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Book
xvi, 191 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Some fundamental economics
  • Academic journal publishing and the open access movement
  • On the access principle in science : a law and economics analysis
  • The future of academic publishing
  • Conclusions and further research
  • Appendix.
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction
  • Some fundamental economics
  • Academic journal publishing and the open access movement
  • On the access principle in science : a law and economics analysis
  • The future of academic publishing
  • Conclusions and further research
  • Appendix.
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
K1420.5 .S34 2015 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 191 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction.- Some Fundamental Economics.- Academic Journal Publishing and the Open Access Movement.- On the Access Principle in Science: A Law & Economics Analysis.- The Future of Academic Publishing.- Conclusions and Further Research.- Appendix.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction.- Some Fundamental Economics.- Academic Journal Publishing and the Open Access Movement.- On the Access Principle in Science: A Law & Economics Analysis.- The Future of Academic Publishing.- Conclusions and Further Research.- Appendix.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xvi, 278 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface Acknowledgments Chapter 1. Scholarly Communications - The Intersection of Research and Commerce Chapter 2. The Scientific Journal - An Historical Perspective to Modern Times Chapter 3. The Scholarly Book - Its Hard Times and Rise Again Chapter 4. Secondary Publishing From Abstracting and Indexing to Access and Information Chapter 5. The Rise and Fall of the CD-ROM Technology Chapter 6. The Birth of Online - the Internet and the Web Change Scholarly Communication Chapter 7. Traditional Economics of Academic Publishing Chapter 8. Institutional Buyers, Scholars, and Open Access: A Continuing Story Chapter 9. Big Data, Big Science, and Social Academic Networks Chapter 10. The Rise of Workflow Systems Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scholarly Communications: A History from Content as King to Content as Kingmaker traces the development of scholarly communications from the creation of the first scientific journal through the wide diversity of professional information services today. Unlike any other book, this work is an authoritative history by the past President of Elsevier and current Professor at Long Island University, which examines the changing nature of scholarly communication throughout its history, including its research importance as well as its business value. It specifically covers four key themes: 1.the value of scholarly content and information at various stages of it development and use; 2.the role that technology has played on the use, importance, and value of scholarly information and research communications; 3.the changing business models affecting the system of scholarly communication from the way it is produced to how it is distributed and consumed; and 4.some of the implications of mobile, cloud, and social computing technologies on the future of scholarly communications. Attention is paid to analyzing the structural changes that the professional publishing community now faces. Regazzi examines research content as an economic good; how technology and business models have greatly affected the value of scholarly publishing; and the drivers of the future sustainability of our system of scholarly communication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface Acknowledgments Chapter 1. Scholarly Communications - The Intersection of Research and Commerce Chapter 2. The Scientific Journal - An Historical Perspective to Modern Times Chapter 3. The Scholarly Book - Its Hard Times and Rise Again Chapter 4. Secondary Publishing From Abstracting and Indexing to Access and Information Chapter 5. The Rise and Fall of the CD-ROM Technology Chapter 6. The Birth of Online - the Internet and the Web Change Scholarly Communication Chapter 7. Traditional Economics of Academic Publishing Chapter 8. Institutional Buyers, Scholars, and Open Access: A Continuing Story Chapter 9. Big Data, Big Science, and Social Academic Networks Chapter 10. The Rise of Workflow Systems Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scholarly Communications: A History from Content as King to Content as Kingmaker traces the development of scholarly communications from the creation of the first scientific journal through the wide diversity of professional information services today. Unlike any other book, this work is an authoritative history by the past President of Elsevier and current Professor at Long Island University, which examines the changing nature of scholarly communication throughout its history, including its research importance as well as its business value. It specifically covers four key themes: 1.the value of scholarly content and information at various stages of it development and use; 2.the role that technology has played on the use, importance, and value of scholarly information and research communications; 3.the changing business models affecting the system of scholarly communication from the way it is produced to how it is distributed and consumed; and 4.some of the implications of mobile, cloud, and social computing technologies on the future of scholarly communications. Attention is paid to analyzing the structural changes that the professional publishing community now faces. Regazzi examines research content as an economic good; how technology and business models have greatly affected the value of scholarly publishing; and the drivers of the future sustainability of our system of scholarly communication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
Z286 .S37 R44 2015 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (362 pages) : illustrations, tables.
Most of us are familiar with the term climate change but few of us understand the science behind it. We don't fully comprehend how climate change will affect us, and for that reason we might not consider it as pressing a concern as, say, housing prices or unemployment. This book explains the scientific knowledge about global climate change clearly and concisely in engaging, nontechnical language, describes how it will affect all of us, and suggests how government, business, and citizens can take action against it. This completely revised and updated edition incorporates the latest scientific research and policy initiatives on climate change. It describes recent major legislative actions, analyzes alternative regulatory tools including new uses of taxes and markets, offers increased coverage of China and other developing nations, discusses the role of social media in communicating about climate change, and provides updated assessments of the effects of climate change. The book first explains the basic scientific facts about climate change and its global impact. It discusses the nature of scientific consensus and the strong consensus of mainstream science on climate change. It then explores policy responses and corporate actions in the United States and the rest of the world, discusses how the communication of climate change information by journalists and others can be improved, and addresses issues of environmental justice -- how climate change affects the most vulnerable populations and regions. We can better tackle climate change, this book shows us, if we understand it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Most of us are familiar with the term climate change but few of us understand the science behind it. We don't fully comprehend how climate change will affect us, and for that reason we might not consider it as pressing a concern as, say, housing prices or unemployment. This book explains the scientific knowledge about global climate change clearly and concisely in engaging, nontechnical language, describes how it will affect all of us, and suggests how government, business, and citizens can take action against it. This completely revised and updated edition incorporates the latest scientific research and policy initiatives on climate change. It describes recent major legislative actions, analyzes alternative regulatory tools including new uses of taxes and markets, offers increased coverage of China and other developing nations, discusses the role of social media in communicating about climate change, and provides updated assessments of the effects of climate change. The book first explains the basic scientific facts about climate change and its global impact. It discusses the nature of scientific consensus and the strong consensus of mainstream science on climate change. It then explores policy responses and corporate actions in the United States and the rest of the world, discusses how the communication of climate change information by journalists and others can be improved, and addresses issues of environmental justice -- how climate change affects the most vulnerable populations and regions. We can better tackle climate change, this book shows us, if we understand it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xix, 361 pages) : illustrations
This book aims to be a reference for researchers studying the promotion of scientific literacy in China, as well as a guide for those interested in promoting scientific awareness. It covers advances in science and technology, communication and popularization practice, and research (STCP) both in China and abroad. Theoretical issues are discussed, and important problems?in promoting scientific and technological awareness are identified (e.g.: basic principles, structures, channels of communication and current needs) This bookprovides a summary of the advances in STCP in China in recent years (especially after the issuing of the ?National Scientific Literacy Outline?) including STCP resource and capacity building, science popularization policies, practitioner development, infrastructure construction, and the development of the science popularization industry as a whole. At the same time, this book also reviews thedesign, organization, monitoring and evaluation of science and technology communication and popularization programs. It also highlights current STCP trends and developments in China and calls for a greater emphasis to be placed on research into promoting scientific literacy. It is hoped that this book will be useful to readers both in China and abroad by familiarizing them with the history and theory of STCP as well as its development over time.
This book aims to be a reference for researchers studying the promotion of scientific literacy in China, as well as a guide for those interested in promoting scientific awareness. It covers advances in science and technology, communication and popularization practice, and research (STCP) both in China and abroad. Theoretical issues are discussed, and important problems?in promoting scientific and technological awareness are identified (e.g.: basic principles, structures, channels of communication and current needs) This bookprovides a summary of the advances in STCP in China in recent years (especially after the issuing of the ?National Scientific Literacy Outline?) including STCP resource and capacity building, science popularization policies, practitioner development, infrastructure construction, and the development of the science popularization industry as a whole. At the same time, this book also reviews thedesign, organization, monitoring and evaluation of science and technology communication and popularization programs. It also highlights current STCP trends and developments in China and calls for a greater emphasis to be placed on research into promoting scientific literacy. It is hoped that this book will be useful to readers both in China and abroad by familiarizing them with the history and theory of STCP as well as its development over time.
Book
xvi, 200 p. : col. ill.
  • Introduction-- Why Tell a Story?-- How Stories Work-- Narrative Ingredients Framework-- Frameworks for Stories with Different Purposes-- Appendix: Narrative Summary Tables.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is a guide to narrative skills, the currency of the creative industries. It shows research scientists how to harness story-telling principles to make their complex and technical content easier to communicate and more fulfilling for their audience. Readers discover how the eight narrative ingredients - Audience, Lure, Change, World, Character, Big Hook, Plot and Structure - are relevant to anyone wanting to convey information or ideas clearly, and how the different ingredients can be emphasised and honed for specific purposes: to build a story, deliver results, to sell an idea, or even to sell oneself. There are tailored exercises to inspire readers to generate creative ideas relevant to their own work, and questions to develop the best ideas to use for their posters, seminar talks, public engagement presentations or grant proposals. The ultimate goal is to enable readers to shape their ideas, information and content so that it crackles and fizzes with relevance for their intended audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- Why Tell a Story?-- How Stories Work-- Narrative Ingredients Framework-- Frameworks for Stories with Different Purposes-- Appendix: Narrative Summary Tables.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is a guide to narrative skills, the currency of the creative industries. It shows research scientists how to harness story-telling principles to make their complex and technical content easier to communicate and more fulfilling for their audience. Readers discover how the eight narrative ingredients - Audience, Lure, Change, World, Character, Big Hook, Plot and Structure - are relevant to anyone wanting to convey information or ideas clearly, and how the different ingredients can be emphasised and honed for specific purposes: to build a story, deliver results, to sell an idea, or even to sell oneself. There are tailored exercises to inspire readers to generate creative ideas relevant to their own work, and questions to develop the best ideas to use for their posters, seminar talks, public engagement presentations or grant proposals. The ultimate goal is to enable readers to shape their ideas, information and content so that it crackles and fizzes with relevance for their intended audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
iv, 451 pages : illustrations (some color), maps, portraits ; 21 cm.
  • Vorwort
  • Grußworte und Einführung
  • Präsident der Akademie gemeinnütziger Wissenschaften zu Erfurt / Klaus Manger
  • Vizepräsident der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Arnold Suppan
  • Präsident der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Wien / Hellmuth Grössing
  • Wissenschaft im Gepäck von Handelsleuten, Diplomaten, Missionaren und Militärangehörigen / Michael Kiehn
  • Unterwegs in der "Alten Welt"
  • Erkenntnisinstrument Reisen : Reflexionen zu einem komplexen wissensund wissenschaftshistorischen Phänomen der Frühen Neuzeit / Marianne Klemun
  • Das führende Kräuterbuch als transporter : Altdeutsche Fachprosa in Johann Wonneckes Gart / Gundolf Keil
  • Rußlandkunde in diplomatischen Reiseberichten aus vier Jahrhunderten / Wolfgang Geier
  • Die Situation der Naturwissenschaft in Spanien und Portugal aus der Sicht von Militärs und Diplomaten um 1800 / Dietrich Von Engelhardt
  • Die Erfurter Akademie und ihre gelehrte Zeitung als öffentliches Forum für wissenschaftliche Studien und Expeditionsberichte von Missionaren, Militärs, Diplomaten und Fürsten / Jürgen Kiefer
  • Die ökonomisch-politische Relevanz der Wissenschaft in der offiziellen Erkundungsmission des Mailänders Marsilio Landriani in Deutschland (1787 bis 1789) / Gian Franco Frigo
  • Die botanischen Aktivitäten des 1848 in Italien gefallenen Adalbert (von) Bracht, Hauptmann im k.k. inienregiment Franz Carl / Michael Kiehn
  • Die Beziehung Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecqs (Bousbecque) [Augerius Gislenius Busbequius] zu Carolus Clusius [Charlesde l'É(s)cluse] und deren Einfluss auf erste botanische Gärten in Wien / Maria Petz-Grabenbauer
  • Das Paris-Sefâretnâme (1721) des 28 Ce̦lebi Mehmed Efendi als Grundlage der Idee der Verwestlichung im Osmanischen Reich / Arin Namal, Türkan Polatci̦
  • Die Gattin des Botschafters als medizinische Pionierin : Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) und die Pockenimpfung / Ingrid Kästner
  • Graf Helmuth von Moltke (1800-1891) : vom Nutzen der militärischen Zeichenkunst' für die Klassische Archäologie / Angelika Geyer
  • Alexander von Humboldt und die Verteidigung der naturhistorischen Forschungsreise / Petra Werner
  • Europäische Erkundungen in Asien und Übersee
  • Der Jesuit Michal Boym und seine Flora sinensis / Hartmut Walravens
  • Botanik und Schmuggel im Japan der frühen Edo-Zeit / Walter Lack
  • Emanuel von Friedrichsthal : der erste Daguerreotypist in Yukatan / Ulla Fischer-Westhauser
  • Wissenschaftliche Forschungen der k. (u.) k. Kriegsmarine / Günther Schefbeck
  • Wissenschaftliche Forschungen der k.k. Kriegsmarine / Günther Schefbeck
  • Botaniker : Pflanzenjäger : Intriganten? Die Rolle der Pflanzenkunde bei der Weltumseglung der Fregatte "Novara" (1857-1859) / Christa Riedl-Dorn
  • Die Reise des Carl Alexander Freiherrn von Hügel (1798-1870) in Asien und Ozeanien in den Jahren 1830-1836 und deren Bedeutung für die Nachwelt : aus seinem Briefwechsel mit Kaspar Maria Graf Sternberg (1761-1838) / Claudia Schweizer
  • Carl Diener (1892-1928) und die Expedition in den zentralen Himalaja / Bernhard Hubmann, Johannes Seidl
  • Tagungsimpressionen
  • Personenregister
  • Autorenverzeichnis.
  • Vorwort
  • Grußworte und Einführung
  • Präsident der Akademie gemeinnütziger Wissenschaften zu Erfurt / Klaus Manger
  • Vizepräsident der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Arnold Suppan
  • Präsident der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Wien / Hellmuth Grössing
  • Wissenschaft im Gepäck von Handelsleuten, Diplomaten, Missionaren und Militärangehörigen / Michael Kiehn
  • Unterwegs in der "Alten Welt"
  • Erkenntnisinstrument Reisen : Reflexionen zu einem komplexen wissensund wissenschaftshistorischen Phänomen der Frühen Neuzeit / Marianne Klemun
  • Das führende Kräuterbuch als transporter : Altdeutsche Fachprosa in Johann Wonneckes Gart / Gundolf Keil
  • Rußlandkunde in diplomatischen Reiseberichten aus vier Jahrhunderten / Wolfgang Geier
  • Die Situation der Naturwissenschaft in Spanien und Portugal aus der Sicht von Militärs und Diplomaten um 1800 / Dietrich Von Engelhardt
  • Die Erfurter Akademie und ihre gelehrte Zeitung als öffentliches Forum für wissenschaftliche Studien und Expeditionsberichte von Missionaren, Militärs, Diplomaten und Fürsten / Jürgen Kiefer
  • Die ökonomisch-politische Relevanz der Wissenschaft in der offiziellen Erkundungsmission des Mailänders Marsilio Landriani in Deutschland (1787 bis 1789) / Gian Franco Frigo
  • Die botanischen Aktivitäten des 1848 in Italien gefallenen Adalbert (von) Bracht, Hauptmann im k.k. inienregiment Franz Carl / Michael Kiehn
  • Die Beziehung Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecqs (Bousbecque) [Augerius Gislenius Busbequius] zu Carolus Clusius [Charlesde l'É(s)cluse] und deren Einfluss auf erste botanische Gärten in Wien / Maria Petz-Grabenbauer
  • Das Paris-Sefâretnâme (1721) des 28 Ce̦lebi Mehmed Efendi als Grundlage der Idee der Verwestlichung im Osmanischen Reich / Arin Namal, Türkan Polatci̦
  • Die Gattin des Botschafters als medizinische Pionierin : Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) und die Pockenimpfung / Ingrid Kästner
  • Graf Helmuth von Moltke (1800-1891) : vom Nutzen der militärischen Zeichenkunst' für die Klassische Archäologie / Angelika Geyer
  • Alexander von Humboldt und die Verteidigung der naturhistorischen Forschungsreise / Petra Werner
  • Europäische Erkundungen in Asien und Übersee
  • Der Jesuit Michal Boym und seine Flora sinensis / Hartmut Walravens
  • Botanik und Schmuggel im Japan der frühen Edo-Zeit / Walter Lack
  • Emanuel von Friedrichsthal : der erste Daguerreotypist in Yukatan / Ulla Fischer-Westhauser
  • Wissenschaftliche Forschungen der k. (u.) k. Kriegsmarine / Günther Schefbeck
  • Wissenschaftliche Forschungen der k.k. Kriegsmarine / Günther Schefbeck
  • Botaniker : Pflanzenjäger : Intriganten? Die Rolle der Pflanzenkunde bei der Weltumseglung der Fregatte "Novara" (1857-1859) / Christa Riedl-Dorn
  • Die Reise des Carl Alexander Freiherrn von Hügel (1798-1870) in Asien und Ozeanien in den Jahren 1830-1836 und deren Bedeutung für die Nachwelt : aus seinem Briefwechsel mit Kaspar Maria Graf Sternberg (1761-1838) / Claudia Schweizer
  • Carl Diener (1892-1928) und die Expedition in den zentralen Himalaja / Bernhard Hubmann, Johannes Seidl
  • Tagungsimpressionen
  • Personenregister
  • Autorenverzeichnis.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
Q125 .E742 2014 Available
Book
1 online resource (xi, 131 pages, 4 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations.
  • Machine generated contents note: Future Earth
  • Advancing Civic Understanding of the Anthropocene Acknowledgements Preface Patrick Hamilton Chapter 1. Welcome to the Anthropocene Patrick Hamilton Chapter 2. The Anthropocene and the Framework for K-12 Science Education Fred N. Finley Chapter 3. Teacher Professional Development in the Anthropocene Devarati Bhattacharya, Gillian Roehrig, Anne Kern, and Mindy Howard Chapter 4. Climate Literacy and Scientific Reasoning Shiyu Liu, Keisha Varma, and Gillian Roehrig Chapter 5. Evaluation and Assessment of Civic Understanding of Planet Earth Julie C. Libarkin Chapter 6. Community-Driven Research in the Anthropocene Rajul Pandya Chapter 7. Geoscience Alliance: Building Capacity to Use Science for Sovereignty in Native Communities Nievita Bueno Watts, Wendy Smythe, Emily Geraghty Ward, Diana Dalbotten, Vanessa Green, Merv Tano, and Antony Berthelote Chapter 8. New Voices: The Role of Undergraduate Geoscience Research in Supporting Alternative Perspectives on the Anthropocene Diana Dalbotten, Rebecca Haaker-Santos, and Suzanne Zurn-Birkhimer Chapter 9. Shaping the Public Dialogue on Climate Change William Spitzer Chapter 10. Opportunities for Communicating Ocean Acidification to Visitors at Informal Science Education Institutions Douglas Meyer and Bill Mott Chapter 11. City-wide Collaborations for Urban Climate Education Steven Snyder, Rita Mukherjee Hoffstadt, Lauren B. Allen, Kevin Crowley, Daniel Bader, and Radley Horton Chapter 12. On Bridging the Journalism/Science Divide Bud Ward .
"Future Earth is a valuable practical guide for scientists from all disciplines including geoscientists, museum curators, science educators, and public policy makers"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: Future Earth
  • Advancing Civic Understanding of the Anthropocene Acknowledgements Preface Patrick Hamilton Chapter 1. Welcome to the Anthropocene Patrick Hamilton Chapter 2. The Anthropocene and the Framework for K-12 Science Education Fred N. Finley Chapter 3. Teacher Professional Development in the Anthropocene Devarati Bhattacharya, Gillian Roehrig, Anne Kern, and Mindy Howard Chapter 4. Climate Literacy and Scientific Reasoning Shiyu Liu, Keisha Varma, and Gillian Roehrig Chapter 5. Evaluation and Assessment of Civic Understanding of Planet Earth Julie C. Libarkin Chapter 6. Community-Driven Research in the Anthropocene Rajul Pandya Chapter 7. Geoscience Alliance: Building Capacity to Use Science for Sovereignty in Native Communities Nievita Bueno Watts, Wendy Smythe, Emily Geraghty Ward, Diana Dalbotten, Vanessa Green, Merv Tano, and Antony Berthelote Chapter 8. New Voices: The Role of Undergraduate Geoscience Research in Supporting Alternative Perspectives on the Anthropocene Diana Dalbotten, Rebecca Haaker-Santos, and Suzanne Zurn-Birkhimer Chapter 9. Shaping the Public Dialogue on Climate Change William Spitzer Chapter 10. Opportunities for Communicating Ocean Acidification to Visitors at Informal Science Education Institutions Douglas Meyer and Bill Mott Chapter 11. City-wide Collaborations for Urban Climate Education Steven Snyder, Rita Mukherjee Hoffstadt, Lauren B. Allen, Kevin Crowley, Daniel Bader, and Radley Horton Chapter 12. On Bridging the Journalism/Science Divide Bud Ward .
"Future Earth is a valuable practical guide for scientists from all disciplines including geoscientists, museum curators, science educators, and public policy makers"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
xi, 131 pages : illustrations, maps (some color) ; 29 cm.
  • Welcome to the Anthropocene / Patrick Hamilton
  • The Anthropocene and the framework for K-12 science education / Fred N. Finley
  • Teacher professional development in the Anthropocene / Devarati Bhattacharya, Gillian Roehrig, Anne Kern, and Mindy Howard
  • Climate literacy and scientific reasoning / Shiyu Liu, Keisha Varma, and Gillian Roehrig
  • Evaluation and assessment of civic understanding of Planet Earth / Julie C. Libarkin
  • Community-driven research in the Anthropocene / Rajul Pandya
  • Geoscience alliance : building capacity to use science for sovereignty in native communities / Nievita Bueno Watts, Wendy Smythe, Emily Geraghty Ward, Diana Dalbotten, Vanessa Green, Merv Tano, and Antony Berthelote
  • New voices : the role of undergraduate geoscience research in supporting alternative perspectives on the Anthropocene / Diana Dalbotten, Rebecca Haaker-Santos, and Suzanne Zurn-Birkhimer
  • Shaping the public dialogue on climate change / William Spitzer
  • Opportunities for communicating ocean acidification to visitors at informal science education institutions / Douglas Meyer and Bill Mott
  • City-wide collaborations for urban climate education / Steven Snyder, Rita Mukherjee Hoffstadt, Lauren B. Allen, Kevin Crowley, Daniel Bader, and Radley Horton
  • On bridging the journalism/science divide / Bud Ward.
"Future Earth is a valuable practical guide for scientists from all disciplines including geoscientists, museum curators, science educators, and public policy makers"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Welcome to the Anthropocene / Patrick Hamilton
  • The Anthropocene and the framework for K-12 science education / Fred N. Finley
  • Teacher professional development in the Anthropocene / Devarati Bhattacharya, Gillian Roehrig, Anne Kern, and Mindy Howard
  • Climate literacy and scientific reasoning / Shiyu Liu, Keisha Varma, and Gillian Roehrig
  • Evaluation and assessment of civic understanding of Planet Earth / Julie C. Libarkin
  • Community-driven research in the Anthropocene / Rajul Pandya
  • Geoscience alliance : building capacity to use science for sovereignty in native communities / Nievita Bueno Watts, Wendy Smythe, Emily Geraghty Ward, Diana Dalbotten, Vanessa Green, Merv Tano, and Antony Berthelote
  • New voices : the role of undergraduate geoscience research in supporting alternative perspectives on the Anthropocene / Diana Dalbotten, Rebecca Haaker-Santos, and Suzanne Zurn-Birkhimer
  • Shaping the public dialogue on climate change / William Spitzer
  • Opportunities for communicating ocean acidification to visitors at informal science education institutions / Douglas Meyer and Bill Mott
  • City-wide collaborations for urban climate education / Steven Snyder, Rita Mukherjee Hoffstadt, Lauren B. Allen, Kevin Crowley, Daniel Bader, and Radley Horton
  • On bridging the journalism/science divide / Bud Ward.
"Future Earth is a valuable practical guide for scientists from all disciplines including geoscientists, museum curators, science educators, and public policy makers"-- Provided by publisher.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Status of items at Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner) Status
Stacks
QC801 .G366 V.203 Unknown
Book
xvi, 329 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library, Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
InfoCenter: Ready Reference (non-circulating) Find it
PN171 .F56 R38 2014 In-library use
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Permanent reserve
PN171 .F56 R38 2014 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
PN171 .F56 R38 2014 Unknown
Book
152 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
P301.5 .M48 M434 2014 Unavailable At bindery Request
Book
xviii, 131 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Tables vii List of Figures ix Introduction xiii Preface xvii Acknowledgements xix 1 Understanding number 1 1.1 Thousands separator 2 1.2 Decimal separator 3 1.3 Level of detail in comparisons 4 1.4 Justification of data 5 1.5 Basic rounding 7 1.6 Effective rounding 9 Notes 16 2 Tables 17 2.1 Position of totals in tables 17 2.2 What is a table? 19 2.3 Reference tables 19 2.4 Summary tables 22 2.5 How tables are read 24 2.6 Layout of data in tables 25 2.7 Capital letters for table titles and headings in tables 29 2.8 Use of bold typeface 30 2.9 Use of gridlines and other lines in tables 30 Notes 31 3 Charts (bar charts, histograms, pie charts, graphs) 33 3.1 How the user interprets charts 33 3.2 Written aims for charts 35 3.3 Scale definition and display 37 3.4 Difference between bar charts and histograms 49 3.5 Pie chart principles 51 3.6 Issues with pie charts 55 3.7 Graph principles 63 3.8 Issues with graphs 64 3.9 Pictogram principles 79 3.10 Comparative charts: Multiple pies, multiple bar charts, double scale graphs 82 3.11 Graphics 88 3.12 Three-dimensional charts 90 Notes 92 4 Numbers in text 93 4.1 Numbers written as text 94 4.1.1 Correct numbers 94 4.1.2 Clear numbers 94 4.1.3 Concise numbers 95 4.1.4 Consistent numbers 96 4.2 Ordering of data 97 4.3 Technical terms 98 4.4 Plain language 100 4.5 Emotive language 102 4.6 Key messages 103 Notes 105 5 Data presentation on the Internet 107 5.1 The early years 110 5.2 Statistics on CD-ROMs 113 5.3 Data on the Internet 116 5.4 Charts on the Internet 120 5.5 Text on the Internet 128 Notes 130.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is a clear easy-to-read guide to presenting your message using statistical data. Poor presentation of data is everywhere; basic principles are forgotten or ignored. As a result, audiences are presented with confusing tables and charts that do not make immediate sense. This book is intended to be read by all who present data in any form. The author, a chartered statistician who has run many courses on the subject of data presentation, presents numerous examples alongside an explanation of how improvements can be made and basic principles to adopt. He advocates following four key C words in all messages: Clear, Concise, Correct and Consistent. Following the principles in the book will lead to clearer, simpler and easier to understand messages which can then be assimilated faster. Anyone from student to researcher, journalist to policy adviser, charity worker to government statistician, will benefit from reading this book. More importantly, it will also benefit the recipients of the presented data. Ed Swires-Hennessy, a recognised expert in the presentation of statistics, explains and clearly describes a set of principles of clear and objective statistical communication. This book should be required reading for all those who present statistics. Richard Laux, UK Statistics Authority. "I think this is a fantastic book and hope everyone who presents data or statistics makes time to read it first." (David Marder, Chief Media Adviser, Office for National Statistics, UK). Ed's book makes his tried-and-tested material widely available to anyone concerned with understanding and presenting data. It is full of interesting insights, is highly practical and packed with sensible suggestions and nice ideas that you immediately want to try out. Dr Shirley Coleman, Principal Statistician, Industrial Statistics Research Unit, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, UK.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Tables vii List of Figures ix Introduction xiii Preface xvii Acknowledgements xix 1 Understanding number 1 1.1 Thousands separator 2 1.2 Decimal separator 3 1.3 Level of detail in comparisons 4 1.4 Justification of data 5 1.5 Basic rounding 7 1.6 Effective rounding 9 Notes 16 2 Tables 17 2.1 Position of totals in tables 17 2.2 What is a table? 19 2.3 Reference tables 19 2.4 Summary tables 22 2.5 How tables are read 24 2.6 Layout of data in tables 25 2.7 Capital letters for table titles and headings in tables 29 2.8 Use of bold typeface 30 2.9 Use of gridlines and other lines in tables 30 Notes 31 3 Charts (bar charts, histograms, pie charts, graphs) 33 3.1 How the user interprets charts 33 3.2 Written aims for charts 35 3.3 Scale definition and display 37 3.4 Difference between bar charts and histograms 49 3.5 Pie chart principles 51 3.6 Issues with pie charts 55 3.7 Graph principles 63 3.8 Issues with graphs 64 3.9 Pictogram principles 79 3.10 Comparative charts: Multiple pies, multiple bar charts, double scale graphs 82 3.11 Graphics 88 3.12 Three-dimensional charts 90 Notes 92 4 Numbers in text 93 4.1 Numbers written as text 94 4.1.1 Correct numbers 94 4.1.2 Clear numbers 94 4.1.3 Concise numbers 95 4.1.4 Consistent numbers 96 4.2 Ordering of data 97 4.3 Technical terms 98 4.4 Plain language 100 4.5 Emotive language 102 4.6 Key messages 103 Notes 105 5 Data presentation on the Internet 107 5.1 The early years 110 5.2 Statistics on CD-ROMs 113 5.3 Data on the Internet 116 5.4 Charts on the Internet 120 5.5 Text on the Internet 128 Notes 130.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is a clear easy-to-read guide to presenting your message using statistical data. Poor presentation of data is everywhere; basic principles are forgotten or ignored. As a result, audiences are presented with confusing tables and charts that do not make immediate sense. This book is intended to be read by all who present data in any form. The author, a chartered statistician who has run many courses on the subject of data presentation, presents numerous examples alongside an explanation of how improvements can be made and basic principles to adopt. He advocates following four key C words in all messages: Clear, Concise, Correct and Consistent. Following the principles in the book will lead to clearer, simpler and easier to understand messages which can then be assimilated faster. Anyone from student to researcher, journalist to policy adviser, charity worker to government statistician, will benefit from reading this book. More importantly, it will also benefit the recipients of the presented data. Ed Swires-Hennessy, a recognised expert in the presentation of statistics, explains and clearly describes a set of principles of clear and objective statistical communication. This book should be required reading for all those who present statistics. Richard Laux, UK Statistics Authority. "I think this is a fantastic book and hope everyone who presents data or statistics makes time to read it first." (David Marder, Chief Media Adviser, Office for National Statistics, UK). Ed's book makes his tried-and-tested material widely available to anyone concerned with understanding and presenting data. It is full of interesting insights, is highly practical and packed with sensible suggestions and nice ideas that you immediately want to try out. Dr Shirley Coleman, Principal Statistician, Industrial Statistics Research Unit, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, UK.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Biology Library (Falconer), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Biology Library (Falconer)
Biology Library (Falconer) Status
Stacks
T10.5 .S95 2014 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
T10.5 .S95 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xv, 258 pages).
  • 1. Science Communication Research: Themes and Challenges Massimiano Bucchi and Brian Trench 2. Popular Science Books: From Public Education to Science Bestsellers Alice Bell and Jon Turney 3. Science Journalism: Prospects in the Digital Age Sharon Dunwoody 4. Science Museums and Centres: Evolution and Contemporary Trends Bernard Schiele 5. Public Relations in Science: Managing the Trust Portfolio Rick E. Borchelt and Kristian H. Nielsen 6. Scientists as Public Experts: Expectations and Responsibilities Hans Peter Peters 7. Scientists in Popular Culture: the Making of Celebrities Declan Fahy and Bruce Lewenstein 8. Science and Technology In Film: Themes and Representations David A. Kirby 9. Environmentalists as Communicators of Science: Advocates and Critics Steven Yearley 10. Publics and Their Participation in Science and Technology: Changing Roles, Blurring Boundaries Edna F. Einsiedel 11. Public Understanding of Science: Survey Research Around the World Martin W. Bauer and Bankole A. Falade 12. Risk, Science and Public Communication: Third-Order Thinking About Scientific Culture Alan Irwin 13. Engaging in Science Policy Controversies: Insights From the US Climate Change Debate Matthew C. Nisbet 14. Communicating the Social Sciences: a Specific Challenge? Angela Cassidy 15. Health Campaign Research: Enduring Challenges and New Developments Robert A. Logan 16. Global Spread of Science Communication: Institutions and Practices Across Continents Brian Trench and Massimiano Bucchi, with Latifah Amin, Gultekin Cakmakci, Bankole A. Falade, Arko Olesk, Carmelo Polino 17. Assessing the Impact of Science Communication: Approaches to Evaluation Federico Neresini and Giuseppe Pellegrini.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Communicating science and technology is a high priority of many research and policy institutions, a concern of many other private and public bodies, and an established subject of training and education. Over the past few decades, the field has developed and expanded significantly, both in terms of professional practice and in terms of research and reflection. The Routledge Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology provides a state-of-the-art review of this fast-growing and increasingly important area, through an examination of the research on the main actors, issues, and arenas involved. In this brand-new revised edition, the book brings the reviews up-to-date and deepens the analysis. As well as substantial reworking of many chapters, it gives more attention to digital media and the global aspects of science communication, with the inclusion of four new chapters. Several new contributors are added to leading mass-communication scholars, sociologists, public-relations practitioners, science writers, and others featured herein. With key questions for further discussion highlighted in each chapter, the handbook is a student-friendly resource and its scope and expert contributors mean it is also ideal for both practitioners and professionals working in the field. Combining the perspectives of different disciplines and of different geographical and cultural contexts, this original text provides an interdisciplinary and global approach to the public communication of science and technology. It is a valuable resource for students, researchers, educators, and professionals in media and journalism, sociology, the history of science, and science and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Science Communication Research: Themes and Challenges Massimiano Bucchi and Brian Trench 2. Popular Science Books: From Public Education to Science Bestsellers Alice Bell and Jon Turney 3. Science Journalism: Prospects in the Digital Age Sharon Dunwoody 4. Science Museums and Centres: Evolution and Contemporary Trends Bernard Schiele 5. Public Relations in Science: Managing the Trust Portfolio Rick E. Borchelt and Kristian H. Nielsen 6. Scientists as Public Experts: Expectations and Responsibilities Hans Peter Peters 7. Scientists in Popular Culture: the Making of Celebrities Declan Fahy and Bruce Lewenstein 8. Science and Technology In Film: Themes and Representations David A. Kirby 9. Environmentalists as Communicators of Science: Advocates and Critics Steven Yearley 10. Publics and Their Participation in Science and Technology: Changing Roles, Blurring Boundaries Edna F. Einsiedel 11. Public Understanding of Science: Survey Research Around the World Martin W. Bauer and Bankole A. Falade 12. Risk, Science and Public Communication: Third-Order Thinking About Scientific Culture Alan Irwin 13. Engaging in Science Policy Controversies: Insights From the US Climate Change Debate Matthew C. Nisbet 14. Communicating the Social Sciences: a Specific Challenge? Angela Cassidy 15. Health Campaign Research: Enduring Challenges and New Developments Robert A. Logan 16. Global Spread of Science Communication: Institutions and Practices Across Continents Brian Trench and Massimiano Bucchi, with Latifah Amin, Gultekin Cakmakci, Bankole A. Falade, Arko Olesk, Carmelo Polino 17. Assessing the Impact of Science Communication: Approaches to Evaluation Federico Neresini and Giuseppe Pellegrini.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Communicating science and technology is a high priority of many research and policy institutions, a concern of many other private and public bodies, and an established subject of training and education. Over the past few decades, the field has developed and expanded significantly, both in terms of professional practice and in terms of research and reflection. The Routledge Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology provides a state-of-the-art review of this fast-growing and increasingly important area, through an examination of the research on the main actors, issues, and arenas involved. In this brand-new revised edition, the book brings the reviews up-to-date and deepens the analysis. As well as substantial reworking of many chapters, it gives more attention to digital media and the global aspects of science communication, with the inclusion of four new chapters. Several new contributors are added to leading mass-communication scholars, sociologists, public-relations practitioners, science writers, and others featured herein. With key questions for further discussion highlighted in each chapter, the handbook is a student-friendly resource and its scope and expert contributors mean it is also ideal for both practitioners and professionals working in the field. Combining the perspectives of different disciplines and of different geographical and cultural contexts, this original text provides an interdisciplinary and global approach to the public communication of science and technology. It is a valuable resource for students, researchers, educators, and professionals in media and journalism, sociology, the history of science, and science and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
ebrary Access limited to 3 simultaneous users.
Book
vii, 332 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Verbal-visual interaction in science
  • A framework for understanding verbal-visual interaction
  • Understanding scientific visuals and tables: a taxonomy
  • Visual evolution and the Heideggerian transformation
  • Verbal-visual interaction and scientific argument: the contexts of discovery and justification
  • Visual argument and narrative in the "historical" sciences: the example of geology
  • Verbal-visual interaction in the Victorian discovery of deep time
  • The public science lecture: powerpoint transforms a genre
  • Weaving the web of scientific knowledge: visuals on the Internet.
John Dalton's molecular structures. Scatter plots and geometric diagrams. Watson and Crick's double helix. The way in which scientists understand the world - and the key concepts that explain it - is undeniably bound up in not only words, but images. Moreover, from PowerPoint presentations to articles in academic journals, scientific communication routinely relies on the relationship between words and pictures. In Science from Sight to Insight, Alan G. Gross and Joseph E. Harmon present a short history of the scientific visual, and then formulate a theory about the interaction between the visual and textual. With great insight and admirable rigor, the authors argue that scientific meaning itself comes from the complex interplay between the verbal and the visual in the form of graphs, diagrams, maps, drawings, and photographs. The authors use a variety of tools to probe the nature of scientific images, from Heidegger's philosophy of science to Peirce's semiotics of visual communication. Their synthesis of these elements offers readers an examination of scientific visuals at a much deeper and more meaningful level than ever before.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Verbal-visual interaction in science
  • A framework for understanding verbal-visual interaction
  • Understanding scientific visuals and tables: a taxonomy
  • Visual evolution and the Heideggerian transformation
  • Verbal-visual interaction and scientific argument: the contexts of discovery and justification
  • Visual argument and narrative in the "historical" sciences: the example of geology
  • Verbal-visual interaction in the Victorian discovery of deep time
  • The public science lecture: powerpoint transforms a genre
  • Weaving the web of scientific knowledge: visuals on the Internet.
John Dalton's molecular structures. Scatter plots and geometric diagrams. Watson and Crick's double helix. The way in which scientists understand the world - and the key concepts that explain it - is undeniably bound up in not only words, but images. Moreover, from PowerPoint presentations to articles in academic journals, scientific communication routinely relies on the relationship between words and pictures. In Science from Sight to Insight, Alan G. Gross and Joseph E. Harmon present a short history of the scientific visual, and then formulate a theory about the interaction between the visual and textual. With great insight and admirable rigor, the authors argue that scientific meaning itself comes from the complex interplay between the verbal and the visual in the form of graphs, diagrams, maps, drawings, and photographs. The authors use a variety of tools to probe the nature of scientific images, from Heidegger's philosophy of science to Peirce's semiotics of visual communication. Their synthesis of these elements offers readers an examination of scientific visuals at a much deeper and more meaningful level than ever before.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .G772 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource
  • The sciences of communication
  • Science in a time of controversy
  • Creating collaborations for communication
  • References
  • Appendix A: Agenda
  • Appendix B: Speakers.
Successful scientists must be effective communicators within their professions. Without those skills, they could not write papers and funding proposals, give talks and field questions, or teach classes and mentor students. However, communicating with audiences outside their profession - people who may not share scientists' interests, technical background, cultural assumptions, and modes of expression - presents different challenges and requires additional skills. Communication about science in political or social settings differs from discourse within a scientific discipline. Not only are scientists just one of many stakeholders vying for access to the public agenda, but the political debates surrounding science and its applications may sometimes confront scientists with unfamiliar and uncomfortable discussions involving religious values, partisan interests, and even the trustworthiness of science. The Science of Science Communication II is the summary of a Sackler Colloquium convened in September 2013 At this event, leading social, behavioral, and decision scientists, other scientists, and communication practitioners shared current research that can improve the communication of science to lay audiences. In the Sackler Colloquia tradition, the meeting also allowed social and natural scientists to identify new opportunities to collaborate and advance their own research, while improving public engagement with science. Speakers provided evidence-based guidance on how to listen to others so as to identify their information needs, ways of thinking about the world, and the cultural stereotypes regarding scientists. They delved deeply into the incentive systems that shape what scientists study and how they report their work, the subtle changes in framing that can influence how messages are interpreted, the complex channels that determine how messages flow, and the potential politicization of scientific evidence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The sciences of communication
  • Science in a time of controversy
  • Creating collaborations for communication
  • References
  • Appendix A: Agenda
  • Appendix B: Speakers.
Successful scientists must be effective communicators within their professions. Without those skills, they could not write papers and funding proposals, give talks and field questions, or teach classes and mentor students. However, communicating with audiences outside their profession - people who may not share scientists' interests, technical background, cultural assumptions, and modes of expression - presents different challenges and requires additional skills. Communication about science in political or social settings differs from discourse within a scientific discipline. Not only are scientists just one of many stakeholders vying for access to the public agenda, but the political debates surrounding science and its applications may sometimes confront scientists with unfamiliar and uncomfortable discussions involving religious values, partisan interests, and even the trustworthiness of science. The Science of Science Communication II is the summary of a Sackler Colloquium convened in September 2013 At this event, leading social, behavioral, and decision scientists, other scientists, and communication practitioners shared current research that can improve the communication of science to lay audiences. In the Sackler Colloquia tradition, the meeting also allowed social and natural scientists to identify new opportunities to collaborate and advance their own research, while improving public engagement with science. Speakers provided evidence-based guidance on how to listen to others so as to identify their information needs, ways of thinking about the world, and the cultural stereotypes regarding scientists. They delved deeply into the incentive systems that shape what scientists study and how they report their work, the subtle changes in framing that can influence how messages are interpreted, the complex channels that determine how messages flow, and the potential politicization of scientific evidence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xxiv, 215 pages).
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • A Note from the Series Editor, xiii Acknowledgments, xv Foreword, xvii Preface, xxi 1 Introduction to the Approach 1 PART I Sentences 9 2 Qualifiers Used in Sentences 11 3 Subordinate Clauses Used as Qualifiers 21 4 Explanatory Phrases, Participle Phrases, and Major Prepositional Phrases 31 5 Infinitive Phrases, and the General Rule for Punctuating Qualifiers 45 6 Sentences with Two Qualifiers 55 7 Higher Orders of Punctuation 69 8 Strategies to Improve Sentences with Qualifiers 77 PART II Lists 89 9 Two-Item Lists 91 10 Multiple-Item Lists 103 11 Strategies for Writing Better Lists 111 PART III Word Choice and Placement 119 12 Adjectives and Adverbs 121 13 Precision in Word Usage 135 PART IV Beyond Sentences 149 14 Paragraphs 151 15 Arguments 163 16 Justification of Arguments 173 17 Organization and Presentation 181 References, 193 About the Author, 207 Index, 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title features a scientific approach to writing. Technical ideas may be solid or even groundbreaking, but if these ideas cannot be clearly communicated, reviewers of technical documents, e.g., proposals for research funding, articles submitted to scientific journals, and business plans to commercialize technology are likely to reject the argument for advancing these ideas. The problem is that many engineers and scientists, entirely comfortable with the logic and principles of mathematics and science, treat writing as if it possesses none of these attributes. The absence of a systematic framework for writing often results in sentences that are difficult to follow or arguments that leave reviewers scratching their heads. This book fixes that problem by presenting a scientific approach to writing that mirrors the sensibilities of scientists and engineers, an approach based on an easily-discernable set of principles. Rather than merely stating rules for English grammar and composition, this book explains the reasons behind these rules and shows that good reasons can guide every writing decision. This resource is also well suited for the growing number of scientists and engineers in the U.S. and elsewhere who speak English as a second language, as well as for anyone else who just wants to be understood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xii, 142 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Part 1: Essentials for Good Writing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Organization of a Research Paper: The IMRAD Format
  • 3. Tables and Figures
  • 4. The "Nuts and Bolts": Numbers, Units, Dates, Abbreviations, Nomenclature
  • Part 2: English: The International Language of Science
  • 5. Words
  • 6. Sentences
  • Part 3: Manuscript: Preparation, Submission, and Follow-up
  • 7. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 8. Dealing with the Journal
  • Part 4: Oral and Poster Presentations
  • 9. Oral Presentations
  • 10. Poster Presentations.
Perhaps there is no dearth of books, reference manuals, and internet sources on scientific writing. Given, however, that different fields have different conventions for writing style, we have found it difficult to recommend a specific book or source material as the go to guide to young scientists in agriculture and natural resources. Having been involved as authors, reviewers, and editors of various journals and publications during the past few decades, we have come to the conclusion that writing a scientific paper is a tedious task for not only us, but most writers. While that is true even for experienced writers, it is a sort of nightmare for the early career professionals such as students, trainees, scientists, and scholars in agriculture and natural resources, especially when their first language of communication is not English. Their trials, tribulations, and frustrations are compounded by the severe pressure they experience from the increasing importance attached to authoring scientific publications (in English). This book is targeted mainly to that group. The ten short chapters of the book are organized in four parts. The first, Essentials for good writing, contains four chapters that emphasize the importance of publishing research results, review briefly the various types of scientific publications and other important features of scientific writing. The second part that includes two chapters deals with the use and misuse of English as the international language of science. Manuscript preparation and submission is the scope of the third part that also has two chapters. Part 4 is about communication of research results through oral and poster presentations to the peer groups at conferences and meetings. Finally, a list of references and recommended reading is included.
  • Part 1: Essentials for Good Writing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Organization of a Research Paper: The IMRAD Format
  • 3. Tables and Figures
  • 4. The "Nuts and Bolts": Numbers, Units, Dates, Abbreviations, Nomenclature
  • Part 2: English: The International Language of Science
  • 5. Words
  • 6. Sentences
  • Part 3: Manuscript: Preparation, Submission, and Follow-up
  • 7. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 8. Dealing with the Journal
  • Part 4: Oral and Poster Presentations
  • 9. Oral Presentations
  • 10. Poster Presentations.
Perhaps there is no dearth of books, reference manuals, and internet sources on scientific writing. Given, however, that different fields have different conventions for writing style, we have found it difficult to recommend a specific book or source material as the go to guide to young scientists in agriculture and natural resources. Having been involved as authors, reviewers, and editors of various journals and publications during the past few decades, we have come to the conclusion that writing a scientific paper is a tedious task for not only us, but most writers. While that is true even for experienced writers, it is a sort of nightmare for the early career professionals such as students, trainees, scientists, and scholars in agriculture and natural resources, especially when their first language of communication is not English. Their trials, tribulations, and frustrations are compounded by the severe pressure they experience from the increasing importance attached to authoring scientific publications (in English). This book is targeted mainly to that group. The ten short chapters of the book are organized in four parts. The first, Essentials for good writing, contains four chapters that emphasize the importance of publishing research results, review briefly the various types of scientific publications and other important features of scientific writing. The second part that includes two chapters deals with the use and misuse of English as the international language of science. Manuscript preparation and submission is the scope of the third part that also has two chapters. Part 4 is about communication of research results through oral and poster presentations to the peer groups at conferences and meetings. Finally, a list of references and recommended reading is included.
Book
xxiv, 728 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • CHAPTER 1. PRELUDE -- 1.1 Importance of Writing in Science -- 1.2 About Readers -- 1.3 About Writers -- 1.4 About This Book -- 1.5 Design of This Book -- PART I. SCIENTIFIC WRITING PRINCIPLES: STYLE AND COMPOSITION -- CHAPTER 2. INDIVIDUAL WORDS -- 2.1 The Central Principle -- 2.2 Word Choice -- 2.3 Word Choice-Special Cases -- 2.4 Redundancies and Jargon -- 2.5 Abbreviations -- 2.6 Nomenclature and Terminology -- 2.7 Dictionaries -- CHAPTER 3. WORD LOCATION -- 3.1 Readers' Expectations -- 3.2 Competition for Emphasis -- 3.3 Placement of Words -- CHAPTER 4. TECHNICAL SENTENCES -- 4.1 Grammar and Technical Style -- 4.2 Person -- 4.3 Voice -- 4.4 Tense -- 4.5 Sentence Length -- 4.6 Verbs and Action -- 4.7 Noun Clusters -- 4.8 Pronouns -- 4.9 Lists and Comparisons -- 4.10 Faulty Comparisons -- 4.11 Common Errors -- CHAPTER 5. SPECIAL ESL GRAMMAR PROBLEMS -- 5.1 Prepositions -- 5.2 Articles -- 5.3 Verbs -- 5.4 Adjectives and Adverbs -- 5.5 Nouns and Pronouns -- 5.6 Grammar References -- CHAPTER 6. FROM SENTENCES TO PARAGRAPHS -- 6.1 Paragraph Structure -- 6.2 Paragraph Organization -- 6.3 Paragraph Coherence -- 6.4 Condensing -- PART II. PLANNING AND LAYING THE FOUNDATION -- CHAPTER 7. THE FIRST DRAFT -- 7.1 The Writing Process -- 7.2 Prewriting -- 7.3 Authorship -- 7.4 Drafting a Manuscript -- 7.5 Outlining and Composing a Manuscript -- 7.6 Writer's Block? -- 7.7 For ESL Authors -- 7.8 Outside Help -- CHAPTER 8. REFERENCES AND PLAGIARISM -- 8.1 About References -- 8.2 Selecting References -- 8.3 Managing References -- 8.4 Text Citations -- 8.5 Plagiarism -- 8.6 Paraphrasing -- 8.7 References Within a Scientific Paper -- 8.8 The Reference List -- 8.9 Common Reference Styles -- 8.10 Citing the Internet -- 8.11 Footnotes and Endnotes -- 8.12 Acknowledgments -- CHAPTER 9. FIGURES AND TABLES -- 9.1 General Guidelines -- 9.2 Importance of Formatting and Placement of Information -- 9.3 Figure or Table? -- 9.4 General Information on Figures -- 9.5 Types of Figures -- 9.6 Formatting Graphs -- 9.7 Examples of Graphs -- 9.8 Figure Legends -- 9.9 General Information on Tables -- 9.10 Formatting Tables -- * 9.11 Basics of Statistical Analysis -- * 9.12 Useful Resources for Statistical Analysis -- 9.13 Other Kinds of Supplementary Information: Formulas, Equations, Proofs, and Algorithms -- PART III. MANUSCRIPTS: RESEARCH PAPERS AND REVIEW ARTICLES -- A. RESEARCH PAPERS -- CHAPTER 10. THE INTRODUCTION -- 10.1 Overall -- 10.2 Content and Organization -- 10.3 Elements of the Introduction -- 10.4 Special Case: Introductions for Descriptive Papers -- 10.5 Important Writing Principles for the Introduction -- 10.6 Signals for the Reader -- 10.7 Common Problems of Introductions -- 10.8 Sample Introductions -- 10.9 Revising the Introduction -- CHAPTER 11. MATERIALS AND METHODS SECTION -- 11.1 Overall -- 11.2 Content -- 11.3 Organization -- 11.4 Important Writing Principles for Materials and Methods -- 11.5 Ethical Conduct -- 11.6 Common Problems of Materials and Methods Section -- 11.7 Sample Materials and Methods Sections -- 11.8 Revising the Materials and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 12. RESULTS -- 12.1 Overall -- 12.2 Content -- 12.3 Organization -- 12.4 Important Writing Principles for the Results -- 12.5 Signals for the Reader -- 12.6 Common Problems of the Results Section -- 12.7 Sample Results Sections -- 12.8 Revising the Results Section -- CHAPTER 13. DISCUSSION -- 13.1 Overall -- 13.2 Content -- 13.3 Organization -- 13.4 First Paragraph -- 13.5 Middle Paragraphs -- 13.6 Last Paragraph -- 13.7 Important Writing Principles for the Discussion -- 13.8 Signals for the Reader -- 13.9 An Alternative: Results and Discussion -- 13.10 Common Problems of the Discussion -- 13.11 Sample Discussions -- 13.12 Revising the Discussion -- CHAPTER 14. ABSTRACT -- 14.1 Overall -- 14.2 Content -- 14.3 Organization -- 14.4 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 14.5 Signals for the Reader -- 14.6 Common Problems of the Abstract -- 14.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 14.8 Revising the Abstract -- CHAPTER 15. TITLES, TITLE PAGES, AND KEY WORDS -- 15.1 Overall -- 15.2 Strong Titles -- 15.3 The Title Page -- 15.4 Running Title -- 15.5 Key Words -- 15.6 Revising the Title -- CHAPTER 16. REVISING AND REVIEWING A MANUSCRIPT -- 16.1 Revising the First Draft -- 16.2 Subsequent Drafts -- 16.3 Reviewing a Manuscript -- CHAPTER 17. FINAL VERSION, SUBMISSION, AND PEER REVIEW -- 17.1 General Advice on the Final Version -- 17.2 Submitting the Manuscript -- 17.3 Writing a Cover Letter -- 17.4 The Review Process -- 17.5 Letter from the Editor -- 17.6 Resubmission -- 17.7 Paper Accepted -- B. REVIEW ARTICLES -- CHAPTER 18. REVIEW ARTICLES -- 18.1 Overall -- 18.2 Content -- 18.3 Organization -- 18.4 Abstract of a Review Article -- 18.5 Introduction of a Review Article -- 18.6 Main Analysis Section of a Review Article -- 18.7 Conclusion of a Review Article -- 18.8 References -- 18.9 Signals for the Reader -- 18.10 Coherence -- 18.11 Common Problems of Review Articles -- 18.12 Revising the Review Article -- PART IV. GRANT PROPOSALS -- CHAPTER 19. PROPOSAL WRITING -- 19.1 General -- 19.2 Types of Proposals -- 19.3 Choosing a Sponsoring Agency -- 19.4 Federal Agencies -- 19.5 Private Foundations -- 19.6 Corporations and Other Funders -- 19.7 Preliminary Steps to Writing a Proposal -- 19.8 Online Resources -- 19.9 Starting to Write a Grant -- 19.10 Interacting With the Funder -- CHAPTER 20. LETTERS OF INQUIRY AND PREPROPOSALS -- 20.1 General -- 20.2 Content and Organization -- 20.3 Abstract/Overview -- 20.4 Introduction/Background -- 20.5 Statement of Need -- 20.6 Objective and Specific Aims -- 20.7 Strategy and Goals -- 20.8 Leadership and Organization -- 20.9 Budget -- 20.10 Impact and Significance -- 20.11 Cover Letter -- 20.12 Verbal Proposals -- 20.13 LOI Outlines -- 20.14 Revising an LOI/Preproposal -- CHAPTER 21. ABSTRACT AND SPECIFIC AIMS -- 21.1 Overall -- 21.2 Abstract -- 21.3 Specific Aims -- 21.4 Significance and Impact -- 21.5 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 21.6 Signals for the Reader -- 21.7 Common Problems -- 21.8 Reasons for Rejection -- 21.9 Revising the Abstract and Specific Aims -- CHAPTER 22. BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE -- 22.1 Overall -- 22.2 Emphasis, Organization, and Length -- 22.3 References -- 22.4 Elements of the Section -- * 22.5 Sample Significance Section for Federal Grants -- 22.6 Signals for the Reader -- 22.7 Coherence -- 22.8 Common Problems -- 22.9 Revising the Background and Significance Section -- * CHAPTER 23. INNOVATION -- 23.1 Content -- 23.2 Organization -- 23.3 Signals for the Reader -- 23.4 Common Problems -- 23.5 Revising the Innovation Section -- CHAPTER 24. PRELIMINARY RESULTS -- 24.1 General Content -- 24.2 Organization -- 24.3 Important Writing Principles -- 24.4 Signals for Preliminary Results -- 24.5 Common Problems of Preliminary Results -- 24.6 Revising the Preliminary Results -- CHAPTER 25. APPROACH/RESEARCH DESIGN -- 25.1 Overall -- 25.2 Content -- 25.3 Organization -- 25.4 Closing Paragraph -- 25.5 Signals for the Reader -- 25.6 Common Problems -- 25.7 Revising the Research Design and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 26. BUDGET AND OTHER SPECIAL PROPOSAL SECTIONS -- 26.1 Budget -- 26.2 Other Special Proposal Sections -- CHAPTER 27. REVISING AND SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL -- 27.1 General -- 27.2 Before Sending Out the Proposal -- 27.3 Revising the Proposal -- 27.4 Submitting the Proposal -- 27.5 Being Reviewed -- 27.6 Site Visits -- *27.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 27.8 If Your Proposal Is Rejected -- 27.9 Resubmission of a Proposal -- 27.10 If Your Proposal Is Funded -- PART V. POSTERS AND PRESENTATIONS -- CHAPTER 28. POSTERS AND CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS -- 28.1 Function and General Overview -- 28.2 Content -- 28.3 Organization -- 28.4 Sections of a Poster -- 28.5 Photos, Figures, and Tables -- 28.6 Resources for Preparing and Presenting a Poster -- *28.7 Revising a Poster -- 28.8 Presenting the Poster -- 28.9 Sample Posters -- 28.10 Checklist for a Poster -- 28.11 Conference Abstracts -- CHAPTER 29. ORAL PRESENTATIONS -- 29.1 Before the Talk -- 29.2 Content and Organization of a Scientific Talk -- 29.3 Visual Aids -- 29.4 Preparing for a Talk -- 29.5 Giving the Talk -- 29.6 Voice and Delivery -- 29.7 Vocabulary and Style -- 29.8 Body Actions and Motions -- 29.9 At the End of the Presentation -- 29.10 Questions and Answers -- 29.11 Other Speech Forms -- *29.12 Resources -- 29.13 Checklist for an Oral Presentation -- PART VI. JOB APPLICATIONS -- CHAPTER 30. WRITING FOR JOB APPLICATIONS -- 30.1 Overall -- 30.2 Curricula Vitae (CVs) and Resumes -- 30.3 Cover Letters -- 30.4 Accompanying Documents -- 30.5 Research Statements -- 30.6 Teaching Statements -- 30.7 Resources -- 30.8 Letters of Recommendation -- 30.9 Checklist for the Job Application -- APPENDIX A: COMMONLY CONFUSED AND MISUSED WORDS -- * APPENDIX B: TIPS ON MS WORD -- * APPENDIX C: TIPS ON MS EXCEL -- * APPENDIX D: TIPS ON MS POWERPOINT -- * APPENDIX E: MS OFFICE CHEAT SHEET.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations, Second Edition, serves as a comprehensive <"one-stop>" reference guide to scientific writing and communication. The second edition of Angelika Hofmann's successful text covers all the areas of scientific communication that a scientist needs to know and master in order to successfully promote his or her research and career. This unique "all-in-one" handbook begins with a discussion of the basic principles of scientific writing style and composition and then applies these principles to writing research papers, review articles, grant proposals, research statements, and resumes, as well as to preparing academic presentations and posters. Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations has been used successfully for a number of years in courses on scientific writing at various universities and institutes worldwide. Readers of the second edition will find numerous new examples and exercises, many with an expanded interdisciplinary focus. Every major section of the text has been updated, with new sections on writing mechanics, expanded coverage of grant writing (including the latest need-to-know information on writing successful federal grants), more advice on preparing posters, conference presentations, and job resumes, and a new set of <"Top 20 Tips>" quick-reference appendices for using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The new second edition of this handbook shows readers how to write clearly and how to recognize shortcomings in their own writing. The book targets a broad audience ranging from upper-level undergraduate students to graduate students, from postdoctoral fellows and faculty to fully fledged researchers. It does so not only by providing crucial knowledge about the structure and delivery of written material but also by explaining how readers go about reading. The level of presentation is geared for those looking to improve their writing without having to read many different books on the subject. Although the second edition of Papers, Proposals, and Presentations can be used as a textbook, it is structured such that it is equally self-explanatory, allowing readers to understand how to write publications or proposals and to present scientific talks without having to take a class.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • CHAPTER 1. PRELUDE -- 1.1 Importance of Writing in Science -- 1.2 About Readers -- 1.3 About Writers -- 1.4 About This Book -- 1.5 Design of This Book -- PART I. SCIENTIFIC WRITING PRINCIPLES: STYLE AND COMPOSITION -- CHAPTER 2. INDIVIDUAL WORDS -- 2.1 The Central Principle -- 2.2 Word Choice -- 2.3 Word Choice-Special Cases -- 2.4 Redundancies and Jargon -- 2.5 Abbreviations -- 2.6 Nomenclature and Terminology -- 2.7 Dictionaries -- CHAPTER 3. WORD LOCATION -- 3.1 Readers' Expectations -- 3.2 Competition for Emphasis -- 3.3 Placement of Words -- CHAPTER 4. TECHNICAL SENTENCES -- 4.1 Grammar and Technical Style -- 4.2 Person -- 4.3 Voice -- 4.4 Tense -- 4.5 Sentence Length -- 4.6 Verbs and Action -- 4.7 Noun Clusters -- 4.8 Pronouns -- 4.9 Lists and Comparisons -- 4.10 Faulty Comparisons -- 4.11 Common Errors -- CHAPTER 5. SPECIAL ESL GRAMMAR PROBLEMS -- 5.1 Prepositions -- 5.2 Articles -- 5.3 Verbs -- 5.4 Adjectives and Adverbs -- 5.5 Nouns and Pronouns -- 5.6 Grammar References -- CHAPTER 6. FROM SENTENCES TO PARAGRAPHS -- 6.1 Paragraph Structure -- 6.2 Paragraph Organization -- 6.3 Paragraph Coherence -- 6.4 Condensing -- PART II. PLANNING AND LAYING THE FOUNDATION -- CHAPTER 7. THE FIRST DRAFT -- 7.1 The Writing Process -- 7.2 Prewriting -- 7.3 Authorship -- 7.4 Drafting a Manuscript -- 7.5 Outlining and Composing a Manuscript -- 7.6 Writer's Block? -- 7.7 For ESL Authors -- 7.8 Outside Help -- CHAPTER 8. REFERENCES AND PLAGIARISM -- 8.1 About References -- 8.2 Selecting References -- 8.3 Managing References -- 8.4 Text Citations -- 8.5 Plagiarism -- 8.6 Paraphrasing -- 8.7 References Within a Scientific Paper -- 8.8 The Reference List -- 8.9 Common Reference Styles -- 8.10 Citing the Internet -- 8.11 Footnotes and Endnotes -- 8.12 Acknowledgments -- CHAPTER 9. FIGURES AND TABLES -- 9.1 General Guidelines -- 9.2 Importance of Formatting and Placement of Information -- 9.3 Figure or Table? -- 9.4 General Information on Figures -- 9.5 Types of Figures -- 9.6 Formatting Graphs -- 9.7 Examples of Graphs -- 9.8 Figure Legends -- 9.9 General Information on Tables -- 9.10 Formatting Tables -- * 9.11 Basics of Statistical Analysis -- * 9.12 Useful Resources for Statistical Analysis -- 9.13 Other Kinds of Supplementary Information: Formulas, Equations, Proofs, and Algorithms -- PART III. MANUSCRIPTS: RESEARCH PAPERS AND REVIEW ARTICLES -- A. RESEARCH PAPERS -- CHAPTER 10. THE INTRODUCTION -- 10.1 Overall -- 10.2 Content and Organization -- 10.3 Elements of the Introduction -- 10.4 Special Case: Introductions for Descriptive Papers -- 10.5 Important Writing Principles for the Introduction -- 10.6 Signals for the Reader -- 10.7 Common Problems of Introductions -- 10.8 Sample Introductions -- 10.9 Revising the Introduction -- CHAPTER 11. MATERIALS AND METHODS SECTION -- 11.1 Overall -- 11.2 Content -- 11.3 Organization -- 11.4 Important Writing Principles for Materials and Methods -- 11.5 Ethical Conduct -- 11.6 Common Problems of Materials and Methods Section -- 11.7 Sample Materials and Methods Sections -- 11.8 Revising the Materials and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 12. RESULTS -- 12.1 Overall -- 12.2 Content -- 12.3 Organization -- 12.4 Important Writing Principles for the Results -- 12.5 Signals for the Reader -- 12.6 Common Problems of the Results Section -- 12.7 Sample Results Sections -- 12.8 Revising the Results Section -- CHAPTER 13. DISCUSSION -- 13.1 Overall -- 13.2 Content -- 13.3 Organization -- 13.4 First Paragraph -- 13.5 Middle Paragraphs -- 13.6 Last Paragraph -- 13.7 Important Writing Principles for the Discussion -- 13.8 Signals for the Reader -- 13.9 An Alternative: Results and Discussion -- 13.10 Common Problems of the Discussion -- 13.11 Sample Discussions -- 13.12 Revising the Discussion -- CHAPTER 14. ABSTRACT -- 14.1 Overall -- 14.2 Content -- 14.3 Organization -- 14.4 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 14.5 Signals for the Reader -- 14.6 Common Problems of the Abstract -- 14.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 14.8 Revising the Abstract -- CHAPTER 15. TITLES, TITLE PAGES, AND KEY WORDS -- 15.1 Overall -- 15.2 Strong Titles -- 15.3 The Title Page -- 15.4 Running Title -- 15.5 Key Words -- 15.6 Revising the Title -- CHAPTER 16. REVISING AND REVIEWING A MANUSCRIPT -- 16.1 Revising the First Draft -- 16.2 Subsequent Drafts -- 16.3 Reviewing a Manuscript -- CHAPTER 17. FINAL VERSION, SUBMISSION, AND PEER REVIEW -- 17.1 General Advice on the Final Version -- 17.2 Submitting the Manuscript -- 17.3 Writing a Cover Letter -- 17.4 The Review Process -- 17.5 Letter from the Editor -- 17.6 Resubmission -- 17.7 Paper Accepted -- B. REVIEW ARTICLES -- CHAPTER 18. REVIEW ARTICLES -- 18.1 Overall -- 18.2 Content -- 18.3 Organization -- 18.4 Abstract of a Review Article -- 18.5 Introduction of a Review Article -- 18.6 Main Analysis Section of a Review Article -- 18.7 Conclusion of a Review Article -- 18.8 References -- 18.9 Signals for the Reader -- 18.10 Coherence -- 18.11 Common Problems of Review Articles -- 18.12 Revising the Review Article -- PART IV. GRANT PROPOSALS -- CHAPTER 19. PROPOSAL WRITING -- 19.1 General -- 19.2 Types of Proposals -- 19.3 Choosing a Sponsoring Agency -- 19.4 Federal Agencies -- 19.5 Private Foundations -- 19.6 Corporations and Other Funders -- 19.7 Preliminary Steps to Writing a Proposal -- 19.8 Online Resources -- 19.9 Starting to Write a Grant -- 19.10 Interacting With the Funder -- CHAPTER 20. LETTERS OF INQUIRY AND PREPROPOSALS -- 20.1 General -- 20.2 Content and Organization -- 20.3 Abstract/Overview -- 20.4 Introduction/Background -- 20.5 Statement of Need -- 20.6 Objective and Specific Aims -- 20.7 Strategy and Goals -- 20.8 Leadership and Organization -- 20.9 Budget -- 20.10 Impact and Significance -- 20.11 Cover Letter -- 20.12 Verbal Proposals -- 20.13 LOI Outlines -- 20.14 Revising an LOI/Preproposal -- CHAPTER 21. ABSTRACT AND SPECIFIC AIMS -- 21.1 Overall -- 21.2 Abstract -- 21.3 Specific Aims -- 21.4 Significance and Impact -- 21.5 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 21.6 Signals for the Reader -- 21.7 Common Problems -- 21.8 Reasons for Rejection -- 21.9 Revising the Abstract and Specific Aims -- CHAPTER 22. BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE -- 22.1 Overall -- 22.2 Emphasis, Organization, and Length -- 22.3 References -- 22.4 Elements of the Section -- * 22.5 Sample Significance Section for Federal Grants -- 22.6 Signals for the Reader -- 22.7 Coherence -- 22.8 Common Problems -- 22.9 Revising the Background and Significance Section -- * CHAPTER 23. INNOVATION -- 23.1 Content -- 23.2 Organization -- 23.3 Signals for the Reader -- 23.4 Common Problems -- 23.5 Revising the Innovation Section -- CHAPTER 24. PRELIMINARY RESULTS -- 24.1 General Content -- 24.2 Organization -- 24.3 Important Writing Principles -- 24.4 Signals for Preliminary Results -- 24.5 Common Problems of Preliminary Results -- 24.6 Revising the Preliminary Results -- CHAPTER 25. APPROACH/RESEARCH DESIGN -- 25.1 Overall -- 25.2 Content -- 25.3 Organization -- 25.4 Closing Paragraph -- 25.5 Signals for the Reader -- 25.6 Common Problems -- 25.7 Revising the Research Design and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 26. BUDGET AND OTHER SPECIAL PROPOSAL SECTIONS -- 26.1 Budget -- 26.2 Other Special Proposal Sections -- CHAPTER 27. REVISING AND SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL -- 27.1 General -- 27.2 Before Sending Out the Proposal -- 27.3 Revising the Proposal -- 27.4 Submitting the Proposal -- 27.5 Being Reviewed -- 27.6 Site Visits -- *27.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 27.8 If Your Proposal Is Rejected -- 27.9 Resubmission of a Proposal -- 27.10 If Your Proposal Is Funded -- PART V. POSTERS AND PRESENTATIONS -- CHAPTER 28. POSTERS AND CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS -- 28.1 Function and General Overview -- 28.2 Content -- 28.3 Organization -- 28.4 Sections of a Poster -- 28.5 Photos, Figures, and Tables -- 28.6 Resources for Preparing and Presenting a Poster -- *28.7 Revising a Poster -- 28.8 Presenting the Poster -- 28.9 Sample Posters -- 28.10 Checklist for a Poster -- 28.11 Conference Abstracts -- CHAPTER 29. ORAL PRESENTATIONS -- 29.1 Before the Talk -- 29.2 Content and Organization of a Scientific Talk -- 29.3 Visual Aids -- 29.4 Preparing for a Talk -- 29.5 Giving the Talk -- 29.6 Voice and Delivery -- 29.7 Vocabulary and Style -- 29.8 Body Actions and Motions -- 29.9 At the End of the Presentation -- 29.10 Questions and Answers -- 29.11 Other Speech Forms -- *29.12 Resources -- 29.13 Checklist for an Oral Presentation -- PART VI. JOB APPLICATIONS -- CHAPTER 30. WRITING FOR JOB APPLICATIONS -- 30.1 Overall -- 30.2 Curricula Vitae (CVs) and Resumes -- 30.3 Cover Letters -- 30.4 Accompanying Documents -- 30.5 Research Statements -- 30.6 Teaching Statements -- 30.7 Resources -- 30.8 Letters of Recommendation -- 30.9 Checklist for the Job Application -- APPENDIX A: COMMONLY CONFUSED AND MISUSED WORDS -- * APPENDIX B: TIPS ON MS WORD -- * APPENDIX C: TIPS ON MS EXCEL -- * APPENDIX D: TIPS ON MS POWERPOINT -- * APPENDIX E: MS OFFICE CHEAT SHEET.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations, Second Edition, serves as a comprehensive <"one-stop>" reference guide to scientific writing and communication. The second edition of Angelika Hofmann's successful text covers all the areas of scientific communication that a scientist needs to know and master in order to successfully promote his or her research and career. This unique "all-in-one" handbook begins with a discussion of the basic principles of scientific writing style and composition and then applies these principles to writing research papers, review articles, grant proposals, research statements, and resumes, as well as to preparing academic presentations and posters. Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations has been used successfully for a number of years in courses on scientific writing at various universities and institutes worldwide. Readers of the second edition will find numerous new examples and exercises, many with an expanded interdisciplinary focus. Every major section of the text has been updated, with new sections on writing mechanics, expanded coverage of grant writing (including the latest need-to-know information on writing successful federal grants), more advice on preparing posters, conference presentations, and job resumes, and a new set of <"Top 20 Tips>" quick-reference appendices for using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The new second edition of this handbook shows readers how to write clearly and how to recognize shortcomings in their own writing. The book targets a broad audience ranging from upper-level undergraduate students to graduate students, from postdoctoral fellows and faculty to fully fledged researchers. It does so not only by providing crucial knowledge about the structure and delivery of written material but also by explaining how readers go about reading. The level of presentation is geared for those looking to improve their writing without having to read many different books on the subject. Although the second edition of Papers, Proposals, and Presentations can be used as a textbook, it is structured such that it is equally self-explanatory, allowing readers to understand how to write publications or proposals and to present scientific talks without having to take a class.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Engineering Library (Terman), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Request at circulation desk
Q223 .H63 2014 Unknown On Reserve 3-day loan
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
Q223 .H63 2014 Unknown
ENGR-202W-01
Course
ENGR-202W-01 -- Technical Writing
Instructor(s)
Harrison, Kelly A.

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