate mass measurement to determine elemental composition of ions in order to identify unknown substances. The book also introduces some of the recent techniques that can be employed to extend the usefulness of mass spectrometry to high molecular weight substances and more polar substances. It includes examples and problems representing a cross section of organic chemistry to help readers integrate the principles presented.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • An Overview A Brief History Definitions Concerning Instruments, Mass, m/z, and Ions Components of Instrument and Their Functions Definitions Concerning Instrument Performance Definitions Concerning Applications Information from Mass Spectra Diversity and Scope of Applications Instrumentation Sample Introduction Ion Sources and Methods of Ionization Mass Analyzers Ion Current Detectors Vacuum Systems Data Systems Methodologies and Strategies Measures of Instrument Performance Interpretation of Mass Spectra Analytical Techniques and Strategies Omics Biopolymers Imaging Mass Spectrometry Bioinformatics Buying a Mass Spectrometer Examples from Representative Publications An Open-Access Mass Spectrometry Facility Environmental: Organochlorines in Fish Environmental: Pharmaceuticals in Surface and Wastewaters Pharmacology: Lipitor Metabolism New Techniques: Paper Spray of Pharmaceuticals Petroleomics: Crude Oil Characterization Metabolomics: Disease Markers for a Tropical Disease Metabolomics: Chemical Defense Lipidomics: Coronary Artery Disease Proteomics: Protein Identification in a Painting Proteomics: Protein Identification and Metastasis Proteomics: Noncovalent Interactions Tissue Imaging The Absolute Essentials General Instrument Components Performance Parameters Techniques and Strategies Resources Books, Journals, Review Articles, Classical Publications Major Instrument Manufacturers Mass Spectrometry Societies, Blogs, and Discussion Groups The Mass Spectrometrist and the Internet.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
With usage of mass spectrometry continually expanding, an increasing number of scientists, technicians, students, and physicians are coming into contact with this valuable technique. Mass spectrometry has many uses, both qualitative and quantitative, from analyzing simple gases to environmental contaminants, pharmaceuticals, and complex biopolymers. The extraordinary versatility can make mass spectrometers daunting to novices. Consequently, new users would benefit greatly from an understanding of the basic concepts as well as the processes that occur in these instruments. Mass Spectrometry for the Novice provides exactly that, with detailed, straightforward descriptions and clear illustrations of principles of operations and techniques. The book begins with an overview that includes essential definitions and then provides information on the components of and the strategies used in the most common instruments. The authors discuss the methodologies available, classes of compounds analyzed, and the types of data that can be generated. A group of representative applications from published articles is summarized, demonstrating the diversity of mass spectrometry. The authors also condense the essentials of the topic into one invaluable chapter that provides a set of concise take-home messages on all aspects of mass spectrometry. The final section provides a collection of resources including books, reviews, and useful websites. Using simple language, new color figures, clever cartoons, and assuming no prior knowledge, this book provides a readily understandable entree to mass spectrometry. A CD-ROM with selected figures and cartoons is included.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • An Overview A Brief History Definitions Concerning Instruments, Mass, m/z, and Ions Components of Instrument and Their Functions Definitions Concerning Instrument Performance Definitions Concerning Applications Information from Mass Spectra Diversity and Scope of Applications Instrumentation Sample Introduction Ion Sources and Methods of Ionization Mass Analyzers Ion Current Detectors Vacuum Systems Data Systems Methodologies and Strategies Measures of Instrument Performance Interpretation of Mass Spectra Analytical Techniques and Strategies Omics Biopolymers Imaging Mass Spectrometry Bioinformatics Buying a Mass Spectrometer Examples from Representative Publications An Open-Access Mass Spectrometry Facility Environmental: Organochlorines in Fish Environmental: Pharmaceuticals in Surface and Wastewaters Pharmacology: Lipitor Metabolism New Techniques: Paper Spray of Pharmaceuticals Petroleomics: Crude Oil Characterization Metabolomics: Disease Markers for a Tropical Disease Metabolomics: Chemical Defense Lipidomics: Coronary Artery Disease Proteomics: Protein Identification in a Painting Proteomics: Protein Identification and Metastasis Proteomics: Noncovalent Interactions Tissue Imaging The Absolute Essentials General Instrument Components Performance Parameters Techniques and Strategies Resources Books, Journals, Review Articles, Classical Publications Major Instrument Manufacturers Mass Spectrometry Societies, Blogs, and Discussion Groups The Mass Spectrometrist and the Internet.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
With usage of mass spectrometry continually expanding, an increasing number of scientists, technicians, students, and physicians are coming into contact with this valuable technique. Mass spectrometry has many uses, both qualitative and quantitative, from analyzing simple gases to environmental contaminants, pharmaceuticals, and complex biopolymers. The extraordinary versatility can make mass spectrometers daunting to novices. Consequently, new users would benefit greatly from an understanding of the basic concepts as well as the processes that occur in these instruments. Mass Spectrometry for the Novice provides exactly that, with detailed, straightforward descriptions and clear illustrations of principles of operations and techniques. The book begins with an overview that includes essential definitions and then provides information on the components of and the strategies used in the most common instruments. The authors discuss the methodologies available, classes of compounds analyzed, and the types of data that can be generated. A group of representative applications from published articles is summarized, demonstrating the diversity of mass spectrometry. The authors also condense the essentials of the topic into one invaluable chapter that provides a set of concise take-home messages on all aspects of mass spectrometry. The final section provides a collection of resources including books, reviews, and useful websites. Using simple language, new color figures, clever cartoons, and assuming no prior knowledge, this book provides a readily understandable entree to mass spectrometry. A CD-ROM with selected figures and cartoons is included.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xvi, 360 pages : illustrations.
  • Overview of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics : opportunities and challenges
  • Global metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry
  • LC-MS profiling to link metabolic and phenotypic diversity in plant mapping populations
  • Mitochondrial metabolomics using high-resolution Fourier-transform mass spectrometry
  • Sample preparation methods for LC-MS-based global aqueous metabolite profiling
  • Methods of discovery-based and targeted metabolite analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection
  • Analysis of mouse liver metabolites by GC x GC-TOF MS
  • Metabolite fingerprinting by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry
  • Quantitative metabolomic profiling using dansylation isotope labeling and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry
  • Quantitative analysis of amino and organic acids by methyl chloroformate derivatization and GC-MS/MS analysis
  • Stable isotope-labeled tracers for metabolic pathway elucidation by GC-MS and FT-MS
  • Multiplexed, quantitative, and targeted metabolite profiling by LC-MS/MRM
  • Multidimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics
  • Comprehensive quantitative determination of PUFA-related bioactive lipids for functional lipidomics using high-resolution mass spectrometry
  • Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry targeted profiling of bile acids : application to serum, liver tissue, and cultured cells of different species
  • Analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric analysis
  • Headspace SPME-GC-MS metabolomics analysis of urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
  • Metabolite profiling by direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
  • Analysis of dried blood spots using DESI mass spectrometry
  • DESI-MS imaging of lipids and metabolites from biological samples
  • Metabolic imaging using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS)
  • Statistical analysis and modeling of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.
Metabolomics is a fast growing field in systems biology and offers a powerful and promising approach for a large range of applications. Metabolomics focuses on deriving the concentrations and fluxes of low molecular weight metabolites in bio-fluids, cells or tissue, plants, foods and related samples and this information provides enormous detail on biological systems and their current status. Mass Spectrometry in Metabolomics: Methods and Protocols presents a broad coverage of the major mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics methods and applications. MS is one of most powerful and commonly used analytical methods in metabolomics; because so many different MS systems are used in metabolomics, this volume includes a wide variety such as triple quads, time of flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and even simple quadrupole systems. A wide range of studies are described, with samples ranging from blood and urine to tissue and even plants. Written in the successful Methods in Molecular Biology series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible protocols, and notes on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and easily accessible, Mass Spectrometry in Metabolomics: Methods and Protocols seeks to serve both professionals and novices with its well-honed methodologies in an effort to further the dynamic field of metabolomics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Overview of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics : opportunities and challenges
  • Global metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry
  • LC-MS profiling to link metabolic and phenotypic diversity in plant mapping populations
  • Mitochondrial metabolomics using high-resolution Fourier-transform mass spectrometry
  • Sample preparation methods for LC-MS-based global aqueous metabolite profiling
  • Methods of discovery-based and targeted metabolite analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection
  • Analysis of mouse liver metabolites by GC x GC-TOF MS
  • Metabolite fingerprinting by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry
  • Quantitative metabolomic profiling using dansylation isotope labeling and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry
  • Quantitative analysis of amino and organic acids by methyl chloroformate derivatization and GC-MS/MS analysis
  • Stable isotope-labeled tracers for metabolic pathway elucidation by GC-MS and FT-MS
  • Multiplexed, quantitative, and targeted metabolite profiling by LC-MS/MRM
  • Multidimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics
  • Comprehensive quantitative determination of PUFA-related bioactive lipids for functional lipidomics using high-resolution mass spectrometry
  • Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry targeted profiling of bile acids : application to serum, liver tissue, and cultured cells of different species
  • Analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric analysis
  • Headspace SPME-GC-MS metabolomics analysis of urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
  • Metabolite profiling by direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
  • Analysis of dried blood spots using DESI mass spectrometry
  • DESI-MS imaging of lipids and metabolites from biological samples
  • Metabolic imaging using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS)
  • Statistical analysis and modeling of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.
Metabolomics is a fast growing field in systems biology and offers a powerful and promising approach for a large range of applications. Metabolomics focuses on deriving the concentrations and fluxes of low molecular weight metabolites in bio-fluids, cells or tissue, plants, foods and related samples and this information provides enormous detail on biological systems and their current status. Mass Spectrometry in Metabolomics: Methods and Protocols presents a broad coverage of the major mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics methods and applications. MS is one of most powerful and commonly used analytical methods in metabolomics; because so many different MS systems are used in metabolomics, this volume includes a wide variety such as triple quads, time of flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and even simple quadrupole systems. A wide range of studies are described, with samples ranging from blood and urine to tissue and even plants. Written in the successful Methods in Molecular Biology series format, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible protocols, and notes on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and easily accessible, Mass Spectrometry in Metabolomics: Methods and Protocols seeks to serve both professionals and novices with its well-honed methodologies in an effort to further the dynamic field of metabolomics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
QH506 .M45 V.1198 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xii, 287 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction: Why study Nucleic Acids in vacuo?
  • Transferring Nucleic Acids to the Gas Phase
  • Structure of Nucleic Acids in the Gas Phase
  • Interactions between Nucleic Acid Ions and Electrons and Photons
  • Gas-phase Spectroscopy of Nucleic Acids
  • Fragmentation Reactions of Nucleic Acid Ions in the Gas Phase
  • Characterization of Ribonucleic Acids and their Modifications by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry
  • Quantification of DNA Damage using Mass Spectrometry Techniques
  • Ligand Binding to Nucleic Acids
  • MS-based Approaches for Nucleic Acid Structural Determination.
This book gives physical chemists a broader view of potential biological applications of their techniques for the study of nucleic acids in the gas phase. It provides organic chemists, biophysicists, and pharmacologists with an introduction to new techniques they can use to find the answers to yet unsolved questions. Laboratory sciences have bloomed with a variety of techniques to decipher the properties of the molecules of life. This volume introduces techniques used to investigate the properties of nucleic acids in the absence of solvent. It highlights the specificities pertaining to the studies of nucleic acids, although some of the techniques can similarly be applied to the study of other biomolecules, like proteins. The first part of the book introduces the techniques, from the transfer of nucleic acids to the gas-phase, to their detailed physico-chemical investigation. Each chapter is devoted to a specific molecular property, and illustrates how various approaches (experimental and theoretical) can be combined for the interpretation. The second part of the book is devoted to applying the gas-phase approaches to solve specific questions related to the biophysics, biochemistry or pharmacology of nucleic acids.
  • Introduction: Why study Nucleic Acids in vacuo?
  • Transferring Nucleic Acids to the Gas Phase
  • Structure of Nucleic Acids in the Gas Phase
  • Interactions between Nucleic Acid Ions and Electrons and Photons
  • Gas-phase Spectroscopy of Nucleic Acids
  • Fragmentation Reactions of Nucleic Acid Ions in the Gas Phase
  • Characterization of Ribonucleic Acids and their Modifications by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry
  • Quantification of DNA Damage using Mass Spectrometry Techniques
  • Ligand Binding to Nucleic Acids
  • MS-based Approaches for Nucleic Acid Structural Determination.
This book gives physical chemists a broader view of potential biological applications of their techniques for the study of nucleic acids in the gas phase. It provides organic chemists, biophysicists, and pharmacologists with an introduction to new techniques they can use to find the answers to yet unsolved questions. Laboratory sciences have bloomed with a variety of techniques to decipher the properties of the molecules of life. This volume introduces techniques used to investigate the properties of nucleic acids in the absence of solvent. It highlights the specificities pertaining to the studies of nucleic acids, although some of the techniques can similarly be applied to the study of other biomolecules, like proteins. The first part of the book introduces the techniques, from the transfer of nucleic acids to the gas-phase, to their detailed physico-chemical investigation. Each chapter is devoted to a specific molecular property, and illustrates how various approaches (experimental and theoretical) can be combined for the interpretation. The second part of the book is devoted to applying the gas-phase approaches to solve specific questions related to the biophysics, biochemistry or pharmacology of nucleic acids.
Book
1 online resource (vii, 237 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • 1. X-Ray Diffraction and Reflectivity
  • 2. Introduction to Optical Characterization of Materials
  • 3. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES)
  • 4. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry
  • 5. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
This unique book covers the most common materials analysis techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, and several optical characterization methods. It stands as a quick reference for experienced users, as a learning tool for students, and as a guide for the understanding of typical data interpretation for anyone looking at results from a range of analytical techniques. The book includes analytical methods covering microstructural, surface, morphological, and optical characterization of materials with emphasis on microscopic structural, electronic, biological, and mechanical properties. Many examples in this volume cover cutting-edge technologies such as nanomaterials and life sciences. This book also: · Presents cross-comparison between materials characterization techniques, including x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometery, ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, and more · Includes clear specifications of strengths and limitations of each technique for specific materials characterization problem · Focuses on applications and clear data interpretation without extensive mathematics
  • 1. X-Ray Diffraction and Reflectivity
  • 2. Introduction to Optical Characterization of Materials
  • 3. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES)
  • 4. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry
  • 5. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
This unique book covers the most common materials analysis techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, and several optical characterization methods. It stands as a quick reference for experienced users, as a learning tool for students, and as a guide for the understanding of typical data interpretation for anyone looking at results from a range of analytical techniques. The book includes analytical methods covering microstructural, surface, morphological, and optical characterization of materials with emphasis on microscopic structural, electronic, biological, and mechanical properties. Many examples in this volume cover cutting-edge technologies such as nanomaterials and life sciences. This book also: · Presents cross-comparison between materials characterization techniques, including x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometery, ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, and more · Includes clear specifications of strengths and limitations of each technique for specific materials characterization problem · Focuses on applications and clear data interpretation without extensive mathematics

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Search all fields

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website