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Book
1 online resource (328 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
Book
1 online resource (477 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
Book
xvi, 225 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Traditional knowledge-based agricultural products and geographical indications law
  • Protecting traditional knowledge-based agricultural products : imperatives and challenges
  • Implementing geographical indications in developing countries
  • Conclusion: Mapping future directions in the use of geographical indications in developing countries.
"In a national context, geographical indications (GIs) are well entrenched in European historical, cultural and legal traditions, particularly in the production and marketing of wines and spirits. Arising from recent developments at the international level in the areas of intellectual property law, traditional knowledge, and biodiversity however, many developing countries, Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities are considering using GIs to protect traditional knowledge in developing countries and to promote trade and overall economic development. Despite the considerable enthusiasm over GIs in diverse quarters in this respect, there is appreciable research dearth on how far and in what context GIs can be used as a protection model for traditional knowledge-based resources.This book critically examines the potential uses of geographical indications as models for protecting traditional knowledge-based products and resources in national and international intellectual property legal frameworks. The book evaluates the development potential of GIs in relation to ensuing changes in international intellectual property law and policy-making to address the inadequacies of the existing global Intellectual Property Rights system in accommodating traditional knowledge. The book analyzes the reception, interest and nuanced reactions towards GIs from developing countries and advocates of development in the various legal and non-legal regimes that provide alternative platform for discussions and elaboration of intellectual property policies, such as the World Trade Organization, World Intellectual Property Organization, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Food and Agricultural Organization. The book argues for a degree of balance in the approach to the implementation of global intellectual property rights in a manner that gives developing countries an opportunity to protect traditional knowledge-based products and to benefit from the flexibility inherent in providing a means of GIs protection to suit different circumstances on a case-by-case basis"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Traditional knowledge-based agricultural products and geographical indications law
  • Protecting traditional knowledge-based agricultural products : imperatives and challenges
  • Implementing geographical indications in developing countries
  • Conclusion: Mapping future directions in the use of geographical indications in developing countries.
"In a national context, geographical indications (GIs) are well entrenched in European historical, cultural and legal traditions, particularly in the production and marketing of wines and spirits. Arising from recent developments at the international level in the areas of intellectual property law, traditional knowledge, and biodiversity however, many developing countries, Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities are considering using GIs to protect traditional knowledge in developing countries and to promote trade and overall economic development. Despite the considerable enthusiasm over GIs in diverse quarters in this respect, there is appreciable research dearth on how far and in what context GIs can be used as a protection model for traditional knowledge-based resources.This book critically examines the potential uses of geographical indications as models for protecting traditional knowledge-based products and resources in national and international intellectual property legal frameworks. The book evaluates the development potential of GIs in relation to ensuing changes in international intellectual property law and policy-making to address the inadequacies of the existing global Intellectual Property Rights system in accommodating traditional knowledge. The book analyzes the reception, interest and nuanced reactions towards GIs from developing countries and advocates of development in the various legal and non-legal regimes that provide alternative platform for discussions and elaboration of intellectual property policies, such as the World Trade Organization, World Intellectual Property Organization, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Food and Agricultural Organization. The book argues for a degree of balance in the approach to the implementation of global intellectual property rights in a manner that gives developing countries an opportunity to protect traditional knowledge-based products and to benefit from the flexibility inherent in providing a means of GIs protection to suit different circumstances on a case-by-case basis"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
K1562 .D34 2015 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (260 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
Book
1 online resource (324 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
Book
p. ; cm.
This revised and updated second edition addresses the area where law and information security concerns intersect. Information systems security and legal compliance are now required to protect critical governmental and corporate infrastructure, intellectual property created by individuals and organizations alike, and information that individuals believe should be protected from unreasonable intrusion. Organizations must build numerous information security and privacy responses into their daily operations to protect the business itself, fully meet legal requirements, and to meet the expectations of employees and customers. -- Edited summary from book.
This revised and updated second edition addresses the area where law and information security concerns intersect. Information systems security and legal compliance are now required to protect critical governmental and corporate infrastructure, intellectual property created by individuals and organizations alike, and information that individuals believe should be protected from unreasonable intrusion. Organizations must build numerous information security and privacy responses into their daily operations to protect the business itself, fully meet legal requirements, and to meet the expectations of employees and customers. -- Edited summary from book.
Book
xxii, 573 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: I.The Integers
  • 1.The Integers: An Introduction
  • Introduction
  • Integer Arithmetic
  • Ordering Axioms
  • What's Next
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 2.Divisibility of Integers
  • Introduction
  • Quotients and Remainders
  • The Well-Ordering Principle
  • Proving the Division Algorithm
  • Putting It All Together
  • Congruence
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 3.Greatest Common Divisors
  • Introduction
  • Calculating Greatest Common Divisors
  • The Euclidean Algorithm
  • GCDs and Linear Combinations
  • Well-Ordering, GCDs, and Linear Combinations
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 4.Prime Factorization
  • Introduction
  • Defining Prime
  • The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic
  • Proving Existence
  • Proving Uniqueness
  • Putting It All Together
  • Primes and Irreducibles in Other Number Systems
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • II.Other Number Systems
  • 5.Equivalence Relations and Zn
  • Congruence Classes
  • Equivalence Relations
  • Equivalence Classes
  • The Number System Zn
  • Binary Operations
  • Zero Divisors and Units in Zn
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 6.Algebra in Other Number Systems
  • Introduction
  • Subsets of the Real Numbers
  • The Complex Numbers
  • Matrices
  • Collections of Sets
  • Putting It All Together
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • III.Rings
  • 7.An Introduction to Rings
  • Introduction
  • Basic Properties of Rings
  • Commutative Rings and Rings with Identity
  • Uniqueness of Identities and Inverses
  • Zero Divisors and Multiplicative Cancellation
  • Fields and Integral Domains
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 8.Integer Multiples and Exponents
  • Introduction
  • Integer Multiplication and Exponentiation
  • Nonpositive Multiples and Exponents
  • Properties of Integer Multiplication and Exponentiation
  • The Characteristic of a Ring
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 9.Subrings, Extensions, and Direct Sums
  • Introduction
  • The Subring Test
  • Subfields and Field Extensions
  • Direct Sums
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 10.Isomorphism and Invariants
  • Introduction
  • Isomorphisms of Rings
  • Renaming Elements
  • Preserving Operations
  • Proving Isomorphism
  • Well-Defined Functions
  • Disproving Isomorphism
  • Invariants
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • IV.Polynomial Rings
  • 11.Polynomial Rings
  • Polynomial Rings
  • Polynomials over an Integral Domain
  • Polynomial Functions
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • Appendix
  • Proof that R[x] Is a Commutative Ring
  • 12.Divisibility in Polynomial Rings
  • Introduction
  • The Division Algorithm in F[x]
  • Greatest Common Divisors of Polynomials
  • Relatively Prime Polynomials
  • The Euclidean Algorithm for Polynomials
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 13.Roots, Factors, and Irreducible Polynomials
  • Polynomial Functions and Remainders
  • Roots of Polynomials and the Factor Theorem
  • Irreducible Polynomials
  • Unique Factorization in F[x]
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 14.Irreducible Polynomials
  • Introduction
  • Factorization in C[x]
  • Factorization in R[x]
  • Factorization in Q[x]
  • Polynomials with No Linear Factors in Q[x]
  • Reducing Polynomials in Z[x] Modulo Primes
  • Eisenstein's Criterion
  • Factorization in F[x] for Other Fields F
  • Summary
  • The Cubic Formula
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Appendix
  • Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
  • 15.Quotients of Polynomial Rings
  • Introduction
  • Congruence Modulo a Polynomial
  • Congruence Classes of Polynomials
  • The Set F[x]/(f(x))
  • Special Quotients of Polynomial Rings
  • Algebraic Numbers
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • V.More Ring Theory
  • 16.Ideals and Homomorphisms
  • Introduction
  • Ideals
  • Congruence Modulo an Ideal
  • Maximal and Prime Ideals
  • Homomorphisms
  • The Kernel and Image of a Homomorphism
  • The First Isomorphism Theorem for Rings
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 17.Divisibility and Factorization in Integral Domains
  • Introduction
  • Divisibility and Euclidean Domains
  • Primes and Irreducibles
  • Unique Factorization Domains
  • Proof 1 Generalizing Greatest Common Divisors
  • Proof 2 Principal Ideal Domains
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 18.From Z to C
  • Introduction
  • From W to Z
  • Ordered Rings
  • From Z to Q
  • Ordering on Q
  • From Q to R
  • From R to C
  • A Characterization of the Integers
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • VI.Groups
  • 19.Symmetry
  • Introduction
  • Symmetries
  • Symmetries of Regular Polygons
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 20.An Introduction to Groups
  • Groups
  • Examples of Groups
  • Basic Properties of Groups
  • Identities and Inverses in a Group
  • The Order of a Group
  • Groups of Units
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 21.Integer Powers of Elements in a Group
  • Introduction
  • Powers of Elements in a Group
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 22.Subgroups
  • Introduction
  • The Subgroup Test
  • The Center of a Group
  • The Subgroup Generated by an Element
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 23.Subgroups of Cyclic Groups
  • Introduction
  • Subgroups of Cyclic Groups
  • Properties of the Order of an Element
  • Finite Cyclic Groups
  • Infinite Cyclic Groups
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 24.The Dihedral Groups
  • Introduction
  • Relationships between Elements in Dn
  • Generators and Group Presentations
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 25.The Symmetric Groups
  • Introduction
  • The Symmetric Group of a Set
  • Permutation Notation and Cycles
  • The Cycle Decomposition of a Permutation
  • Transpositions
  • Even and Odd Permutations and the Alternating Group
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 26.Cosets and Lagrange's Theorem
  • Introduction
  • A Relation in Groups
  • Cosets
  • Lagrange's Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 27.Normal Subgroups and Quotient Groups
  • Introduction
  • An Operation on Cosets
  • Normal Subgroups
  • Quotient Groups
  • Cauchy's Theorem for Finite Abelian Groups
  • Simple Groups and the Simplicity of An
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 28.Products of Groups
  • External Direct Products of Groups
  • Orders of Elements in Direct Products
  • Internal Direct Products in Groups
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 29.Group Isomorphisms and Invariants
  • Introduction
  • Isomorphisms of Groups
  • Renaming Elements
  • Preserving Operations
  • Proving Isomorphism
  • Some Basic Properties of Isomorphisms
  • Well-Defined Functions
  • Disproving Isomorphism
  • Invariants
  • Isomorphism Classes
  • Isomorphisms and Cyclic Groups
  • Cayley's Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 30.Homomorphisms and Isomorphism Theorems
  • Homomorphisms
  • The Kernel of a Homomorphism
  • The Image of a Homomorphism
  • The Isomorphism Theorems for Groups
  • The First Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • The Second Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • The Third Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • The Fourth Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 31.The Fundamental Theorem of Finite Abelian Groups
  • Introduction
  • The Components: p-Groups
  • The Fundamental Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 32.The First Sylow Theorem
  • Introduction
  • Conjugacy and the Class Equation
  • The Class Equation
  • Cauchy's Theorem
  • The First Sylow Theorem
  • The Second and Third Sylow Theorems
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 33.The Second and Third Sylow Theorems
  • Introduction
  • Conjugate Subgroups and Normalizers
  • The Second Sylow Theorem
  • The Third Sylow Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • VII.Special Topics
  • 34.RSA Encryption
  • Introduction
  • Congruence and Modular Arithmetic
  • The Basics of RSA Encryption
  • An Example
  • Why RSA Works
  • Concluding Thoughts and Notes
  • Exercises
  • 35.Check Digits
  • Introduction
  • Check Digits
  • Credit Card Check Digits
  • ISBN Check Digits
  • Verhoeff's Dihedral Group D5 Check
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 36.Games: NIM and the 15 Puzzle
  • The Game of NIM
  • The 15 Puzzle
  • Permutations and the 15 Puzzle
  • Solving the 15 Puzzle
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 37.Finite Fields, the Group of Units in Zn, and Splitting Fields
  • Introduction
  • Finite Fields
  • The Group of Units of a Finite Field
  • The Group of Units of Zn
  • Splitting Fields
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 38.Groups of Order 8 and 12: Semidirect Products of Groups
  • Introduction
  • Groups of Order 8
  • Semi-direct Products of Groups
  • Groups of Order 12 and p3
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • A.Functions
  • Special Types of Functions: Injections and Surjections
  • Injections
  • Surjections
  • The Importance of the Domain and Codomain
  • Composition of Functions
  • Inverse Functions
  • Theorems about Inverse Functions
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • B.Mathematical Induction and the Well-Ordering Principle
  • Introduction
  • The Principle of Mathematical Induction
  • The Extended Principle of Mathematical Induction
  • The Strong Form of Mathematical Induction
  • The Well-Ordering Principle
  • The Equivalence of the Well-Ordering Principle and the Principles of Mathematical Induction
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises.
"Preface The impetus for this book lies in our approach to teaching abstract algebra. We place an emphasis on active learning and on developing students' intuition through their investigation of examples. For us, active learning involves students--they are doing something instead of just being passive learners. What students are doing when they are actively learning might include discovering, processing, discussing, applying information, writing intensive assignments, and engaging in common intellectual in-class experiences or collaborative assignments and projects. We support all of these activities with peer review and substantial faculty mentoring. According to Meyers and Jones [2], active learning derives from the assumptions that learning is an active endeavor by nature and that different people learn in different ways. A number of reports and studies show that active learning has a positive impact on students. For example, active learning is described as a high-impact learning activity in the latest report from the Association of American Colleges and Universities' Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative [1]. Results of a study [3] testing the active learning findings in liberal arts education show, in part, that students who experience the type of instruction we describe as active learning show larger "value-added" gains on a variety of outcomes than their peers. Although it is difficult to capture the essence of active learning in a textbook, this book is our attempt to do just that. Our goals for these materials are several: - To carefully introduce the ideas behind definitions and theorems"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: I.The Integers
  • 1.The Integers: An Introduction
  • Introduction
  • Integer Arithmetic
  • Ordering Axioms
  • What's Next
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 2.Divisibility of Integers
  • Introduction
  • Quotients and Remainders
  • The Well-Ordering Principle
  • Proving the Division Algorithm
  • Putting It All Together
  • Congruence
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 3.Greatest Common Divisors
  • Introduction
  • Calculating Greatest Common Divisors
  • The Euclidean Algorithm
  • GCDs and Linear Combinations
  • Well-Ordering, GCDs, and Linear Combinations
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 4.Prime Factorization
  • Introduction
  • Defining Prime
  • The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic
  • Proving Existence
  • Proving Uniqueness
  • Putting It All Together
  • Primes and Irreducibles in Other Number Systems
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • II.Other Number Systems
  • 5.Equivalence Relations and Zn
  • Congruence Classes
  • Equivalence Relations
  • Equivalence Classes
  • The Number System Zn
  • Binary Operations
  • Zero Divisors and Units in Zn
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 6.Algebra in Other Number Systems
  • Introduction
  • Subsets of the Real Numbers
  • The Complex Numbers
  • Matrices
  • Collections of Sets
  • Putting It All Together
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • III.Rings
  • 7.An Introduction to Rings
  • Introduction
  • Basic Properties of Rings
  • Commutative Rings and Rings with Identity
  • Uniqueness of Identities and Inverses
  • Zero Divisors and Multiplicative Cancellation
  • Fields and Integral Domains
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 8.Integer Multiples and Exponents
  • Introduction
  • Integer Multiplication and Exponentiation
  • Nonpositive Multiples and Exponents
  • Properties of Integer Multiplication and Exponentiation
  • The Characteristic of a Ring
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 9.Subrings, Extensions, and Direct Sums
  • Introduction
  • The Subring Test
  • Subfields and Field Extensions
  • Direct Sums
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 10.Isomorphism and Invariants
  • Introduction
  • Isomorphisms of Rings
  • Renaming Elements
  • Preserving Operations
  • Proving Isomorphism
  • Well-Defined Functions
  • Disproving Isomorphism
  • Invariants
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • IV.Polynomial Rings
  • 11.Polynomial Rings
  • Polynomial Rings
  • Polynomials over an Integral Domain
  • Polynomial Functions
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • Appendix
  • Proof that R[x] Is a Commutative Ring
  • 12.Divisibility in Polynomial Rings
  • Introduction
  • The Division Algorithm in F[x]
  • Greatest Common Divisors of Polynomials
  • Relatively Prime Polynomials
  • The Euclidean Algorithm for Polynomials
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 13.Roots, Factors, and Irreducible Polynomials
  • Polynomial Functions and Remainders
  • Roots of Polynomials and the Factor Theorem
  • Irreducible Polynomials
  • Unique Factorization in F[x]
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 14.Irreducible Polynomials
  • Introduction
  • Factorization in C[x]
  • Factorization in R[x]
  • Factorization in Q[x]
  • Polynomials with No Linear Factors in Q[x]
  • Reducing Polynomials in Z[x] Modulo Primes
  • Eisenstein's Criterion
  • Factorization in F[x] for Other Fields F
  • Summary
  • The Cubic Formula
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Appendix
  • Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
  • 15.Quotients of Polynomial Rings
  • Introduction
  • Congruence Modulo a Polynomial
  • Congruence Classes of Polynomials
  • The Set F[x]/(f(x))
  • Special Quotients of Polynomial Rings
  • Algebraic Numbers
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • V.More Ring Theory
  • 16.Ideals and Homomorphisms
  • Introduction
  • Ideals
  • Congruence Modulo an Ideal
  • Maximal and Prime Ideals
  • Homomorphisms
  • The Kernel and Image of a Homomorphism
  • The First Isomorphism Theorem for Rings
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 17.Divisibility and Factorization in Integral Domains
  • Introduction
  • Divisibility and Euclidean Domains
  • Primes and Irreducibles
  • Unique Factorization Domains
  • Proof 1 Generalizing Greatest Common Divisors
  • Proof 2 Principal Ideal Domains
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 18.From Z to C
  • Introduction
  • From W to Z
  • Ordered Rings
  • From Z to Q
  • Ordering on Q
  • From Q to R
  • From R to C
  • A Characterization of the Integers
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • VI.Groups
  • 19.Symmetry
  • Introduction
  • Symmetries
  • Symmetries of Regular Polygons
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 20.An Introduction to Groups
  • Groups
  • Examples of Groups
  • Basic Properties of Groups
  • Identities and Inverses in a Group
  • The Order of a Group
  • Groups of Units
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 21.Integer Powers of Elements in a Group
  • Introduction
  • Powers of Elements in a Group
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 22.Subgroups
  • Introduction
  • The Subgroup Test
  • The Center of a Group
  • The Subgroup Generated by an Element
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 23.Subgroups of Cyclic Groups
  • Introduction
  • Subgroups of Cyclic Groups
  • Properties of the Order of an Element
  • Finite Cyclic Groups
  • Infinite Cyclic Groups
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 24.The Dihedral Groups
  • Introduction
  • Relationships between Elements in Dn
  • Generators and Group Presentations
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 25.The Symmetric Groups
  • Introduction
  • The Symmetric Group of a Set
  • Permutation Notation and Cycles
  • The Cycle Decomposition of a Permutation
  • Transpositions
  • Even and Odd Permutations and the Alternating Group
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 26.Cosets and Lagrange's Theorem
  • Introduction
  • A Relation in Groups
  • Cosets
  • Lagrange's Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 27.Normal Subgroups and Quotient Groups
  • Introduction
  • An Operation on Cosets
  • Normal Subgroups
  • Quotient Groups
  • Cauchy's Theorem for Finite Abelian Groups
  • Simple Groups and the Simplicity of An
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 28.Products of Groups
  • External Direct Products of Groups
  • Orders of Elements in Direct Products
  • Internal Direct Products in Groups
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 29.Group Isomorphisms and Invariants
  • Introduction
  • Isomorphisms of Groups
  • Renaming Elements
  • Preserving Operations
  • Proving Isomorphism
  • Some Basic Properties of Isomorphisms
  • Well-Defined Functions
  • Disproving Isomorphism
  • Invariants
  • Isomorphism Classes
  • Isomorphisms and Cyclic Groups
  • Cayley's Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 30.Homomorphisms and Isomorphism Theorems
  • Homomorphisms
  • The Kernel of a Homomorphism
  • The Image of a Homomorphism
  • The Isomorphism Theorems for Groups
  • The First Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • The Second Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • The Third Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • The Fourth Isomorphism Theorem for Groups
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 31.The Fundamental Theorem of Finite Abelian Groups
  • Introduction
  • The Components: p-Groups
  • The Fundamental Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • 32.The First Sylow Theorem
  • Introduction
  • Conjugacy and the Class Equation
  • The Class Equation
  • Cauchy's Theorem
  • The First Sylow Theorem
  • The Second and Third Sylow Theorems
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 33.The Second and Third Sylow Theorems
  • Introduction
  • Conjugate Subgroups and Normalizers
  • The Second Sylow Theorem
  • The Third Sylow Theorem
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • VII.Special Topics
  • 34.RSA Encryption
  • Introduction
  • Congruence and Modular Arithmetic
  • The Basics of RSA Encryption
  • An Example
  • Why RSA Works
  • Concluding Thoughts and Notes
  • Exercises
  • 35.Check Digits
  • Introduction
  • Check Digits
  • Credit Card Check Digits
  • ISBN Check Digits
  • Verhoeff's Dihedral Group D5 Check
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 36.Games: NIM and the 15 Puzzle
  • The Game of NIM
  • The 15 Puzzle
  • Permutations and the 15 Puzzle
  • Solving the 15 Puzzle
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 37.Finite Fields, the Group of Units in Zn, and Splitting Fields
  • Introduction
  • Finite Fields
  • The Group of Units of a Finite Field
  • The Group of Units of Zn
  • Splitting Fields
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • 38.Groups of Order 8 and 12: Semidirect Products of Groups
  • Introduction
  • Groups of Order 8
  • Semi-direct Products of Groups
  • Groups of Order 12 and p3
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • Connections
  • A.Functions
  • Special Types of Functions: Injections and Surjections
  • Injections
  • Surjections
  • The Importance of the Domain and Codomain
  • Composition of Functions
  • Inverse Functions
  • Theorems about Inverse Functions
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises
  • B.Mathematical Induction and the Well-Ordering Principle
  • Introduction
  • The Principle of Mathematical Induction
  • The Extended Principle of Mathematical Induction
  • The Strong Form of Mathematical Induction
  • The Well-Ordering Principle
  • The Equivalence of the Well-Ordering Principle and the Principles of Mathematical Induction
  • Concluding Activities
  • Exercises.
"Preface The impetus for this book lies in our approach to teaching abstract algebra. We place an emphasis on active learning and on developing students' intuition through their investigation of examples. For us, active learning involves students--they are doing something instead of just being passive learners. What students are doing when they are actively learning might include discovering, processing, discussing, applying information, writing intensive assignments, and engaging in common intellectual in-class experiences or collaborative assignments and projects. We support all of these activities with peer review and substantial faculty mentoring. According to Meyers and Jones [2], active learning derives from the assumptions that learning is an active endeavor by nature and that different people learn in different ways. A number of reports and studies show that active learning has a positive impact on students. For example, active learning is described as a high-impact learning activity in the latest report from the Association of American Colleges and Universities' Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative [1]. Results of a study [3] testing the active learning findings in liberal arts education show, in part, that students who experience the type of instruction we describe as active learning show larger "value-added" gains on a variety of outcomes than their peers. Although it is difficult to capture the essence of active learning in a textbook, this book is our attempt to do just that. Our goals for these materials are several: - To carefully introduce the ideas behind definitions and theorems"-- Provided by publisher.
Math & Statistics Library
Status of items at Math & Statistics Library
Math & Statistics Library Status
Stacks
QA162 .H63 2014 Unknown
Book
xvi, 493 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction & methodology
  • Access to medicines : the problem
  • A human right of access to medicines?
  • The TRIPS Agreement : patent protection for pharmaceuticals
  • The interface between patents and human rights in the context of access to medicines
  • Access to medicines in South Africa
  • Access to medicines in India
  • Access to medicines in Uganda
  • Findings, conclusions and recommendations.
"Millions of people worldwide lack adequate access to medicines, particularly in developing countries where resources are scarce with devastating human, social and economic consequences. The example of HIV/AIDS, for which treatment has advanced so significantly in the last decade that a diagnosis no longer necessarily brings with it a death sentence, highlights the importance of ensuring that essential medicines are affordable and accessible to all. This book focuses on one aspect of access to medicines: the affordability of essential medicines, and its connection to human rights and patents. The argument often made is that patent protection for medicines results in higher prices which negatively impacts access. Patients having no or inadequate access to affordable medicines endangers the full realisation of human rights, particularly the right to health. This book investigates this issue from a legal perspective, taking both an international and domestic angle. This study examines the interface of access to affordable medicines and patent protection from the perspective of international human rights law and the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) within the framework of the World Trade Organisation. The essential question posed by this book is whether access to medicines and patent protection conflict or coexist. The discussion is deepened by including a developing country approach. Three country studies have been conducted, on South Africa, India and Uganda. These aim to provide a concrete insight into whether these countries recognise and acknowledge the interplay between patents and human rights with respect to access to medicines. Secondly these studies examine whether TRIPS leaves sufficient freedom for (developing) states to adopt a patent system suited to their domestic needs, enabling them to strike a fair balance between access to medicines and patent protection for medicines. In other words: does one size fit all?"-- Back cover.
  • Introduction & methodology
  • Access to medicines : the problem
  • A human right of access to medicines?
  • The TRIPS Agreement : patent protection for pharmaceuticals
  • The interface between patents and human rights in the context of access to medicines
  • Access to medicines in South Africa
  • Access to medicines in India
  • Access to medicines in Uganda
  • Findings, conclusions and recommendations.
"Millions of people worldwide lack adequate access to medicines, particularly in developing countries where resources are scarce with devastating human, social and economic consequences. The example of HIV/AIDS, for which treatment has advanced so significantly in the last decade that a diagnosis no longer necessarily brings with it a death sentence, highlights the importance of ensuring that essential medicines are affordable and accessible to all. This book focuses on one aspect of access to medicines: the affordability of essential medicines, and its connection to human rights and patents. The argument often made is that patent protection for medicines results in higher prices which negatively impacts access. Patients having no or inadequate access to affordable medicines endangers the full realisation of human rights, particularly the right to health. This book investigates this issue from a legal perspective, taking both an international and domestic angle. This study examines the interface of access to affordable medicines and patent protection from the perspective of international human rights law and the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) within the framework of the World Trade Organisation. The essential question posed by this book is whether access to medicines and patent protection conflict or coexist. The discussion is deepened by including a developing country approach. Three country studies have been conducted, on South Africa, India and Uganda. These aim to provide a concrete insight into whether these countries recognise and acknowledge the interplay between patents and human rights with respect to access to medicines. Secondly these studies examine whether TRIPS leaves sufficient freedom for (developing) states to adopt a patent system suited to their domestic needs, enabling them to strike a fair balance between access to medicines and patent protection for medicines. In other words: does one size fit all?"-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
K3260.3 .S45 2014 Unknown
Book
pages cm
  • Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Final Act: Its Main Features and Contents: 1. An overview of the agreement: contents and features Frederick Abbott; 2. ACTA initial provisions and general definitions Xavier Seuba; 3. ACTA general obligations with respect to enforcement Xavier Seuba; 4. Provisions on civil enforcement
  • Section 2 of ACTA Anselm Kamperman Sanders; 5. Legal framework for enforcement: border measures Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan; 6. The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and beyond: towards a differentiated approach to criminal enforcement of intellectual property rights at the global level Christopher Geiger; 7. ACTA's digital chapter: remaining concerns and what can be done Rita Matulionyte; 8. The ACTA committee Peter Yu; Part II. Domestic Legislative Challenges: 9. ACTA's constitutional problem in the United States Sean Flynn; 10. Trick or treaty?: The Australian debate over the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement Matthew Rimmer; 11. A Brazilian perspective: res inter alios ACTA Denis Borges Barbosa; 12. Lessons to be drawn from the ACTA process: an African perspective Andrew Rens; Part III. Impact on Related Processes: 13. Three steps taken toward a reinterpreted three-step test: the impact of ACTA and SOPA on TPP Jonathan Band; 14. ACTA and the future of access to knowledge in the digital environment: U.S. enforcement trends as a global predictor Annemarie Bridy; 15. ACTA, East African enforcement legislation and generic medicines
  • a comparison Christoph Spennemann; 16. The EU and its IP policies: ACTA and third countries Anselm Kampermann Sanders; Part IV. Views from Stakeholders: Lessons: 17. Lessons learned from the ACTA process: an industry perspective Candice Li; 18. Lessons learned from the ACTA process: the view of creators Adriana Moscoso; 19. ACTA, a view from the eye of the storm Marietje Schaake; 20. ACTA, EU, and economic, social, and cultural rights in the digital environment Ante Wessels; Part V. What Lies Behind ACTA: 21. Assessing the implications of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement for the European Union: legitimate aim but wrong means Christophe Geiger; 22. ACTA: anatomy of a failed agreement Bryan Mercurio; 23. What was left out of ACTA Kimberlee Weatherall; 24. Slaying the ACTA myths Michael Geist; 25. Developing countries and ACTA: the anatomy of contestation Ahmed Abdel Latif; 26. ACTA: what lessons for future plurilateral agreements? Ricardo Melendez-Ortiz and Ahmed Abdel Latif.
"The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is the most important effort undertaken to lay down a plurilateral legal framework for the enforcement of intellectual property rights. With the view to learn more about the origins of this treaty, the process leading to its conclusion and its implications for law making in this field, The ACTA and the Plurilateral Enforcement Agenda: Genesis and Aftermath analyses in great depth both the context and the content of the agreements. In order to attain this objective, a large and diverse group of experts - renowned scholars, policy makers and civil society actors - who represent different perspectives on the necessary balance between intellectual property enforcement and other economic and social interests have been gathered together. This book is the most comprehensive analysis of ACTA, and of its relation with ongoing initiatives to improve enforcement of intellectual property and norms pertaining to a range of international legal regimes, conducted so far"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Final Act: Its Main Features and Contents: 1. An overview of the agreement: contents and features Frederick Abbott; 2. ACTA initial provisions and general definitions Xavier Seuba; 3. ACTA general obligations with respect to enforcement Xavier Seuba; 4. Provisions on civil enforcement
  • Section 2 of ACTA Anselm Kamperman Sanders; 5. Legal framework for enforcement: border measures Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan; 6. The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and beyond: towards a differentiated approach to criminal enforcement of intellectual property rights at the global level Christopher Geiger; 7. ACTA's digital chapter: remaining concerns and what can be done Rita Matulionyte; 8. The ACTA committee Peter Yu; Part II. Domestic Legislative Challenges: 9. ACTA's constitutional problem in the United States Sean Flynn; 10. Trick or treaty?: The Australian debate over the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement Matthew Rimmer; 11. A Brazilian perspective: res inter alios ACTA Denis Borges Barbosa; 12. Lessons to be drawn from the ACTA process: an African perspective Andrew Rens; Part III. Impact on Related Processes: 13. Three steps taken toward a reinterpreted three-step test: the impact of ACTA and SOPA on TPP Jonathan Band; 14. ACTA and the future of access to knowledge in the digital environment: U.S. enforcement trends as a global predictor Annemarie Bridy; 15. ACTA, East African enforcement legislation and generic medicines
  • a comparison Christoph Spennemann; 16. The EU and its IP policies: ACTA and third countries Anselm Kampermann Sanders; Part IV. Views from Stakeholders: Lessons: 17. Lessons learned from the ACTA process: an industry perspective Candice Li; 18. Lessons learned from the ACTA process: the view of creators Adriana Moscoso; 19. ACTA, a view from the eye of the storm Marietje Schaake; 20. ACTA, EU, and economic, social, and cultural rights in the digital environment Ante Wessels; Part V. What Lies Behind ACTA: 21. Assessing the implications of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement for the European Union: legitimate aim but wrong means Christophe Geiger; 22. ACTA: anatomy of a failed agreement Bryan Mercurio; 23. What was left out of ACTA Kimberlee Weatherall; 24. Slaying the ACTA myths Michael Geist; 25. Developing countries and ACTA: the anatomy of contestation Ahmed Abdel Latif; 26. ACTA: what lessons for future plurilateral agreements? Ricardo Melendez-Ortiz and Ahmed Abdel Latif.
"The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is the most important effort undertaken to lay down a plurilateral legal framework for the enforcement of intellectual property rights. With the view to learn more about the origins of this treaty, the process leading to its conclusion and its implications for law making in this field, The ACTA and the Plurilateral Enforcement Agenda: Genesis and Aftermath analyses in great depth both the context and the content of the agreements. In order to attain this objective, a large and diverse group of experts - renowned scholars, policy makers and civil society actors - who represent different perspectives on the necessary balance between intellectual property enforcement and other economic and social interests have been gathered together. This book is the most comprehensive analysis of ACTA, and of its relation with ongoing initiatives to improve enforcement of intellectual property and norms pertaining to a range of international legal regimes, conducted so far"-- Provided by publisher.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Book
254 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
In process Find it Request
(no call number) Unavailable
Book
xvii, 149 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
  • The legal history of Indian tribes
  • Law and African-American slavery
  • Rights of property and their regulation
  • Law and entrepreneurship
  • Criminal law
  • Law and domestic relations
  • Civil injuries and the law of torts
  • Legal education and the legal profession.
"Law has played a central role in American history. From colonial times to the present, law has not just reflected the changing society in which legal decisions have been made-it has played a powerful role in shaping that society, though not always in positive ways. In this Very Short Introduction, eminent legal scholar G. Edward White-author of the ongoing, multi-volume Law in American History-offers a compact overview that sheds light on the impact of law on a number of key social issues. Rather than offer a straight chronological history, the book instead traces important threads woven throughout our nation's past, looking at how law shaped Native American affairs, slavery, business, and home life, as well as how it has dealt with criminal and civil offenses. White shows that law has not always been used to exemplary ends. For instance, a series of decisions by the Marshall court essentially marginalized Amerindians, indigenous people of the Americas, reducing tribes to wards of the government. Likewise, law initially legitimated slavery in the United States, and legal institutions, including the Supreme Court, failed to resolve the tensions stirred up by the westward expansion of slavery, eventually sparking the Civil War. White also looks at the expansion of laws regarding property rights, which were vitally important to the colonists, many of whom left Europe hoping to become land owners; the evolution of criminal punishment from a public display (the stocks, the gallows) to a private prison system; the rise of tort law after the Civil War; and the progress in legal education, moving from informal apprenticeships and lax standards to modern law schools and rigorous bar exams. In this illuminating look at the pivotal role of law in American life, White offers us an excellent first step to a better appreciation of the function of law in our society. About the Series: Oxford's Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects--from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative--yet always balanced and complete--discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable"-- Provided by publisher.
""Law, " in this book, includes basic common law subjects (such as property, torts, and contracts), as well as statutory and constitutional issues, including issues associated with gender, race, and domestic relations. The domain of law also includes foundational issues of American political and social theory, such as sovereignty, liberty, equality, and criminal justice. It includes the evolving status and roles of members of the legal profession as influential figures in American culture. Understanding the importance of law in American society begins with recognition of the multiple dimensions of "legal" activity. Law, over the course of American history, has reflected the changing cultural settings in which legal decisions have been made, and has helped shape those settings. The Constitution of the United States was drafted in response to a set of political, economic, social, and intellectual concerns held by some late eighteenth-century Americans. Those concerns centered on the structural and functional efficacy of the form of federal government created by the Articles of Confederation in 1781, and were a product of a particular set of historical experiences. But once the Constitution was drafted and ratified, an authoritative legal document had recast the form and structure of American government, providing a framework into which future political, economic, social, and intellectual issues would be set. As the example suggests, law has not been only a cultural artifact in the history of American civilization, but also a causal agent in the unfolding of that history"-- Provided by publisher.
  • The legal history of Indian tribes
  • Law and African-American slavery
  • Rights of property and their regulation
  • Law and entrepreneurship
  • Criminal law
  • Law and domestic relations
  • Civil injuries and the law of torts
  • Legal education and the legal profession.
"Law has played a central role in American history. From colonial times to the present, law has not just reflected the changing society in which legal decisions have been made-it has played a powerful role in shaping that society, though not always in positive ways. In this Very Short Introduction, eminent legal scholar G. Edward White-author of the ongoing, multi-volume Law in American History-offers a compact overview that sheds light on the impact of law on a number of key social issues. Rather than offer a straight chronological history, the book instead traces important threads woven throughout our nation's past, looking at how law shaped Native American affairs, slavery, business, and home life, as well as how it has dealt with criminal and civil offenses. White shows that law has not always been used to exemplary ends. For instance, a series of decisions by the Marshall court essentially marginalized Amerindians, indigenous people of the Americas, reducing tribes to wards of the government. Likewise, law initially legitimated slavery in the United States, and legal institutions, including the Supreme Court, failed to resolve the tensions stirred up by the westward expansion of slavery, eventually sparking the Civil War. White also looks at the expansion of laws regarding property rights, which were vitally important to the colonists, many of whom left Europe hoping to become land owners; the evolution of criminal punishment from a public display (the stocks, the gallows) to a private prison system; the rise of tort law after the Civil War; and the progress in legal education, moving from informal apprenticeships and lax standards to modern law schools and rigorous bar exams. In this illuminating look at the pivotal role of law in American life, White offers us an excellent first step to a better appreciation of the function of law in our society. About the Series: Oxford's Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects--from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative--yet always balanced and complete--discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable"-- Provided by publisher.
""Law, " in this book, includes basic common law subjects (such as property, torts, and contracts), as well as statutory and constitutional issues, including issues associated with gender, race, and domestic relations. The domain of law also includes foundational issues of American political and social theory, such as sovereignty, liberty, equality, and criminal justice. It includes the evolving status and roles of members of the legal profession as influential figures in American culture. Understanding the importance of law in American society begins with recognition of the multiple dimensions of "legal" activity. Law, over the course of American history, has reflected the changing cultural settings in which legal decisions have been made, and has helped shape those settings. The Constitution of the United States was drafted in response to a set of political, economic, social, and intellectual concerns held by some late eighteenth-century Americans. Those concerns centered on the structural and functional efficacy of the form of federal government created by the Articles of Confederation in 1781, and were a product of a particular set of historical experiences. But once the Constitution was drafted and ratified, an authoritative legal document had recast the form and structure of American government, providing a framework into which future political, economic, social, and intellectual issues would be set. As the example suggests, law has not been only a cultural artifact in the history of American civilization, but also a causal agent in the unfolding of that history"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
KF352 .W478 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 538 pages) : illustrations.
  • Duffing-Type Oscillators with Amplitude-Independent Period
  • Asymptotics of Rigid-Body Motions for Nonlinear Dynamics: Physical In-sight and Methodologies
  • Non-Linear Phenomena Exhibited by Flexible Cylindrical and Sector Shells
  • Gear Shift Patterns in Uncertain Terrestrial Locomotion Systems
  • Turbulence in Flexible Plates and Shells
  • Using Bifurcation Diagrams for Controlling Chaos
  • Shear Waves Dispersion in Cylindrically Structured Cancellous Viscoelastic Bones
  • Quasi-Regular and Chaotic Dynamics of Postural Sway in Human
  • Modeling of Ropes with Consideration of Large Deformations and Friction by Means of the Rigid Finite Element Method
  • Dynamical Response of a Van Der Pol-Duffing System with an External Harmonic Excitation and Fractional Derivative
  • Vortex Structure Around the Cylinder at a Flow of Viscous Fluid
  • Asymptotic Analysis and Limiting Phase Trajectories in The Dynamics of Spring Pendulum
  • Vibration Surveillance System with Variable Stiffness Holder for Flexible Details Milling
  • Diversities in the Inverse Dynamics Problem for Underactuated Mechanical Systems Subject to Servo-Constraints
  • Rare Phenomena and Chaos in Switching Power Converters
  • Constrained Motion of Mechanical Systems and Tracking Control of Nonlinear Systems
  • The General Conception of Intellectual Investigation the Regular and Chaotic Behavior of Dynamical Systems of Special Structure
  • Dynamic Properties of Two-Axle Freight Wagon with UIC Double-Link Suspension as a Non-Smooth System with Dry Friction
  • Dynamics of Mechanical Systems with Mecanum Wheels
  • Reliability Analysis of the Dynamics of a Horizontal Drill-String
  • Transition in Oscillatory Behavior in Mouse Oocyte and Mouse Embryo Trough Oscillatory Spherical Net Model of Mouse Zona Pellucida
  • Constrained N-Body Problems
  • Hunting French Ducks in Population Dynamics
  • Model of Nonlinear Fractal Oscillator in Nanosystem
  • Dynamical Statement Networks
  • The Shooting Method for Non-Standard Boundary Value Problem
  • Automatic Sleep Scoring From a Single Electrode Using Delay Differential Equations
  • Methods for the Quick Analysis of Micro-Chaos
  • Bouncing Ball Dynamics: Simple Motion of the Table Approximating the Sinusoidal Motion
  • Periodic Motions of Coupled Oscillators Excited by Dry Friction and Harmonic Force
  • Limit Cycle Oscillations of an Aerodynamic Pendulum
  • Vibratory Energy Localization by Non-Smooth Energy Sink with Time-Varying Mass
  • Coordinate-Free Formulation of Nonholonomic Constraints for Wheeled Robots
  • Optomechatronic Choppers with Rotating Elements: Design Programs
  • A Delay Mathematical Model for HIV Dynamics in HIV-Specific
  • The Application of Parametric Excitation in Resonant MEMS Gyros
  • Influence of Smart Materials on the Dynamical Response of Mechanical Oscillator
  • Dynamical Pendulum-Like Nonconservative Systems.
The book is a collection of contributions devoted to analytical, numerical and experimental techniques of dynamical systems, presented at the International Conference on Dynamical Systems: Theory and Applications, held in Łódź, Poland on December 2-5, 2013. The studies give deep insight into both the theory and applications of non-linear dynamical systems, emphasizing directions for future research. Topics covered include: constrained motion of mechanical systems and tracking control; diversities in the inverse dynamics; singularly perturbed ODEs with periodic coefficients; asymptotic solutions to the problem of vortex structure around a cylinder; investigation of the regular and chaotic dynamics; rare phenomena and chaos in power converters; non-holonomic constraints in wheeled robots; exotic bifurcations in non-smooth systems; micro-chaos; energy exchange of coupled oscillators; HIV dynamics; homogenous transformations with applications to off-shore slender structures; novel approaches to a qualitative study of a dissipative system; chaos of postural sway in humans; oscillators with fractional derivatives; controlling chaos via bifurcation diagrams; theories relating to optical choppers with rotating wheels; dynamics in expert systems; shooting methods for non-standard boundary value problems; automatic sleep scoring governed by delay differential equations; isochronous oscillations; the aerodynamics pendulum and its limit cycles; constrained N-body problems; nano-fractal oscillators; and dynamically-coupled dry friction.
  • Duffing-Type Oscillators with Amplitude-Independent Period
  • Asymptotics of Rigid-Body Motions for Nonlinear Dynamics: Physical In-sight and Methodologies
  • Non-Linear Phenomena Exhibited by Flexible Cylindrical and Sector Shells
  • Gear Shift Patterns in Uncertain Terrestrial Locomotion Systems
  • Turbulence in Flexible Plates and Shells
  • Using Bifurcation Diagrams for Controlling Chaos
  • Shear Waves Dispersion in Cylindrically Structured Cancellous Viscoelastic Bones
  • Quasi-Regular and Chaotic Dynamics of Postural Sway in Human
  • Modeling of Ropes with Consideration of Large Deformations and Friction by Means of the Rigid Finite Element Method
  • Dynamical Response of a Van Der Pol-Duffing System with an External Harmonic Excitation and Fractional Derivative
  • Vortex Structure Around the Cylinder at a Flow of Viscous Fluid
  • Asymptotic Analysis and Limiting Phase Trajectories in The Dynamics of Spring Pendulum
  • Vibration Surveillance System with Variable Stiffness Holder for Flexible Details Milling
  • Diversities in the Inverse Dynamics Problem for Underactuated Mechanical Systems Subject to Servo-Constraints
  • Rare Phenomena and Chaos in Switching Power Converters
  • Constrained Motion of Mechanical Systems and Tracking Control of Nonlinear Systems
  • The General Conception of Intellectual Investigation the Regular and Chaotic Behavior of Dynamical Systems of Special Structure
  • Dynamic Properties of Two-Axle Freight Wagon with UIC Double-Link Suspension as a Non-Smooth System with Dry Friction
  • Dynamics of Mechanical Systems with Mecanum Wheels
  • Reliability Analysis of the Dynamics of a Horizontal Drill-String
  • Transition in Oscillatory Behavior in Mouse Oocyte and Mouse Embryo Trough Oscillatory Spherical Net Model of Mouse Zona Pellucida
  • Constrained N-Body Problems
  • Hunting French Ducks in Population Dynamics
  • Model of Nonlinear Fractal Oscillator in Nanosystem
  • Dynamical Statement Networks
  • The Shooting Method for Non-Standard Boundary Value Problem
  • Automatic Sleep Scoring From a Single Electrode Using Delay Differential Equations
  • Methods for the Quick Analysis of Micro-Chaos
  • Bouncing Ball Dynamics: Simple Motion of the Table Approximating the Sinusoidal Motion
  • Periodic Motions of Coupled Oscillators Excited by Dry Friction and Harmonic Force
  • Limit Cycle Oscillations of an Aerodynamic Pendulum
  • Vibratory Energy Localization by Non-Smooth Energy Sink with Time-Varying Mass
  • Coordinate-Free Formulation of Nonholonomic Constraints for Wheeled Robots
  • Optomechatronic Choppers with Rotating Elements: Design Programs
  • A Delay Mathematical Model for HIV Dynamics in HIV-Specific
  • The Application of Parametric Excitation in Resonant MEMS Gyros
  • Influence of Smart Materials on the Dynamical Response of Mechanical Oscillator
  • Dynamical Pendulum-Like Nonconservative Systems.
The book is a collection of contributions devoted to analytical, numerical and experimental techniques of dynamical systems, presented at the International Conference on Dynamical Systems: Theory and Applications, held in Łódź, Poland on December 2-5, 2013. The studies give deep insight into both the theory and applications of non-linear dynamical systems, emphasizing directions for future research. Topics covered include: constrained motion of mechanical systems and tracking control; diversities in the inverse dynamics; singularly perturbed ODEs with periodic coefficients; asymptotic solutions to the problem of vortex structure around a cylinder; investigation of the regular and chaotic dynamics; rare phenomena and chaos in power converters; non-holonomic constraints in wheeled robots; exotic bifurcations in non-smooth systems; micro-chaos; energy exchange of coupled oscillators; HIV dynamics; homogenous transformations with applications to off-shore slender structures; novel approaches to a qualitative study of a dissipative system; chaos of postural sway in humans; oscillators with fractional derivatives; controlling chaos via bifurcation diagrams; theories relating to optical choppers with rotating wheels; dynamics in expert systems; shooting methods for non-standard boundary value problems; automatic sleep scoring governed by delay differential equations; isochronous oscillations; the aerodynamics pendulum and its limit cycles; constrained N-body problems; nano-fractal oscillators; and dynamically-coupled dry friction.
Book
319 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Vorwort
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" und der größte Kunstraub aller Zeiten
  • Der "Führer" als Kunstsammler
  • Hitlers Böcklin-Kollektion
  • Berater und Händler
  • Meisterwerke der Malerei AH
  • Das Projekt "Führermuseum"
  • Eine Galerie fiir Hitlers Heimatstadt
  • Das Erlebnis der Uffizien
  • Der Sonderbeauftragte Hans Posse
  • Kunstraub in Österreich
  • Vom Vermögensentzug zum Kunstraub
  • Hitler sammelt Österreichisch
  • Das Denkmalamt als Kollaborateur
  • Streit um die Rothschild-Sammlungen
  • Die gescheiterte Verteilung
  • Raubkunst für die Museen
  • Posse inspiziert die Wiener Raubkunst
  • Zugriff auf die sichergestellten Kunstwerke
  • Der Kunstbesitz der Klöster und Stifte
  • Zwangsverkäufe
  • Posses Verteilungsplan
  • Streit um die Sammlung Lanckoroński
  • Kunstraub im "Altreich"
  • Kunstraub in Polen
  • Die Rolle Hitlers
  • Posses Polen-Mission
  • Wissenschaft als Legitimierung
  • Die "Führerauswahl" in Berlin
  • Lubomirskis Dürer-Sammlung
  • Konkurrierende Verteilungspläne
  • "Heimführung"
  • Deutsche Kunstraub-Paranoia
  • Deutscher Kunstraub-Revanchismus
  • Posses Gutachten zum Genter Altar
  • Die Odyssee des Genter Altars
  • Kunstraub in Frankreich
  • Die Rolle Hitlers
  • Rosenbergs Zugriff auf die jüdischen Sammlungen
  • Posse in den Pariser Raubkunstdepots
  • Der Profiteur Hermann Göring
  • Konflikte um den Abtransport
  • Die symbolische Übergabe der Beute
  • Kunstraub in den Niederlanden
  • Erwerbungen en gros
  • Kampf gegen die Konkurrenz
  • Kunstraub in der Tschechoslowakei
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" im Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren
  • Die Sammlung des Fürsten Lobkowicz
  • Der Hohenfiirther Altar
  • Kunstraub in der Sowjetunion
  • Der "Sonderauftrag" in der Sowjetunion
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" für die Eremitage
  • Posses Beauftragter Niels von Holst
  • Überraschende Kooperationen
  • Der Anteil Rosenbergs
  • Die Gemälde für das "Führermuseum"
  • Die geplante Präsentation in München
  • Das "Führermuseum" in Kremsmünster
  • Hitlers Sorge um die Kunstwerke
  • Der "Sonderauftrag" nach Stalingrad
  • Der Nachfolger Hermann Voss
  • Die Zentralregistrierung in Dresden
  • Die Kunstwerke in Altaussee
  • Unautorisierte Einlieferungen
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" als Instrument
  • Hitler ist der Chef
  • Posse setzt sich durch
  • Das Nachkriegsschicksal der Raubkunst
  • Anmerkungen
  • Abkürzungen
  • Quellen
  • Literatur
  • Personenregister.
  • Vorwort
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" und der größte Kunstraub aller Zeiten
  • Der "Führer" als Kunstsammler
  • Hitlers Böcklin-Kollektion
  • Berater und Händler
  • Meisterwerke der Malerei AH
  • Das Projekt "Führermuseum"
  • Eine Galerie fiir Hitlers Heimatstadt
  • Das Erlebnis der Uffizien
  • Der Sonderbeauftragte Hans Posse
  • Kunstraub in Österreich
  • Vom Vermögensentzug zum Kunstraub
  • Hitler sammelt Österreichisch
  • Das Denkmalamt als Kollaborateur
  • Streit um die Rothschild-Sammlungen
  • Die gescheiterte Verteilung
  • Raubkunst für die Museen
  • Posse inspiziert die Wiener Raubkunst
  • Zugriff auf die sichergestellten Kunstwerke
  • Der Kunstbesitz der Klöster und Stifte
  • Zwangsverkäufe
  • Posses Verteilungsplan
  • Streit um die Sammlung Lanckoroński
  • Kunstraub im "Altreich"
  • Kunstraub in Polen
  • Die Rolle Hitlers
  • Posses Polen-Mission
  • Wissenschaft als Legitimierung
  • Die "Führerauswahl" in Berlin
  • Lubomirskis Dürer-Sammlung
  • Konkurrierende Verteilungspläne
  • "Heimführung"
  • Deutsche Kunstraub-Paranoia
  • Deutscher Kunstraub-Revanchismus
  • Posses Gutachten zum Genter Altar
  • Die Odyssee des Genter Altars
  • Kunstraub in Frankreich
  • Die Rolle Hitlers
  • Rosenbergs Zugriff auf die jüdischen Sammlungen
  • Posse in den Pariser Raubkunstdepots
  • Der Profiteur Hermann Göring
  • Konflikte um den Abtransport
  • Die symbolische Übergabe der Beute
  • Kunstraub in den Niederlanden
  • Erwerbungen en gros
  • Kampf gegen die Konkurrenz
  • Kunstraub in der Tschechoslowakei
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" im Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren
  • Die Sammlung des Fürsten Lobkowicz
  • Der Hohenfiirther Altar
  • Kunstraub in der Sowjetunion
  • Der "Sonderauftrag" in der Sowjetunion
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" für die Eremitage
  • Posses Beauftragter Niels von Holst
  • Überraschende Kooperationen
  • Der Anteil Rosenbergs
  • Die Gemälde für das "Führermuseum"
  • Die geplante Präsentation in München
  • Das "Führermuseum" in Kremsmünster
  • Hitlers Sorge um die Kunstwerke
  • Der "Sonderauftrag" nach Stalingrad
  • Der Nachfolger Hermann Voss
  • Die Zentralregistrierung in Dresden
  • Die Kunstwerke in Altaussee
  • Unautorisierte Einlieferungen
  • Der "Führervorbehalt" als Instrument
  • Hitler ist der Chef
  • Posse setzt sich durch
  • Das Nachkriegsschicksal der Raubkunst
  • Anmerkungen
  • Abkürzungen
  • Quellen
  • Literatur
  • Personenregister.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
N8795.3 .E85 S39 2014 Unknown
Book
427 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
  • Einleitung : für eine Mediengeschichte von Rechtsnormen
  • Schrift und Aufzeichnung
  • Musiknoten
  • Buchbilder
  • Stimmenspeicher
  • Konservenmusik
  • Verwertungsagenturen und Forschungsmaterialien
  • Verwertungskollektive
  • Zelluloidzirkulationen
  • Lautsprecherartisten
  • Privatkopien und Universalnormen
  • Apparateabgaben
  • Informationsfluss
  • Traditionsautoren
  • Zum Schluss : Rechtsgeschichten des Medienwandels
  • Bibliographischer Essay
  • Dank
  • Anmerkungen
  • Bibliographie
  • Abbildungsnachweis
  • Abkürzungsverzeichnis
  • Register.
  • Einleitung : für eine Mediengeschichte von Rechtsnormen
  • Schrift und Aufzeichnung
  • Musiknoten
  • Buchbilder
  • Stimmenspeicher
  • Konservenmusik
  • Verwertungsagenturen und Forschungsmaterialien
  • Verwertungskollektive
  • Zelluloidzirkulationen
  • Lautsprecherartisten
  • Privatkopien und Universalnormen
  • Apparateabgaben
  • Informationsfluss
  • Traditionsautoren
  • Zum Schluss : Rechtsgeschichten des Medienwandels
  • Bibliographischer Essay
  • Dank
  • Anmerkungen
  • Bibliographie
  • Abbildungsnachweis
  • Abkürzungsverzeichnis
  • Register.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
KK2655 .D66 2014 Unknown
Book
xvi, 352 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
KG411 .B353 2014 Unknown
Book
1 volume
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
In process Request
(no call number) In-library use
Book
xxvi, 578 p. : ill. ; 28 cm
  • Introduction to law and biodefense, bioterrorism, and biosecurity
  • The role of the federal government in biodefense
  • U.S. Constitution, biodefense and public health emergencies
  • Biodefense countermeasures : liability, compensation, intellectual property
  • State laws and biodefense, biosecurity and other public health emergencies
  • Regulation of research and biological agents and biological safety laboratories
  • Federal statutes for crimes of bioterrorism
  • National defense and bioterrorism : the military, criminal law and biodefense
  • Federal law and civil issues arising from biosecurity threats
  • Private causes of action against persons or non-governmental entities concerning issues in bioterrorism
  • Global bioterrorism and biosecurity law
  • The future of law and biosecurity, biodefense and bioterrorism.
  • Introduction to law and biodefense, bioterrorism, and biosecurity
  • The role of the federal government in biodefense
  • U.S. Constitution, biodefense and public health emergencies
  • Biodefense countermeasures : liability, compensation, intellectual property
  • State laws and biodefense, biosecurity and other public health emergencies
  • Regulation of research and biological agents and biological safety laboratories
  • Federal statutes for crimes of bioterrorism
  • National defense and bioterrorism : the military, criminal law and biodefense
  • Federal law and civil issues arising from biosecurity threats
  • Private causes of action against persons or non-governmental entities concerning issues in bioterrorism
  • Global bioterrorism and biosecurity law
  • The future of law and biosecurity, biodefense and bioterrorism.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Stacks 1
KF9430 .S88 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • chapter 1. Introduction to biotechnology in medical sciences
  • chapter 2. Human diseases : causes and reasons
  • chapter 3. Bacteriology and antibiotics
  • chapter 4. Virology and vaccines
  • chapter 5. Immunological disorders and immunotherapy
  • chapter 6. Recombinant DNA technology and therapeutic proteins
  • chapter 7. Stem cell technology
  • chapter 8. Cell and tissue engineering
  • chapter 9. Molecular diagnostics and forensic science
  • chapter 10. Genetic disorders and gene therapy
  • chapter 11. Synthetic biology and nanomedicine
  • chapter 12. Pharmacogenomics and predictive medicine
  • chapter 13. Bioethics
  • chapter 14. Biobusiness and intellectual property rights
  • chapter 15. Career opportunities.
"This book is a comprehensive overview of all the important aspects of medical biotechnology intended for interested, scientifically oriented laypersons, along, who want a relatively low level presentation of important biotechnology medical specialties such as bacteriology, immunology, recombinant DNA, molecular diagnostics, gene therapy, synthetic biology, tissue engineering, bioethics, IP issues, vaccines, and more"--Provided by publisher.
  • chapter 1. Introduction to biotechnology in medical sciences
  • chapter 2. Human diseases : causes and reasons
  • chapter 3. Bacteriology and antibiotics
  • chapter 4. Virology and vaccines
  • chapter 5. Immunological disorders and immunotherapy
  • chapter 6. Recombinant DNA technology and therapeutic proteins
  • chapter 7. Stem cell technology
  • chapter 8. Cell and tissue engineering
  • chapter 9. Molecular diagnostics and forensic science
  • chapter 10. Genetic disorders and gene therapy
  • chapter 11. Synthetic biology and nanomedicine
  • chapter 12. Pharmacogenomics and predictive medicine
  • chapter 13. Bioethics
  • chapter 14. Biobusiness and intellectual property rights
  • chapter 15. Career opportunities.
"This book is a comprehensive overview of all the important aspects of medical biotechnology intended for interested, scientifically oriented laypersons, along, who want a relatively low level presentation of important biotechnology medical specialties such as bacteriology, immunology, recombinant DNA, molecular diagnostics, gene therapy, synthetic biology, tissue engineering, bioethics, IP issues, vaccines, and more"--Provided by publisher.
Book
vii, 440 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • The context
  • Toward free trade and investment between China and the United States
  • The economic impact of a China--US free trade and investment agreement
  • Adjustment challenges for US workers
  • Potential self-balancing stand-alone agreements
  • Merchandise tariffs
  • Government procurement
  • Agriculture
  • Potential components of a comprehensive agreement
  • Services barriers
  • Financial services
  • Intellectual property rights
  • Labor policy
  • Environment policy
  • Export controls
  • The investment cluster
  • Foreign direct investment
  • State-owned enterprises
  • Competition policy
  • Parallel issues
  • Cyberespionage
  • Trade and currency
  • Wrapping up
  • Dispute settlement
  • Conclusions and recommendations.
  • The context
  • Toward free trade and investment between China and the United States
  • The economic impact of a China--US free trade and investment agreement
  • Adjustment challenges for US workers
  • Potential self-balancing stand-alone agreements
  • Merchandise tariffs
  • Government procurement
  • Agriculture
  • Potential components of a comprehensive agreement
  • Services barriers
  • Financial services
  • Intellectual property rights
  • Labor policy
  • Environment policy
  • Export controls
  • The investment cluster
  • Foreign direct investment
  • State-owned enterprises
  • Competition policy
  • Parallel issues
  • Cyberespionage
  • Trade and currency
  • Wrapping up
  • Dispute settlement
  • Conclusions and recommendations.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
HF1456.5 .C6 B47 2014 Unavailable In process Request

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