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Book
xxi, 205 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
"Media and the Ecological Crisis is a collaborative work of interdisciplinary writers engaged in mapping, understanding and addressing the complex contribution of media to the current ecological crisis. The book is informed by a fusion of scholarly, practitioner, and activist interests to inform, educate, and advocate for real, environmentally sound changes in design, policy, industrial, and consumer practices. Aligned with an emerging area of scholarship devoted to identifying and analysing the material physical links of media technologies, cultural production, and environment, it contributes to the project of greening media studies by raising awareness of media technology's concrete environmental effects. "-- Provided by publisher.
"Media and the Ecological Crisis is a collaborative work of interdisciplinary writers engaged in mapping, understanding and addressing the complex contribution of media to the current ecological crisis. The book is informed by a fusion of scholarly, practitioner, and activist interests to inform, educate, and advocate for real, environmentally sound changes in design, policy, industrial, and consumer practices. Aligned with an emerging area of scholarship devoted to identifying and analysing the material physical links of media technologies, cultural production, and environment, it contributes to the project of greening media studies by raising awareness of media technology's concrete environmental effects. "-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
P96 .E57 M43 2015 Unknown
Book
viii, 171 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. Climate crisis: Ethnography of a moment of possibility 2. Climate Pragmatism 3. Climate Movement: 2007-2010 4. Climate Motivations 5. Hopes 6. Strategies - Direct Action 7. Alternatives and Policies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the late 2000s climate action became a defining feature of the international political agenda. Evidence of global warming and accelerating greenhouse gas emissions created a new sense of urgency and, despite consensus on the need for action, the growing failure of international climate policy engendered new political space for social movements. By 2007 a 'climate justice' movement was surfacing and developing a strong critique of existing official climate policies and engaging in new forms of direct action to assert the need for reduced extraction and burning of fossil fuels. Climate Action Upsurge offers an insight into this important period in climate movement politics, drawing on the perspectives of activists who were directly engaged in the mobilisation process. Through the interpretation of these perspectives the book illustrates important lessons for the climate movement today. In developing its examination of the climate action upsurge, the book focuses on individual activists involved in direct action 'Climate Camps' in Australia, while drawing comparisons and highlighting links with climate campaigns in other locales. The book should be of interest to scholars and researchers in climate change, environmental sociology, politics, policy and activism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction 1. Climate crisis: Ethnography of a moment of possibility 2. Climate Pragmatism 3. Climate Movement: 2007-2010 4. Climate Motivations 5. Hopes 6. Strategies - Direct Action 7. Alternatives and Policies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the late 2000s climate action became a defining feature of the international political agenda. Evidence of global warming and accelerating greenhouse gas emissions created a new sense of urgency and, despite consensus on the need for action, the growing failure of international climate policy engendered new political space for social movements. By 2007 a 'climate justice' movement was surfacing and developing a strong critique of existing official climate policies and engaging in new forms of direct action to assert the need for reduced extraction and burning of fossil fuels. Climate Action Upsurge offers an insight into this important period in climate movement politics, drawing on the perspectives of activists who were directly engaged in the mobilisation process. Through the interpretation of these perspectives the book illustrates important lessons for the climate movement today. In developing its examination of the climate action upsurge, the book focuses on individual activists involved in direct action 'Climate Camps' in Australia, while drawing comparisons and highlighting links with climate campaigns in other locales. The book should be of interest to scholars and researchers in climate change, environmental sociology, politics, policy and activism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Status of items at Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner) Status
Stacks
QC903 .R67 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource
  • Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Nature of the Problem -- 2.1 The Development of Climate Science -- 2.2 Climate Change as a Public Issue -- 2.3 The Age of Climate Diplomacy -- 2.4 Concluding Remarks -- 3. Obstacles to Action -- 3.1 Scientific Ignorance -- 3.2 Politicizing Science -- 3.3 Facts and Values -- 3.4 The Science/Policy Interface -- 3.5 Organized Denial -- 3.6 Partisanship -- 3.7 Political Institutions -- 3.8 The Hardest Problem -- 3.9 Concluding Remarks -- 4. The Limits of Economics -- 4.1 Economics and Climate Change -- 4.2 The Stern Review and Its Critics -- 4.3 Discounting -- 4.4 Further Problems -- 4.5 State of the Discussion -- 4.6 Concluding Remarks -- 5. The Frontiers of Ethics -- 5.1 The Domain of Concern -- 5.2 Responsibility and Harm -- 5.3 Fault Liability -- 5.4 Human Rights and Domination -- 5.5 Differences That Matter -- 5.6 Revising Morality -- 5.7 Concluding Remarks -- 6. Living With Climate Change -- 6.1 Life in the Anthropocene -- 6.2 It Doesn't Matter What I Do -- 6.3 It's Not the Meat It's the Motion -- 6.4 Ethics for the Anthropocene -- 6.5 Respect For Nature -- 6.6 Global Justice -- 6.7 Concluding Remarks -- 7. Politics, Policy, and the Road Ahead -- 7.1 The Rectification of Names -- 7.2 Adaptation: The Neglected Option? -- 7.3 Why Abatement and Mitigation Still Matter -- 7.4 The Category Formerly Known as Geoengineering -- 7.5 The Way Forward -- 7.6 Concluding Remarks -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
From the 1992 Rio Earth Summit to the 2009 Copenhagen Climate Conference there was a concerted international effort to stop climate change. Yet greenhouse gas emissions increased, atmospheric concentrations grew, and global warming became an observable fact of life. In this book, philosopher Dale Jamieson explains what climate change is, why we have failed to stop it, and why it still matters what we do. Centered in philosophy, the volume also treats the historical, economic, and political dimensions of climate change. Our failure to prevent or even to respond significantly to climate change, Jamieson argues, reflects the impoverishment of our systems of practical reason, the paralysis of our politics, and the limits of our cognitive and affective capacities. The climate change that is underway is remaking the world in such a way that familiar comforts, places, and ways of life will disappear in years or decades rather than centuries. Climate change also threatens our sense of meaning, since it is difficult to believe that our individual actions matter. The challenges that climate change presents go beyond the resources of common sense morality - it can be hard to view such everyday acts as driving and flying as presenting moral problems. But we must learn to do so if we are to continue to live meaningful lives. There is much that we can do to slow climate change, to adapt to it and restore a sense of agency while living meaningful lives in a changing world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Nature of the Problem -- 2.1 The Development of Climate Science -- 2.2 Climate Change as a Public Issue -- 2.3 The Age of Climate Diplomacy -- 2.4 Concluding Remarks -- 3. Obstacles to Action -- 3.1 Scientific Ignorance -- 3.2 Politicizing Science -- 3.3 Facts and Values -- 3.4 The Science/Policy Interface -- 3.5 Organized Denial -- 3.6 Partisanship -- 3.7 Political Institutions -- 3.8 The Hardest Problem -- 3.9 Concluding Remarks -- 4. The Limits of Economics -- 4.1 Economics and Climate Change -- 4.2 The Stern Review and Its Critics -- 4.3 Discounting -- 4.4 Further Problems -- 4.5 State of the Discussion -- 4.6 Concluding Remarks -- 5. The Frontiers of Ethics -- 5.1 The Domain of Concern -- 5.2 Responsibility and Harm -- 5.3 Fault Liability -- 5.4 Human Rights and Domination -- 5.5 Differences That Matter -- 5.6 Revising Morality -- 5.7 Concluding Remarks -- 6. Living With Climate Change -- 6.1 Life in the Anthropocene -- 6.2 It Doesn't Matter What I Do -- 6.3 It's Not the Meat It's the Motion -- 6.4 Ethics for the Anthropocene -- 6.5 Respect For Nature -- 6.6 Global Justice -- 6.7 Concluding Remarks -- 7. Politics, Policy, and the Road Ahead -- 7.1 The Rectification of Names -- 7.2 Adaptation: The Neglected Option? -- 7.3 Why Abatement and Mitigation Still Matter -- 7.4 The Category Formerly Known as Geoengineering -- 7.5 The Way Forward -- 7.6 Concluding Remarks -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
From the 1992 Rio Earth Summit to the 2009 Copenhagen Climate Conference there was a concerted international effort to stop climate change. Yet greenhouse gas emissions increased, atmospheric concentrations grew, and global warming became an observable fact of life. In this book, philosopher Dale Jamieson explains what climate change is, why we have failed to stop it, and why it still matters what we do. Centered in philosophy, the volume also treats the historical, economic, and political dimensions of climate change. Our failure to prevent or even to respond significantly to climate change, Jamieson argues, reflects the impoverishment of our systems of practical reason, the paralysis of our politics, and the limits of our cognitive and affective capacities. The climate change that is underway is remaking the world in such a way that familiar comforts, places, and ways of life will disappear in years or decades rather than centuries. Climate change also threatens our sense of meaning, since it is difficult to believe that our individual actions matter. The challenges that climate change presents go beyond the resources of common sense morality - it can be hard to view such everyday acts as driving and flying as presenting moral problems. But we must learn to do so if we are to continue to live meaningful lives. There is much that we can do to slow climate change, to adapt to it and restore a sense of agency while living meaningful lives in a changing world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
viii, 269 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: Voice and the Environment
  • Critical Perspectives; Jennifer Peeples and Stephen Depoe
  • SECTION I: VOICE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY. 1. Corporate Ventriloquism: Corporate Advocacy, the Coal Industry, and the Appropriation of Voice; Peter K. Bsumek, Jen Schneider, Steve Schwarze, and Jennifer Peeples
  • 2. Defending the Fort: Michael Crichton, Pulp Fiction, and Green Conspiracy; Patrick Belanger
  • 3. Invoking the Ecological Indian: Rhetoric, Culture, and the Environment; Casey R. Schmitt
  • 4. Sustainable Advocacy: Voice For and Before an Intergenerational Audience; Jessica M. Prody and Brandon Inabinet
  • 5. RESPONSE ESSAY: The (Im)possibility of Voice in Environmental Advocacy; Danielle Endres
  • SECTION II: VOICE AND CONSUMPTION. 6. Voices of Organic Consumption: Understanding Organic Consumption as Political Action; Leah Sprain
  • 7. Vote With Your Fork: The Performance of Environmental Voice at the Farmers' Market; Benjamin Garner
  • 8. RESPONSE ESSAY: Thinking through Issues of Voice and Consumption; Laura Lindenfeld
  • SECTION III: LISTENING TO NON-HUMAN VOICES. 9. The Language that All Things Speak: Thoreau and the Voice of Nature; William Homestead
  • 10. The Ethics of Listening in the Wilderness Writings of Sigurd F. Olson; David A. Tschida
  • 11. Listening to the Natural World: Ecopsychology of Listening From a Hawai'ian Spiritual Perspective; Yukari Kunisue
  • 12. RESPONSE ESSAY: Environmental Voices Including Dialogue with Nature, Within and Beyond Language; Donal Carbaugh
  • CODA: Food, Future, Zombies; Eric King Watts.
"Voice and Environmental Communication explores how people give voice to, and listen to the voices of, the environment. As anxieties around degrading environments increase, so too do the number and volume of voices vying for the opportunity to express their experiences, beliefs, anxieties, knowledge and proposals for meaningful change. Nature itself speaks through, and perhaps to, individuals who advocate on behalf of the environment. This collection includes nine original essays organized into three sections: Voice and Environmental Advocacy, Voice and Consumption, and Listening to Non-human Voices. Four notable scholars reflect on these chapters, and provide both an audience to the scholars as well as a forum for extending their own understanding of voice and the environment. This foundational book introduces the relationship between these two fundamental aspects of human existence and extends our knowledge of the role of voice in the study of environmental communication."-- Provided by publisher.
  • Introduction: Voice and the Environment
  • Critical Perspectives; Jennifer Peeples and Stephen Depoe
  • SECTION I: VOICE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY. 1. Corporate Ventriloquism: Corporate Advocacy, the Coal Industry, and the Appropriation of Voice; Peter K. Bsumek, Jen Schneider, Steve Schwarze, and Jennifer Peeples
  • 2. Defending the Fort: Michael Crichton, Pulp Fiction, and Green Conspiracy; Patrick Belanger
  • 3. Invoking the Ecological Indian: Rhetoric, Culture, and the Environment; Casey R. Schmitt
  • 4. Sustainable Advocacy: Voice For and Before an Intergenerational Audience; Jessica M. Prody and Brandon Inabinet
  • 5. RESPONSE ESSAY: The (Im)possibility of Voice in Environmental Advocacy; Danielle Endres
  • SECTION II: VOICE AND CONSUMPTION. 6. Voices of Organic Consumption: Understanding Organic Consumption as Political Action; Leah Sprain
  • 7. Vote With Your Fork: The Performance of Environmental Voice at the Farmers' Market; Benjamin Garner
  • 8. RESPONSE ESSAY: Thinking through Issues of Voice and Consumption; Laura Lindenfeld
  • SECTION III: LISTENING TO NON-HUMAN VOICES. 9. The Language that All Things Speak: Thoreau and the Voice of Nature; William Homestead
  • 10. The Ethics of Listening in the Wilderness Writings of Sigurd F. Olson; David A. Tschida
  • 11. Listening to the Natural World: Ecopsychology of Listening From a Hawai'ian Spiritual Perspective; Yukari Kunisue
  • 12. RESPONSE ESSAY: Environmental Voices Including Dialogue with Nature, Within and Beyond Language; Donal Carbaugh
  • CODA: Food, Future, Zombies; Eric King Watts.
"Voice and Environmental Communication explores how people give voice to, and listen to the voices of, the environment. As anxieties around degrading environments increase, so too do the number and volume of voices vying for the opportunity to express their experiences, beliefs, anxieties, knowledge and proposals for meaningful change. Nature itself speaks through, and perhaps to, individuals who advocate on behalf of the environment. This collection includes nine original essays organized into three sections: Voice and Environmental Advocacy, Voice and Consumption, and Listening to Non-human Voices. Four notable scholars reflect on these chapters, and provide both an audience to the scholars as well as a forum for extending their own understanding of voice and the environment. This foundational book introduces the relationship between these two fundamental aspects of human existence and extends our knowledge of the role of voice in the study of environmental communication."-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GE25 .V65 2014 Unknown
Book
xi, 235 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Peter N. Goggin Part I: Places We Dig (Mine) 1. A Certain Uncertainty: Drilling into the Rhetoric of the Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Development James Guignard 2. Eco-Seeing a Tradition of Colonization: Revealing Shadow Realities of Marcellus Drilling Brian Cope 3. Sense of Place, Identity, and Cultural Continuity in an Arizona Community Deborah L. Williams & Elizabeth A. Brandt 4. Mt. Taylor, New Mexico: Efforts to Provide Resilience to a Sacred Mountain Socio-Ecological System Sally Said Part II: Places We Build and Create 5. A Land Ethic for Urban Dwellers Gesa E. Kirsch 6. "We Face East": The Narragansett Dawn and Ecocentric Discourses of Identity and Justice Matthew Ortoleva 7. Conjuring the Farm: Constructing Agricultural Places in U.S. Schools Cynthia R. Haller 8. Digital Cities: Rhetorics of Place in Environmental Video Games Michael Springer & Peter N. Goggin Part III. Places We Travel Through, Around, and Within 9. Reading the Atlas of the Patagonian Sea: Toward a Visual-Material Rhetorics of Environmental Advocacy Amy D. Propen 10. A Place of One's Own Samantha Senda-Cook & Danielle Endres 11. Local Flaneury: Losing and Finding One's Place Jaqueline McLeod Rogers Part IV. Places of Resistance and Acceptance 12. From Concept to Action: Do Environmental Regulations Promote Sustainability? Becca Cammack, Linn K. Bekins, & Alison Krug 13. Mapping Literacies: Land-Use Planning and the Sponsorship of Place Rebecca Powell 14. Place-Identity and the Sociospatial Environment Rick Carpenter Afterword Kim Donehower.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Understanding how rhetoric, and environmental rhetoric in particular, informs and is informed by local and global ecologies contributes to our conversations about sustainability and resilience - the preservation and conservation of the earth and the future of human society. This book explores some of the complex relationships, collaborations, compromises, and contradictions between human endeavor and situated discourses, identities and landscapes, social justice and natural resources, movement and geographies, unpacking and grappling with the complexities of rhetoric of presence. Making a significant contribution to exploring the complex discursive constructions of environmental rhetorics and place-based rhetorics, this collection considers discourses, actions, and adaptations concerning environmental regulations and development, sustainability, exploitation, and conservation of energy resources. Essays visit arguments on cultural values, social justice, environmental advocacy, and identity as political constructions of rhetorical place and space. Rural and urban case studies contribute to discussions of the ethics and identities of environment, and the rhetorics of environmental cartography and glocalization. Contributors represent a range of specialization across a variety of scholarly research in such fields as communication studies, rhetorical theory, social/cultural geography, technical/professional communication, cartography, anthropology, linguistics, comparative literature/ecocriticism, literacy studies, digital rhetoric/media studies, and discourse analysis. Thus, this book goes beyond the assumption that rhetorics are situated, and challenges us to consider not only how and why they are situated, but what we mean when we theorize notions of situated, place-based rhetorics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction Peter N. Goggin Part I: Places We Dig (Mine) 1. A Certain Uncertainty: Drilling into the Rhetoric of the Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Development James Guignard 2. Eco-Seeing a Tradition of Colonization: Revealing Shadow Realities of Marcellus Drilling Brian Cope 3. Sense of Place, Identity, and Cultural Continuity in an Arizona Community Deborah L. Williams & Elizabeth A. Brandt 4. Mt. Taylor, New Mexico: Efforts to Provide Resilience to a Sacred Mountain Socio-Ecological System Sally Said Part II: Places We Build and Create 5. A Land Ethic for Urban Dwellers Gesa E. Kirsch 6. "We Face East": The Narragansett Dawn and Ecocentric Discourses of Identity and Justice Matthew Ortoleva 7. Conjuring the Farm: Constructing Agricultural Places in U.S. Schools Cynthia R. Haller 8. Digital Cities: Rhetorics of Place in Environmental Video Games Michael Springer & Peter N. Goggin Part III. Places We Travel Through, Around, and Within 9. Reading the Atlas of the Patagonian Sea: Toward a Visual-Material Rhetorics of Environmental Advocacy Amy D. Propen 10. A Place of One's Own Samantha Senda-Cook & Danielle Endres 11. Local Flaneury: Losing and Finding One's Place Jaqueline McLeod Rogers Part IV. Places of Resistance and Acceptance 12. From Concept to Action: Do Environmental Regulations Promote Sustainability? Becca Cammack, Linn K. Bekins, & Alison Krug 13. Mapping Literacies: Land-Use Planning and the Sponsorship of Place Rebecca Powell 14. Place-Identity and the Sociospatial Environment Rick Carpenter Afterword Kim Donehower.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Understanding how rhetoric, and environmental rhetoric in particular, informs and is informed by local and global ecologies contributes to our conversations about sustainability and resilience - the preservation and conservation of the earth and the future of human society. This book explores some of the complex relationships, collaborations, compromises, and contradictions between human endeavor and situated discourses, identities and landscapes, social justice and natural resources, movement and geographies, unpacking and grappling with the complexities of rhetoric of presence. Making a significant contribution to exploring the complex discursive constructions of environmental rhetorics and place-based rhetorics, this collection considers discourses, actions, and adaptations concerning environmental regulations and development, sustainability, exploitation, and conservation of energy resources. Essays visit arguments on cultural values, social justice, environmental advocacy, and identity as political constructions of rhetorical place and space. Rural and urban case studies contribute to discussions of the ethics and identities of environment, and the rhetorics of environmental cartography and glocalization. Contributors represent a range of specialization across a variety of scholarly research in such fields as communication studies, rhetorical theory, social/cultural geography, technical/professional communication, cartography, anthropology, linguistics, comparative literature/ecocriticism, literacy studies, digital rhetoric/media studies, and discourse analysis. Thus, this book goes beyond the assumption that rhetorics are situated, and challenges us to consider not only how and why they are situated, but what we mean when we theorize notions of situated, place-based rhetorics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
QH541.18 .E68 2013 Unknown
Book
xi, 190 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • 1. Introduction: The media, animal conservation and environmental education John Blewitt 2. Critical practice and the public pedagogy of environmental and conservation media John Blewitt 3. Humans, sharks and the shared environment in the contemporary eco-doc Helen Hughes 4. Studying Green Spectacular Environmentalisms Group: Sian Sullivan, Gill Branston, Mike Goodman, Jaimie Lorimer, James Igoe, Dan Brockington and John Blewitt & Filmmaker: Patrick Rouxel 5. Harnessing visual media in environmental education: increasing knowledge of orangutan conservation issues and facilitating sustainable behaviour through video presentations Elissa Pearson, Jillian Dorrian and Carla Litchfield 6. The application of online wildlife imagery as an education conservation tool Alexander Royan and Bonnie Metherell 7. Conservation photography as environmental education: focus on the pedagogues Bruce Evan Farnsworth 8. Field birding and digital objects: immaterial technologies and their implications for one practice of coming to know the more-than-human Gavan Peter Longley Watson 9. Exploring use of new media in environmental education contexts: introducing visitors' technology use in zoos model Victor Yocco, Elizabeth H. Danter, Joseph E. Heimlich, Betty A. Dunckel and Chris Myers 10. Linking community communication to conservation of the maned wolf in central Brazil Marcelo Ximenes A. Bizerril, Carla Cruz Soares and Jean Pierre Santos 11. The environmental education through filmmaking project Hallie Harness and Howard Drossman 12. Enhancing college students' environmental sensibilities through online nature journaling Gwen Arnold.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Natural History filmmaking has a long history but the generic boundaries between it and environmental and conservation filmmaking are blurred. Nature, environment and animal imagery has been a mainstay of television, campaigning organisations and conservation bodies from Greenpeace to the Sierra Club, with vibrant images being used effectively on posters, leaflets and postcards, and in coffee table books, media releases, short films and viral emails to educate and inform the general public. However, critics suggest that wildlife film and photography frequently convey a false image of the state of the world's flora and fauna. The environmental educator David Orr once remarked that all education is environmental education, and it is possible to see all image-based communication in the same way. The Media, Animal Conservation and Environmental Education has contributions from filmmakers, photographers, researchers and academics from across the globe. It explores the various ways in which film, television and video are, and can be, used by conservationists and educators to encourage both a greater awareness of environmental and conservation issues, and practical action designed to help endangered species. This book is based on a special issue of the journal Environmental Education Research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction: The media, animal conservation and environmental education John Blewitt 2. Critical practice and the public pedagogy of environmental and conservation media John Blewitt 3. Humans, sharks and the shared environment in the contemporary eco-doc Helen Hughes 4. Studying Green Spectacular Environmentalisms Group: Sian Sullivan, Gill Branston, Mike Goodman, Jaimie Lorimer, James Igoe, Dan Brockington and John Blewitt & Filmmaker: Patrick Rouxel 5. Harnessing visual media in environmental education: increasing knowledge of orangutan conservation issues and facilitating sustainable behaviour through video presentations Elissa Pearson, Jillian Dorrian and Carla Litchfield 6. The application of online wildlife imagery as an education conservation tool Alexander Royan and Bonnie Metherell 7. Conservation photography as environmental education: focus on the pedagogues Bruce Evan Farnsworth 8. Field birding and digital objects: immaterial technologies and their implications for one practice of coming to know the more-than-human Gavan Peter Longley Watson 9. Exploring use of new media in environmental education contexts: introducing visitors' technology use in zoos model Victor Yocco, Elizabeth H. Danter, Joseph E. Heimlich, Betty A. Dunckel and Chris Myers 10. Linking community communication to conservation of the maned wolf in central Brazil Marcelo Ximenes A. Bizerril, Carla Cruz Soares and Jean Pierre Santos 11. The environmental education through filmmaking project Hallie Harness and Howard Drossman 12. Enhancing college students' environmental sensibilities through online nature journaling Gwen Arnold.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Natural History filmmaking has a long history but the generic boundaries between it and environmental and conservation filmmaking are blurred. Nature, environment and animal imagery has been a mainstay of television, campaigning organisations and conservation bodies from Greenpeace to the Sierra Club, with vibrant images being used effectively on posters, leaflets and postcards, and in coffee table books, media releases, short films and viral emails to educate and inform the general public. However, critics suggest that wildlife film and photography frequently convey a false image of the state of the world's flora and fauna. The environmental educator David Orr once remarked that all education is environmental education, and it is possible to see all image-based communication in the same way. The Media, Animal Conservation and Environmental Education has contributions from filmmakers, photographers, researchers and academics from across the globe. It explores the various ways in which film, television and video are, and can be, used by conservationists and educators to encourage both a greater awareness of environmental and conservation issues, and practical action designed to help endangered species. This book is based on a special issue of the journal Environmental Education Research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
P96 .E57 M445 2013 Unknown
Book
xiv, 231 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Part I Public participation and media
  • When citizens matter in the mass mediation of science : the role of imagined audiences in multidirectional communication processes / Ursula Plesner
  • Contested ethanol dreams : public participation in environmental news / Annika Egan Sjölander and Anna Maria Jönsson
  • Citizen action and post-socialist journalism : the responses of journalists to a citizen campaign against government policy towards smoking / Pavel P. Antonov
  • Discourse communities as catalysts for science and technology communication / Hedwig te Molder
  • Online talk : how exposure to disagreement in online comments affects beliefs in the promise of controversial science / Ashley A. Anderson, Dominique Brossard, Dietram A. Scheufele and Michael A. Xenos
  • Part II Public participation and formal public engagement initiatives
  • Communicating about climate change in a citizen consultation : dynamics of exclusion and inclusion / Louise Phillips
  • Public engagement as a field of tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies : critical discourse moments in an "energy town" / anders Horsbøl and Inger Lassen
  • The stem cell network : communicating social science through a spatial installation / Maja Horst
  • Issue-centred exploration with a citizen panel : knowledge communication and ICTs in participatory city governance / Pauliina Lehtonen and Jarkko Bamberg.
  • Part I Public participation and media
  • When citizens matter in the mass mediation of science : the role of imagined audiences in multidirectional communication processes / Ursula Plesner
  • Contested ethanol dreams : public participation in environmental news / Annika Egan Sjölander and Anna Maria Jönsson
  • Citizen action and post-socialist journalism : the responses of journalists to a citizen campaign against government policy towards smoking / Pavel P. Antonov
  • Discourse communities as catalysts for science and technology communication / Hedwig te Molder
  • Online talk : how exposure to disagreement in online comments affects beliefs in the promise of controversial science / Ashley A. Anderson, Dominique Brossard, Dietram A. Scheufele and Michael A. Xenos
  • Part II Public participation and formal public engagement initiatives
  • Communicating about climate change in a citizen consultation : dynamics of exclusion and inclusion / Louise Phillips
  • Public engagement as a field of tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies : critical discourse moments in an "energy town" / anders Horsbøl and Inger Lassen
  • The stem cell network : communicating social science through a spatial installation / Maja Horst
  • Issue-centred exploration with a citizen panel : knowledge communication and ICTs in participatory city governance / Pauliina Lehtonen and Jarkko Bamberg.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
P95.8 .C53 2012 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xiii, 284 p.) ill., maps.
This is the first book designed to help planners, municipal staff and officials, citizens and others working at local levels to develop Climate Action Plans (CAPs). CAPs are strategic plans that establish policies and programmes for mitigating a community's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. They typically focus on transportation, energy use, and solid waste. CAPs are usually based on GHG emissions inventories, which identify the sources of emissions from the community and quantify amounts. CAPs may also address adaptation - how the community will respond to the local impacts of climate change, such as increased flooding, extended drought, or sea level rise. With examples drawn from actual plans, Local Climate Action Planning guides preparers of CAPs through the entire plan development process, identifying the key considerations and choices that must be made in order to assure that a plan is both workable and effective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first book designed to help planners, municipal staff and officials, citizens and others working at local levels to develop Climate Action Plans (CAPs). CAPs are strategic plans that establish policies and programmes for mitigating a community's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. They typically focus on transportation, energy use, and solid waste. CAPs are usually based on GHG emissions inventories, which identify the sources of emissions from the community and quantify amounts. CAPs may also address adaptation - how the community will respond to the local impacts of climate change, such as increased flooding, extended drought, or sea level rise. With examples drawn from actual plans, Local Climate Action Planning guides preparers of CAPs through the entire plan development process, identifying the key considerations and choices that must be made in order to assure that a plan is both workable and effective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xiii, 284 p. : ill.
This is the first book designed to help planners, municipal staff and officials, citizens and others working at local levels to develop Climate Action Plans (CAPs). CAPs are strategic plans that establish policies and programmes for mitigating a community's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. They typically focus on transportation, energy use, and solid waste. CAPs are usually based on GHG emissions inventories, which identify the sources of emissions from the community and quantify amounts. CAPs may also address adaptation - how the community will respond to the local impacts of climate change, such as increased flooding, extended drought, or sea level rise. With examples drawn from actual plans, Local Climate Action Planning guides preparers of CAPs through the entire plan development process, identifying the key considerations and choices that must be made in order to assure that a plan is both workable and effective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first book designed to help planners, municipal staff and officials, citizens and others working at local levels to develop Climate Action Plans (CAPs). CAPs are strategic plans that establish policies and programmes for mitigating a community's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. They typically focus on transportation, energy use, and solid waste. CAPs are usually based on GHG emissions inventories, which identify the sources of emissions from the community and quantify amounts. CAPs may also address adaptation - how the community will respond to the local impacts of climate change, such as increased flooding, extended drought, or sea level rise. With examples drawn from actual plans, Local Climate Action Planning guides preparers of CAPs through the entire plan development process, identifying the key considerations and choices that must be made in order to assure that a plan is both workable and effective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
271 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Biology Library (Falconer)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
GE25 .S76 2012 Unknown
Book
xiii, 384 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • PART I: CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES 1. Studying Environmental Communication The Field of Environmental Communication Nature, Communication, and the Public Sphere Diverse Voices and Interests in a "Green" Public Sphere 2. Social/Symbolic Constructions of "Environment" The U.S. Environmental Movement Social/Symbolic Approaches to the Environment Visual Rhetorics: Portraying Nature PART II. CITIZEN VOICES AND PUBLIC FORUMS 3. Public Participation in Environmental Decisions Right to Know: Access to Information Right of Public Comment Right of Standing in Court: Citizen Suites Citizens' Communication and Public Participation Growth of Public Participation Internationally 4. Conflict Resolution and Collaboration in Environmental Disputes New Approaches to Environmental Disputes Collaborating to Resolve Environmental Conflicts Limits of Collaboration and Consensus PART III. MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE ENVIRONMENT 5. Media and the Environment Online Media Depictions of Nature News Production and the Environment New Media and the Environment Online Media Effects 6. Risk Communication: Environmental Dangers and the Public Dangerous Environments: Assessing Risk Communicating Environmental Risks to the Public Media and Environmental Risk PART IV. VOICES FOR CHANGE 7. Environmental Advocacy Campaigns Environmental Advocacy Environmental Advocacy Campaigns The Campaign to Protect Zuni Salt Lake The Attitude-Behavior Gap and the Challenges of Advocacy 8. Environmental Justice/Climate Justice: Voices From the Grassroots Whose Environment? Whose Voices? Building the Movement for Environmental Justice Indecorous Voices and Democratic Inclusion The Global Movement for Climate Justice PART V. ENVIRONMENTAL DISCOURSES OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY 9. Science Communication and Environmental Controversies Science and Symbolic Legitimacy Boundaries The Precautionary Principle Science and Symbolic Legitimacy Conflict Early Warners: Disputes Over the Public Role of Environmental Scientists 10. Green Marketing and Corporate Advocacy Free Market Discourse and the Environment Corporate Green Marketing Corporate Advocacy: Three Bites of the Apple SLAPP Lawsuits: Strategic Litigation Against Public Participation Epilogue: Imagining a Different World.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Environmental Communication and the Public Sphere" is the first comprehensive undergraduate textbook in the growing field of environmental communication. It takes as its theme the role of communication in influencing the ways in which we perceive the environment as well as what actions we and others take in our relations to the natural world. The text blends scholarship and hands-on experiences to provide a theory-based and coherent description of the concrete communication practices and sites in the debates over environment protection. Additional theory and vocabulary are introduced, as are case studies and examples for closer examination of the principal sites and practices of environmental communication - including forums for public participation, advocacy campaigns, media coverage of environmental stories, risk communication, and models of dispute settlement. This accessible book: summarizes current scholarship in the area and makes accessible many of the practices of media, corporations, and advocacy groups that are not readily available in public sources; gives students insight into the practical ways to participate publicly in influencing the decisions of governmental agencies that affect the environment; offers a comprehensible treatment of the complexity and range of issues, sites, and practices in environmental communication; and, includes 'Act Locally' exercises, which provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge of the principles of environmental communication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • PART I: CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES 1. Studying Environmental Communication The Field of Environmental Communication Nature, Communication, and the Public Sphere Diverse Voices and Interests in a "Green" Public Sphere 2. Social/Symbolic Constructions of "Environment" The U.S. Environmental Movement Social/Symbolic Approaches to the Environment Visual Rhetorics: Portraying Nature PART II. CITIZEN VOICES AND PUBLIC FORUMS 3. Public Participation in Environmental Decisions Right to Know: Access to Information Right of Public Comment Right of Standing in Court: Citizen Suites Citizens' Communication and Public Participation Growth of Public Participation Internationally 4. Conflict Resolution and Collaboration in Environmental Disputes New Approaches to Environmental Disputes Collaborating to Resolve Environmental Conflicts Limits of Collaboration and Consensus PART III. MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE ENVIRONMENT 5. Media and the Environment Online Media Depictions of Nature News Production and the Environment New Media and the Environment Online Media Effects 6. Risk Communication: Environmental Dangers and the Public Dangerous Environments: Assessing Risk Communicating Environmental Risks to the Public Media and Environmental Risk PART IV. VOICES FOR CHANGE 7. Environmental Advocacy Campaigns Environmental Advocacy Environmental Advocacy Campaigns The Campaign to Protect Zuni Salt Lake The Attitude-Behavior Gap and the Challenges of Advocacy 8. Environmental Justice/Climate Justice: Voices From the Grassroots Whose Environment? Whose Voices? Building the Movement for Environmental Justice Indecorous Voices and Democratic Inclusion The Global Movement for Climate Justice PART V. ENVIRONMENTAL DISCOURSES OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY 9. Science Communication and Environmental Controversies Science and Symbolic Legitimacy Boundaries The Precautionary Principle Science and Symbolic Legitimacy Conflict Early Warners: Disputes Over the Public Role of Environmental Scientists 10. Green Marketing and Corporate Advocacy Free Market Discourse and the Environment Corporate Green Marketing Corporate Advocacy: Three Bites of the Apple SLAPP Lawsuits: Strategic Litigation Against Public Participation Epilogue: Imagining a Different World.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Environmental Communication and the Public Sphere" is the first comprehensive undergraduate textbook in the growing field of environmental communication. It takes as its theme the role of communication in influencing the ways in which we perceive the environment as well as what actions we and others take in our relations to the natural world. The text blends scholarship and hands-on experiences to provide a theory-based and coherent description of the concrete communication practices and sites in the debates over environment protection. Additional theory and vocabulary are introduced, as are case studies and examples for closer examination of the principal sites and practices of environmental communication - including forums for public participation, advocacy campaigns, media coverage of environmental stories, risk communication, and models of dispute settlement. This accessible book: summarizes current scholarship in the area and makes accessible many of the practices of media, corporations, and advocacy groups that are not readily available in public sources; gives students insight into the practical ways to participate publicly in influencing the decisions of governmental agencies that affect the environment; offers a comprehensible treatment of the complexity and range of issues, sites, and practices in environmental communication; and, includes 'Act Locally' exercises, which provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge of the principles of environmental communication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GE25 .C69 2010 Unknown
Book
xxiii, 310 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Part 1: Principles of Environmental Communication 1. Understanding the world around us 2. Communicating about the environment 3. Developing your environmental literacy 4. Investigating environmental issues Part 2: Communication planning 5. Planning environmental communication 6. Analyzing your audience 7. Evaluating your messages' effects 8. Characterizing the mass media 9. Highlighting useful media Part 3: Skills Building and Practical Applications 10. Grouping together well 11. Differing ways of thinking and doing 12. Communicating across cultures 13.Speaking to an audience 14.Communicating without words 15. Using visual aids 16. Dealing with the news media 17. Managing conflict 18. Communicating about risk 19. Learning from marketing and public relations 20. Walking the Talk of Green Business and Sustainability.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Environmental professionals can no longer simply publish research in technical journals. Informing the public is now a critical part of the job. Environmental Communication demonstrates, step by step, how it's done, and is an essential guide for communicating complex information to groups not familiar with scientific material. It addresses the entire communications process, from message planning, audience analysis and media relations to public speaking - skills a good communicator must master for effective public dialogue. Environmental Communication provides all the knowledge and tools you need to reach your target audience in a persuasive and highly professional manner. "This book will certainly help produce the skills for environmental communications sorely needed for industry, government and non-profit groups as well as an informed public". Sol P. Baltimore, Director, Environmental Communications and Adjunct faculty, Hazardous Waste management program, Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. "All environmental education professionals agree that the practice of good communications is essential for the success of any program. This book provides practical skills for this concern". Ju Chou, Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Environmental Education National Taiwan Normal University Taipei, Taiwan.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part 1: Principles of Environmental Communication 1. Understanding the world around us 2. Communicating about the environment 3. Developing your environmental literacy 4. Investigating environmental issues Part 2: Communication planning 5. Planning environmental communication 6. Analyzing your audience 7. Evaluating your messages' effects 8. Characterizing the mass media 9. Highlighting useful media Part 3: Skills Building and Practical Applications 10. Grouping together well 11. Differing ways of thinking and doing 12. Communicating across cultures 13.Speaking to an audience 14.Communicating without words 15. Using visual aids 16. Dealing with the news media 17. Managing conflict 18. Communicating about risk 19. Learning from marketing and public relations 20. Walking the Talk of Green Business and Sustainability.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Environmental professionals can no longer simply publish research in technical journals. Informing the public is now a critical part of the job. Environmental Communication demonstrates, step by step, how it's done, and is an essential guide for communicating complex information to groups not familiar with scientific material. It addresses the entire communications process, from message planning, audience analysis and media relations to public speaking - skills a good communicator must master for effective public dialogue. Environmental Communication provides all the knowledge and tools you need to reach your target audience in a persuasive and highly professional manner. "This book will certainly help produce the skills for environmental communications sorely needed for industry, government and non-profit groups as well as an informed public". Sol P. Baltimore, Director, Environmental Communications and Adjunct faculty, Hazardous Waste management program, Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. "All environmental education professionals agree that the practice of good communications is essential for the success of any program. This book provides practical skills for this concern". Ju Chou, Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Environmental Education National Taiwan Normal University Taipei, Taiwan.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
GE25 .J8 2010 Available
Book
1 online resource (ix, 283 p.) : ill.
  • Chapter 1 Climate Change at Universities: Results of a World Survey, Walter Leal Filho . - Chapter 2 Path to the Future for Climate Change Education: an University Project Approach, Maruf Sanni, James O. Adejuwon, Idowu Ologeh and William O. Siyanbola. - Chapter 3 Australian Universities, Government Research and the Application of Climate Change Knowledge in Australian Coastal Zone Management, Laura Stocker, Bob Pokrant, David Wood, Nicholas Harvey, Marcus Haward, Kevin O'Toole, Tim Smith. - Chapter 4 Implications of the University with the Climatic Change, Javier Benayas, Inmaculada Alonso, David Alba, Luis Pertierra. - Chapter 5 University of Minnesota Water Based Nitrogen Budget, Erica K. Schram and Jim A. Perry. - Chapter 6 Sustainable Literacy and Climate Change: Engagement, Partnerships, Projects, Julie Matthews and Peter Waterman. - Chapter 7 Getting to the Heart of Climate Change through Stories, Scott Carlin, Ph.D.. - Chapter 8 Climate change education in curricula of technical and classical universities, Dagnija Blumberga, Maris Klavins. - Chapter 9 Interdisciplinary and interfaculty approaches in higher education capable to permeate the complexity of climate change, Roland Hergert, Volker Barth, Thomas Klenke. - Chapter 10 Campus as Classroom: Integrating People, Place and Performance for Communicating Climate Change, Millie Rooney and Jennifer McMillin. - Chapter 11 How to educate for a healthy climate at a university? An intergenerational cooperation (A case study from Slovakia), Alexander Feher, Martin Hauptvogl, Petra Trangosova, Lucia Svetlanska. - Chapter 12 Targeting a low-carbon university: a greenhouse gas reduction target for the Australian Technology Network of Universities, Chris Riedy and Jane Daly. - Chapter 13 Malaysian University Students' Awareness of Geographic Information Systems, Nor Rasidah Hashim and Mohd Fazlin Nazli. - Chapter 14 The changes of life style - significant contribution to GHG emission reduction efforts, DaliaStreimikiene and Remigijus Ciegis. - Chapter 15 Universities as Learning Organizations for Sustainability? The Task of Climate Protection, Florian Ludeke-Freund and Simon Burandt. - Chapter 16 Using a Spare-Time University for climate change education, Michael H. Glantz and Ilan Kelman. - Chapter 17 Embracing the Future: The Ball State University Geothermal Project, James W. Lowe, Robert J. Koester and Philip J. Sachtleben. - Chapter 18 Engaged learning for Climate Change: The Perils and Potentials of Collaborative Partnerships and Projects, Julie Matthews. - Chapter 19 Learning for climate responsibility - via consciousness to action, Anne Virtanen. - Chapter 20 CO2 Emissions Impact of Sustainable Food Procurement: Informing University Policy, Esther E. Bowen and Pamela A. Martin. - Chapter 21 Graduate Studies of Global Change at the University of Latvia, Arnolds Ubelis, Janis Abolins, Dina Berzina, Janis Blahins, Gunars Bajars. - About the Authors. - Thematic Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Climate change is a matter of global concern and specific sectors of society such as universities need to engage and be active in the search for regional and local solutions for what is a global problem. Despite the fact that many universities all around the world are undertaking remarkable efforts in tackling the challenges posed by climate change, few of such works are widely documented and disseminated. The book "Universities and Climate Change" addresses this gap. The book pursues three aims. Firstly, it presents a review of the approaches and methods to inform, communicate and educate university students and the public on climate change being used by universities around the world. Secondly, it introduces initiatives, projects and communication strategies undertaken by universities with a view to informing students and other stakeholders in order to raise awareness on matters related to climate change. Finally, the book documents, promotes and disseminates some of the on-going initiatives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1 Climate Change at Universities: Results of a World Survey, Walter Leal Filho . - Chapter 2 Path to the Future for Climate Change Education: an University Project Approach, Maruf Sanni, James O. Adejuwon, Idowu Ologeh and William O. Siyanbola. - Chapter 3 Australian Universities, Government Research and the Application of Climate Change Knowledge in Australian Coastal Zone Management, Laura Stocker, Bob Pokrant, David Wood, Nicholas Harvey, Marcus Haward, Kevin O'Toole, Tim Smith. - Chapter 4 Implications of the University with the Climatic Change, Javier Benayas, Inmaculada Alonso, David Alba, Luis Pertierra. - Chapter 5 University of Minnesota Water Based Nitrogen Budget, Erica K. Schram and Jim A. Perry. - Chapter 6 Sustainable Literacy and Climate Change: Engagement, Partnerships, Projects, Julie Matthews and Peter Waterman. - Chapter 7 Getting to the Heart of Climate Change through Stories, Scott Carlin, Ph.D.. - Chapter 8 Climate change education in curricula of technical and classical universities, Dagnija Blumberga, Maris Klavins. - Chapter 9 Interdisciplinary and interfaculty approaches in higher education capable to permeate the complexity of climate change, Roland Hergert, Volker Barth, Thomas Klenke. - Chapter 10 Campus as Classroom: Integrating People, Place and Performance for Communicating Climate Change, Millie Rooney and Jennifer McMillin. - Chapter 11 How to educate for a healthy climate at a university? An intergenerational cooperation (A case study from Slovakia), Alexander Feher, Martin Hauptvogl, Petra Trangosova, Lucia Svetlanska. - Chapter 12 Targeting a low-carbon university: a greenhouse gas reduction target for the Australian Technology Network of Universities, Chris Riedy and Jane Daly. - Chapter 13 Malaysian University Students' Awareness of Geographic Information Systems, Nor Rasidah Hashim and Mohd Fazlin Nazli. - Chapter 14 The changes of life style - significant contribution to GHG emission reduction efforts, DaliaStreimikiene and Remigijus Ciegis. - Chapter 15 Universities as Learning Organizations for Sustainability? The Task of Climate Protection, Florian Ludeke-Freund and Simon Burandt. - Chapter 16 Using a Spare-Time University for climate change education, Michael H. Glantz and Ilan Kelman. - Chapter 17 Embracing the Future: The Ball State University Geothermal Project, James W. Lowe, Robert J. Koester and Philip J. Sachtleben. - Chapter 18 Engaged learning for Climate Change: The Perils and Potentials of Collaborative Partnerships and Projects, Julie Matthews. - Chapter 19 Learning for climate responsibility - via consciousness to action, Anne Virtanen. - Chapter 20 CO2 Emissions Impact of Sustainable Food Procurement: Informing University Policy, Esther E. Bowen and Pamela A. Martin. - Chapter 21 Graduate Studies of Global Change at the University of Latvia, Arnolds Ubelis, Janis Abolins, Dina Berzina, Janis Blahins, Gunars Bajars. - About the Authors. - Thematic Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Climate change is a matter of global concern and specific sectors of society such as universities need to engage and be active in the search for regional and local solutions for what is a global problem. Despite the fact that many universities all around the world are undertaking remarkable efforts in tackling the challenges posed by climate change, few of such works are widely documented and disseminated. The book "Universities and Climate Change" addresses this gap. The book pursues three aims. Firstly, it presents a review of the approaches and methods to inform, communicate and educate university students and the public on climate change being used by universities around the world. Secondly, it introduces initiatives, projects and communication strategies undertaken by universities with a view to informing students and other stakeholders in order to raise awareness on matters related to climate change. Finally, the book documents, promotes and disseminates some of the on-going initiatives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xvii, 261 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Contents: Simon Cottle: Series Editor's Preface: Global Crises and the Media - Justin Lewis/Tammy Boyce: Climate Change and the Media: The Scale of the Challenge - Richard Maxwell/Toby Miller: Talking Rubbish: Green Citizenship, Media, and the Environment - Rowan Howard-Williams: Ideological Construction of Climate Change in Australian and New Zealand Newspapers - Catherine Butler/Nick Pidgeon: Media Communications and Public Understanding of Climate Change: Reporting Scientific Consensus on Anthropogenic Warming - Robert E.T. Ward: Climate Change, the Public, and the Media in the UK: A Watershed Moment - Grace Reid: The Climate Change Docudrama: Challenges in Simultaneously Entertaining and Informing Audiences - Stephen Zehr: An Environmentalist/Economic Hybrid Frame in US Press Coverage of Climate Change, 2000-2008 - Tim Holmes: Balancing Acts: PR, Impartiality, and Power in Mass Media Coverage of Climate Change - Julie Doyle: Climate Action and Environmental Activism: The Role of Environmental NGOs and Grassroots Movements in the Global Politics of Climate Change - Mike Hulme: Mediated Messages about Climate Change: Reporting the IPCC Fourth Assessment in the UK Print Media - Neil T. Gavin: The Web and Climate Change Politics: Lessons from Britain? - Mike Shanahan: Time to Adapt? Media Coverage of Climate Change in Nonindustrialised Countries - Yan Wu: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media Coverage of Global Climate Change - Lyn McGaurr/Libby Lester: Complementary Problems, Competing Risks: Climate Change, Nuclear Energy, and the Australian - Alex Lockwood: Preparations for a Post-Kyoto Media Coverage of UK Climate Policy - Astrid Dirikx/Dave Gelders: Global Warming through the Same Lens: An Explorative Framing Study in Dutch and French Newspapers - Peter Berglez/Birgitta Hoeijer/Ulrika Olausson: Individualisation and Nationalisation of the Climate Issue: Two Ideological Horizons in Swedish News Media.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Climate Change and the Media brings together an international group of scholars to discuss one of the most important issues in human history: climate change. Since public understanding of the issue relies heavily on media coverage, the media plays a pivotal role in the way we address it. This edited collection - the first scholarly work to examine the relationship between climate change and the media - examines the changing nature of media coverage around the world, from the USA, the UK, and Europe, to China, Australasia, and the developing world. Chapters consider the impact of public relations and fictional programming, the relationship between public understanding and media coverage, and the impact of the media industries themselves on climate change. At a time when governments must take action to alleviate the catastrophic risk that climate change poses, this collection expertly details the pivotal role the media plays in this most fundamental of issues.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Contents: Simon Cottle: Series Editor's Preface: Global Crises and the Media - Justin Lewis/Tammy Boyce: Climate Change and the Media: The Scale of the Challenge - Richard Maxwell/Toby Miller: Talking Rubbish: Green Citizenship, Media, and the Environment - Rowan Howard-Williams: Ideological Construction of Climate Change in Australian and New Zealand Newspapers - Catherine Butler/Nick Pidgeon: Media Communications and Public Understanding of Climate Change: Reporting Scientific Consensus on Anthropogenic Warming - Robert E.T. Ward: Climate Change, the Public, and the Media in the UK: A Watershed Moment - Grace Reid: The Climate Change Docudrama: Challenges in Simultaneously Entertaining and Informing Audiences - Stephen Zehr: An Environmentalist/Economic Hybrid Frame in US Press Coverage of Climate Change, 2000-2008 - Tim Holmes: Balancing Acts: PR, Impartiality, and Power in Mass Media Coverage of Climate Change - Julie Doyle: Climate Action and Environmental Activism: The Role of Environmental NGOs and Grassroots Movements in the Global Politics of Climate Change - Mike Hulme: Mediated Messages about Climate Change: Reporting the IPCC Fourth Assessment in the UK Print Media - Neil T. Gavin: The Web and Climate Change Politics: Lessons from Britain? - Mike Shanahan: Time to Adapt? Media Coverage of Climate Change in Nonindustrialised Countries - Yan Wu: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Framing of China in News Media Coverage of Global Climate Change - Lyn McGaurr/Libby Lester: Complementary Problems, Competing Risks: Climate Change, Nuclear Energy, and the Australian - Alex Lockwood: Preparations for a Post-Kyoto Media Coverage of UK Climate Policy - Astrid Dirikx/Dave Gelders: Global Warming through the Same Lens: An Explorative Framing Study in Dutch and French Newspapers - Peter Berglez/Birgitta Hoeijer/Ulrika Olausson: Individualisation and Nationalisation of the Climate Issue: Two Ideological Horizons in Swedish News Media.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Climate Change and the Media brings together an international group of scholars to discuss one of the most important issues in human history: climate change. Since public understanding of the issue relies heavily on media coverage, the media plays a pivotal role in the way we address it. This edited collection - the first scholarly work to examine the relationship between climate change and the media - examines the changing nature of media coverage around the world, from the USA, the UK, and Europe, to China, Australasia, and the developing world. Chapters consider the impact of public relations and fictional programming, the relationship between public understanding and media coverage, and the impact of the media industries themselves on climate change. At a time when governments must take action to alleviate the catastrophic risk that climate change poses, this collection expertly details the pivotal role the media plays in this most fundamental of issues.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
QC903 .C557 2009 Unknown
Book
53 p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GE30.5 .F67 Z34 2009 Unknown

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