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Book
xx, 250 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
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HD8686.5 .A637 2013 Unknown
Book
xiii, 240 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
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JA85 .B463 2013 Unknown
Book
xi, 373 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
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JN96 .A58 B876 2011 Unknown
Book
xvi, 326 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Political violence and social movements: an introduction; 2. Escalating policing; 3. Competitive escalation during protest cycles; 4. The activation of militant networks; 5. Organizational compartmentalization; 6. Action militarization; 7. Ideological encapsulation; 8. Militant enclosure; 9. Leaving clandestinity? Reversing mechanisms of engagement; 10. Clandestine political violence: some conclusions.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Political violence and social movements: an introduction; 2. Escalating policing; 3. Competitive escalation during protest cycles; 4. The activation of militant networks; 5. Organizational compartmentalization; 6. Action militarization; 7. Ideological encapsulation; 8. Militant enclosure; 9. Leaving clandestinity? Reversing mechanisms of engagement; 10. Clandestine political violence: some conclusions.
Green Library
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JC328.6 .D445 2013 Unknown
Book
xvii, 249 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Green Library
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JA85 .T37 2013 Unknown
Book
xiii, 259 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
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JC491 .C374 2013 Unknown
Book
xxiv, 289 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
  • Ethnic protest, moderation, and democratization
  • Time, process, and events in democratization
  • Ethnic contention in context
  • Local violence and uncertainty in Târgul Mureș, 1990
  • The power of symbols : Romanians, Hungarians, and King Mathias in Cluj
  • Forging language laws : schools and sign wars
  • Debating local governance : autonomy, local control, and minority enclaves
  • Implications of group interaction.
  • Ethnic protest, moderation, and democratization
  • Time, process, and events in democratization
  • Ethnic contention in context
  • Local violence and uncertainty in Târgul Mureș, 1990
  • The power of symbols : Romanians, Hungarians, and King Mathias in Cluj
  • Forging language laws : schools and sign wars
  • Debating local governance : autonomy, local control, and minority enclaves
  • Implications of group interaction.
dx.doi.org Cambridge Books Online
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JN96 .A91 S77 2012 Unknown
Book
xx, 424 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Part I. The struggle for independence and birth of a nation
  • Colonialism, racism, and modernity
  • Foreigners and nation building
  • Race and the nation-building project
  • Part II. The socialist experiment
  • African socialism : the challenges of nation building
  • Socialism, self-reliance, and foreigners
  • Nationalism, state socialism, and the politics of race
  • Part III. Neoliberalism, global capitalism, and the nation-state
  • Neoliberalism and the transition from state socialism to capitalism
  • Neoliberalism, foreigners, and globalization
  • Neoliberalism, race, and the global economy
  • Conclusion : race, nation, and citizenship in historical and comparative perspective.
  • Introduction
  • Part I. The struggle for independence and birth of a nation
  • Colonialism, racism, and modernity
  • Foreigners and nation building
  • Race and the nation-building project
  • Part II. The socialist experiment
  • African socialism : the challenges of nation building
  • Socialism, self-reliance, and foreigners
  • Nationalism, state socialism, and the politics of race
  • Part III. Neoliberalism, global capitalism, and the nation-state
  • Neoliberalism and the transition from state socialism to capitalism
  • Neoliberalism, foreigners, and globalization
  • Neoliberalism, race, and the global economy
  • Conclusion : race, nation, and citizenship in historical and comparative perspective.
Green Library
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DT448.2 .A45 2013 Unknown
Book
xviii, 318 p. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. The inconvenient fact of antineoliberal mobilization-- 2. Contentious politics, contemporary market society, and power-- 3. The argument: explaining episodes of antineoliberal contention in Latin America-- 4. Argentina-- 5. Bolivia-- 6. Ecuador-- 7. Venezuela-- 8. Peru and Chile-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
At the turn of the twentieth century, a concatenation of diverse social movements arose unexpectedly in Latin America, culminating in massive anti-free market demonstrations. These events ushered in governments in Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela that advocated socialization and planning, challenging the consensus over neoliberal hegemony and the weakness of movements to oppose it. Eduardo Silva offers the first comprehensive comparative account of these extraordinary events, arguing that the shift was influenced by favorable political associational space, a reformist orientation to demands, economic crisis, and mechanisms that facilitated horizontal linkages among a wide variety of social movement organizations. His analysis applies Karl Polanyi's theory of the double movement of market society to these events, predicting the dawning of an era more supportive of government intervention in the economy and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. The inconvenient fact of antineoliberal mobilization-- 2. Contentious politics, contemporary market society, and power-- 3. The argument: explaining episodes of antineoliberal contention in Latin America-- 4. Argentina-- 5. Bolivia-- 6. Ecuador-- 7. Venezuela-- 8. Peru and Chile-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
At the turn of the twentieth century, a concatenation of diverse social movements arose unexpectedly in Latin America, culminating in massive anti-free market demonstrations. These events ushered in governments in Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela that advocated socialization and planning, challenging the consensus over neoliberal hegemony and the weakness of movements to oppose it. Eduardo Silva offers the first comprehensive comparative account of these extraordinary events, arguing that the shift was influenced by favorable political associational space, a reformist orientation to demands, economic crisis, and mechanisms that facilitated horizontal linkages among a wide variety of social movement organizations. His analysis applies Karl Polanyi's theory of the double movement of market society to these events, predicting the dawning of an era more supportive of government intervention in the economy and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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HC125 .S534 2009 Unknown
Book
xxii, 383 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • The republican era and the emergence of communist leadership during the anti-Japanese war of resistance
  • The ascent of the vigilante militia : the violent antecedents of Mao's war Communism
  • The onset of collectivization and popular dissatisfaction with Mao's "yellow bomb" road
  • The mandate abandoned : the disaster of the Great Leap Forward
  • Strategies of survival and their elimination in the great leap forward
  • The escape from famine and death
  • Indignation and frustrated retaliation : the politics of disengagement
  • The market comes first : the economics of disengagement and the origins of reform
  • Persistent memories and long-delayed retaliation in the reform era.
  • The republican era and the emergence of communist leadership during the anti-Japanese war of resistance
  • The ascent of the vigilante militia : the violent antecedents of Mao's war Communism
  • The onset of collectivization and popular dissatisfaction with Mao's "yellow bomb" road
  • The mandate abandoned : the disaster of the Great Leap Forward
  • Strategies of survival and their elimination in the great leap forward
  • The escape from famine and death
  • Indignation and frustrated retaliation : the politics of disengagement
  • The market comes first : the economics of disengagement and the origins of reform
  • Persistent memories and long-delayed retaliation in the reform era.
Green Library
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HC428 .D34 T43 2008 Unknown
Book
xviii, 190 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The gray zone-- 2. Party politics and everyday life-- 3. Food lootings-- 4. Moreno and La Matanza lootings-- 5. Making sense of collective violence.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Close to three hundred stores and supermarkets were looted during week-long food riots in Argentina in December 2001. Thirty-four people were reported dead and hundreds were injured. Among the looting crowds, activists from the Peronist party (the main political party in the country) were quite prominent. During the lootings, police officers were conspicuously absent - particularly when small stores were sacked. Through a combination of archival research, statistical analysis, multi-sited fieldwork, and taking heed of the perspective of contentious politics, this book provides the first available analytic description of the origins, course, meanings, and outcomes of the December 2001 wave of lootings in Argentina.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. The gray zone-- 2. Party politics and everyday life-- 3. Food lootings-- 4. Moreno and La Matanza lootings-- 5. Making sense of collective violence.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Close to three hundred stores and supermarkets were looted during week-long food riots in Argentina in December 2001. Thirty-four people were reported dead and hundreds were injured. Among the looting crowds, activists from the Peronist party (the main political party in the country) were quite prominent. During the lootings, police officers were conspicuously absent - particularly when small stores were sacked. Through a combination of archival research, statistical analysis, multi-sited fieldwork, and taking heed of the perspective of contentious politics, this book provides the first available analytic description of the origins, course, meanings, and outcomes of the December 2001 wave of lootings in Argentina.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
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HV6485 .A7 A94 2007 Unknown
Book
xiv, 237 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Insurgent groups and the quest for overseas support-- 2. Power, exchange, and marketing-- 3. From ethnic to environmental conflict: Nigeria's Ogoni movement-- 4. The making of an anti-globalization icon: Mexico's Zapatista uprising-- 5. Transnational marketing and world politics.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
How do a few Third World political movements become global causes celebres, while most remain isolated? This book rejects dominant views that needy groups readily gain help from selfless nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Instead, they face a Darwinian struggle for scarce resources where support goes to the savviest, not the neediest. Examining Mexico's Zapatista rebels and Nigeria's Ogoni ethnic group, the book draws critical conclusions about social movements, NGOs, and 'global civil society'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Insurgent groups and the quest for overseas support-- 2. Power, exchange, and marketing-- 3. From ethnic to environmental conflict: Nigeria's Ogoni movement-- 4. The making of an anti-globalization icon: Mexico's Zapatista uprising-- 5. Transnational marketing and world politics.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
How do a few Third World political movements become global causes celebres, while most remain isolated? This book rejects dominant views that needy groups readily gain help from selfless nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Instead, they face a Darwinian struggle for scarce resources where support goes to the savviest, not the neediest. Examining Mexico's Zapatista rebels and Nigeria's Ogoni ethnic group, the book draws critical conclusions about social movements, NGOs, and 'global civil society'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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JC328.5 .B63 2005 Unknown
Book
xiv, 191 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • 1. A continuum of information: the influence of minority political protest
  • 2. Measuring information in minority protest
  • 3. Viewing minority protest from the Hill: the individual and collective response from Congress
  • 4. Knocking on the president's door: the impact of minority protest on presidential responsiveness
  • 5. Appealing to an unlikely branch: minority political protest and the Supreme Court
  • Conclusion: settling protest dust in a post-racial society.
"This book demonstrates the direct influence that political protest behavior has on Congress, the presidency, and the Supreme Court, illustrating that protest is a form of democratic responsiveness that government officials have used, and continue to draw on, to implement federal policies. Focusing on racial and ethnic minority concerns, this book shows that the context of political protest has served as a signal for political preferences. As pro-minority rights behavior grew and anti-minority rights actions declined, politicians learned from minority protest and responded when they felt emboldened by stronger informational cues stemming from citizens' behavior, a theory referred to as the "information continuum." Given the influence that minority protest actions have wielded over national government, the book offers a powerful implication. Although the shift from protest to politics as a political strategy has opened the door for institutionalized political opportunity, racial and ethnic minorities have neglected a powerful tool to illustrate the inequalities that exist in contemporary society"-- Provided by publisher.
  • 1. A continuum of information: the influence of minority political protest
  • 2. Measuring information in minority protest
  • 3. Viewing minority protest from the Hill: the individual and collective response from Congress
  • 4. Knocking on the president's door: the impact of minority protest on presidential responsiveness
  • 5. Appealing to an unlikely branch: minority political protest and the Supreme Court
  • Conclusion: settling protest dust in a post-racial society.
"This book demonstrates the direct influence that political protest behavior has on Congress, the presidency, and the Supreme Court, illustrating that protest is a form of democratic responsiveness that government officials have used, and continue to draw on, to implement federal policies. Focusing on racial and ethnic minority concerns, this book shows that the context of political protest has served as a signal for political preferences. As pro-minority rights behavior grew and anti-minority rights actions declined, politicians learned from minority protest and responded when they felt emboldened by stronger informational cues stemming from citizens' behavior, a theory referred to as the "information continuum." Given the influence that minority protest actions have wielded over national government, the book offers a powerful implication. Although the shift from protest to politics as a political strategy has opened the door for institutionalized political opportunity, racial and ethnic minorities have neglected a powerful tool to illustrate the inequalities that exist in contemporary society"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
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HN57 .G565 2013 Unknown
Book
xi, 186 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. The Seattle cycle: 1998-2002; 3. The Seattle tactics; 4. The organizations most likely to adopt; 5. Regimes on repertoires: nation-states, cities, and networks; 6. Opinion leaders: local anti-globalization coalitions; 7. Talking 'bout a revolution; 8. Talking about smashing; 9. Not like us: debates about identity; 10. The cops and the courts: the effect of repression; 11. After 9/11: the effect of repression; 12. Conclusion.
"What are the micro-level interactions and conversations that underlie successful and failed diffusion? By comparing the spread of direct action tactics from the 1999 Global Justice Movement protests against the World Trade Organization in Seattle to grassroots activists in Toronto and New York, Lesley Wood argues that dynamics of deliberation among local activists both aided and blocked diffusion. To analyze the localization of this cycle of protest, the research brings together rich ethnography, interviews, social network analysis and catalogs of protest events. The findings suggest that when diverse activists with different perspectives can discuss innovations in a reflexive, egalitarian manner, they are more likely to make strategic and meaningful choices"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. The Seattle cycle: 1998-2002; 3. The Seattle tactics; 4. The organizations most likely to adopt; 5. Regimes on repertoires: nation-states, cities, and networks; 6. Opinion leaders: local anti-globalization coalitions; 7. Talking 'bout a revolution; 8. Talking about smashing; 9. Not like us: debates about identity; 10. The cops and the courts: the effect of repression; 11. After 9/11: the effect of repression; 12. Conclusion.
"What are the micro-level interactions and conversations that underlie successful and failed diffusion? By comparing the spread of direct action tactics from the 1999 Global Justice Movement protests against the World Trade Organization in Seattle to grassroots activists in Toronto and New York, Lesley Wood argues that dynamics of deliberation among local activists both aided and blocked diffusion. To analyze the localization of this cycle of protest, the research brings together rich ethnography, interviews, social network analysis and catalogs of protest events. The findings suggest that when diverse activists with different perspectives can discuss innovations in a reflexive, egalitarian manner, they are more likely to make strategic and meaningful choices"-- Provided by publisher.
dx.doi.org Cambridge Books Online
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HM881 .W66 2012 Unknown
Book
xiv, 225 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Clashing networks in world politics; 2. Making and unmaking policy; 3. Culture wars gone global: gay rights vs. the Baptist-burqa network; 4. Litigating for the lord: American attorneys and European sexualities; 5. Shootout at UN plaza: dueling over global gun control; 6. Battlefield Brazil: national disarmament and international activism; 7. Conclusion.
"Human rights, environmentalism, and global justice: these transnational movements today face fierce opposition from networks of conservative activists promoting contrary aims. In this groundbreaking book, Clifford Bob analyzes the clashes, proposing a new model of global policy making - and unmaking. This highlights the battle of networks, marked by exclusionary strategies, negative tactics, and dissuasive ideas. Bob first investigates the fight over gay rights, in which a coalition of religious conservatives, the "Baptist-burqa" network, confronts human rights groups at the United Nations and in such countries as Sweden, Romania, and Uganda. Next, he examines conflicts over gun control, pitting firearms enthusiasts against disarmament and safety advocates in the UN, Brazil, and elsewhere. Bob's provocative findings extend beyond the culture wars. With its critical conclusions about norms, activists, and institutions, this book will change how campaigners fight, analysts study international issues, and all of us think about global politics"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Clashing networks in world politics; 2. Making and unmaking policy; 3. Culture wars gone global: gay rights vs. the Baptist-burqa network; 4. Litigating for the lord: American attorneys and European sexualities; 5. Shootout at UN plaza: dueling over global gun control; 6. Battlefield Brazil: national disarmament and international activism; 7. Conclusion.
"Human rights, environmentalism, and global justice: these transnational movements today face fierce opposition from networks of conservative activists promoting contrary aims. In this groundbreaking book, Clifford Bob analyzes the clashes, proposing a new model of global policy making - and unmaking. This highlights the battle of networks, marked by exclusionary strategies, negative tactics, and dissuasive ideas. Bob first investigates the fight over gay rights, in which a coalition of religious conservatives, the "Baptist-burqa" network, confronts human rights groups at the United Nations and in such countries as Sweden, Romania, and Uganda. Next, he examines conflicts over gun control, pitting firearms enthusiasts against disarmament and safety advocates in the UN, Brazil, and elsewhere. Bob's provocative findings extend beyond the culture wars. With its critical conclusions about norms, activists, and institutions, this book will change how campaigners fight, analysts study international issues, and all of us think about global politics"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
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JZ4841 .B63 2012 Unknown
Book
xviii, 298 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: The women's jury movements and strategic adaptation
  • Theorizing social movement strategic adaptation
  • Broadening women's citizenship : a history of U.S. women's jury rights
  • Responding to political defeats
  • Countering public opposition and indifference
  • Taking advantage of cultural opportunities
  • Turning the movement around
  • Comparing the movements : qualitative comparative analysis
  • Conclusion: Final thoughts on strategic adaptation and social movement agency.
"When women won the vote in the United States in 1920 they were still routinely barred from serving as jurors, but some began vigorous campaigns for a place in the jury box. This book tells the story of how women mobilized in fifteen states to change jury laws so that women could gain this additional right of citizenship. Some campaigns quickly succeeded; others took substantially longer. The book reveals that when women strategically adapted their tactics to the broader political environment, they were able to speed up the pace of jury reform, while less strategic movements took longer. A comparison of the more strategic women's jury movements with those that were less strategic shows that the former built coalitions with other women's groups, took advantage of political opportunities, had past experience in seeking legal reforms and confronted tensions and even conflict within their ranks in ways that bolstered their action"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Introduction: The women's jury movements and strategic adaptation
  • Theorizing social movement strategic adaptation
  • Broadening women's citizenship : a history of U.S. women's jury rights
  • Responding to political defeats
  • Countering public opposition and indifference
  • Taking advantage of cultural opportunities
  • Turning the movement around
  • Comparing the movements : qualitative comparative analysis
  • Conclusion: Final thoughts on strategic adaptation and social movement agency.
"When women won the vote in the United States in 1920 they were still routinely barred from serving as jurors, but some began vigorous campaigns for a place in the jury box. This book tells the story of how women mobilized in fifteen states to change jury laws so that women could gain this additional right of citizenship. Some campaigns quickly succeeded; others took substantially longer. The book reveals that when women strategically adapted their tactics to the broader political environment, they were able to speed up the pace of jury reform, while less strategic movements took longer. A comparison of the more strategic women's jury movements with those that were less strategic shows that the former built coalitions with other women's groups, took advantage of political opportunities, had past experience in seeking legal reforms and confronted tensions and even conflict within their ranks in ways that bolstered their action"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
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Basement
KF8977 .M33 2012 Unknown
Book
xvii, 222 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
"No other country maintains a global military presence comparable to the United States. Yet outside the United States, considerable debate exists about what this presence is about and how well it serves national and global interests. Anti-U.S. base protests, played out in parliaments and the streets of host nations, continue to arise in different parts of the world. In a novel approach fusing international relations theory with social movement perspectives, this book examines the impact of anti-base movements and the important role bilateral alliance relationships play in shaping movement outcomes. The author explains not only when and how anti-base movements matter, but also how host governments balance between domestic and international pressure on base-related issues. Drawing on interviews with activists, politicians, policy makers, and U.S. base officials in the Philippines, Japan (Okinawa), Ecuador, Italy, and South Korea, the author finds that the security and foreign policy ideas held by host government elites act as a political opportunity or barrier for anti-base movements, influencing their ability to challenge overseas U.S. basing policies"-- Provided by publisher.
"No other country maintains a global military presence comparable to the United States. Yet outside the United States, considerable debate exists about what this presence is about and how well it serves national and global interests. Anti-U.S. base protests, played out in parliaments and the streets of host nations, continue to arise in different parts of the world. In a novel approach fusing international relations theory with social movement perspectives, this book examines the impact of anti-base movements and the important role bilateral alliance relationships play in shaping movement outcomes. The author explains not only when and how anti-base movements matter, but also how host governments balance between domestic and international pressure on base-related issues. Drawing on interviews with activists, politicians, policy makers, and U.S. base officials in the Philippines, Japan (Okinawa), Ecuador, Italy, and South Korea, the author finds that the security and foreign policy ideas held by host government elites act as a political opportunity or barrier for anti-base movements, influencing their ability to challenge overseas U.S. basing policies"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
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UA26 .A2 Y46 2011 Unknown
Book
xiv, 246 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The logic of social movement outcomes-- 2. Civil rights and reactive countermobilization-- 3. The calculus of compromise-- 4. Local struggles-- 5. Patterns of regional change-- 6. Federal responses to civil rights mobilization-- 7. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Social movements have wrought dramatic changes upon American society. This raises the question: Why do some movements succeed in their endeavors while others fail? Luders answers this question by introducing an analytical framework that begins with a shift in emphasis away from the characteristics of movements toward the targets of protests and affected bystanders and why they respond as they do. This shift brings into focus how targets and other interests assess both their exposure to movement disruptions as well as the costs of conceding to movement demands. From this point, diverse outcomes stem not only from a movement's capabilities for protest but also from differences among targets and others in their vulnerability to disruption and the substance of movement goals. Applied to the civil rights movement, this approach recasts conventional accounts of the movement's outcome in local struggles and national politics and clarifies the broader logic of social change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. The logic of social movement outcomes-- 2. Civil rights and reactive countermobilization-- 3. The calculus of compromise-- 4. Local struggles-- 5. Patterns of regional change-- 6. Federal responses to civil rights mobilization-- 7. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Social movements have wrought dramatic changes upon American society. This raises the question: Why do some movements succeed in their endeavors while others fail? Luders answers this question by introducing an analytical framework that begins with a shift in emphasis away from the characteristics of movements toward the targets of protests and affected bystanders and why they respond as they do. This shift brings into focus how targets and other interests assess both their exposure to movement disruptions as well as the costs of conceding to movement demands. From this point, diverse outcomes stem not only from a movement's capabilities for protest but also from differences among targets and others in their vulnerability to disruption and the substance of movement goals. Applied to the civil rights movement, this approach recasts conventional accounts of the movement's outcome in local struggles and national politics and clarifies the broader logic of social change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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E185.61 .L82 2010 Unknown
Book
xv, 192 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Understanding social movements, contentions and private politics and their consequences-- 3. Anti-corporate protest in the United States, 1960-1990-- 4. The effect of protest on university divestment-- 5. Private and contentious politics in the post-1990 era-- 6. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book examines anti-corporate activism in the United States, including analysis of anti-corporate challenges associated with social movements as diverse as the Civil Rights Movement and the Dolphin-safe Tuna Movement. Using a unique dataset of protest events in the United States, the book shows that anti-corporate activism is primarily about corporate policies, products, and negligence. Although activists have always been distrustful of corporations and sought to change them, until the 1970s and 1980s, this was primarily accomplished via seeking government regulation of corporations or via organized labor. Sarah A. Soule traces the shift brought about by deregulation and the decline in organized labor, which prompted activists to target corporations directly, often in combination with targeting the state. Using the literatures on contentious and private politics, which are both essential for understanding anti-corporate activism, the book provides a nuanced understanding of the changing focal points of activism directed at corporations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Understanding social movements, contentions and private politics and their consequences-- 3. Anti-corporate protest in the United States, 1960-1990-- 4. The effect of protest on university divestment-- 5. Private and contentious politics in the post-1990 era-- 6. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book examines anti-corporate activism in the United States, including analysis of anti-corporate challenges associated with social movements as diverse as the Civil Rights Movement and the Dolphin-safe Tuna Movement. Using a unique dataset of protest events in the United States, the book shows that anti-corporate activism is primarily about corporate policies, products, and negligence. Although activists have always been distrustful of corporations and sought to change them, until the 1970s and 1980s, this was primarily accomplished via seeking government regulation of corporations or via organized labor. Sarah A. Soule traces the shift brought about by deregulation and the decline in organized labor, which prompted activists to target corporations directly, often in combination with targeting the state. Using the literatures on contentious and private politics, which are both essential for understanding anti-corporate activism, the book provides a nuanced understanding of the changing focal points of activism directed at corporations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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HD2785 .S59 2009 Unknown
Book
xvi, 235 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Claims as performances-- 2. How to detect and describe performances and repertoires-- 3. How performances form, change, and disappear-- 4. From campaign to campaign-- 5. Invention of the social movement-- 6. Repertoires and regimes-- 7. Contention in space and time-- 8. Conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
How can we get inside popular collective struggles and explain how they work? Contentious Performances presents a distinctive approach to analyzing such struggles, drawing especially on incomparably rich evidence from Great Britain between 1758 and 1834. The book accomplishes three main things. First, it presents a logic and method for describing contentious events, occasions on which people publicly make consequential claims on each other. Second, it shows how that logic yields superior explanations of the dynamics in such events, both individually and in the aggregate. Third, it illustrates its methods and arguments by means of detailed analyses of contentious events in Great Britain from 1758 to 1834.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Claims as performances-- 2. How to detect and describe performances and repertoires-- 3. How performances form, change, and disappear-- 4. From campaign to campaign-- 5. Invention of the social movement-- 6. Repertoires and regimes-- 7. Contention in space and time-- 8. Conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
How can we get inside popular collective struggles and explain how they work? Contentious Performances presents a distinctive approach to analyzing such struggles, drawing especially on incomparably rich evidence from Great Britain between 1758 and 1834. The book accomplishes three main things. First, it presents a logic and method for describing contentious events, occasions on which people publicly make consequential claims on each other. Second, it shows how that logic yields superior explanations of the dynamics in such events, both individually and in the aggregate. Third, it illustrates its methods and arguments by means of detailed analyses of contentious events in Great Britain from 1758 to 1834.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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HM866 .T55 2008 Unknown

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