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Book
1 online resource (xxvi, 333 pages)
Book
xxii, 383 p. : ill. (some col.)
  • pt. 1. Synthetic methods
  • pt. 2. Catalysis
  • pt. 3. Combinatorial and chemical biology.
  • pt. 1. Synthetic methods
  • pt. 2. Catalysis
  • pt. 3. Combinatorial and chemical biology.
Book
xxii, 370 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD156 .S38 2012 Unknown
Book
xx, 590 p.
  • Introduction - Frontiers in Modern Inorganic Synthetic Chemistry
  • High-Temperature Synthesis
  • Synthesis and Purification at Low Temperature
  • Hydrothermal and Solvothermal Syntheses
  • High Pressure Synthesis and Preparation of Inorganic Materials
  • Inorganic Photochemical Synthesis
  • CVD and its Related Theories in Inorganic Synthesis and Materials Preparations
  • Microwave-Assisted Inorganic Syntheses
  • Syntheses of Coordination Compounds
  • Assembly Chemistry of Coordination Polymers
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Cluster Compounds
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Fullerenes
  • Synthesis of Organometallic Compounds
  • Synthetic and Assembly Chemistry of Inorganic Polymers
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Nonstoichiometric Compounds
  • Synthetic Chemistry of the Inorganic Ordered Polour Materials
  • Assembly Chemistry of Anion-Intercalated Layered Materials
  • Host-Guest Functional Materials
  • Chemical Preparation of Advanced Ceramic Materials
  • Amorphous Materials
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Nanomaterials
  • Preparation Chemistry of Inorganic Membranes
  • The Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (I) - Biomimetic Synthesis
  • Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (II) - Designed Synthesis - Inorganic Crystalline Porous Materials.
The book has four main parts. In the first part the discussion centers on inorganic synthesis reactions, dealing with inorganic synthesis and preparative chemistry under specific conditions: high temperature, low temperature and cryogenic, hydrothermal and solvothermal, high pressure and super-high pressure, photochemical, microwave irradiation and plasma conditions. The second part systematically describes the synthesis, preparation and assembly of six important categories of compounds with wide coverage of distinct synthetic chemistry systems: coordination compounds, coordination polymers, clusters, organometallic compounds, non-stoichiometric compounds and inorganic polymers. In the third part seven important representative inorganic materials are selected for discussion of their preparation and assembly, including porous, advanced ceramic, amorphous- and nano-materials, inorganic membranes, synthetic crystals and advanced functional materials. The last part of the book, which is also its distinct feature, addresses the frontiers of inorganic synthesis and preparative chemistry. These final two chapters introduce the two emerging synthetic areas. Included are approximately 3000 references, a large proportion of which are from the recent decade. Focuses on the "chemistry" of inorganic synthesis, preparation and assembly of various compounds and describes all inorganic synthesis methods New state of the art inorganic synthesis chemistry areas Inclusion of a number of real examples for the preparation and assembly of important classes of materials More than 3,000 reference to the primary literature Comprehensive state of the art reviews written by the experts in the area.
  • Introduction - Frontiers in Modern Inorganic Synthetic Chemistry
  • High-Temperature Synthesis
  • Synthesis and Purification at Low Temperature
  • Hydrothermal and Solvothermal Syntheses
  • High Pressure Synthesis and Preparation of Inorganic Materials
  • Inorganic Photochemical Synthesis
  • CVD and its Related Theories in Inorganic Synthesis and Materials Preparations
  • Microwave-Assisted Inorganic Syntheses
  • Syntheses of Coordination Compounds
  • Assembly Chemistry of Coordination Polymers
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Cluster Compounds
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Fullerenes
  • Synthesis of Organometallic Compounds
  • Synthetic and Assembly Chemistry of Inorganic Polymers
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Nonstoichiometric Compounds
  • Synthetic Chemistry of the Inorganic Ordered Polour Materials
  • Assembly Chemistry of Anion-Intercalated Layered Materials
  • Host-Guest Functional Materials
  • Chemical Preparation of Advanced Ceramic Materials
  • Amorphous Materials
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Nanomaterials
  • Preparation Chemistry of Inorganic Membranes
  • The Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (I) - Biomimetic Synthesis
  • Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (II) - Designed Synthesis - Inorganic Crystalline Porous Materials.
The book has four main parts. In the first part the discussion centers on inorganic synthesis reactions, dealing with inorganic synthesis and preparative chemistry under specific conditions: high temperature, low temperature and cryogenic, hydrothermal and solvothermal, high pressure and super-high pressure, photochemical, microwave irradiation and plasma conditions. The second part systematically describes the synthesis, preparation and assembly of six important categories of compounds with wide coverage of distinct synthetic chemistry systems: coordination compounds, coordination polymers, clusters, organometallic compounds, non-stoichiometric compounds and inorganic polymers. In the third part seven important representative inorganic materials are selected for discussion of their preparation and assembly, including porous, advanced ceramic, amorphous- and nano-materials, inorganic membranes, synthetic crystals and advanced functional materials. The last part of the book, which is also its distinct feature, addresses the frontiers of inorganic synthesis and preparative chemistry. These final two chapters introduce the two emerging synthetic areas. Included are approximately 3000 references, a large proportion of which are from the recent decade. Focuses on the "chemistry" of inorganic synthesis, preparation and assembly of various compounds and describes all inorganic synthesis methods New state of the art inorganic synthesis chemistry areas Inclusion of a number of real examples for the preparation and assembly of important classes of materials More than 3,000 reference to the primary literature Comprehensive state of the art reviews written by the experts in the area.
Book
xvi, 271 p. : ill. (some col.)
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction
  • 2. Practical Equipment
  • 2.1. Containers
  • 2.2. Milling
  • 2.3. Fabrication of Ceramic Monoliths
  • 2.4. Furnaces
  • 2.5. Powder X-ray Diffractometry
  • 3. Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSi4O10 (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method
  • 4. Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid-Vapour Reaction
  • 5. Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid-Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent
  • 6. Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 by a Solid-State Reaction
  • 7. Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO4)3 by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent
  • 8. Cobalt Ferrite CoFe2O4 by a Coprecipitation Method
  • 9. Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination.
  • 10. Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ (δ ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation
  • 11. Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc-Tin Phosphide ZnSnP2 by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent
  • 12. Artificial Kieftite CoSb3 by an Antimony Self-Flux Method
  • 13. Artificial Violarite FeNi2S4 by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent
  • 14. Artificial Willemite Zn1.96Mn0.04SiO4 by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method
  • 15. Artificial Scheelite CaWO4 by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction
  • 16. Artificial Hackmanite Na8[Al6Si6O24]Cl1.8S0.1 by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere
  • 17. Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium-Antimony-Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction
  • 2. Practical Equipment
  • 2.1. Containers
  • 2.2. Milling
  • 2.3. Fabrication of Ceramic Monoliths
  • 2.4. Furnaces
  • 2.5. Powder X-ray Diffractometry
  • 3. Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSi4O10 (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method
  • 4. Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid-Vapour Reaction
  • 5. Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid-Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent
  • 6. Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 by a Solid-State Reaction
  • 7. Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO4)3 by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent
  • 8. Cobalt Ferrite CoFe2O4 by a Coprecipitation Method
  • 9. Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination.
  • 10. Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ (δ ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation
  • 11. Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc-Tin Phosphide ZnSnP2 by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent
  • 12. Artificial Kieftite CoSb3 by an Antimony Self-Flux Method
  • 13. Artificial Violarite FeNi2S4 by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent
  • 14. Artificial Willemite Zn1.96Mn0.04SiO4 by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method
  • 15. Artificial Scheelite CaWO4 by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction
  • 16. Artificial Hackmanite Na8[Al6Si6O24]Cl1.8S0.1 by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere
  • 17. Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium-Antimony-Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing.
Book
xvi, 271 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
  • Front Matter
  • Introduction
  • Practical Equipment
  • Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSiO (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method
  • Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid₆Vapour Reaction
  • Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid₆Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent
  • Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride RbCuICl by a Solid-State Reaction
  • Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO) by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent
  • Cobalt Ferrite CoFeO by a Coprecipitation Method
  • Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZrTiO by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination
  • Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBaCuO₆d(d ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation
  • Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc₆Tin Phosphide ZnSnP by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent
  • Artificial Kieftite CoSb by an Antimony Self-Flux Method
  • Artificial Violarite FeNiS by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent
  • Artificial Willemite ZnMnSiO by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method
  • Artificial Scheelite CaWO by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction
  • Artificial Hackmanite Na[AlSiO]ClS by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere
  • Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium₆Antimony₆Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing
  • Index.
  • Front Matter
  • Introduction
  • Practical Equipment
  • Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSiO (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method
  • Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid₆Vapour Reaction
  • Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid₆Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent
  • Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride RbCuICl by a Solid-State Reaction
  • Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO) by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent
  • Cobalt Ferrite CoFeO by a Coprecipitation Method
  • Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZrTiO by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination
  • Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBaCuO₆d(d ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation
  • Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc₆Tin Phosphide ZnSnP by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent
  • Artificial Kieftite CoSb by an Antimony Self-Flux Method
  • Artificial Violarite FeNiS by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent
  • Artificial Willemite ZnMnSiO by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method
  • Artificial Scheelite CaWO by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction
  • Artificial Hackmanite Na[AlSiO]ClS by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere
  • Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium₆Antimony₆Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing
  • Index.
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
x, 253 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Cellular systems
  • Synthetic models.
  • Cellular systems
  • Synthetic models.
dx.doi.org American Chemical Society
Book
x, 227 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Book
2 v. (xxv, 721 p.) : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
xvii, 363 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface. List of Contributors. 1 Carbon Dioxide Reduction and Uses as a Chemical Feedstock (Michele Aresta). 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Properties of the CO2 Molecule. 1.3 CO2 Coordination to Metal Centers and Reactivity of Coordinated CO2. 1.4 CO2 Conversion. 1.5 Conclusions. References. 2 Nitrogen Monoxide and Nitrous Oxide Binding and Reduction (Dong-Heon Lee, Biplab Mondal, and Kenneth D. Karlin). 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 NO. 2.3 N2O. 2.4 Summary and Conclusions. References. 3 Bio-organometallic Approaches to Nitrogen Fixation Chemistry (Jonas C. Peters and Mark P. Mehn). 3.1 Introduction - The N2 Fixation Challenge. 3.2 Biological N2 Reduction. 3.3 Biomimetic Systems that Model Structure and Function. 3.4 Concluding Remarks. References. 4 The Activation of Dihydrogen (Jesse W. Tye and Michael B. Hall). 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Structure and Bonding of Metal-bound H-Atoms. 4.3 Intramolecular H-Atom Exchange. 4.4 Nonclassical H-Bonds. 4.5 Reactivity of Metal-bound H-Atoms. 4.6 Recent Advances in the Activation of Dihydrogen by Synthetic Complexes. 4.7 Enzymatically Catalyzed Dihydrogen Oxidation and Proton Reduction. 4.8 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. Abbreviations. References. 5 Molecular Oxygen Binding and Activation: Oxidation Catalysis (Candace N. Cornell and Matthew S. Sigman). 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Additive Coreductants. 5.3 Ligand-modified Catalysis. 5.4 Conclusions and Outlook. References. 6 Dioxygen Binding and Activation: Reactive Intermediates (Andrew S. Borovik, Paul J. Zinn and Matthew K. Zart). 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Dioxygen Binders. 6.3 Reactive Intermediates: Iron and Copper Species. 6.4 Cobalt-Dioxygen Complexes. 6.5 Manganese-Dioxygen Complexes. 6.6 Nickel-Dioxygen Complexes and Their Reactive Intermediates. 6.7 Summary. Acknowledgments. References. 7 Methane Functionalization (Brian Conley, William J. Tenn, III, Kenneth J.H. Young, Somesh Ganesh, Steve Meier, Jonas Oxgaard, Jason Gonzales, William A. Goddard, III, and Roy A. Periana). 7.1 Methane as a Replacement for Petroleum. 7.2 Low Temperature is Key to Economical Methane Functionalization. 7.3 CH Activation as a Pathway to Economical Methane Functionalization via CH Hydroxylation. 7.4 Conclusions and Perspective for Methane Functionalization. References. 8 Water Activation: Catalytic Hydrolysis (Lisa M. Berreau). 8.1 Introduction. 8.2 Water Activation: Coordination Sphere Effects on M-OH2 Acidity and Structure. 8.3 Secondary H-Bonding Effects on Substrate Coordination, Activation and Catalytic Hydrolysis Involving Phosphate Esters. 8.4 Summary and Future Directions. References. 9 Carbon Monoxide as a Chemical Feedstock: Carbonylation Catalysis (Piet W.N.M. van Leeuwen and Zoraida Freixa). 9.1 Introduction. 9.2 Rhodium-catalyzed Hydroformylation. 9.3 Methanol Carbonylation. 9.4 Concluding Remarks. References. Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The first to combine both the bioinorganic and the organometallic view, this handbook provides all the necessary knowledge in one convenient volume. Alongside a look at CO2 and N2 reduction, the authors discuss O2, NO and N2O binding and reduction, activation of H2 and the oxidation catalysis of O2. This book is edited by the highly renowned William Tolman, who has won several awards for his research in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface. List of Contributors. 1 Carbon Dioxide Reduction and Uses as a Chemical Feedstock (Michele Aresta). 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Properties of the CO2 Molecule. 1.3 CO2 Coordination to Metal Centers and Reactivity of Coordinated CO2. 1.4 CO2 Conversion. 1.5 Conclusions. References. 2 Nitrogen Monoxide and Nitrous Oxide Binding and Reduction (Dong-Heon Lee, Biplab Mondal, and Kenneth D. Karlin). 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 NO. 2.3 N2O. 2.4 Summary and Conclusions. References. 3 Bio-organometallic Approaches to Nitrogen Fixation Chemistry (Jonas C. Peters and Mark P. Mehn). 3.1 Introduction - The N2 Fixation Challenge. 3.2 Biological N2 Reduction. 3.3 Biomimetic Systems that Model Structure and Function. 3.4 Concluding Remarks. References. 4 The Activation of Dihydrogen (Jesse W. Tye and Michael B. Hall). 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Structure and Bonding of Metal-bound H-Atoms. 4.3 Intramolecular H-Atom Exchange. 4.4 Nonclassical H-Bonds. 4.5 Reactivity of Metal-bound H-Atoms. 4.6 Recent Advances in the Activation of Dihydrogen by Synthetic Complexes. 4.7 Enzymatically Catalyzed Dihydrogen Oxidation and Proton Reduction. 4.8 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. Abbreviations. References. 5 Molecular Oxygen Binding and Activation: Oxidation Catalysis (Candace N. Cornell and Matthew S. Sigman). 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Additive Coreductants. 5.3 Ligand-modified Catalysis. 5.4 Conclusions and Outlook. References. 6 Dioxygen Binding and Activation: Reactive Intermediates (Andrew S. Borovik, Paul J. Zinn and Matthew K. Zart). 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Dioxygen Binders. 6.3 Reactive Intermediates: Iron and Copper Species. 6.4 Cobalt-Dioxygen Complexes. 6.5 Manganese-Dioxygen Complexes. 6.6 Nickel-Dioxygen Complexes and Their Reactive Intermediates. 6.7 Summary. Acknowledgments. References. 7 Methane Functionalization (Brian Conley, William J. Tenn, III, Kenneth J.H. Young, Somesh Ganesh, Steve Meier, Jonas Oxgaard, Jason Gonzales, William A. Goddard, III, and Roy A. Periana). 7.1 Methane as a Replacement for Petroleum. 7.2 Low Temperature is Key to Economical Methane Functionalization. 7.3 CH Activation as a Pathway to Economical Methane Functionalization via CH Hydroxylation. 7.4 Conclusions and Perspective for Methane Functionalization. References. 8 Water Activation: Catalytic Hydrolysis (Lisa M. Berreau). 8.1 Introduction. 8.2 Water Activation: Coordination Sphere Effects on M-OH2 Acidity and Structure. 8.3 Secondary H-Bonding Effects on Substrate Coordination, Activation and Catalytic Hydrolysis Involving Phosphate Esters. 8.4 Summary and Future Directions. References. 9 Carbon Monoxide as a Chemical Feedstock: Carbonylation Catalysis (Piet W.N.M. van Leeuwen and Zoraida Freixa). 9.1 Introduction. 9.2 Rhodium-catalyzed Hydroformylation. 9.3 Methanol Carbonylation. 9.4 Concluding Remarks. References. Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The first to combine both the bioinorganic and the organometallic view, this handbook provides all the necessary knowledge in one convenient volume. Alongside a look at CO2 and N2 reduction, the authors discuss O2, NO and N2O binding and reduction, activation of H2 and the oxidation catalysis of O2. This book is edited by the highly renowned William Tolman, who has won several awards for his research in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD461 .A24 2006 Unknown
Book
xx, 409 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface to the Second Edition. Foreword. Acknowledgements. Table of Contents. Abbreviations. 1 Introduction. 2 Solid-State Reactions. 2.1 Reactions Between Solid Compounds. 2.1.1 Ceramic Method. 2.1.2 Carbothermal Reduction. 2.1.3 Combustion Synthesis. 2.1.4 Sintering. 2.2 Solid-Gas Reactions. 2.3 Decomposition and Dehydration Reactions. 2.4 Intercalation Reactions. 2.4.1 General Aspects. 2.4.2 Preparative Methods. 2.4.3 Pillaring of Layered Compounds. 2.5. Further Reading. 3 Formation of Solids from the Gas Phase. 3.1 Chemical Vapor Transport. 3.2 Chemical Vapor Deposition. 3.2.1 General Aspects. 3.2.2 Metal CVD. 3.2.3 Diamond CVD. 3.2.4 CVD of Metal Oxides. 3.2.5 CVD of Metal Nitrides. 3.2.6 CVD of Compound Semiconductors. 3.3 Aerosol Processes. 3.4 Further Reading. 4 Formation of Solids from Solutions and Melts. 4.1 Glass. 4.1.1 The Structural Theory of Glass Formation. 4.1.2 Crystallization versus Glass Formation. 4.1.3 Glass Melting. 4.1.4 Metallic Glasses. 4.2 Precipitation. 4.3 Biomaterials. 4.3.1 Biogenic Materials and Biomineralization. 4.3.2 Synthetic Biomaterials. 4.3.3 Biomimetic Materials Chemistry. 4.4 Solvothermal Processes. 4.4.1 Hydrothermal Synthesis of Single Crystals. 4.4.2 Hydrothermal Synthesis. 4.4.3 Hydrothermal Leaching. 4.5 Sol-Gel Processes. 4.5.1 The Physics of Sols. 4.5.2 Sol-Gel Processing of Silicate Materials. 4.5.3 Sol-Gel Chemistry of Metal Oxides. 4.5.4 Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials. 4.6 Further Reading. 5 Preparation and Modification of Inorganic Polymers. 5.1 General Aspects. 5.1.1 Polymeric Materials. 5.1.2 Crosslinking. 5.1.3 Preceramic Polymers. 5.2 Polysiloxanes (Silicones). 5.2.1 Properties and Applications of Silicones. 5.2.2 Structure of Silicones. 5.2.3 Preparation of Silicones. 5.3 Polyphosphazenes. 5.3.1 Properties and Applications of Polyphosphazenes. 5.3.2 Preparation and Modification. 5.4 Polysilanes. 5.4.1 Properties and Applications of Polysilanes. 5.4.2 Preparation and Modification of Polysilanes. 5.4.3 Crosslinking of Polysilanes. 5.5 Polycarbosilanes. 5.5.1 SiC Fibers from Polycarbosilanes (Yajima Process). 5.5.2 Chemical Issues of Polymer Preparation, Curing and Pyrolysis. 5.6 Polysilazanes and Polycarbosilazanes. 5.6.1 Preparation of Polysilazanes and Polycarbosilazanes. 5.6.2 Curing and Pyrolysis Reactions. 5.7 Other Inorganic Polymers. 5.7.1 Other Phosphorus-Containing Polymers. 5.7.2 Poly(oxothiazenes). 5.7.3 Transition Metal-Containing Polymers. 5.7.4 Preceramic Polymers for BN. 5.8 Further Reading. 6 Porous Materials. 6.1 Introduction to Porosity. 6.2 Metallic Foams and Porous Metals. 6.2.1 Casting Techniques. 6.2.2 Gas-Eutectic Transformation. 6.2.3 Powder Metallurgy. 6.2.4 Metal Deposition. 6.3 Aerogels. 6.3.1 Drying Methods. 6.3.2 Properties and Applications. 6.4 Porous Solids with an Ordered Porosity. 6.4.1 Microporous Crystalline Solids. 6.4.2 Mesoporous Solids with Ordered Porosity. 6.4.3 Macroporous Solids with Ordered Porosity. 6.5 Incorporation of Functional Groups into Porous Materials. 6.6 Further Reading. 7 Nanostructured Materials. 7.1 Nanoparticles and Nanocrystalline Materials. 7.1.1 Nanocrystalline Ceramics. 7.1.2 Semiconductor Nanoparticles. 7.1.3 Metal Nanoparticles. 7.2 Nanotubes. 7.3 Mono- and Multilayers. 7.3.1 Multilayers of Inorganic Materials. 7.3.2 Langmuir Monolayers. 7.3.3 Self-assembled Monolayers. 7.4 Further Reading. 8 Glossary. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This second edition of a very well received advanced textbook retains the chemist's viewpoint in its comprehensive overview of methods for chemical synthesis of inorganic materials. The second chapter now includes a section on biomorphic ceramics, while one on LEDs has been added to Chapter 3. Chapter 4 now includes a more thorough explanation of borate glasses, with certain sections being completely rearranged. In addition, Chapter 6 has been extensively revised, and a whole new sub-chapter added on coordination polymers. The general principles and requirements are discussed for each method given, along with selected examples of technically applied materials, as well as the material properties and applications of the resulting products. Furthermore, numerous tables with further examples help in assessing the scope and limitation of the various methods and in choosing a suitable synthesis for any given problem. Intended for both courses in inorganic chemistry and materials science, this volume is equally valuable for all researchers working on the borderline of these two disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface to the Second Edition. Foreword. Acknowledgements. Table of Contents. Abbreviations. 1 Introduction. 2 Solid-State Reactions. 2.1 Reactions Between Solid Compounds. 2.1.1 Ceramic Method. 2.1.2 Carbothermal Reduction. 2.1.3 Combustion Synthesis. 2.1.4 Sintering. 2.2 Solid-Gas Reactions. 2.3 Decomposition and Dehydration Reactions. 2.4 Intercalation Reactions. 2.4.1 General Aspects. 2.4.2 Preparative Methods. 2.4.3 Pillaring of Layered Compounds. 2.5. Further Reading. 3 Formation of Solids from the Gas Phase. 3.1 Chemical Vapor Transport. 3.2 Chemical Vapor Deposition. 3.2.1 General Aspects. 3.2.2 Metal CVD. 3.2.3 Diamond CVD. 3.2.4 CVD of Metal Oxides. 3.2.5 CVD of Metal Nitrides. 3.2.6 CVD of Compound Semiconductors. 3.3 Aerosol Processes. 3.4 Further Reading. 4 Formation of Solids from Solutions and Melts. 4.1 Glass. 4.1.1 The Structural Theory of Glass Formation. 4.1.2 Crystallization versus Glass Formation. 4.1.3 Glass Melting. 4.1.4 Metallic Glasses. 4.2 Precipitation. 4.3 Biomaterials. 4.3.1 Biogenic Materials and Biomineralization. 4.3.2 Synthetic Biomaterials. 4.3.3 Biomimetic Materials Chemistry. 4.4 Solvothermal Processes. 4.4.1 Hydrothermal Synthesis of Single Crystals. 4.4.2 Hydrothermal Synthesis. 4.4.3 Hydrothermal Leaching. 4.5 Sol-Gel Processes. 4.5.1 The Physics of Sols. 4.5.2 Sol-Gel Processing of Silicate Materials. 4.5.3 Sol-Gel Chemistry of Metal Oxides. 4.5.4 Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials. 4.6 Further Reading. 5 Preparation and Modification of Inorganic Polymers. 5.1 General Aspects. 5.1.1 Polymeric Materials. 5.1.2 Crosslinking. 5.1.3 Preceramic Polymers. 5.2 Polysiloxanes (Silicones). 5.2.1 Properties and Applications of Silicones. 5.2.2 Structure of Silicones. 5.2.3 Preparation of Silicones. 5.3 Polyphosphazenes. 5.3.1 Properties and Applications of Polyphosphazenes. 5.3.2 Preparation and Modification. 5.4 Polysilanes. 5.4.1 Properties and Applications of Polysilanes. 5.4.2 Preparation and Modification of Polysilanes. 5.4.3 Crosslinking of Polysilanes. 5.5 Polycarbosilanes. 5.5.1 SiC Fibers from Polycarbosilanes (Yajima Process). 5.5.2 Chemical Issues of Polymer Preparation, Curing and Pyrolysis. 5.6 Polysilazanes and Polycarbosilazanes. 5.6.1 Preparation of Polysilazanes and Polycarbosilazanes. 5.6.2 Curing and Pyrolysis Reactions. 5.7 Other Inorganic Polymers. 5.7.1 Other Phosphorus-Containing Polymers. 5.7.2 Poly(oxothiazenes). 5.7.3 Transition Metal-Containing Polymers. 5.7.4 Preceramic Polymers for BN. 5.8 Further Reading. 6 Porous Materials. 6.1 Introduction to Porosity. 6.2 Metallic Foams and Porous Metals. 6.2.1 Casting Techniques. 6.2.2 Gas-Eutectic Transformation. 6.2.3 Powder Metallurgy. 6.2.4 Metal Deposition. 6.3 Aerogels. 6.3.1 Drying Methods. 6.3.2 Properties and Applications. 6.4 Porous Solids with an Ordered Porosity. 6.4.1 Microporous Crystalline Solids. 6.4.2 Mesoporous Solids with Ordered Porosity. 6.4.3 Macroporous Solids with Ordered Porosity. 6.5 Incorporation of Functional Groups into Porous Materials. 6.6 Further Reading. 7 Nanostructured Materials. 7.1 Nanoparticles and Nanocrystalline Materials. 7.1.1 Nanocrystalline Ceramics. 7.1.2 Semiconductor Nanoparticles. 7.1.3 Metal Nanoparticles. 7.2 Nanotubes. 7.3 Mono- and Multilayers. 7.3.1 Multilayers of Inorganic Materials. 7.3.2 Langmuir Monolayers. 7.3.3 Self-assembled Monolayers. 7.4 Further Reading. 8 Glossary. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This second edition of a very well received advanced textbook retains the chemist's viewpoint in its comprehensive overview of methods for chemical synthesis of inorganic materials. The second chapter now includes a section on biomorphic ceramics, while one on LEDs has been added to Chapter 3. Chapter 4 now includes a more thorough explanation of borate glasses, with certain sections being completely rearranged. In addition, Chapter 6 has been extensively revised, and a whole new sub-chapter added on coordination polymers. The general principles and requirements are discussed for each method given, along with selected examples of technically applied materials, as well as the material properties and applications of the resulting products. Furthermore, numerous tables with further examples help in assessing the scope and limitation of the various methods and in choosing a suitable synthesis for any given problem. Intended for both courses in inorganic chemistry and materials science, this volume is equally valuable for all researchers working on the borderline of these two disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
QD156 .S38 2005 Available
Book
xvi, 364 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface-- Contributors-- INTRODUCTION-- SYNTHESIS AND PURIFICATION OF IONIC LIQUIDS-- Synthesis of Ionic Liquids-- Quality Aspects and Other Questions Related to Commercial Ionic Liquid Production-- Synthesis of Task-specific Ionic Liquids-- PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF IONIC LIQUIDS-- Melting Points and Phase Diagrams-- Viscosity and Density of Ionic Liquids-- Solubility and Solvation in Ionic Liquids-- Gas Solubilities in Ionic Liquids-- Polarity-- Electrochemical Properties of Ionic Liquids-- MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS-- Order in the Liquid State and Structure-- Quantum Mechanical Methods for Structure Elucidation-- Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies-- Translational Diffusion-- Molecular Reorientational Dynamics-- ORGANIC SYNTHESIS-- Stoichiometric Organic Reactions and Acid-Catalyzed Reactions in Ionic Liquids-- Transition Metal Catalysis in Ionic Liquids-- Ionic Liquids in Multiphasic Reactions-- Multiphasic Catalysis with Ionic Liquids in Combination with Compressed CO 2-- INORGANIC SYNTHESIS-- Directed Inorganic and Organometallic Synthesis-- Making of Inorganic Materials by Electrochemical Methods-- POLYMER SYNTHESIS IN IONIC LIQUIDS-- Introduction-- Acid-catalyzed Cationic Polymerization and Oligomerization-- Free Radical Polymerization-- Transition Metal-catalyzed Polymerization-- Preparation of Conductive Polymers-- Conclusions-- BIOCATALYTIC REACTIONS IN IONIC LIQUIDS-- Introduction-- Biocatalytic Reactions and their Special Needs-- Examples of Biocatalytic Reactions in Ionic Liquids-- Conclusions and Outlook-- OUTLOOK-- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The demand for increasingly clean and efficient chemical syntheses is becoming more urgent from both an economic and an environmental standpoint. The development of ionic liquids that are fluid at room temperature is a major advance in green chemistry. These new green "designer-solvents" are less toxic and therefore more environmnetally friendly. This book brings together the latest developments in this fascinating field: It guides readers through both theory and application of this new approach The editors are pioneers on this cutting-edge field of research It is relevant to industry as these solvents prove to be cost-effective Ionic Liquids in Synthesis serves as both an introduction to the field and as a source of advanced material for experts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface-- Contributors-- INTRODUCTION-- SYNTHESIS AND PURIFICATION OF IONIC LIQUIDS-- Synthesis of Ionic Liquids-- Quality Aspects and Other Questions Related to Commercial Ionic Liquid Production-- Synthesis of Task-specific Ionic Liquids-- PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF IONIC LIQUIDS-- Melting Points and Phase Diagrams-- Viscosity and Density of Ionic Liquids-- Solubility and Solvation in Ionic Liquids-- Gas Solubilities in Ionic Liquids-- Polarity-- Electrochemical Properties of Ionic Liquids-- MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS-- Order in the Liquid State and Structure-- Quantum Mechanical Methods for Structure Elucidation-- Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies-- Translational Diffusion-- Molecular Reorientational Dynamics-- ORGANIC SYNTHESIS-- Stoichiometric Organic Reactions and Acid-Catalyzed Reactions in Ionic Liquids-- Transition Metal Catalysis in Ionic Liquids-- Ionic Liquids in Multiphasic Reactions-- Multiphasic Catalysis with Ionic Liquids in Combination with Compressed CO 2-- INORGANIC SYNTHESIS-- Directed Inorganic and Organometallic Synthesis-- Making of Inorganic Materials by Electrochemical Methods-- POLYMER SYNTHESIS IN IONIC LIQUIDS-- Introduction-- Acid-catalyzed Cationic Polymerization and Oligomerization-- Free Radical Polymerization-- Transition Metal-catalyzed Polymerization-- Preparation of Conductive Polymers-- Conclusions-- BIOCATALYTIC REACTIONS IN IONIC LIQUIDS-- Introduction-- Biocatalytic Reactions and their Special Needs-- Examples of Biocatalytic Reactions in Ionic Liquids-- Conclusions and Outlook-- OUTLOOK-- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The demand for increasingly clean and efficient chemical syntheses is becoming more urgent from both an economic and an environmental standpoint. The development of ionic liquids that are fluid at room temperature is a major advance in green chemistry. These new green "designer-solvents" are less toxic and therefore more environmnetally friendly. This book brings together the latest developments in this fascinating field: It guides readers through both theory and application of this new approach The editors are pioneers on this cutting-edge field of research It is relevant to industry as these solvents prove to be cost-effective Ionic Liquids in Synthesis serves as both an introduction to the field and as a source of advanced material for experts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD561 .I65 2003 Unknown
Book
xvi, 364 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
x, 254 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This book examines the recent advances in the art of organic synthesis via organoboranes. The volume includes a wide range of topics in asymmetric synthesis, such as reduction , aldol reaction , allyboration, homologation, and cyclopropanation. Additional subjects include Suzuki coupling, amino acid synthesis, fluoro-organic synthesis, boron catalysts for stereoselective transformations, heterocyclic synthesis and novel borohydride reagents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book examines the recent advances in the art of organic synthesis via organoboranes. The volume includes a wide range of topics in asymmetric synthesis, such as reduction , aldol reaction , allyboration, homologation, and cyclopropanation. Additional subjects include Suzuki coupling, amino acid synthesis, fluoro-organic synthesis, boron catalysts for stereoselective transformations, heterocyclic synthesis and novel borohydride reagents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
dx.doi.org American Chemical Society
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD412 .B1 O725 2001 Unknown
Book
207 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface. 1. Introduction to Soft Mechanochemistry. 2. Chemical Bonds, Structure and Preparation of Hydrated Oxides. 3. Some Theoretical Aspects of Mechanochemical Reactions. 4. Apparatus for Mechanochemical Reactions. 5. Mechanical Activation of Hydrated Oxides. 6. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Double Oxides. 7. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Multicomponent Oxide Compounds. 8. Some Features and Possible Mechanisms of Mechanochemical Reactions of Hydrated Oxides. 9. Industrial Applications of Soft Mechanochemical Synthesis. Conclusions. Subject Index. Author Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mechanical methods of the activation of chemical processes are currently widely used for the synthesis of various compounds. The present monograph deals with the development of a novel approach to mechanochemical synthesis based on reactions of solid acids, bases, hydrated compounds, crystal hydrates, basic and acidic salts. This method has been called soft mechanochemical synthesis. The monograph includes the papers published by the present authors. They describe the results of their investigations in the last two decades. New theoretical and experimental data on kinetics and mechanism of soft mechanochemical reactions in the mixtures of compounds mentioned above to give complex oxide compounds are presented. The description of new high energetic and high efficient mills providing effective occurrence of these reactions is delivered. The possibilities of applying soft mechanochemical synthesis for materials used in catalysts, material science, electronics, etcetera are discussed. The advantages of the method proposed in comparison with other methods are demonstrated. The monograph is designed for researchers, engineers and technicians engaged in chemical and ceramic industry, for scientists and students specialized in the area of development, and application of new materials.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface. 1. Introduction to Soft Mechanochemistry. 2. Chemical Bonds, Structure and Preparation of Hydrated Oxides. 3. Some Theoretical Aspects of Mechanochemical Reactions. 4. Apparatus for Mechanochemical Reactions. 5. Mechanical Activation of Hydrated Oxides. 6. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Double Oxides. 7. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Multicomponent Oxide Compounds. 8. Some Features and Possible Mechanisms of Mechanochemical Reactions of Hydrated Oxides. 9. Industrial Applications of Soft Mechanochemical Synthesis. Conclusions. Subject Index. Author Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mechanical methods of the activation of chemical processes are currently widely used for the synthesis of various compounds. The present monograph deals with the development of a novel approach to mechanochemical synthesis based on reactions of solid acids, bases, hydrated compounds, crystal hydrates, basic and acidic salts. This method has been called soft mechanochemical synthesis. The monograph includes the papers published by the present authors. They describe the results of their investigations in the last two decades. New theoretical and experimental data on kinetics and mechanism of soft mechanochemical reactions in the mixtures of compounds mentioned above to give complex oxide compounds are presented. The description of new high energetic and high efficient mills providing effective occurrence of these reactions is delivered. The possibilities of applying soft mechanochemical synthesis for materials used in catalysts, material science, electronics, etcetera are discussed. The advantages of the method proposed in comparison with other methods are demonstrated. The monograph is designed for researchers, engineers and technicians engaged in chemical and ceramic industry, for scientists and students specialized in the area of development, and application of new materials.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
QD850 .A93 2001 Available
Book
xvii, 396 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword-- Acknowledgements-- Table of Contents-- Abbreviations-- Introduction-- Solid-State Reactions-- Formation of Solids from the Gas Phase-- Formation of Solids from Solutions and Melts-- Preparation and Modification of Inorganic Polymers-- Porous Materials-- Nanostructured Materials-- Glossary-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The preparation process of inorganic materials is one of the most important aspects of material science. Not only the chemical composition of a particular material plays a crucial role for many applications but also its structure. The proper choice of the chemical precursors and the preparation technique to obtain a material with the desired chemical and physical properties is a challenge for both material scientists and inorganic chemists. This is the first book to give a comprehensive overview of the current methods for chemical synthesis of inorganic materials. The spectrum ranges from solid state reactions, CVD, reactions of aqueous systems, preparation and modification of inorganic polymers to the synthesis of tailored porous materials. With examples of selected technically applied materials for each method the general principles and requirements as well as the material properties and application of the resulting products are discussed. Numerous tables with further examples help to assess the scope and limitation of the various methods and to choose a suitable synthesis for a given problem. First and foremost directed to students in chemistry, material sciences and physics this book will also be appreciated by advanced scientists in these fields as a valuable reference book for inorganic synthesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Foreword-- Acknowledgements-- Table of Contents-- Abbreviations-- Introduction-- Solid-State Reactions-- Formation of Solids from the Gas Phase-- Formation of Solids from Solutions and Melts-- Preparation and Modification of Inorganic Polymers-- Porous Materials-- Nanostructured Materials-- Glossary-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The preparation process of inorganic materials is one of the most important aspects of material science. Not only the chemical composition of a particular material plays a crucial role for many applications but also its structure. The proper choice of the chemical precursors and the preparation technique to obtain a material with the desired chemical and physical properties is a challenge for both material scientists and inorganic chemists. This is the first book to give a comprehensive overview of the current methods for chemical synthesis of inorganic materials. The spectrum ranges from solid state reactions, CVD, reactions of aqueous systems, preparation and modification of inorganic polymers to the synthesis of tailored porous materials. With examples of selected technically applied materials for each method the general principles and requirements as well as the material properties and application of the resulting products are discussed. Numerous tables with further examples help to assess the scope and limitation of the various methods and to choose a suitable synthesis for a given problem. First and foremost directed to students in chemistry, material sciences and physics this book will also be appreciated by advanced scientists in these fields as a valuable reference book for inorganic synthesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
QD151.2 .S38 2000 Available
Book
1 online resource (xi, 192 p.) : ill.
  • Introduction-- Chemical Depolymerization-- Gasification and Partial Oxidation-- Thermal Processes-- Catalytic Cracking and Reforming-- Hydrogenation-- Concluding Remarks-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The use of plastic materials has seen a massive increase in recent years, and generation of plastic wastes has grown proportionately. Recycling of these wastes to reduce landfill disposal is problematic due to the wide variation in properties and chemical composition among the different types of plastics. Feedstock recycling is one of the alternatives available for consideration, and Feedstock Recycling of Plastic Wastes looks at the conversion of plastic wastes into valuable chemicals useful as fuels or raw materials. Looking at both scientific and technical aspects of the recycling developments, this book describes the alternatives available. Areas include chemical depolymerization, thermal processes, oxidation and hydrogenation. Besides conventional treatments, new technological approaches for the degradation of plastics, such as conversion under supercritical conditions and coprocessing with coal are discussed. This book is essential reading for those involved in plastic recycling, whether from an academic or industrial perspective. Consultants and government agencies will also find it immensely useful.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- Chemical Depolymerization-- Gasification and Partial Oxidation-- Thermal Processes-- Catalytic Cracking and Reforming-- Hydrogenation-- Concluding Remarks-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The use of plastic materials has seen a massive increase in recent years, and generation of plastic wastes has grown proportionately. Recycling of these wastes to reduce landfill disposal is problematic due to the wide variation in properties and chemical composition among the different types of plastics. Feedstock recycling is one of the alternatives available for consideration, and Feedstock Recycling of Plastic Wastes looks at the conversion of plastic wastes into valuable chemicals useful as fuels or raw materials. Looking at both scientific and technical aspects of the recycling developments, this book describes the alternatives available. Areas include chemical depolymerization, thermal processes, oxidation and hydrogenation. Besides conventional treatments, new technological approaches for the degradation of plastics, such as conversion under supercritical conditions and coprocessing with coal are discussed. This book is essential reading for those involved in plastic recycling, whether from an academic or industrial perspective. Consultants and government agencies will also find it immensely useful.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xi, 192 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- Chemical Depolymerization-- Gasification and Partial Oxidation-- Thermal Processes-- Catalytic Cracking and Reforming-- Hydrogenation-- Concluding Remarks-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The use of plastic materials has seen a massive increase in recent years, and generation of plastic wastes has grown proportionately. Recycling of these wastes to reduce landfill disposal is problematic due to the wide variation in properties and chemical composition among the different types of plastics. Feedstock recycling is one of the alternatives available for consideration, and Feedstock Recycling of Plastic Wastes looks at the conversion of plastic wastes into valuable chemicals useful as fuels or raw materials. Looking at both scientific and technical aspects of the recycling developments, this book describes the alternatives available. Areas include chemical depolymerization, thermal processes, oxidation and hydrogenation. Besides conventional treatments, new technological approaches for the degradation of plastics, such as conversion under supercritical conditions and coprocessing with coal are discussed. This book is essential reading for those involved in plastic recycling, whether from an academic or industrial perspective. Consultants and government agencies will also find it immensely useful.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- Chemical Depolymerization-- Gasification and Partial Oxidation-- Thermal Processes-- Catalytic Cracking and Reforming-- Hydrogenation-- Concluding Remarks-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The use of plastic materials has seen a massive increase in recent years, and generation of plastic wastes has grown proportionately. Recycling of these wastes to reduce landfill disposal is problematic due to the wide variation in properties and chemical composition among the different types of plastics. Feedstock recycling is one of the alternatives available for consideration, and Feedstock Recycling of Plastic Wastes looks at the conversion of plastic wastes into valuable chemicals useful as fuels or raw materials. Looking at both scientific and technical aspects of the recycling developments, this book describes the alternatives available. Areas include chemical depolymerization, thermal processes, oxidation and hydrogenation. Besides conventional treatments, new technological approaches for the degradation of plastics, such as conversion under supercritical conditions and coprocessing with coal are discussed. This book is essential reading for those involved in plastic recycling, whether from an academic or industrial perspective. Consultants and government agencies will also find it immensely useful.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
ebook.rsc.org RSC eBook Collection

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