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Book
iii, 27 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
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US Federal Documents Find it
Y 4.F 76/2:S.HRG.113-540 Unknown
Book
xi, 527 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Part I. Cooperation or combat
  • A fighting faith
  • Apostolic catholics
  • Behind the scenes
  • Enter the CIA
  • Allard Lowenstein and the International Student Conference
  • Part II. Denial operations
  • The counteroffensive
  • The battle for members
  • Opening the spigot
  • The spirit of Bandung
  • Shifting battlefields
  • Part III. Competitive coexistence
  • Hungary and the struggle against nonalignment
  • Debating democracy in Red Square
  • Courting revolutionaries
  • Gloria Steinem and the Vienna operation
  • Social upheavals
  • Part IV. Losing control
  • Showdown in Madison
  • Pro-west moderate militants
  • A pyrrhic victory
  • The persistent questioner
  • Lifting the veil
  • Part V. The flap
  • Philip Sherburne takes on the CIA
  • The game within the game
  • Hide-and-seek
  • Do you want blood on your hands?
  • The firestorm
  • The enemy at home.
In this revelatory book, Karen M. Paget shows how the CIA turned the National Student Association into an intelligence asset during the Cold War, with students used-often wittingly and sometimes unwittingly-as undercover agents inside America and abroad. In 1967, Ramparts magazine exposed the story, prompting the Agency into engineering a successful cover-up. Now Paget, drawing on archival sources, declassified documents, and more than 150 interviews, shows that the Ramparts story revealed only a small part of the plot. A cautionary tale, throwing sharp light on the persistent argument, heard even now, about whether America's national-security interests can be advanced by skullduggery and deception, Patriotic Betrayal, says Karl E. Meyer, a former editorial board member of the New York Times and The Washington Post, evokes "the aura of a John le Carre novel with its self-serving rationalizations, its layers of duplicity, and its bureaucratic doubletalk." And Hugh Wilford, author of The Mighty Wurlitzer: How the CIA Played America, calls Patriotic Betrayal "extremely valuable as a case study of relations between the CIA and one of its front groups, greatly extending and enriching our knowledge and understanding of the complex dynamics involved in such covert, state-private relationships; it offers a fascinating portrayal of post-World War II U.S. political culture in microcosm.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Cooperation or combat
  • A fighting faith
  • Apostolic catholics
  • Behind the scenes
  • Enter the CIA
  • Allard Lowenstein and the International Student Conference
  • Part II. Denial operations
  • The counteroffensive
  • The battle for members
  • Opening the spigot
  • The spirit of Bandung
  • Shifting battlefields
  • Part III. Competitive coexistence
  • Hungary and the struggle against nonalignment
  • Debating democracy in Red Square
  • Courting revolutionaries
  • Gloria Steinem and the Vienna operation
  • Social upheavals
  • Part IV. Losing control
  • Showdown in Madison
  • Pro-west moderate militants
  • A pyrrhic victory
  • The persistent questioner
  • Lifting the veil
  • Part V. The flap
  • Philip Sherburne takes on the CIA
  • The game within the game
  • Hide-and-seek
  • Do you want blood on your hands?
  • The firestorm
  • The enemy at home.
In this revelatory book, Karen M. Paget shows how the CIA turned the National Student Association into an intelligence asset during the Cold War, with students used-often wittingly and sometimes unwittingly-as undercover agents inside America and abroad. In 1967, Ramparts magazine exposed the story, prompting the Agency into engineering a successful cover-up. Now Paget, drawing on archival sources, declassified documents, and more than 150 interviews, shows that the Ramparts story revealed only a small part of the plot. A cautionary tale, throwing sharp light on the persistent argument, heard even now, about whether America's national-security interests can be advanced by skullduggery and deception, Patriotic Betrayal, says Karl E. Meyer, a former editorial board member of the New York Times and The Washington Post, evokes "the aura of a John le Carre novel with its self-serving rationalizations, its layers of duplicity, and its bureaucratic doubletalk." And Hugh Wilford, author of The Mighty Wurlitzer: How the CIA Played America, calls Patriotic Betrayal "extremely valuable as a case study of relations between the CIA and one of its front groups, greatly extending and enriching our knowledge and understanding of the complex dynamics involved in such covert, state-private relationships; it offers a fascinating portrayal of post-World War II U.S. political culture in microcosm.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
JK468 .I6 P27 2015 Unknown
Book
xxxiii, 293 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Poland, students and communism
  • Part I. From sovietization to destalinization : 1944-1957
  • The lost generation
  • The great leap forward
  • The generation of '56
  • Part II. From acquiescence to contestation : 1957-1968
  • Our small stabilization
  • No pasaran!
  • The generation of '68
  • Part III. From repression to resurgence : 1968-1980
  • The post-March hangover
  • Socialist complacency
  • We don't need no thought control
  • Part IV. From solidarity to betrayal : 1980-1989
  • The generation of '81
  • For our freedom and yours
  • The generation of '89
  • Epilogue: The end of the classical student movement.
"The book presents a chronological narrative of student political activity in Communist Poland and discusses it both from the point of view of those who supported and those who opposed the regime while elaborating on generational change within the country's student milieu. It sheds light on lesser-known aspects of the history of Communist Poland and shows that students played an important political role and that many known members of the country's elite emerged from the ranks of student activists"--Provided by publisher.
  • Introduction: Poland, students and communism
  • Part I. From sovietization to destalinization : 1944-1957
  • The lost generation
  • The great leap forward
  • The generation of '56
  • Part II. From acquiescence to contestation : 1957-1968
  • Our small stabilization
  • No pasaran!
  • The generation of '68
  • Part III. From repression to resurgence : 1968-1980
  • The post-March hangover
  • Socialist complacency
  • We don't need no thought control
  • Part IV. From solidarity to betrayal : 1980-1989
  • The generation of '81
  • For our freedom and yours
  • The generation of '89
  • Epilogue: The end of the classical student movement.
"The book presents a chronological narrative of student political activity in Communist Poland and discusses it both from the point of view of those who supported and those who opposed the regime while elaborating on generational change within the country's student milieu. It sheds light on lesser-known aspects of the history of Communist Poland and shows that students played an important political role and that many known members of the country's elite emerged from the ranks of student activists"--Provided by publisher.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LA843.7 .J86 2015 Unavailable On order Request
Book
x, 213 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The rise of a new generation : Palestinian students and the experience of Nakba
  • The GUPS and PLO : from struggle to accommodation
  • The politics of survival : the GUPS in times of crisis
  • Between Cairo and Beirut : the GUPS in the aftermath of the 1973 war
  • The 1980s : military challenges and paradigm shift
  • The emergence of the Palestinian higher education system
  • Between academic freedom and military supervision : the Palestinian universities and the national struggle
  • The Palestinian student movement in the West Bank and Gaza Strip : a socio-political account
  • The Palestinian student movement between two intifadas.
  • Introduction
  • The rise of a new generation : Palestinian students and the experience of Nakba
  • The GUPS and PLO : from struggle to accommodation
  • The politics of survival : the GUPS in times of crisis
  • Between Cairo and Beirut : the GUPS in the aftermath of the 1973 war
  • The 1980s : military challenges and paradigm shift
  • The emergence of the Palestinian higher education system
  • Between academic freedom and military supervision : the Palestinian universities and the national struggle
  • The Palestinian student movement in the West Bank and Gaza Strip : a socio-political account
  • The Palestinian student movement between two intifadas.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LA1444.5 .Z45 2015 In-library use New book shelf Request
Book
220 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
"Fifty years after Freedom Summer, To Write in the Light of Freedom offers a glimpse into the hearts of the African American youths who attended the Mississippi Freedom Schools in 1964. One of the most successful initiatives of Freedom Summer, more than forty Freedom Schools opened doors to thousands of young African American students. Here they learned civics, politics, and history, curriculum that helped them instead of the degrading lessons supporting segregation and Jim Crow and sanctioned by White Citizen's Councils. Young people enhanced their self-esteem and gained a new outlook on the future. And at more than a dozen of these schools, students wrote, edited, printed and published their own newspapers. For more than five decades, the Mississippi Freedom Schools have served as powerful models of educational activism. Yet, little has been published that documents black Mississippi youths' responses to this profound experience"-- Provided by publisher.
"Fifty years after Freedom Summer, To Write in the Light of Freedom offers a glimpse into the hearts of the African American youths who attended the Mississippi Freedom Schools in 1964. One of the most successful initiatives of Freedom Summer, more than forty Freedom Schools opened doors to thousands of young African American students. Here they learned civics, politics, and history, curriculum that helped them instead of the degrading lessons supporting segregation and Jim Crow and sanctioned by White Citizen's Councils. Young people enhanced their self-esteem and gained a new outlook on the future. And at more than a dozen of these schools, students wrote, edited, printed and published their own newspapers. For more than five decades, the Mississippi Freedom Schools have served as powerful models of educational activism. Yet, little has been published that documents black Mississippi youths' responses to this profound experience"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
E185.93 .M6 T6 2015 Unknown
Book
xxii, 335 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The unthinkable revolution
  • Enemies from the past : bureaucracy, class, and Mao's continuous revolution
  • From the good blood to the right to rebel : politics of class and citizenship in the Beijing Red Guard movement
  • Revolutionary alchemy : "economism" and the making of Shanghai's "January revolution"
  • Revolution is dead, long live the revolution : popular radicalization of the cultural revolution in Hunan
  • Coping with crisis in the wake of the cultural revolution : the historical origins of Chinese postsocialism
  • Epilogue : from revolution to reform : rethinking the cultural revolution in the present.
Mao Zedong envisioned a great struggle to "wreak havoc under the heaven" when he launched the Cultural Revolution in 1966. But as radicalized Chinese youth rose up against Party officials, events quickly slipped from the government's grasp, and rebellion took on a life of its own. Turmoil became a reality in a way the Great Leader had not foreseen. The Cultural"Revolution at the Margins" recaptures these formative moments from the perspective of the disenfranchised and disobedient rebels Mao unleashed and later betrayed. The Cultural Revolution began as a "revolution from above, " and Mao had only a tenuous relationship with the Red Guard students and workers who responded to his call. Yet it was these young rebels at the grassroots who advanced the Cultural Revolution's more radical possibilities, Yiching Wu argues, and who not only acted for themselves but also transgressed Maoism by critically reflecting on broader issues concerning Chinese socialism. As China's state machinery broke down and the institutional foundations of the PRC were threatened, Mao resolved to suppress the crisis. Leaving out in the cold the very activists who had taken its transformative promise seriously, the Cultural Revolution devoured its children and exhausted its political energy. The mass demobilizations of 1968-69, Wu shows, were the starting point of a series of crisis-coping maneuvers to contain and neutralize dissent, producing immense changes in Chinese society a decade later.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The unthinkable revolution
  • Enemies from the past : bureaucracy, class, and Mao's continuous revolution
  • From the good blood to the right to rebel : politics of class and citizenship in the Beijing Red Guard movement
  • Revolutionary alchemy : "economism" and the making of Shanghai's "January revolution"
  • Revolution is dead, long live the revolution : popular radicalization of the cultural revolution in Hunan
  • Coping with crisis in the wake of the cultural revolution : the historical origins of Chinese postsocialism
  • Epilogue : from revolution to reform : rethinking the cultural revolution in the present.
Mao Zedong envisioned a great struggle to "wreak havoc under the heaven" when he launched the Cultural Revolution in 1966. But as radicalized Chinese youth rose up against Party officials, events quickly slipped from the government's grasp, and rebellion took on a life of its own. Turmoil became a reality in a way the Great Leader had not foreseen. The Cultural"Revolution at the Margins" recaptures these formative moments from the perspective of the disenfranchised and disobedient rebels Mao unleashed and later betrayed. The Cultural Revolution began as a "revolution from above, " and Mao had only a tenuous relationship with the Red Guard students and workers who responded to his call. Yet it was these young rebels at the grassroots who advanced the Cultural Revolution's more radical possibilities, Yiching Wu argues, and who not only acted for themselves but also transgressed Maoism by critically reflecting on broader issues concerning Chinese socialism. As China's state machinery broke down and the institutional foundations of the PRC were threatened, Mao resolved to suppress the crisis. Leaving out in the cold the very activists who had taken its transformative promise seriously, the Cultural Revolution devoured its children and exhausted its political energy. The mass demobilizations of 1968-69, Wu shows, were the starting point of a series of crisis-coping maneuvers to contain and neutralize dissent, producing immense changes in Chinese society a decade later.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
DS778.7 .W85 2014 Unknown
Book
xxvi, 291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Illustrations Acknowledgments Editor's Note Foreword Tom Hayden Introduction 1. The Making of a Berkeley Civil Rights Activist 2. Going South: Freedom Summer, 1964 3. Leading the Free Speech Movement: Protest and Negotiation, September November 1964 4. No Restrictions on the Content of Speech": Savio and the FSM Win, December 1964 Coda Afterword Robert B. Reich Epilogue Lynne Hollander Savio Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Free Speech Movement in Berkeley, California, was pivotal in shaping 1960s America. Led by Mario Savio and other young veterans of the civil rights movement, student activists organized what was to that point the most tumultuous student rebellion in American history. Mass sit-ins, a nonviolent blockade around a police car, occupations of the campus administration building, and a student strike united thousands of students to champion the right of students to free speech and unrestricted political advocacy on campus. This compendium of influential speeches and previously unknown writings offers insight into and perspective on the disruptive yet nonviolent civil disobedience tactics used by Savio. The Essential Mario Savio is the perfect introduction to an American icon and to one of the most important social movements of the post-war period in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Illustrations Acknowledgments Editor's Note Foreword Tom Hayden Introduction 1. The Making of a Berkeley Civil Rights Activist 2. Going South: Freedom Summer, 1964 3. Leading the Free Speech Movement: Protest and Negotiation, September November 1964 4. No Restrictions on the Content of Speech": Savio and the FSM Win, December 1964 Coda Afterword Robert B. Reich Epilogue Lynne Hollander Savio Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Free Speech Movement in Berkeley, California, was pivotal in shaping 1960s America. Led by Mario Savio and other young veterans of the civil rights movement, student activists organized what was to that point the most tumultuous student rebellion in American history. Mass sit-ins, a nonviolent blockade around a police car, occupations of the campus administration building, and a student strike united thousands of students to champion the right of students to free speech and unrestricted political advocacy on campus. This compendium of influential speeches and previously unknown writings offers insight into and perspective on the disruptive yet nonviolent civil disobedience tactics used by Savio. The Essential Mario Savio is the perfect introduction to an American icon and to one of the most important social movements of the post-war period in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
SSRC: new books shelf Find it
JC599 .U6 E87 2014 Unknown
Book
xii, 196 pages ; 24 cm
  • Church-State Relations from the Porfiriato to the Mexican Revolution, 1876-1917
  • The Asociación Católica de la Juventud Mexicana, the Mexican Revolution, and the Cristero Rebellion, 1912-1929
  • The Union Nacional de Estudiantes Católicos, the University of Mexico, and the Partido Acción Nacional : Student Politics, National Politics
  • The Revival of Catholic Higher Education in Mexico, 1943-1952 : The Centro Cultural Universitario
  • The "Mexican Economic Miracle" and Vatican II, 1952-1967 : The Universidad Iberoamericana
  • Tlatelolco, the Corpus Christi Massacre, and the Transformation of the Universidad Iberoamericana, 1968-1979.
The history of Mexico in the twentieth century is marked by conflict between church and state. This book focuses on the efforts of the Roman Catholic Church to influence Mexican society through Jesuit-led organizations such as the Mexican Catholic Youth Association, the National Catholic Student Union, and the Universidad Iberoamericana. Dedicated to the education and indoctrination of MexicoAEs middle- and upper-class youth, these organizations were designed to promote conservative Catholic values. The author shows that they left a very different imprint on Mexican society, training a generation of activists who played important roles in politics and education. Ultimately, Espinosa shows, the social justice movement that grew out of Jesuit education fostered the leftist student movement of the 1960s that culminated in the Tlatelolco massacre of 1968. This study demonstrates the convergence of the Church, MexicoAEs new business class, and the increasingly pro-capitalist PRI, the party that has ruled Mexico in recent decades. EspinosaAEs archival research has led him to important but long-overlooked events like the student strike of 1944, the internal upheavals of the Church over liberation theology, and the complicated relations between the Jesuits and the conservative business class. His book offers vital new perspectives for scholars of education, politics, and religion in twentieth-century Mexico.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Church-State Relations from the Porfiriato to the Mexican Revolution, 1876-1917
  • The Asociación Católica de la Juventud Mexicana, the Mexican Revolution, and the Cristero Rebellion, 1912-1929
  • The Union Nacional de Estudiantes Católicos, the University of Mexico, and the Partido Acción Nacional : Student Politics, National Politics
  • The Revival of Catholic Higher Education in Mexico, 1943-1952 : The Centro Cultural Universitario
  • The "Mexican Economic Miracle" and Vatican II, 1952-1967 : The Universidad Iberoamericana
  • Tlatelolco, the Corpus Christi Massacre, and the Transformation of the Universidad Iberoamericana, 1968-1979.
The history of Mexico in the twentieth century is marked by conflict between church and state. This book focuses on the efforts of the Roman Catholic Church to influence Mexican society through Jesuit-led organizations such as the Mexican Catholic Youth Association, the National Catholic Student Union, and the Universidad Iberoamericana. Dedicated to the education and indoctrination of MexicoAEs middle- and upper-class youth, these organizations were designed to promote conservative Catholic values. The author shows that they left a very different imprint on Mexican society, training a generation of activists who played important roles in politics and education. Ultimately, Espinosa shows, the social justice movement that grew out of Jesuit education fostered the leftist student movement of the 1960s that culminated in the Tlatelolco massacre of 1968. This study demonstrates the convergence of the Church, MexicoAEs new business class, and the increasingly pro-capitalist PRI, the party that has ruled Mexico in recent decades. EspinosaAEs archival research has led him to important but long-overlooked events like the student strike of 1944, the internal upheavals of the Church over liberation theology, and the complicated relations between the Jesuits and the conservative business class. His book offers vital new perspectives for scholars of education, politics, and religion in twentieth-century Mexico.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LA428.7 .E73 2014 Unknown
Book
xi, 283 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm
  • Trading places
  • Radical challenges to liberal politics
  • Rejecting the Republic - and a detainee dies
  • The student left takes charge
  • The rediscovery of resistance
  • Release all political prisoners
  • Students, intellectuals and worker organisation
  • Unravelling the Industrial Aid Society
  • Unavoidably detained
  • Trials and tribulations
  • Bookends.
By the end of the 1960s, opposition to apartheid was in disarray. Yet in the space of a few short years. major and radical challenges developed that would set the country on a new path. This lively and original book tells the story of a generation of activists who embraced new forms of opposition politics that would have profound consequences. In the process it rescues the early 1970s from previous neglect and shows just how crucial these years were in the struggle to transform society. It explores the influence of Black Consciousness, the new trade unionism, radicalisation of students on both black and white campuses, the Durban strikes, and Soweto 1976, and concludes that these developments were largely the result of home-grown initiatives, with little influence exercised by the banned and exiled movements for national liberation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Trading places
  • Radical challenges to liberal politics
  • Rejecting the Republic - and a detainee dies
  • The student left takes charge
  • The rediscovery of resistance
  • Release all political prisoners
  • Students, intellectuals and worker organisation
  • Unravelling the Industrial Aid Society
  • Unavoidably detained
  • Trials and tribulations
  • Bookends.
By the end of the 1960s, opposition to apartheid was in disarray. Yet in the space of a few short years. major and radical challenges developed that would set the country on a new path. This lively and original book tells the story of a generation of activists who embraced new forms of opposition politics that would have profound consequences. In the process it rescues the early 1970s from previous neglect and shows just how crucial these years were in the struggle to transform society. It explores the influence of Black Consciousness, the new trade unionism, radicalisation of students on both black and white campuses, the Durban strikes, and Soweto 1976, and concludes that these developments were largely the result of home-grown initiatives, with little influence exercised by the banned and exiled movements for national liberation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
DT1945 .M678 2014 Unknown
Book
xvi, 299 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
In the second half of the 1960s and the early 1970s, the Ethiopian student movement emerged from rather innocuous beginnings to become the major opposition force against the imperial regime in Ethiopia, contributing perhaps more than any other factor to the eruption of the 1974 revolution, a revolution that brought about not only the end of the long reign of Emperor Haile Sellassie, but also a dynasty of exceptional longevity. The student movement would be of fundamental importance in the shaping of the future Ethiopia, instrumental in both its political and social development. Bahru Zewde, himself one of the students involved in the uprising, draws on interviews with former student leaders and activists, as well as documentary sources, to describe the steady radicalisation of the movement, characterised particularly after 1965 by annual demonstrations against the regime and culminating in the ascendancy of Marxism-Leninism by the early 1970s. Almost in tandem with the global student movement, the year 1969 marked the climax of student opposition to the imperial regime, both at home and abroad. It was also in that year that students broached what came to be famously known as the 'national question', ultimately resulting in the adoption in 1971of the Leninist/Stalinist principle of self-determination up to and including secession. On the eve of the revolution, the student movement abroad split into two rival factions; a split that was ultimately to lead to the liquidation of both and the consolidation of military dictatorship as well as the emergence of the ethno-nationalist agenda as the only viable alternative to the military regime. Bahru Zewde is Emeritus Professor of History at Addis Ababa University and Vice President of the Ethiopian Academy of Sciences. He has authored many books and articles, notably A History of Modern Ethiopia, 1855-1974 and Pioneers of Change in Ethiopia: The Reformist Intellectuals of the Early Twentieth Century. Ethiopia: Addis Ababa University Press (paperback).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the second half of the 1960s and the early 1970s, the Ethiopian student movement emerged from rather innocuous beginnings to become the major opposition force against the imperial regime in Ethiopia, contributing perhaps more than any other factor to the eruption of the 1974 revolution, a revolution that brought about not only the end of the long reign of Emperor Haile Sellassie, but also a dynasty of exceptional longevity. The student movement would be of fundamental importance in the shaping of the future Ethiopia, instrumental in both its political and social development. Bahru Zewde, himself one of the students involved in the uprising, draws on interviews with former student leaders and activists, as well as documentary sources, to describe the steady radicalisation of the movement, characterised particularly after 1965 by annual demonstrations against the regime and culminating in the ascendancy of Marxism-Leninism by the early 1970s. Almost in tandem with the global student movement, the year 1969 marked the climax of student opposition to the imperial regime, both at home and abroad. It was also in that year that students broached what came to be famously known as the 'national question', ultimately resulting in the adoption in 1971of the Leninist/Stalinist principle of self-determination up to and including secession. On the eve of the revolution, the student movement abroad split into two rival factions; a split that was ultimately to lead to the liquidation of both and the consolidation of military dictatorship as well as the emergence of the ethno-nationalist agenda as the only viable alternative to the military regime. Bahru Zewde is Emeritus Professor of History at Addis Ababa University and Vice President of the Ethiopian Academy of Sciences. He has authored many books and articles, notably A History of Modern Ethiopia, 1855-1974 and Pioneers of Change in Ethiopia: The Reformist Intellectuals of the Early Twentieth Century. Ethiopia: Addis Ababa University Press (paperback).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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Stacks Find it
DT387.95 .B347 2014 Unknown
Book
98 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • EDITORS' NOTES 1 Christopher J. Broadhurst, Georgianna L. Martin 1. Campus Activism in the 21st Century: A Historical Framing 3 Christopher J. Broadhurst This chapter frames campus activism by introducing the historical movements that have been important for higher education since the 18th century to the present and exploring the connections and shared characteristics among these various movements. 2. The Role of Graduate Student Unions in the Higher Education Landscape 17 Heidi Whitford Graduate student unionization efforts have made an indelible mark on the higher education milieu, as illustrated by the experiences of students who participated in this movement in recent years. 3. Collective Action on Campus Toward Student Development and Democratic Engagement 31 Adrianna Kezar, Dan Maxey This chapter explores the ways faculty and staff work with students to support their activism as well as the way students tap faculty and staff to support their movements. 4. Campus-Based Organizing: Tactical Repertoires of Contemporary Student Movements 43 Cassie L. Barnhardt This chapter elaborates on the range of collective action tactics and organizing strategies that today s students invoke to pursue their ambitions for social change. 5. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability 59 Penny A. Pasque, Juanita Gamez Vargas This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children 6. Development Through Dissent: Campus Activism as Civic Learning 73 J. Patrick Biddix This chapter traces two decades of published research on learning outcomes related to campus activism and reports results from a speculative study considering civic outcomes from participation in campus political and war demonstrations. 7. Understanding and Improving Campus Climates for Activists 87 Georgianna L. Martin This chapter synthesizes the common themes across chapters in this volume and argues that campus activists are an integral part of the higher education landscape. INDEX 93.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Take an in-depth look at campus activism in the 21st century with this issue of New Directions for Higher Education. Campuses have always experienced an ebb and flow of activism, and the recent displays of student activism on American campuses show that protesters remain a vibrant subculture in American higher education. From rising tuition costs to the need to improve and welcome diversity, activists signal a continued restlessness among the nation's collegiate youth over various issues, expressing their views with a vigor comparable to most periods in American history. The purpose of this work is to dispel the myths that today's activists are either apathetic or "radicals" determined on disrupting the "establishment." It's also a guide to help higher education practitioners better understand the needs, rights, and responsibilities of campus activists. And, it will help readers understand the best paths to not only allowing student voice, but helping direct that voice toward peaceful and constructive expression. This is the 167th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • EDITORS' NOTES 1 Christopher J. Broadhurst, Georgianna L. Martin 1. Campus Activism in the 21st Century: A Historical Framing 3 Christopher J. Broadhurst This chapter frames campus activism by introducing the historical movements that have been important for higher education since the 18th century to the present and exploring the connections and shared characteristics among these various movements. 2. The Role of Graduate Student Unions in the Higher Education Landscape 17 Heidi Whitford Graduate student unionization efforts have made an indelible mark on the higher education milieu, as illustrated by the experiences of students who participated in this movement in recent years. 3. Collective Action on Campus Toward Student Development and Democratic Engagement 31 Adrianna Kezar, Dan Maxey This chapter explores the ways faculty and staff work with students to support their activism as well as the way students tap faculty and staff to support their movements. 4. Campus-Based Organizing: Tactical Repertoires of Contemporary Student Movements 43 Cassie L. Barnhardt This chapter elaborates on the range of collective action tactics and organizing strategies that today s students invoke to pursue their ambitions for social change. 5. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability 59 Penny A. Pasque, Juanita Gamez Vargas This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children 6. Development Through Dissent: Campus Activism as Civic Learning 73 J. Patrick Biddix This chapter traces two decades of published research on learning outcomes related to campus activism and reports results from a speculative study considering civic outcomes from participation in campus political and war demonstrations. 7. Understanding and Improving Campus Climates for Activists 87 Georgianna L. Martin This chapter synthesizes the common themes across chapters in this volume and argues that campus activists are an integral part of the higher education landscape. INDEX 93.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Take an in-depth look at campus activism in the 21st century with this issue of New Directions for Higher Education. Campuses have always experienced an ebb and flow of activism, and the recent displays of student activism on American campuses show that protesters remain a vibrant subculture in American higher education. From rising tuition costs to the need to improve and welcome diversity, activists signal a continued restlessness among the nation's collegiate youth over various issues, expressing their views with a vigor comparable to most periods in American history. The purpose of this work is to dispel the myths that today's activists are either apathetic or "radicals" determined on disrupting the "establishment." It's also a guide to help higher education practitioners better understand the needs, rights, and responsibilities of campus activists. And, it will help readers understand the best paths to not only allowing student voice, but helping direct that voice toward peaceful and constructive expression. This is the 167th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LB2300 .N5 NO.167 Unknown
Book
xiv, 263 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • 1. Introduction 2. A New Era in Social Service? Student Associational Culture and the Settlement Movement 3. Christian Internationalism, Social Study and the Universities Before 1914 4. The Student Chapter in Post-War Reconstruction, 1920-1926 5. No Longer the Privilege of the Well-To-Do? Student Culture, Strikes and Self-Help, 1926-1932 6. Digging with the Unemployed: The Rise of a Student Social Consciousness? 1932-1939 7. Students in Action: Students and Anti-Fascist Relief Efforts, 1933-1939 8. The Students' Contribution to Victory: Voluntary Work in the Second World War And After 9. Experiments in Living: Student Social Service and Social Action, 1950-1965 10. From Service to Action? Rethinking Student Voluntarism, 1965-1980 11. Conclusions: Students and Social Change, 1880-1980.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Georgina Brewis takes a long view of the experience of going to university in Britain over a hundred year period. She explores students' extra-curricular volunteering, fundraising, campaigning and protest activities in Britain and beyond to show that voluntary action was central to the emergence of a distinct student movement. Brewis also considers the evolution of volunteering since the late nineteenth century through study of students' activities and argues that the universities made significant contributions to causes and campaigns ranging from educational reconstruction in 1920s Europe, relief for victims of fascism in the 1930s, and international development in the 1960s. The book draws on rich historical sources and a wider range of student testimony than any earlier study to tell the fascinating story of how ordinary women and men students engaged with the pressing social and international problems of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction 2. A New Era in Social Service? Student Associational Culture and the Settlement Movement 3. Christian Internationalism, Social Study and the Universities Before 1914 4. The Student Chapter in Post-War Reconstruction, 1920-1926 5. No Longer the Privilege of the Well-To-Do? Student Culture, Strikes and Self-Help, 1926-1932 6. Digging with the Unemployed: The Rise of a Student Social Consciousness? 1932-1939 7. Students in Action: Students and Anti-Fascist Relief Efforts, 1933-1939 8. The Students' Contribution to Victory: Voluntary Work in the Second World War And After 9. Experiments in Living: Student Social Service and Social Action, 1950-1965 10. From Service to Action? Rethinking Student Voluntarism, 1965-1980 11. Conclusions: Students and Social Change, 1880-1980.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Georgina Brewis takes a long view of the experience of going to university in Britain over a hundred year period. She explores students' extra-curricular volunteering, fundraising, campaigning and protest activities in Britain and beyond to show that voluntary action was central to the emergence of a distinct student movement. Brewis also considers the evolution of volunteering since the late nineteenth century through study of students' activities and argues that the universities made significant contributions to causes and campaigns ranging from educational reconstruction in 1920s Europe, relief for victims of fascism in the 1930s, and international development in the 1960s. The book draws on rich historical sources and a wider range of student testimony than any earlier study to tell the fascinating story of how ordinary women and men students engaged with the pressing social and international problems of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LA637.7 .B69 2014 Unknown
Book
xxiv, 212 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Table of Content Foreword Acknowledgments Chronology Section One: Introduction Prologue Surviving 1989 Chapter 1 June 4: History and Memory in Exile Chapter 2 Seeds of Fire Section Two: Triumph and Trauma Chapter 3 On the Road: Yi Danxuan Chapter 4 No Direction Home: Shen Tong Chapter 5 Living Somewhere Else: Wang Dan Chapter 6 Romance and Revolution: Group Discussions Section Three: Conclusion Chapter 7 Citizenship in Exile Epilogue The Beginning of an End Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the spring of 1989, millions of citizens across China took to the streets in a nationwide uprising against government corruption and authoritarian rule. What began with widespread hope for political reform ended with the People's Liberation Army firing on unarmed citizens in the capital city of Beijing, and those leaders who survived the crackdown became wanted criminals overnight. Among the witnesses to this unprecedented popular movement was Rowena Xiaoqing He, who would later join former student leaders and other exiles in North America, where she has worked tirelessly for over a decade to keep the memory of the Tiananmen Movement alive. This moving oral history interweaves He's own experiences with the accounts of three student leaders exiled from China. Here, in their own words, they describe their childhoods during Mao's Cultural Revolution, their political activism, the bitter disappointments of 1989, and the profound contradictions and challenges they face as exiles. Variously labeled as heroes, victims, and traitors in the years after Tiananmen, these individuals tell difficult stories of thwarted ideals and disconnection that nonetheless embody the hope for a freer China and a more just world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Table of Content Foreword Acknowledgments Chronology Section One: Introduction Prologue Surviving 1989 Chapter 1 June 4: History and Memory in Exile Chapter 2 Seeds of Fire Section Two: Triumph and Trauma Chapter 3 On the Road: Yi Danxuan Chapter 4 No Direction Home: Shen Tong Chapter 5 Living Somewhere Else: Wang Dan Chapter 6 Romance and Revolution: Group Discussions Section Three: Conclusion Chapter 7 Citizenship in Exile Epilogue The Beginning of an End Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In the spring of 1989, millions of citizens across China took to the streets in a nationwide uprising against government corruption and authoritarian rule. What began with widespread hope for political reform ended with the People's Liberation Army firing on unarmed citizens in the capital city of Beijing, and those leaders who survived the crackdown became wanted criminals overnight. Among the witnesses to this unprecedented popular movement was Rowena Xiaoqing He, who would later join former student leaders and other exiles in North America, where she has worked tirelessly for over a decade to keep the memory of the Tiananmen Movement alive. This moving oral history interweaves He's own experiences with the accounts of three student leaders exiled from China. Here, in their own words, they describe their childhoods during Mao's Cultural Revolution, their political activism, the bitter disappointments of 1989, and the profound contradictions and challenges they face as exiles. Variously labeled as heroes, victims, and traitors in the years after Tiananmen, these individuals tell difficult stories of thwarted ideals and disconnection that nonetheless embody the hope for a freer China and a more just world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
DS779.32 .H44 2014 Unknown
Book
253 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. The Beginnings of the Student Movement in the Fifties and Early Sixties 2. "The Troubles" of Universities in the Mid-sixties 3. 1968, That Magical Year 4. The Transformation of the Student Movement 5. The Seventies and the Rise of the Unions Epilogue and Conclusions Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Based on empirical evidence derived from university and national archives across the country and interviews with participants, British Student Activism in the Long Sixties reconstructs the world of university students in the 1960s and 1970s. Student accounts are placed within the context of a wide variety of primary and secondary sources from across Britain and the world, making this project the first book-length history of the British student movement to employ literary and theoretical frameworks which differentiate it from most other histories of student activism to date. Globalization, especially of mass communications, made British students aware of global problems such as the threat of nuclear weapons, the Vietnam War, racism, sexism and injustice. British students applied these global ideas to their own unique circumstances, using their intellectual traditions and political theories which resulted in unique outcomes. British student activists effectively gained support from students, staff, and workers for their struggle for student's rights to unionize, freely assemble and speak, and participate in university decision-making. Their campaigns effectively raised public awareness of these issues and contributed to significant national decisions in many considerable areas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction 1. The Beginnings of the Student Movement in the Fifties and Early Sixties 2. "The Troubles" of Universities in the Mid-sixties 3. 1968, That Magical Year 4. The Transformation of the Student Movement 5. The Seventies and the Rise of the Unions Epilogue and Conclusions Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Based on empirical evidence derived from university and national archives across the country and interviews with participants, British Student Activism in the Long Sixties reconstructs the world of university students in the 1960s and 1970s. Student accounts are placed within the context of a wide variety of primary and secondary sources from across Britain and the world, making this project the first book-length history of the British student movement to employ literary and theoretical frameworks which differentiate it from most other histories of student activism to date. Globalization, especially of mass communications, made British students aware of global problems such as the threat of nuclear weapons, the Vietnam War, racism, sexism and injustice. British students applied these global ideas to their own unique circumstances, using their intellectual traditions and political theories which resulted in unique outcomes. British student activists effectively gained support from students, staff, and workers for their struggle for student's rights to unionize, freely assemble and speak, and participate in university decision-making. Their campaigns effectively raised public awareness of these issues and contributed to significant national decisions in many considerable areas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LA631.82 .H64 2013 Unknown
Book
xvii, 373 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures Abbreviations Introduction Chapter 1. A Changing Society * Universities between Progression and Regression * Student Activism * Teds and ye-yes: Youth culture * Generation Z * Continuities and ruptures in contentious politics Chapter 2. Phoenix with a Bayonet * Passivity, Consensus, Resistance * Tidying up the university * '68 as a point of reference * Life is Elsewhere: Greek Students Abroad * "The first square meters of liberated Greek soil" * The Greek Carbonari * Home-grown revolutionaries * The terrible solitude of Rigas Feraios * The historical generation retires Chapter 3. A Mosquito on a Bull * Competing youth cultures * Heirs and defectors * Tale of two cities * Political opportunities * Technocracy and its discontents * Marx's children * The Reformists * The Robespierres * The "other" among student groups Chapter 4. Cultural Warfare * Media and Publishing Strategies * The arrival of the 3 M's in Colonels' Greece * Cinema as a Gun * "Tickets to freedom": Theater * The musical culture wars * Gendered militancy and "sexual revolution" * Revolutionizing everyday life Chapter 5. Ten Months that Shook Greece * The Movement Gains Prestige * "Anything But May '68": The Law School occupations * The Cost of Participation * A "glocal" movement * The mission of the youth * "This is what Revolution must be like": The Polytechnic events * The copycat occupation * After the Revolution * Metapolitefsi and beyond Epilogue * "Everything Links" * Events * Medium-length: Utopias and outcomes * Future's past: Cultural changes Bibliography * Interviews * Periodicals * Archives * Published Sources * Secondary Sources * Film * Documentaries * Television Documentaries * Music.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Putting Greece back on the cultural and political map of the "Long 1960s, " this book traces the dissent and activism of anti-regime students during the dictatorship of the Colonels (1967-74). It explores the cultural as well as ideological protest of Greek student activists, illustrating how these "children of the dictatorship" managed to re-appropriate indigenous folk tradition for their "progressive" purposes and how their transnational exchange molded a particular local protest culture. It examines how the students' social and political practices became a major source of pressure on the Colonels' regime, finding its apogee in the three day Polytechnic uprising of November 1973 which laid the foundations for a total reshaping of Greek political culture in the following decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures Abbreviations Introduction Chapter 1. A Changing Society * Universities between Progression and Regression * Student Activism * Teds and ye-yes: Youth culture * Generation Z * Continuities and ruptures in contentious politics Chapter 2. Phoenix with a Bayonet * Passivity, Consensus, Resistance * Tidying up the university * '68 as a point of reference * Life is Elsewhere: Greek Students Abroad * "The first square meters of liberated Greek soil" * The Greek Carbonari * Home-grown revolutionaries * The terrible solitude of Rigas Feraios * The historical generation retires Chapter 3. A Mosquito on a Bull * Competing youth cultures * Heirs and defectors * Tale of two cities * Political opportunities * Technocracy and its discontents * Marx's children * The Reformists * The Robespierres * The "other" among student groups Chapter 4. Cultural Warfare * Media and Publishing Strategies * The arrival of the 3 M's in Colonels' Greece * Cinema as a Gun * "Tickets to freedom": Theater * The musical culture wars * Gendered militancy and "sexual revolution" * Revolutionizing everyday life Chapter 5. Ten Months that Shook Greece * The Movement Gains Prestige * "Anything But May '68": The Law School occupations * The Cost of Participation * A "glocal" movement * The mission of the youth * "This is what Revolution must be like": The Polytechnic events * The copycat occupation * After the Revolution * Metapolitefsi and beyond Epilogue * "Everything Links" * Events * Medium-length: Utopias and outcomes * Future's past: Cultural changes Bibliography * Interviews * Periodicals * Archives * Published Sources * Secondary Sources * Film * Documentaries * Television Documentaries * Music.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Putting Greece back on the cultural and political map of the "Long 1960s, " this book traces the dissent and activism of anti-regime students during the dictatorship of the Colonels (1967-74). It explores the cultural as well as ideological protest of Greek student activists, illustrating how these "children of the dictatorship" managed to re-appropriate indigenous folk tradition for their "progressive" purposes and how their transnational exchange molded a particular local protest culture. It examines how the students' social and political practices became a major source of pressure on the Colonels' regime, finding its apogee in the three day Polytechnic uprising of November 1973 which laid the foundations for a total reshaping of Greek political culture in the following decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LA788.7 .K67 2013 Unknown
Book
174 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: trans/national memories of 1968
  • Remember? 1968 in German fiction
  • Forget it? 1968 in East Germany
  • Transatlantic encounters between Germany and the United States as intercultural exchange and generational conflict
  • Transnational memories: 1968 and German-Turkish authors
  • Conclusion: continued taboos, confirmed canons.
Through a close reading of novels by Ulrike Kolb, Irmtraud Morgner, Emine Sevgi Ozdamar, Bernhard Schlink, Peter Schneider, and Uwe Timm, this monograph traces the cultural memory of the 1960s student movement in German fiction, revealing layers of remembering and forgetting that go beyond conventional boundaries of time and space. These novels engage this seemingly German memory contest by constructing a palimpsest of memories that reshape the readers' understanding of the 1960s with respect to the end of the Cold War and to the legacy of the Third Reich and the Holocaust. Topographically, these novels refute assertions that East Germans were isolated from the political upheaval that took place in the late 1960s and 1970s in the West and the East. Through their aesthetic appropriations and subversions, multicultural contributions challenge conventional understandings of German identity and at the same time lay down claims of belonging within a German society that is more openly diverse than ever before.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: trans/national memories of 1968
  • Remember? 1968 in German fiction
  • Forget it? 1968 in East Germany
  • Transatlantic encounters between Germany and the United States as intercultural exchange and generational conflict
  • Transnational memories: 1968 and German-Turkish authors
  • Conclusion: continued taboos, confirmed canons.
Through a close reading of novels by Ulrike Kolb, Irmtraud Morgner, Emine Sevgi Ozdamar, Bernhard Schlink, Peter Schneider, and Uwe Timm, this monograph traces the cultural memory of the 1960s student movement in German fiction, revealing layers of remembering and forgetting that go beyond conventional boundaries of time and space. These novels engage this seemingly German memory contest by constructing a palimpsest of memories that reshape the readers' understanding of the 1960s with respect to the end of the Cold War and to the legacy of the Third Reich and the Holocaust. Topographically, these novels refute assertions that East Germans were isolated from the political upheaval that took place in the late 1960s and 1970s in the West and the East. Through their aesthetic appropriations and subversions, multicultural contributions challenge conventional understandings of German identity and at the same time lay down claims of belonging within a German society that is more openly diverse than ever before.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
PT772 .R54 2013 Unknown
Book
xv, 199 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
The famous 1962 Port Huron Statement by the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) introduced the concept of participatory democracy to popular discourse and practice. In Inspiring Participatory Democracy Tom Hayden, one of the principal architects of the statement, analyses its historical impact and relevance to today's movements. Inspiring Participatory Democracy includes the full transcript of the Port Huron statment and shows how it played an important role in the movements for black civil rights, against the Vietnam war and for the Freedom of Information Act. Published during the year of Port Huron's 50th anniversary, Inspiring Participatory Democracy will be of great interest to readers interested in social history, politics and social activism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The famous 1962 Port Huron Statement by the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) introduced the concept of participatory democracy to popular discourse and practice. In Inspiring Participatory Democracy Tom Hayden, one of the principal architects of the statement, analyses its historical impact and relevance to today's movements. Inspiring Participatory Democracy includes the full transcript of the Port Huron statment and shows how it played an important role in the movements for black civil rights, against the Vietnam war and for the Freedom of Information Act. Published during the year of Port Huron's 50th anniversary, Inspiring Participatory Democracy will be of great interest to readers interested in social history, politics and social activism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LB3610 .I526 2013 Unknown
Book
xiv, 206 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
James Meredith is a Civil Rights icon who took on the U.S. federal government and forced it to take a stand on whether African Americans were entitled to receive higher education at the same schools as whites. James Meredith: Warrior and the America That Created Him provides an insightful, revealing examination of the state of the United States that engendered James Meredith and others of his generation who stood up for equality. The book examines Meredith's early life; his actions that resulted in the integration of Ole Miss; his 1966 "March Against Fear, " during which he was shot by a shotgun-wielding sniper; and voting rights stories from the Civil Rights era. The book also explores the roles played by famed Civil Rights activist Medgar W. Evers, Meredith's legal team, and the NAACP in shaping the events that prompted President John F. Kennedy to send in armed troops to restore order and break Mississippi's Jim Crow laws. The last two chapters focus on closing America's wealth gap in modern-day society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
James Meredith is a Civil Rights icon who took on the U.S. federal government and forced it to take a stand on whether African Americans were entitled to receive higher education at the same schools as whites. James Meredith: Warrior and the America That Created Him provides an insightful, revealing examination of the state of the United States that engendered James Meredith and others of his generation who stood up for equality. The book examines Meredith's early life; his actions that resulted in the integration of Ole Miss; his 1966 "March Against Fear, " during which he was shot by a shotgun-wielding sniper; and voting rights stories from the Civil Rights era. The book also explores the roles played by famed Civil Rights activist Medgar W. Evers, Meredith's legal team, and the NAACP in shaping the events that prompted President John F. Kennedy to send in armed troops to restore order and break Mississippi's Jim Crow laws. The last two chapters focus on closing America's wealth gap in modern-day society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Stacks
LD3412.9 .M38 2013 Unknown

19. March [2013 - ]

Book
v. : chiefly ill. ; 24 cm
"Congressman John Lewis has been a resounding moral voice in the quest for equality for more than 50 years, and I'm so pleased that he is sharing his memories of the Civil Rights Movement with America's young leaders. In March, he brings a whole new generation with him across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, from a past of clenched fists into a future of outstretched hands." (President Bill Clinton). "Superbly told history." (Publishers Weekly (starred review)). "Dazzling ...a grand work." (Booklist (starred review)). "Lewis' remarkable life has been skillfully translated into graphics...Segregation's insult to personhood comes across here with a visual, visceral punch. This version of Lewis's life story belongs in libraries to teach readers about the heroes of America." (Library Journal (starred review)). "A powerful tale of courage and principle igniting sweeping social change, told by a strong-minded, uniquely qualified eyewitness ...the heroism of those who sat and marched ...comes through with vivid, inspiring clarity." (Kirkus Reviews (starred review)). Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole). March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story." Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations. Coretta Scott King Author Honor Books selection: recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults: "March: Book One, " written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, illustrated by Nate Powell, and published by Top Shelf Productions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Congressman John Lewis has been a resounding moral voice in the quest for equality for more than 50 years, and I'm so pleased that he is sharing his memories of the Civil Rights Movement with America's young leaders. In March, he brings a whole new generation with him across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, from a past of clenched fists into a future of outstretched hands." (President Bill Clinton). "Superbly told history." (Publishers Weekly (starred review)). "Dazzling ...a grand work." (Booklist (starred review)). "Lewis' remarkable life has been skillfully translated into graphics...Segregation's insult to personhood comes across here with a visual, visceral punch. This version of Lewis's life story belongs in libraries to teach readers about the heroes of America." (Library Journal (starred review)). "A powerful tale of courage and principle igniting sweeping social change, told by a strong-minded, uniquely qualified eyewitness ...the heroism of those who sat and marched ...comes through with vivid, inspiring clarity." (Kirkus Reviews (starred review)). Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole). March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story." Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations. Coretta Scott King Author Honor Books selection: recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults: "March: Book One, " written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, illustrated by Nate Powell, and published by Top Shelf Productions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley)
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
E840.8 .L43 A3 2013 BK.1 Unknown
Status of items at Education Library (Cubberley)
Education Library (Cubberley) Status
Curriculum Collection
E840.8 .L43 A3 2013 BK.1 Unknown
Book
xxi, 226 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • "Ours is an immediate task" : Juanita Jackson and the origins of the NAACP youth movement
  • To "keep our vision unclouded" : war and democracy
  • To finish the fight : "freedom from fear!"
  • "With all deliberate speed" : school desegregation, Emmett Till, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • "More than a hamburger and a cup of coffee" : NAACP youth and the 1960s freedom struggle
  • "And if not now, when?" : securing our freedom.
Historical studies of black youth activism have until now focused almost exclusively on the activities of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). However, the NAACP youth councils and college chapters predate both of those organizations. They initiated grassroots organizing efforts and nonviolent direct-action tactics as early as the 1930s and, in doing so, made significant contributions to the struggle for racial equality in the United States. This deeply researched book breaks new ground in an important and compelling area of study. Thomas Bynum carefully examines the activism of the NAACP youth and effectively refutes the perception of the NAACP as working strictly through the courts. His research illuminates the many direct-action activities undertaken by the young people of the NAACP -- activities that helped precipitate the breakdown of racial discrimination and segregation in America. Beginning with the formal organization of the NAACP youth movement under Juanita Jackson, the author traces the group's activities from their early anti-lynching demonstrations through their post-World War II "withholding patronage" campaigns to their participation in the sit-in protests of the 1960s. He also explores the evolution of the youth councils and college chapters, including their sometime rocky relationship with the national office, and shows how these groups actually provided a framework for the emergence of youth activism within CORE and SNCC. The author provides a comprehensive account of the generational struggle for racial equality, capturing the successes, failures, and challenges the NAACP youth groups experienced at the national, state, and local levels. He firmly establishes the vital role they played in the history of the civil rights movement in the United States and in the burgeoning tradition of youth activism in the postwar decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • "Ours is an immediate task" : Juanita Jackson and the origins of the NAACP youth movement
  • To "keep our vision unclouded" : war and democracy
  • To finish the fight : "freedom from fear!"
  • "With all deliberate speed" : school desegregation, Emmett Till, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • "More than a hamburger and a cup of coffee" : NAACP youth and the 1960s freedom struggle
  • "And if not now, when?" : securing our freedom.
Historical studies of black youth activism have until now focused almost exclusively on the activities of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). However, the NAACP youth councils and college chapters predate both of those organizations. They initiated grassroots organizing efforts and nonviolent direct-action tactics as early as the 1930s and, in doing so, made significant contributions to the struggle for racial equality in the United States. This deeply researched book breaks new ground in an important and compelling area of study. Thomas Bynum carefully examines the activism of the NAACP youth and effectively refutes the perception of the NAACP as working strictly through the courts. His research illuminates the many direct-action activities undertaken by the young people of the NAACP -- activities that helped precipitate the breakdown of racial discrimination and segregation in America. Beginning with the formal organization of the NAACP youth movement under Juanita Jackson, the author traces the group's activities from their early anti-lynching demonstrations through their post-World War II "withholding patronage" campaigns to their participation in the sit-in protests of the 1960s. He also explores the evolution of the youth councils and college chapters, including their sometime rocky relationship with the national office, and shows how these groups actually provided a framework for the emergence of youth activism within CORE and SNCC. The author provides a comprehensive account of the generational struggle for racial equality, capturing the successes, failures, and challenges the NAACP youth groups experienced at the national, state, and local levels. He firmly establishes the vital role they played in the history of the civil rights movement in the United States and in the burgeoning tradition of youth activism in the postwar decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
E185.5 .N276 B96 2013 Unknown

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