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Book
vii, 332 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Verbal-visual interaction in science
  • A framework for understanding verbal-visual interaction
  • Understanding scientific visuals and tables: a taxonomy
  • Visual evolution and the Heideggerian transformation
  • Verbal-visual interaction and scientific argument: the contexts of discovery and justification
  • Visual argument and narrative in the "historical" sciences: the example of geology
  • Verbal-visual interaction in the Victorian discovery of deep time
  • The public science lecture: powerpoint transforms a genre
  • Weaving the web of scientific knowledge: visuals on the Internet.
  • Verbal-visual interaction in science
  • A framework for understanding verbal-visual interaction
  • Understanding scientific visuals and tables: a taxonomy
  • Visual evolution and the Heideggerian transformation
  • Verbal-visual interaction and scientific argument: the contexts of discovery and justification
  • Visual argument and narrative in the "historical" sciences: the example of geology
  • Verbal-visual interaction in the Victorian discovery of deep time
  • The public science lecture: powerpoint transforms a genre
  • Weaving the web of scientific knowledge: visuals on the Internet.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .G772 2014 Unknown
Book
xv, 457 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Inscription practices and materialities of communication / Timothy Lenoir
  • The language of strange facts in early modern science / Lorraine Daston
  • Shaping information: mathematics, computing, and typography / Robin Rider
  • The technology of mathematical persuasion / Brian Rotman
  • On the take-off of operators / Friedrich Kittler
  • Switchboards and sex: the Nut(t) case / Bernhard Siegert
  • Politics on the topographer's table: the Helvetic triangulation of cartography, politics, and representation / David Gugerli
  • Writing Darwin's islands: England and the insular condition / Gillian Beer
  • Illustration as strategy in Charles Darwin's The expression of the emotions in man and animals / Phillip Prodger
  • The Leviathan of Parsonstown: literary technology and scientific representation / Simon Schaffer
  • Technology, aesthetics, and the development of astrophotography at the Lick Observatory / Alex Pang
  • Standards and semiotics / Robert Brain
  • Experimental systems, graphematic spaces / Hans-Jörg Rheinberger
  • Emergent power: vitality and theology in artificial life / Richard M. Doyle
  • Science and writing: two national narratives of failure / Lisa Bloom
  • Perception versus experience: moving pictures and their resistance to interpretation / Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht.
  • Inscription practices and materialities of communication / Timothy Lenoir
  • The language of strange facts in early modern science / Lorraine Daston
  • Shaping information: mathematics, computing, and typography / Robin Rider
  • The technology of mathematical persuasion / Brian Rotman
  • On the take-off of operators / Friedrich Kittler
  • Switchboards and sex: the Nut(t) case / Bernhard Siegert
  • Politics on the topographer's table: the Helvetic triangulation of cartography, politics, and representation / David Gugerli
  • Writing Darwin's islands: England and the insular condition / Gillian Beer
  • Illustration as strategy in Charles Darwin's The expression of the emotions in man and animals / Phillip Prodger
  • The Leviathan of Parsonstown: literary technology and scientific representation / Simon Schaffer
  • Technology, aesthetics, and the development of astrophotography at the Lick Observatory / Alex Pang
  • Standards and semiotics / Robert Brain
  • Experimental systems, graphematic spaces / Hans-Jörg Rheinberger
  • Emergent power: vitality and theology in artificial life / Richard M. Doyle
  • Science and writing: two national narratives of failure / Lisa Bloom
  • Perception versus experience: moving pictures and their resistance to interpretation / Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .I497 1998 Unknown
Book
[3], 36 p. 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .H54 1972 Unknown
Book
xvi, 200 p. : col. ill.
  • ch. 1. Your audience: the person or people whose full engagement you need
  • ch. 2. Change and affect: gives communication its meaning and impact
  • ch. 3. Lure: an enticement, usually with a bait, offering the promise of a reward
  • ch. 4. World: the contextual space in which your narrative will unfold
  • ch. 5. Character: you! – the audience's guide, in search of a prize
  • ch. 6. Big hook: a puzzle which drives the narrative
  • ch. 7. Plot: the perilous journey to solve the puzzle and reach the prize
  • ch. 8. Structure: making the whole more than the sum of its parts
  • ch. 9. Make your pitch crackle: how to persuade, to win support.
This is a book for scientists and other experts who need to explain the significance and potential of their work to colleagues, committees, funding bodies or the general public. It details how to harness story-telling principles to make complex or technical content easier to communicate and fulfilling for audiences. Eight narrative ingredients, Audience, Change and Affect, Lure, World, Character, Big Hook, Plot and Structure, are illustrated with examples and exercises to demonstrate how to build a presentation, how to pitch for funds or resources, how to make a persuasive argument, or simply how to explain ideas so they crackle and fizz for the audience.
  • ch. 1. Your audience: the person or people whose full engagement you need
  • ch. 2. Change and affect: gives communication its meaning and impact
  • ch. 3. Lure: an enticement, usually with a bait, offering the promise of a reward
  • ch. 4. World: the contextual space in which your narrative will unfold
  • ch. 5. Character: you! – the audience's guide, in search of a prize
  • ch. 6. Big hook: a puzzle which drives the narrative
  • ch. 7. Plot: the perilous journey to solve the puzzle and reach the prize
  • ch. 8. Structure: making the whole more than the sum of its parts
  • ch. 9. Make your pitch crackle: how to persuade, to win support.
This is a book for scientists and other experts who need to explain the significance and potential of their work to colleagues, committees, funding bodies or the general public. It details how to harness story-telling principles to make complex or technical content easier to communicate and fulfilling for audiences. Eight narrative ingredients, Audience, Change and Affect, Lure, World, Character, Big Hook, Plot and Structure, are illustrated with examples and exercises to demonstrate how to build a presentation, how to pitch for funds or resources, how to make a persuasive argument, or simply how to explain ideas so they crackle and fizz for the audience.
Book
xxiii, 360 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
  • Contents note continued: 4.Communication, Learning and Writing
  • 4.1.Communication Theories
  • 4.2.Learning and Learning Theory
  • 4.3.Learning Theory Frameworks
  • 4.4.Constructivism and How it Applies to Science Communication Events
  • 4.5.Learning Styles
  • 4.6.Model of Family Centred Learning
  • 4.7.Successful Scientific Writing for the Public
  • 4.8.Concluding Remarks
  • Recommended Additional Reading for Writing for the Public
  • References
  • 5.Monitoring and Evaluating your Event or Activity
  • 5.1.Introduction
  • 5.2.Key Stages in Undertaking an Engagement Project
  • 5.3.Monitoring and Evaluating
  • 5.4.Undertaking Evaluation
  • 5.5.Interviews
  • 5.6.Focus Groups
  • 5.7.Observational Research
  • 5.8.Deciding Which Evaluation Tools to Use for Your Project
  • 5.9.Analysing the Results
  • 5.10.Reporting the Results
  • 5.11.Assessing Impact
  • 5.12.Ethical Issues Associated with Evaluation Projects
  • Other Useful Resources and References
  • Contents note continued: 6.Getting Started with Public Science Communication
  • 6.1.Introduction
  • 6.2.Understanding Your Audience
  • 6.3.Taking Your First Steps
  • 6.4.Planning Your Own Event or Activity
  • 6.5.How to Design Hooks for Your Event or Activity
  • 6.6.Designing a Science Communication Activity
  • 6.7.Consider Your Resources - Consumables, Equipment, Expertise and People (CEEP)
  • 6.8.How to Get Your Project Funded
  • 6.9.Top Tips for Successful Marketing
  • 6.10.Health and Safety
  • 6.11.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 7.Direct Public Communication
  • 7.1.Introduction
  • 7.2.Direct Communication Delivering Information
  • 7.3.Information through Conversation
  • 7.4.A Focus on Policymakers
  • 7.5.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 8.Indirect Public Communication
  • 8.1.Introduction
  • 8.2.A Focus on Science and Television
  • 8.3.A Focus on Radio and Science
  • 8.4.A Focus on Newspapers
  • 8.5.A Focus on Science and Writing
  • 8.6.A Focus on Science Advocacy
  • Contents note continued: 8.7.A Focus on Citizen Science
  • 8.8.Public Involvement in Health Research
  • 8.9.A Focus on Web 2.0 Tools and Services
  • 8.10.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 9.Getting Started with Science Communication in Schools
  • 9.1.Introduction
  • 9.2.School Science Education and Scientific Literacy
  • 9.3.A Skills Shortage in Science
  • 9.4.Attitudes and Knowledge of Young People about Science
  • 9.5.The Importance of Extra-curricular Science to Achievement
  • 9.6.Getting Started with Science Communication in Schools
  • 9.7.Think about your Resources, Consumables and Equipment
  • 9.8.School Years and Qualifications
  • 9.9.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Useful Websites
  • 10.Demonstrating Interactions between Scientists and Schools
  • 10.1.Introduction
  • 10.2.Enhancing the Curriculum within the School Environment
  • 10.3.Developing Cross-Curricular Activities for Primary and Secondary Schools
  • Contents note continued: 10.4.Enhancing the Curriculum with Activities with a School Audience but Outside the School Environment
  • 10.5.Influencing Curriculum Change
  • 10.6.Embedding Scientists into Schools
  • 10.7.Training Teachers
  • 10.8.Concluding Remarks
  • References.
  • Contents note continued: 4.Communication, Learning and Writing
  • 4.1.Communication Theories
  • 4.2.Learning and Learning Theory
  • 4.3.Learning Theory Frameworks
  • 4.4.Constructivism and How it Applies to Science Communication Events
  • 4.5.Learning Styles
  • 4.6.Model of Family Centred Learning
  • 4.7.Successful Scientific Writing for the Public
  • 4.8.Concluding Remarks
  • Recommended Additional Reading for Writing for the Public
  • References
  • 5.Monitoring and Evaluating your Event or Activity
  • 5.1.Introduction
  • 5.2.Key Stages in Undertaking an Engagement Project
  • 5.3.Monitoring and Evaluating
  • 5.4.Undertaking Evaluation
  • 5.5.Interviews
  • 5.6.Focus Groups
  • 5.7.Observational Research
  • 5.8.Deciding Which Evaluation Tools to Use for Your Project
  • 5.9.Analysing the Results
  • 5.10.Reporting the Results
  • 5.11.Assessing Impact
  • 5.12.Ethical Issues Associated with Evaluation Projects
  • Other Useful Resources and References
  • Contents note continued: 6.Getting Started with Public Science Communication
  • 6.1.Introduction
  • 6.2.Understanding Your Audience
  • 6.3.Taking Your First Steps
  • 6.4.Planning Your Own Event or Activity
  • 6.5.How to Design Hooks for Your Event or Activity
  • 6.6.Designing a Science Communication Activity
  • 6.7.Consider Your Resources - Consumables, Equipment, Expertise and People (CEEP)
  • 6.8.How to Get Your Project Funded
  • 6.9.Top Tips for Successful Marketing
  • 6.10.Health and Safety
  • 6.11.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 7.Direct Public Communication
  • 7.1.Introduction
  • 7.2.Direct Communication Delivering Information
  • 7.3.Information through Conversation
  • 7.4.A Focus on Policymakers
  • 7.5.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 8.Indirect Public Communication
  • 8.1.Introduction
  • 8.2.A Focus on Science and Television
  • 8.3.A Focus on Radio and Science
  • 8.4.A Focus on Newspapers
  • 8.5.A Focus on Science and Writing
  • 8.6.A Focus on Science Advocacy
  • Contents note continued: 8.7.A Focus on Citizen Science
  • 8.8.Public Involvement in Health Research
  • 8.9.A Focus on Web 2.0 Tools and Services
  • 8.10.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • 9.Getting Started with Science Communication in Schools
  • 9.1.Introduction
  • 9.2.School Science Education and Scientific Literacy
  • 9.3.A Skills Shortage in Science
  • 9.4.Attitudes and Knowledge of Young People about Science
  • 9.5.The Importance of Extra-curricular Science to Achievement
  • 9.6.Getting Started with Science Communication in Schools
  • 9.7.Think about your Resources, Consumables and Equipment
  • 9.8.School Years and Qualifications
  • 9.9.Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Useful Websites
  • 10.Demonstrating Interactions between Scientists and Schools
  • 10.1.Introduction
  • 10.2.Enhancing the Curriculum within the School Environment
  • 10.3.Developing Cross-Curricular Activities for Primary and Secondary Schools
  • Contents note continued: 10.4.Enhancing the Curriculum with Activities with a School Audience but Outside the School Environment
  • 10.5.Influencing Curriculum Change
  • 10.6.Embedding Scientists into Schools
  • 10.7.Training Teachers
  • 10.8.Concluding Remarks
  • References.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
Q223 .B69 2013 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
Q223 .B69 2013 Unknown
Book
xviii, 184 p. : ill ; 25 cm.
  • Science communication in the 21st century
  • The seven challenges of communicating science
  • Preparing your talk
  • Illustrating your talk
  • The performance : delivering your talk
  • Medicine and science in the media
  • Media interview techniques
  • Every interaction counts.
  • Science communication in the 21st century
  • The seven challenges of communicating science
  • Preparing your talk
  • Illustrating your talk
  • The performance : delivering your talk
  • Medicine and science in the media
  • Media interview techniques
  • Every interaction counts.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
Q223 .C536 2012 Unknown
Book
xxix, 462 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: Authors' biographies; Foreword Sir Walter Bodmer; Introduction: public engagement in an evolving science policy landscape Richard A. L. Jones; Part I. What it Helps to Know Beforehand: 1. Deficits and dialogues: science communication and the public understanding of science in the UK Simon J. Lock; 2. Explaining the world: communicating science through the ages James Hannam; 3. Science, truth, and ethics Richard Jennings; 4. The public's view of science George Gaskell, Sally Stares and Nicole Kronberger; 5. The common language of research Tracey Brown; 6. Not 100% sure? The 'public' understanding of risk John Adams; 7. The ethos of science vs. ethics of science communication Alfred Nordmann; Part II. Policy Makers, the Media and Public Interest Organisations: 8. Research and public communication in EU policy and practice Michel Claessens; 9. Tackling the Climate Communication Challenge Andrew C. Revkin; 10. Dealings with the media Stephen White; 11. Dealings with the U.S. media Chris Mooney; 12. Relations with public interest organisations: consumers Sue Davies MBE; 13. Relations with public interest organisations: patients and families Alastair Kent; 14. Relations with environmental organisations: a very personal story Piet Schenkelaars; Part III. What You Can Do and How To Do It: 15. Building relations with the various groups David J. Bennett; 16. Finding the right words: how to shine in radio and television interviews Peter Evans; 17. Nanotechnology and the media
  • front page or no story? Richard Hayhurst; 18. The power of the podcast: the Naked Scientists' story Chris Smith; 19. The social web in science communication Hayley Birch; 20. Dealing with dilemmas and societal expectations: a company's response Lise Kingo and Susanne Stormer; 21. Science festivals Nicola Buckley and Sue Hordijenko; 22. Things to see and do: how scientific images work Rikke Schmidt Kj'rgaard; 23. The triple helix: the undergraduate student-run face of science communication James Shepherd; 24. Public understanding of research: the Open Research Laboratory at the Deutsches Museum Paul Hix and Wolfgang M. Heckl; 25. 'Imagine': a communication project putting life sciences in the spotlight Patricia Osseweijer and Tanja Klop; Part IV. And Finally, Evaluating and Embedding Science Communication: 26. Evaluating success: how to find out what worked (and what didn't) Laura Grant; 27. Effectively embedding corporate science communication in academia: a second paradigm shift? Maarten C. A. van der Sanden and Patricia Osseweijer; Index.
"In the 25 years since the 'Bodmer Report' kick-started the public understanding of science movement, there has been something of a revolution in science communication. However, despite the ever-growing demands of the public, policy-makers and the media, many scientists still find it difficult to successfully explain and publicise their activities or to understand and respond to people's hopes and concerns about their work. Bringing together experienced and successful science communicators from across the academic, commercial and media worlds, this practical guide fills this gap to provide a one-stop resource covering science communication in its many different forms. The chapters provide vital background knowledge and inspiring ideas for how to deal with different situations and interest groups. Entertaining personal accounts of projects ranging from podcasts, to science festivals, to student-run societies give working examples of how scientists can engage with their audiences and demonstrate the key ingredients in successful science communication"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: Authors' biographies; Foreword Sir Walter Bodmer; Introduction: public engagement in an evolving science policy landscape Richard A. L. Jones; Part I. What it Helps to Know Beforehand: 1. Deficits and dialogues: science communication and the public understanding of science in the UK Simon J. Lock; 2. Explaining the world: communicating science through the ages James Hannam; 3. Science, truth, and ethics Richard Jennings; 4. The public's view of science George Gaskell, Sally Stares and Nicole Kronberger; 5. The common language of research Tracey Brown; 6. Not 100% sure? The 'public' understanding of risk John Adams; 7. The ethos of science vs. ethics of science communication Alfred Nordmann; Part II. Policy Makers, the Media and Public Interest Organisations: 8. Research and public communication in EU policy and practice Michel Claessens; 9. Tackling the Climate Communication Challenge Andrew C. Revkin; 10. Dealings with the media Stephen White; 11. Dealings with the U.S. media Chris Mooney; 12. Relations with public interest organisations: consumers Sue Davies MBE; 13. Relations with public interest organisations: patients and families Alastair Kent; 14. Relations with environmental organisations: a very personal story Piet Schenkelaars; Part III. What You Can Do and How To Do It: 15. Building relations with the various groups David J. Bennett; 16. Finding the right words: how to shine in radio and television interviews Peter Evans; 17. Nanotechnology and the media
  • front page or no story? Richard Hayhurst; 18. The power of the podcast: the Naked Scientists' story Chris Smith; 19. The social web in science communication Hayley Birch; 20. Dealing with dilemmas and societal expectations: a company's response Lise Kingo and Susanne Stormer; 21. Science festivals Nicola Buckley and Sue Hordijenko; 22. Things to see and do: how scientific images work Rikke Schmidt Kj'rgaard; 23. The triple helix: the undergraduate student-run face of science communication James Shepherd; 24. Public understanding of research: the Open Research Laboratory at the Deutsches Museum Paul Hix and Wolfgang M. Heckl; 25. 'Imagine': a communication project putting life sciences in the spotlight Patricia Osseweijer and Tanja Klop; Part IV. And Finally, Evaluating and Embedding Science Communication: 26. Evaluating success: how to find out what worked (and what didn't) Laura Grant; 27. Effectively embedding corporate science communication in academia: a second paradigm shift? Maarten C. A. van der Sanden and Patricia Osseweijer; Index.
"In the 25 years since the 'Bodmer Report' kick-started the public understanding of science movement, there has been something of a revolution in science communication. However, despite the ever-growing demands of the public, policy-makers and the media, many scientists still find it difficult to successfully explain and publicise their activities or to understand and respond to people's hopes and concerns about their work. Bringing together experienced and successful science communicators from across the academic, commercial and media worlds, this practical guide fills this gap to provide a one-stop resource covering science communication in its many different forms. The chapters provide vital background knowledge and inspiring ideas for how to deal with different situations and interest groups. Entertaining personal accounts of projects ranging from podcasts, to science festivals, to student-run societies give working examples of how scientists can engage with their audiences and demonstrate the key ingredients in successful science communication"-- Provided by publisher.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
Q223 .S884 2011 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
Q223 .S884 2011 Unknown
Book
xiv, 265 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Science communication has become increasingly popular in journalism and mass communication as the media offer more scientific and technological information to the public. This volume explores the evolution of science communication, addressing key issues and offering substance for future study.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Science communication has become increasingly popular in journalism and mass communication as the media offer more scientific and technological information to the public. This volume explores the evolution of science communication, addressing key issues and offering substance for future study.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Engineering Library (Terman)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Stacks
Q223 .C66 2010 Unknown
Book
xiv, 357 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • FOREWORD -- INTRODUCTION: EXPLAINING YOUR RESEARCH IS A PROFESSIONAL NECESSITY -- SECTION I: LEARNING A NEW COMMUNICATIONS PARADIGM -- 1. Understand Your Audiences -- 2. Plan Your Research Communication Strategy -- SECTION II: EFFECTIVELY REACHING YOUR PEERS -- 3. Give Compelling Talks -- 4. Develop Informative Visuals -- 5. Create Effective Poster Presentations -- 6. Write Clear Research Explanations -- 7. Build a Quality Web Site -- SECTION III: ENGAGING LAY AUDIENCES -- 8. Forge Your Research Communications Strategy -- 9. The Essential News Release -- 10. Craft Releases That Tell Your Research Story -- 11. Target Releases to Key Audiences -- 12. Produce Effective Research Photography -- 13. Produce Informative Research Videos -- 14. Organize Dynamic Multimedia Presentations -- 15. Create E-Newsletters, Wikis, Blogs, Podcasts, Social Networks, and Webinars -- 16. Write Popular Articles, Op-Eds, and Essays -- 17. Author Popular Books -- 18. Become a Public Educator -- 19. Persuade Administrators, Donors, and Legislators -- SECTION IV: EXPLAINING YOUR RESEARCH THROUGH THE MEDIA -- 20. Parse Publicity's Pros and Cons -- 21. Understand Journalists -- 22. Meet Journalists' Needs -- 23. Prepare for Media Interviews -- 24. Make the Interview Work For You -- 25. Protect Yourself from Communication Traps -- 26. Manage Media Communications at Scientific Meetings -- 27. Should You Be a Public Scientist?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Explaining Research is the first comprehensive communications guidebook for scientists, engineers, and physicians. Drawing on knowledge gleaned from a forty-year career in research communications, Dennis Meredith maps out how scientists can utilize sophisticated tools and techniques to disseminate their discoveries to important audiences. He explains how to use websites, blogs, videos, webinars, old-fashioned lectures, news releases, and lay-level articles to reach key audiences, emphasizing along the way that a strong understanding of the audience in question will allow a more effective communication tailored to a unique background and set of needs. In addition to drawing on the experience of the author, the book also includes excerpts from interviews with 45 of the country's leading science communications experts, including academics, authors, journalists, and public information officers. As the "information age" places new demands on scientists, Explaining Research will be a valuable resource not only for current professional scientists, but also for students who are the voice of the science community's next generation. This authoritative guide shows how to: BL Develop a "strategy of synergy" that makes research communication efficient and effective BL Give compelling talks BL Build a professional Web site BL Create quality posters, photos, animations, videos, e-newsletters, blogs, podcasts, and Webinars BL Write popular articles and books BL Persuade donors, administrators and other key funding decision-makers BL Produce news releases that attract media coverage BL Give clear media interviews BL Serve as a public educator in schools and science centers Visit www.explainingresearch.com to learn more about the book and additional resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • FOREWORD -- INTRODUCTION: EXPLAINING YOUR RESEARCH IS A PROFESSIONAL NECESSITY -- SECTION I: LEARNING A NEW COMMUNICATIONS PARADIGM -- 1. Understand Your Audiences -- 2. Plan Your Research Communication Strategy -- SECTION II: EFFECTIVELY REACHING YOUR PEERS -- 3. Give Compelling Talks -- 4. Develop Informative Visuals -- 5. Create Effective Poster Presentations -- 6. Write Clear Research Explanations -- 7. Build a Quality Web Site -- SECTION III: ENGAGING LAY AUDIENCES -- 8. Forge Your Research Communications Strategy -- 9. The Essential News Release -- 10. Craft Releases That Tell Your Research Story -- 11. Target Releases to Key Audiences -- 12. Produce Effective Research Photography -- 13. Produce Informative Research Videos -- 14. Organize Dynamic Multimedia Presentations -- 15. Create E-Newsletters, Wikis, Blogs, Podcasts, Social Networks, and Webinars -- 16. Write Popular Articles, Op-Eds, and Essays -- 17. Author Popular Books -- 18. Become a Public Educator -- 19. Persuade Administrators, Donors, and Legislators -- SECTION IV: EXPLAINING YOUR RESEARCH THROUGH THE MEDIA -- 20. Parse Publicity's Pros and Cons -- 21. Understand Journalists -- 22. Meet Journalists' Needs -- 23. Prepare for Media Interviews -- 24. Make the Interview Work For You -- 25. Protect Yourself from Communication Traps -- 26. Manage Media Communications at Scientific Meetings -- 27. Should You Be a Public Scientist?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Explaining Research is the first comprehensive communications guidebook for scientists, engineers, and physicians. Drawing on knowledge gleaned from a forty-year career in research communications, Dennis Meredith maps out how scientists can utilize sophisticated tools and techniques to disseminate their discoveries to important audiences. He explains how to use websites, blogs, videos, webinars, old-fashioned lectures, news releases, and lay-level articles to reach key audiences, emphasizing along the way that a strong understanding of the audience in question will allow a more effective communication tailored to a unique background and set of needs. In addition to drawing on the experience of the author, the book also includes excerpts from interviews with 45 of the country's leading science communications experts, including academics, authors, journalists, and public information officers. As the "information age" places new demands on scientists, Explaining Research will be a valuable resource not only for current professional scientists, but also for students who are the voice of the science community's next generation. This authoritative guide shows how to: BL Develop a "strategy of synergy" that makes research communication efficient and effective BL Give compelling talks BL Build a professional Web site BL Create quality posters, photos, animations, videos, e-newsletters, blogs, podcasts, and Webinars BL Write popular articles and books BL Persuade donors, administrators and other key funding decision-makers BL Produce news releases that attract media coverage BL Give clear media interviews BL Serve as a public educator in schools and science centers Visit www.explainingresearch.com to learn more about the book and additional resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
Q223 .M399 2010 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
Q223 .M399 2010 Unknown
Book
xvi, 100 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Introduction / Carolyn Johnsen-- 1. "The Difficulty of Nubbing Together a Regurgitative Purwell and a Superaminative Wennel Sprocket" / Leslie Fink-- 2. Who Is Science Writing For? / Margaret Wertheim-- 3. Taking Your Science to the Capital / Gene Whitney-- 4. Building a Better Science Communicator / Stacey Pasco-- 5. Reflections of an Engineer/Science Writer / Abby Vogel-- 6. Translating Science: From Academia to Mass Media to the Public / Kristine Kelly-- 7. Building New Media's Science Information on the Pillars of Journalism / Warren Leary-- 8. Preparing Scientists to Deal with Reporters / Boyce Rensberger-- 9. Picture Power / David Ehrenstein-- 10. Communicating Real Science through Hollywood Science / Sidney Perkowitz and Eddy Von Mueller-- Afterword: The Challenge and the Need to Talk and Write about Science / John Janovy Jr.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The American public, government, and the news media continually grapple with myriad policy issues related to science and technology. Those issues include global warming, energy, stem-cell research, health care, childhood autism, food safety, and genetics, to name but a few. When the public is informed on such topics, chances improve for reasoned policy decisions. Journalists have typically bridged the gap between scientists and the public, but the times now call for more engagement from the experts. The authors in this collection write convincingly about why scientists and engineers should shake off their ivory-tower reticence and take science to the people. "Taking Science to the People" calls on scientists and engineers to polish their writing and speaking skills in order to communicate more clearly about their work to the public, policy makers, and reporters who cover science. The authors represent a range of experience and authority, including distinguished scientists who write well about science, federal officials who communicate to Congress about science, and science journalists who weigh in with their own expertise. In this long-overdue volume, scientists, engineers, and journalists will find both a convincing rationale for communicating well about science and many practical methods for doing so.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgments Introduction / Carolyn Johnsen-- 1. "The Difficulty of Nubbing Together a Regurgitative Purwell and a Superaminative Wennel Sprocket" / Leslie Fink-- 2. Who Is Science Writing For? / Margaret Wertheim-- 3. Taking Your Science to the Capital / Gene Whitney-- 4. Building a Better Science Communicator / Stacey Pasco-- 5. Reflections of an Engineer/Science Writer / Abby Vogel-- 6. Translating Science: From Academia to Mass Media to the Public / Kristine Kelly-- 7. Building New Media's Science Information on the Pillars of Journalism / Warren Leary-- 8. Preparing Scientists to Deal with Reporters / Boyce Rensberger-- 9. Picture Power / David Ehrenstein-- 10. Communicating Real Science through Hollywood Science / Sidney Perkowitz and Eddy Von Mueller-- Afterword: The Challenge and the Need to Talk and Write about Science / John Janovy Jr.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The American public, government, and the news media continually grapple with myriad policy issues related to science and technology. Those issues include global warming, energy, stem-cell research, health care, childhood autism, food safety, and genetics, to name but a few. When the public is informed on such topics, chances improve for reasoned policy decisions. Journalists have typically bridged the gap between scientists and the public, but the times now call for more engagement from the experts. The authors in this collection write convincingly about why scientists and engineers should shake off their ivory-tower reticence and take science to the people. "Taking Science to the People" calls on scientists and engineers to polish their writing and speaking skills in order to communicate more clearly about their work to the public, policy makers, and reporters who cover science. The authors represent a range of experience and authority, including distinguished scientists who write well about science, federal officials who communicate to Congress about science, and science journalists who weigh in with their own expertise. In this long-overdue volume, scientists, engineers, and journalists will find both a convincing rationale for communicating well about science and many practical methods for doing so.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
Q223 .T35 2010 Unknown
Book
vii, 179 p. ; 23 cm.
  • List of Tables Acknowledgements Introduction Reporting Science Risk Society and the Media News Coverage of Nanotechnologies Nanotechnologies, Public Knowledge and the Media Scientists' and Policymakers' Representations of Nanotechnologies Communication about Nanotechnologies in the Future Notes References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Drawing together insights from media studies, sociology and science and technology studies, this book offers a novel analysis of the early framing of nanotechnology and makes a fascinating and timely contribution to debates about the public communication of science. 'Nanotechnology, Risk and Communication' is one of the first major studies of media coverage, policy debates and public perceptions about nanotechnology, one of the fastest growing areas of scientific innovation in the 21st Century. Drawing on data from two of the first studies of nanotechnology communication in the UK, it contributes important new empirical and conceptual analyses of the relationship between scientists and the media in communicating controversial new technologies, and charts new ground in a field of growing scientific and media interest.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Tables Acknowledgements Introduction Reporting Science Risk Society and the Media News Coverage of Nanotechnologies Nanotechnologies, Public Knowledge and the Media Scientists' and Policymakers' Representations of Nanotechnologies Communication about Nanotechnologies in the Future Notes References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Drawing together insights from media studies, sociology and science and technology studies, this book offers a novel analysis of the early framing of nanotechnology and makes a fascinating and timely contribution to debates about the public communication of science. 'Nanotechnology, Risk and Communication' is one of the first major studies of media coverage, policy debates and public perceptions about nanotechnology, one of the fastest growing areas of scientific innovation in the 21st Century. Drawing on data from two of the first studies of nanotechnology communication in the UK, it contributes important new empirical and conceptual analyses of the relationship between scientists and the media in communicating controversial new technologies, and charts new ground in a field of growing scientific and media interest.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
T174.7 .N375245 2009 Unknown
Book
vi, 203 p. ; 22 cm.
The relationship between science and its publics has concerned commentators since science itself began. Yet, in recent years, questions of how - and how should - science and society interact have come to particular prominence. A field of practice, initially dubbed 'public understanding of science' and later rebranded as 'public engagement with science and technology', has blossomed. But, although academic studies have informed the development of this practical field, to date there has been little opportunity to take stock of the full breadth and variety of academic analyses of science communication.In an attempt to reveal the richness of the nascent field of science communication studies, this volume presents critical interdisciplinary analyses of some of the many ways in which science intersects with its publics. From children's science books to computer advertising, news media to lab talk, public engagement to science fiction - the sites, modes and meanings of public science are explored. Contributions draw on historical, cultural, science and media studies. All, however, follow science through popular culture, taking critical science studies out of the lab and into society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The relationship between science and its publics has concerned commentators since science itself began. Yet, in recent years, questions of how - and how should - science and society interact have come to particular prominence. A field of practice, initially dubbed 'public understanding of science' and later rebranded as 'public engagement with science and technology', has blossomed. But, although academic studies have informed the development of this practical field, to date there has been little opportunity to take stock of the full breadth and variety of academic analyses of science communication.In an attempt to reveal the richness of the nascent field of science communication studies, this volume presents critical interdisciplinary analyses of some of the many ways in which science intersects with its publics. From children's science books to computer advertising, news media to lab talk, public engagement to science fiction - the sites, modes and meanings of public science are explored. Contributions draw on historical, cultural, science and media studies. All, however, follow science through popular culture, taking critical science studies out of the lab and into society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .S2355 2008 Unknown
Book
xv, 270 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface.- The Ideal Communication Office.- The Communication Flow.- The Product Chain.- Target Groups.- Product Types.- Written Communication.- Press Releases.-Production of Brochures.- Visual Communication.- Technical Set-up.- Distribution.- Evaluation and Archiving.- Video Production.- Crisis Communication.- Guidelines for Scientists.- The Press Conference.- Summary and Conclusions.- References, Web Links.- Glossary and Index.- Appendices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Many people know something about communication "it is after all an innate human ability" but a full comprehension of how to do science communication effectively is not acquired easily. This Guide touches upon all aspects of science communication, revealing a tightly interwoven fabric of issues: product types, target groups, written communication, visual communication, validation processes, practices of efficient workflow, distribution, promotion, advertising and much more. New science communicators will find this Guide both helpful and inspirational.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface.- The Ideal Communication Office.- The Communication Flow.- The Product Chain.- Target Groups.- Product Types.- Written Communication.- Press Releases.-Production of Brochures.- Visual Communication.- Technical Set-up.- Distribution.- Evaluation and Archiving.- Video Production.- Crisis Communication.- Guidelines for Scientists.- The Press Conference.- Summary and Conclusions.- References, Web Links.- Glossary and Index.- Appendices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Many people know something about communication "it is after all an innate human ability" but a full comprehension of how to do science communication effectively is not acquired easily. This Guide touches upon all aspects of science communication, revealing a tightly interwoven fabric of issues: product types, target groups, written communication, visual communication, validation processes, practices of efficient workflow, distribution, promotion, advertising and much more. New science communicators will find this Guide both helpful and inspirational.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xix, 299 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • The Role of Visual Representation in the Production of Scientific Reality-- A Theoretical Framework for Assessing Visual Representational Practices in Knowledge Building and Science Communications-- The Production of Scientific Images: Vision and Re-Vision in the History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science-- Representing or Mediating: a History and Philosophy of X-ray Images in Medicine-- The Accursed Part of Scientific Iconography-- Images of Science in the Classroom: Natural History Wall Charts between the Two Centuries-- Representing Moving Cultures: Aesthetics, Multivocality and Reflexivity in Anthropological and Sociological Filmmaking-- Arguing with Images: Pauling's Theory of Antibody Formation-- Discipline and Material Form of Images: An Analysis of Scientific Visibility-- Edward Tufte and the Promise of a Visual Social Science-- Making Science Visible: Visual Literacy in Science Communication.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Issues of representation affect every aspect of scientific activity, from the encoding, display, analysis, and presentation of data to the communication of scientific concepts and information to students and the general public. The essays in this collection explore the issues involved in the creation and deployment of visual representations in both the natural and the social sciences. "Visual Cultures of Science" offers a mix of theoretical analyses and revealing case studies. The latter address such topics as the technologies of visualization (from X-ray machines to films made by anthropologists), the persuasive power of the graphic presentation of data (including a critique of the work of Edward Tufte), and the distillation of data into pedagogical representations such as scientific wall charts for classroom use. With its useful mix of theory and case study, the book addresses both abstract and practical issues of representation, as well as demonstrating the importance of recognizing historicized perspectives in addressing issues of representation. These essays, by many of the field's leading minds today, offer solid research and new information pertaining to the methods, purposes, and implications of scientific visual culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The Role of Visual Representation in the Production of Scientific Reality-- A Theoretical Framework for Assessing Visual Representational Practices in Knowledge Building and Science Communications-- The Production of Scientific Images: Vision and Re-Vision in the History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science-- Representing or Mediating: a History and Philosophy of X-ray Images in Medicine-- The Accursed Part of Scientific Iconography-- Images of Science in the Classroom: Natural History Wall Charts between the Two Centuries-- Representing Moving Cultures: Aesthetics, Multivocality and Reflexivity in Anthropological and Sociological Filmmaking-- Arguing with Images: Pauling's Theory of Antibody Formation-- Discipline and Material Form of Images: An Analysis of Scientific Visibility-- Edward Tufte and the Promise of a Visual Social Science-- Making Science Visible: Visual Literacy in Science Communication.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Issues of representation affect every aspect of scientific activity, from the encoding, display, analysis, and presentation of data to the communication of scientific concepts and information to students and the general public. The essays in this collection explore the issues involved in the creation and deployment of visual representations in both the natural and the social sciences. "Visual Cultures of Science" offers a mix of theoretical analyses and revealing case studies. The latter address such topics as the technologies of visualization (from X-ray machines to films made by anthropologists), the persuasive power of the graphic presentation of data (including a critique of the work of Edward Tufte), and the distillation of data into pedagogical representations such as scientific wall charts for classroom use. With its useful mix of theory and case study, the book addresses both abstract and practical issues of representation, as well as demonstrating the importance of recognizing historicized perspectives in addressing issues of representation. These essays, by many of the field's leading minds today, offer solid research and new information pertaining to the methods, purposes, and implications of scientific visual culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .V574 2006 Unknown
Book
xvi, 219 p. ; 24 cm.
A radical new theory of the language of science by eminent linguist Roy Harris. In The Semantics of Science Roy Harris challenges a number of long-accepted assumptions about science and scientific discourse. According to Harris, science - like art, religion and history - is one of the supercategories adopted by modern societies for explaining and justifying certain types of human activity. Harris argues that these supercategories are themselves verbal constructs, and thus language-dependent. Each supercategory has its own semantics. The function of the supercategory is to integrate what would otherwise be unconnected forms of inquiry, and the result of such integrations is to draw a certain map of our intellectual world. Among the questions tackled are: Is mathematics a language? Does the language of science go beyond the bounds of common sense? And, if so, on what basis? In a wide-ranging historical survey, Harris rejects the view that the Greeks and medieval thinkers had any concept of scientific inquiry that corresponds to our own. He pays close attention to the early work of the Royal Society and to the twentieth-century semantic crisis caused by attempting to integrate Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics. This lucidly written book will be of interest to all those engaged in linguistics, semiotics, philosophy of science and cultural studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
A radical new theory of the language of science by eminent linguist Roy Harris. In The Semantics of Science Roy Harris challenges a number of long-accepted assumptions about science and scientific discourse. According to Harris, science - like art, religion and history - is one of the supercategories adopted by modern societies for explaining and justifying certain types of human activity. Harris argues that these supercategories are themselves verbal constructs, and thus language-dependent. Each supercategory has its own semantics. The function of the supercategory is to integrate what would otherwise be unconnected forms of inquiry, and the result of such integrations is to draw a certain map of our intellectual world. Among the questions tackled are: Is mathematics a language? Does the language of science go beyond the bounds of common sense? And, if so, on what basis? In a wide-ranging historical survey, Harris rejects the view that the Greeks and medieval thinkers had any concept of scientific inquiry that corresponds to our own. He pays close attention to the early work of the Royal Society and to the twentieth-century semantic crisis caused by attempting to integrate Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics. This lucidly written book will be of interest to all those engaged in linguistics, semiotics, philosophy of science and cultural studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .H373 2005 Unknown
Book
xiv, 258 p. ; 22 cm.
Confronting us at every turn, flowing from every imaginable source, information defines our era - and yet what we don't know about it could - and does - fill a book. In this indispensable volume, a primer for the information age, Hans Christian von Baeyer presents a clear description of what information is, how concepts of its measurement, meaning, and transmission evolved, and what its ever-expanding presence portends for the future. Information is poised to replace matter as the primary stuff of the universe, von Baeyer suggests; it will provide a new basic framework for describing and predicting reality in the twenty-first century. Despite its revolutionary premise, von Baeyer's book is written simply in a straightforward fashion, offering a wonderfully accessible introduction to classical and quantum information. Enlivened with anecdotes from the lives of philosophers, mathematicians, and scientists who have contributed significantly to the field, Information conducts readers from questions of subjectivity inherent in classical information to the blurring of distinctions between computers and what they measure or store in our quantum age. A great advance in our efforts to define and describe the nature of information, the book also marks an important step forward in our ability to exploit information - and, ultimately, to transform the nature of our relationship with the physical universe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Confronting us at every turn, flowing from every imaginable source, information defines our era - and yet what we don't know about it could - and does - fill a book. In this indispensable volume, a primer for the information age, Hans Christian von Baeyer presents a clear description of what information is, how concepts of its measurement, meaning, and transmission evolved, and what its ever-expanding presence portends for the future. Information is poised to replace matter as the primary stuff of the universe, von Baeyer suggests; it will provide a new basic framework for describing and predicting reality in the twenty-first century. Despite its revolutionary premise, von Baeyer's book is written simply in a straightforward fashion, offering a wonderfully accessible introduction to classical and quantum information. Enlivened with anecdotes from the lives of philosophers, mathematicians, and scientists who have contributed significantly to the field, Information conducts readers from questions of subjectivity inherent in classical information to the blurring of distinctions between computers and what they measure or store in our quantum age. A great advance in our efforts to define and describe the nature of information, the book also marks an important step forward in our ability to exploit information - and, ultimately, to transform the nature of our relationship with the physical universe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .V66 2004 Unknown
Book
282 p. ; 23 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q225 .D58 2000 Unknown
Book
xxii, 255 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .V53 2000 Unknown
Book
64 p. ; 18 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
QA76.9 .C66 J53 1999 Unknown
Book
438 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
Q223 .F67 1998 Unknown

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