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Book
viii, 174 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Introduction: War and Its Other PART I: POSING THE PROBLEM Hobbes: War Redeemed by Sovereignty Kant: Peace through War Clausewitz: War as the Activation of the Social PART II: THE WAR/OTHER COMPLEX Freud: War and Ambivalence Bataille: War, Consumption and Religion Deleuze and Guattari: Owning the War-Machine Under the Black Light: Derrida, Levinas, Schmitt and the Aporia of War PART III: THE PROBLEM OF DIFFERENCE The Collapse of Difference: Insisting on Clausewitz Global War Recovering Difference Conclusion: War and Human Rights Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
We all think we know what war is, yet it has always been explained in relation to something else: sovereign authority, civil society, peace, friendship, love. Traditionally, war has been perceived as either the opposite of these values, or as their instrument. Yet, in our time, it seems to be both of these things at once: social values, like human rights, are both what justifies war, and what we need to protect from war. In this book, Nick Mansfield studies this paradox through a reading of canonical thinkers on war like Hobbes and Clausewitz, and also of other thinkers (from Freud and Bataille to Deleuze and Guattari, Levinas and Derrida) who have attempted to deal with our complex and contradictory relationship to war. He also investigates the way that the most influential recent thinkers (from Virilio and Baudrillard to Mbembe, Badiou and A iA ek) have theorized war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgements Introduction: War and Its Other PART I: POSING THE PROBLEM Hobbes: War Redeemed by Sovereignty Kant: Peace through War Clausewitz: War as the Activation of the Social PART II: THE WAR/OTHER COMPLEX Freud: War and Ambivalence Bataille: War, Consumption and Religion Deleuze and Guattari: Owning the War-Machine Under the Black Light: Derrida, Levinas, Schmitt and the Aporia of War PART III: THE PROBLEM OF DIFFERENCE The Collapse of Difference: Insisting on Clausewitz Global War Recovering Difference Conclusion: War and Human Rights Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
We all think we know what war is, yet it has always been explained in relation to something else: sovereign authority, civil society, peace, friendship, love. Traditionally, war has been perceived as either the opposite of these values, or as their instrument. Yet, in our time, it seems to be both of these things at once: social values, like human rights, are both what justifies war, and what we need to protect from war. In this book, Nick Mansfield studies this paradox through a reading of canonical thinkers on war like Hobbes and Clausewitz, and also of other thinkers (from Freud and Bataille to Deleuze and Guattari, Levinas and Derrida) who have attempted to deal with our complex and contradictory relationship to war. He also investigates the way that the most influential recent thinkers (from Virilio and Baudrillard to Mbembe, Badiou and A iA ek) have theorized war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
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B105 .W3 M37 2008 Unknown
Book
xi, 343 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: 1. Justifying war but restricting tactics-- Part A. Philosophical Groundings: 2. Collective responsibility and honor during war-- 3. Jus gentium and minimal natural law-- 4. Humane treatment as the cornerstone of the rules of war-- Part B. Problems in Identifying War Crimes: 5. Killing naked soldiers: combatants and noncombatants-- 6. Shooting poisoned arrows: banned and accepted weapons-- 7. Torturing prisoners of war: protected and normal soldiers-- Part C. Normative Principles: 8. The principle of discrimination or distinction-- 9. The principle of necessity-- 10. The principle of proportionality-- Part D. Prosecuting War Crimes: 11. Prosecuting soldiers for war crimes-- 12. Prosecuting military leaders for war crimes-- 13. Commanded and commanding defenses-- Epilogue and Conclusions: 14. Should terrorists be treated humanely?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Larry May argues that the best way to understand war crimes is as crimes against humanness rather than as violations of justice. He shows that in a deeply pluralistic world, we need to understand the rules of war as the collective responsibility of states that send their citizens into harm's way, as the embodiment of humanity, and as the chief way for soldiers to retain a sense of honour on the battlefield. Throughout, May demonstrates that the principle of humanness is the cornerstone of international humanitarian law, and is itself the basis of the traditional principles of discrimination, necessity, and proportionality. He draws extensively on the older Just War tradition to assess recent cases from the International Tribunal for Yugoslavia as well as examples of atrocities from the archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: 1. Justifying war but restricting tactics-- Part A. Philosophical Groundings: 2. Collective responsibility and honor during war-- 3. Jus gentium and minimal natural law-- 4. Humane treatment as the cornerstone of the rules of war-- Part B. Problems in Identifying War Crimes: 5. Killing naked soldiers: combatants and noncombatants-- 6. Shooting poisoned arrows: banned and accepted weapons-- 7. Torturing prisoners of war: protected and normal soldiers-- Part C. Normative Principles: 8. The principle of discrimination or distinction-- 9. The principle of necessity-- 10. The principle of proportionality-- Part D. Prosecuting War Crimes: 11. Prosecuting soldiers for war crimes-- 12. Prosecuting military leaders for war crimes-- 13. Commanded and commanding defenses-- Epilogue and Conclusions: 14. Should terrorists be treated humanely?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Larry May argues that the best way to understand war crimes is as crimes against humanness rather than as violations of justice. He shows that in a deeply pluralistic world, we need to understand the rules of war as the collective responsibility of states that send their citizens into harm's way, as the embodiment of humanity, and as the chief way for soldiers to retain a sense of honour on the battlefield. Throughout, May demonstrates that the principle of humanness is the cornerstone of international humanitarian law, and is itself the basis of the traditional principles of discrimination, necessity, and proportionality. He draws extensively on the older Just War tradition to assess recent cases from the International Tribunal for Yugoslavia as well as examples of atrocities from the archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B105 .W3 M39 2007 Unknown

3. The war puzzle [1993]

Book
378 p.
  • Part I. Preliminaries: Introduction-- 1. Conceptualizing war-- 2. Types of war-- 3. Power politics and war-- Part II. The Onset and Expansion of Wars of Rivalry: 4. Territorial continuity as a source of conflict leading to war-- 5. The realist road to war-- 6. The domestic prerequisites of wars of rivalry-- 7. Explaining world war: its scope, severity, and duration-- 8. Peace-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book constructs a new scientific explanation of the onset and expansion of war and the conditions of peace. The author describes systematically those factors common to wars between equal states to see if there is a pattern that suggests why war occurs, and how it might be avoided or mitigated, delineating the typical path by which relatively equal states have become embroiled in wars with one another in the modern global system. Emphasis is placed on the issues that give rise to war and how the practices of power politics lead to a series of steps that produce war rather than peace. The book differs from others in that it employs the large number of empirical findings generated in the last twenty-five years as the basis of its theorizing, and integrates these research findings so as to advance dramatically the scientific knowledge of war and peace.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Preliminaries: Introduction-- 1. Conceptualizing war-- 2. Types of war-- 3. Power politics and war-- Part II. The Onset and Expansion of Wars of Rivalry: 4. Territorial continuity as a source of conflict leading to war-- 5. The realist road to war-- 6. The domestic prerequisites of wars of rivalry-- 7. Explaining world war: its scope, severity, and duration-- 8. Peace-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book constructs a new scientific explanation of the onset and expansion of war and the conditions of peace. The author describes systematically those factors common to wars between equal states to see if there is a pattern that suggests why war occurs, and how it might be avoided or mitigated, delineating the typical path by which relatively equal states have become embroiled in wars with one another in the modern global system. Emphasis is placed on the issues that give rise to war and how the practices of power politics lead to a series of steps that produce war rather than peace. The book differs from others in that it employs the large number of empirical findings generated in the last twenty-five years as the basis of its theorizing, and integrates these research findings so as to advance dramatically the scientific knowledge of war and peace.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
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B105 .W3 V37 1993 1993 Unknown
Book
vi, 278 p. ; 23 cm.
This is not a book about philosophy and war. It is a book on contemporary conflict in which the author invokes philosophy to help understand the problems that we face in fighting war today. Barbarous Philosophers sets out to discuss the nature of war through the work of sixteen philosophers from Heraclitus in the sixth century BC to the philosopher-physicist Werner Heisenberg writing in the 1950s. Each section begins with a brief epigram representative of each writer's thinking. The contention of the book is that war, as opposed to warfare, is largely an invention of philosophy - our reflection on organised collective violence that date from the time we emerged from the hunter-gatherer stage of development and created the first civilisations centred around city life. The Greek philosophers were the first to invent what Pascal called the 'rules' of war and in representing the nature of war they also influenced how it was conducted to the extent that generals allowed their minds to be shaped over time by the work of philosophy. The purpose of philosophy, writes Herbert Simon, is to understand meaningful simplicity in the midst of disorderly complexity. Behind the flux of everyday life there is an 'ordered' existence which it is the task of philosophy to uncover if it can. Behind the ever changing character of war lies its nature that needs to be grasped if it is to be waged successfully.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is not a book about philosophy and war. It is a book on contemporary conflict in which the author invokes philosophy to help understand the problems that we face in fighting war today. Barbarous Philosophers sets out to discuss the nature of war through the work of sixteen philosophers from Heraclitus in the sixth century BC to the philosopher-physicist Werner Heisenberg writing in the 1950s. Each section begins with a brief epigram representative of each writer's thinking. The contention of the book is that war, as opposed to warfare, is largely an invention of philosophy - our reflection on organised collective violence that date from the time we emerged from the hunter-gatherer stage of development and created the first civilisations centred around city life. The Greek philosophers were the first to invent what Pascal called the 'rules' of war and in representing the nature of war they also influenced how it was conducted to the extent that generals allowed their minds to be shaped over time by the work of philosophy. The purpose of philosophy, writes Herbert Simon, is to understand meaningful simplicity in the midst of disorderly complexity. Behind the flux of everyday life there is an 'ordered' existence which it is the task of philosophy to uncover if it can. Behind the ever changing character of war lies its nature that needs to be grasped if it is to be waged successfully.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
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Stacks Find it
B105 .W3 C65 2010 Unknown
Book
ix, 179 p. ; 22 cm.
Book
256 p. ; 24 cm.
Domenico Losurdo reconstructs the genesis of Heidegger's philosophy in its historical context, analysing the meaning and characteristics of the peculiar 'ideology of war' developed in Germany at the outset of the First World War. In the 20th century, conflicts between states took the form for the first time of total war requiring the mobilisation of an entire society. This all-pervasive ideological mobilisation of consciences was associated at the purely military and industrial level in a form never seen before. On the one hand, among the allied nations the ideology of war centred on the principle of 'democratic intervention', the Wilsonian idea of a holy crusade able to subvert the eternally militarist and autocratic Germany and, in this way, favour a kind of great 'international democratic revolution.' On the other hand, in a spiral of radicalisation, the German ideology of war characterised the looming conflict as a great clash between irreconcilable civilisations, faiths, world-visions, and even races. Germans affirmed not only the superiority of their culture over the enemy countries, but above all the hypothesis of a political and social model that expelled from modernity every universalistic concept of emancipation and democratisation. Moving within this milieu, Heidegger's philosophy contested the cultural decadence and 'massification' reigning in Western industrial society. In a sharp confrontation with the entire philosophical tradition starting from ancient Greece, he finally condemned the conceptual basis that is the foundation of the modern world as a form of degenerated Platonism in which liberal, revolutionary, and Marxist ideas, and even Nietzsche's philosophy, were involved. Contrary to the majority of interpreters of Heidegger's philosophy, Losurdo reconstructs Heidegger's political dimension and shows the influence of historical and social forces on the development of his ideas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Domenico Losurdo reconstructs the genesis of Heidegger's philosophy in its historical context, analysing the meaning and characteristics of the peculiar 'ideology of war' developed in Germany at the outset of the First World War. In the 20th century, conflicts between states took the form for the first time of total war requiring the mobilisation of an entire society. This all-pervasive ideological mobilisation of consciences was associated at the purely military and industrial level in a form never seen before. On the one hand, among the allied nations the ideology of war centred on the principle of 'democratic intervention', the Wilsonian idea of a holy crusade able to subvert the eternally militarist and autocratic Germany and, in this way, favour a kind of great 'international democratic revolution.' On the other hand, in a spiral of radicalisation, the German ideology of war characterised the looming conflict as a great clash between irreconcilable civilisations, faiths, world-visions, and even races. Germans affirmed not only the superiority of their culture over the enemy countries, but above all the hypothesis of a political and social model that expelled from modernity every universalistic concept of emancipation and democratisation. Moving within this milieu, Heidegger's philosophy contested the cultural decadence and 'massification' reigning in Western industrial society. In a sharp confrontation with the entire philosophical tradition starting from ancient Greece, he finally condemned the conceptual basis that is the foundation of the modern world as a form of degenerated Platonism in which liberal, revolutionary, and Marxist ideas, and even Nietzsche's philosophy, were involved. Contrary to the majority of interpreters of Heidegger's philosophy, Losurdo reconstructs Heidegger's political dimension and shows the influence of historical and social forces on the development of his ideas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
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Stacks Find it
B3279 .H49 L66613 2001 Unknown
Book
xviii, 316 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: A remedial primer
  • Use the dictionary
  • Watch your axioms
  • Ideas have consequences
  • Diplomacy : medium, not message
  • Power makes money
  • Wars are for winning
  • Use intelligence, not intelligence
  • Security for our side
  • Keep it simple.
War presidents are hardly exceptional in modern American history. To a greater or lesser extent, every president since Wilson has been a War President. Each has committed our country to the pursuit of peace, yet involved us in a seemingly endless series of wars-conflicts that the American foreign policy establishment has generally made worse. The chief reason, argues Angelo Codevilla in Advice to War Presidents, is that Americas leaders have habitually imagined the world as they wished it to be rather than as it is: They acted under the assumptions that war is not a normal tool of statecraft but a curable disease, and that all the worlds peoples wish to live as Americans do. As a result, our leaders have committed America to the grandest of ends while constantly subverting their own goals. Employing many negative examples from the Bush II administration but also ranging widely over the last century, Advice to War Presidents offers a primer on the unchanging principles of foreign policy. Codevilla explains the essentials-focusing on realities such as diplomacy, alliances, war, economic statecraft, intelligence, and prestige, rather than on meaningless phrases like international community, peacekeeping and collective security. Not a realist, neoconservative, or a liberal internationalist, Codevilla follows an older tradition: that of historians like Thucydides, Herodotus, and Winston Churchill-writers who analyzed international affairs without imposing false categories. Advice to War Presidents is an effort to talk our future presidents down from their rhetorical highs and get them to practice statecraft rather than wishful thinking, lest they give us further violence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: A remedial primer
  • Use the dictionary
  • Watch your axioms
  • Ideas have consequences
  • Diplomacy : medium, not message
  • Power makes money
  • Wars are for winning
  • Use intelligence, not intelligence
  • Security for our side
  • Keep it simple.
War presidents are hardly exceptional in modern American history. To a greater or lesser extent, every president since Wilson has been a War President. Each has committed our country to the pursuit of peace, yet involved us in a seemingly endless series of wars-conflicts that the American foreign policy establishment has generally made worse. The chief reason, argues Angelo Codevilla in Advice to War Presidents, is that Americas leaders have habitually imagined the world as they wished it to be rather than as it is: They acted under the assumptions that war is not a normal tool of statecraft but a curable disease, and that all the worlds peoples wish to live as Americans do. As a result, our leaders have committed America to the grandest of ends while constantly subverting their own goals. Employing many negative examples from the Bush II administration but also ranging widely over the last century, Advice to War Presidents offers a primer on the unchanging principles of foreign policy. Codevilla explains the essentials-focusing on realities such as diplomacy, alliances, war, economic statecraft, intelligence, and prestige, rather than on meaningless phrases like international community, peacekeeping and collective security. Not a realist, neoconservative, or a liberal internationalist, Codevilla follows an older tradition: that of historians like Thucydides, Herodotus, and Winston Churchill-writers who analyzed international affairs without imposing false categories. Advice to War Presidents is an effort to talk our future presidents down from their rhetorical highs and get them to practice statecraft rather than wishful thinking, lest they give us further violence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
JZ1480 .C64 2009 Unknown
Book
221 p. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B2138.W37 C37 1987 Unknown

9. Cosmopolitan war [2012]

Book
xiii, 309 p. ; 24 cm.
dx.doi.org Oxford Scholarship Online
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B105 .W3 F33 2012 Unknown
Book
x, 564 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: The Changing Character of War -- PART I: THE NEED FOR A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: WHAT HAS CHANGED? -- 1. The Changing Character of War -- 2. Had a Distinct Template for a 'Western Way of War' Been Established Before 1800? -- 3. Changes in War: The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars -- 4. The Change from Within -- 5. 'Killing is Easy': The Atomic Bomb and the Temptation of Terror -- 6. The 'New Wars' Thesis Revisited -- 7. What is Really Changing? Change and Continuity in Global Terrorism -- PART II: THE PURPOSE OF WAR: WHY GO TO WAR? -- 8. Humanitarian intervention -- 9. Democracy and War in the Strategic Thought of Giulio Douhet -- 10. Religion in the War on Terror -- 11. The Changing Character of Civil Wars, 1800-2009 -- 12. Crime versus War -- PART III: THE CHANGING IDENTITIES OF COMBATANTS: WHO FIGHTS? -- 13. War Without the People -- 14. The Changing Character of Private Force -- 15. Who Fights?-A Comparative Demographic Depiction of Terrorists and Insurgents in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries -- 16. Warlords -- 17. The European Union, Multilateralism, and the Use of Force -- 18. Robots at War: The New Battlefield -- PART IV: THE CHANGING IDENTITIES OF NON-COMBATANTS -- 19. The Civilian in Modern War -- 20. Killing Civilians -- 21. The Status and Protections of Prisoners of War and Detainees -- 22. The Challenge of the Child Soldier -- PART V: THE IDEAS WHICH ENABLE US TO UNDERSTAND WAR -- 23. American Strategic Culture: Problems and Prospects -- 24. Morality and Law in War -- 25. Target-selection Norms, Torture Norms, and Growing US Permissiveness -- 26. he Return of Realism? War and Changing Concepts of the Political -- 27. Strategy in the Twenty-first Century -- Conclusion: Absent War Studies? War, Knowledge, and Critique.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Over the last decade (and indeed ever since the Cold War), the rise of insurgents and non-state actors in war, and their readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting, have led commentators to speak of 'new wars'. They have assumed that the 'old wars' were waged solely between states, and were accordingly fought between comparable and 'symmetrical' armed forces. Much of this commentary has lacked context or sophistication. It has been bounded by norms and theories more than the messiness of reality. Fed by the impact of the 9/11 attacks, it has privileged some wars and certain trends over others. Most obviously it has been historically unaware. But it has also failed to consider many of the other dimensions which help us to define what war is - legal, ethical, religious, and social. The Changing Character of War, the fruit of a five-year interdisciplinary programme at Oxford of the same name, draws together all these themes, in order to distinguish between what is really changing about war and what only seems to be changing. Self-evidently, as the product of its own times, the character of each war is always changing. But if war's character is in flux, its underlying nature contains its own internal consistency. Each war is an adversarial business, capable of generating its own dynamic, and therefore of spiralling in directions that are never totally predictable. War is both utilitarian, the tool of policy, and dysfunctional. This book brings together scholars with world-wide reputations, drawn from a clutch of different disciplines, but united by a common intellectual goal: that of understanding a problem of extraordinary importance for our times. This book is a project of the Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: The Changing Character of War -- PART I: THE NEED FOR A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: WHAT HAS CHANGED? -- 1. The Changing Character of War -- 2. Had a Distinct Template for a 'Western Way of War' Been Established Before 1800? -- 3. Changes in War: The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars -- 4. The Change from Within -- 5. 'Killing is Easy': The Atomic Bomb and the Temptation of Terror -- 6. The 'New Wars' Thesis Revisited -- 7. What is Really Changing? Change and Continuity in Global Terrorism -- PART II: THE PURPOSE OF WAR: WHY GO TO WAR? -- 8. Humanitarian intervention -- 9. Democracy and War in the Strategic Thought of Giulio Douhet -- 10. Religion in the War on Terror -- 11. The Changing Character of Civil Wars, 1800-2009 -- 12. Crime versus War -- PART III: THE CHANGING IDENTITIES OF COMBATANTS: WHO FIGHTS? -- 13. War Without the People -- 14. The Changing Character of Private Force -- 15. Who Fights?-A Comparative Demographic Depiction of Terrorists and Insurgents in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries -- 16. Warlords -- 17. The European Union, Multilateralism, and the Use of Force -- 18. Robots at War: The New Battlefield -- PART IV: THE CHANGING IDENTITIES OF NON-COMBATANTS -- 19. The Civilian in Modern War -- 20. Killing Civilians -- 21. The Status and Protections of Prisoners of War and Detainees -- 22. The Challenge of the Child Soldier -- PART V: THE IDEAS WHICH ENABLE US TO UNDERSTAND WAR -- 23. American Strategic Culture: Problems and Prospects -- 24. Morality and Law in War -- 25. Target-selection Norms, Torture Norms, and Growing US Permissiveness -- 26. he Return of Realism? War and Changing Concepts of the Political -- 27. Strategy in the Twenty-first Century -- Conclusion: Absent War Studies? War, Knowledge, and Critique.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Over the last decade (and indeed ever since the Cold War), the rise of insurgents and non-state actors in war, and their readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting, have led commentators to speak of 'new wars'. They have assumed that the 'old wars' were waged solely between states, and were accordingly fought between comparable and 'symmetrical' armed forces. Much of this commentary has lacked context or sophistication. It has been bounded by norms and theories more than the messiness of reality. Fed by the impact of the 9/11 attacks, it has privileged some wars and certain trends over others. Most obviously it has been historically unaware. But it has also failed to consider many of the other dimensions which help us to define what war is - legal, ethical, religious, and social. The Changing Character of War, the fruit of a five-year interdisciplinary programme at Oxford of the same name, draws together all these themes, in order to distinguish between what is really changing about war and what only seems to be changing. Self-evidently, as the product of its own times, the character of each war is always changing. But if war's character is in flux, its underlying nature contains its own internal consistency. Each war is an adversarial business, capable of generating its own dynamic, and therefore of spiralling in directions that are never totally predictable. War is both utilitarian, the tool of policy, and dysfunctional. This book brings together scholars with world-wide reputations, drawn from a clutch of different disciplines, but united by a common intellectual goal: that of understanding a problem of extraordinary importance for our times. This book is a project of the Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
U21.2 .C446 2011 Unknown
Book
x, 564 p. ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: The changing character of war / Hew Strachan and Sibylle Scheipers
  • The changing character of war / Azar Gat
  • Had a distinct template for a "Western way of war" been established before 1800? / David Parrott
  • Changes in war : the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars / Michael Broers
  • The change from within / Gil-li Vardi
  • "Killing is easy" : the atomic bomb and the temptation of terror / Gerard J. DeGroot
  • The "new wars" thesis revisited / Mats Berdal
  • What is really changing? : change and continuity in global terrorism / Audrey Kurth Cronin
  • Humanitarian intervention / D.J.B. Trim
  • Democracy and war in the strategic thought of Giulio Douhet / Thomas Hippler
  • Religion in the War on Terror / Alia Brahimi
  • The changing character of civil wars, 1800-2009 / Stathis N. Kalyvas
  • Crime versus war / William Reno
  • War without the people / Pascal Vennesson
  • The changing character of private force / Sarah Percy
  • Who fights? : a comparative demographic depiction of terrorists and insurgents in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries / Bruce Hoffman
  • Warlords / Kimberly Marten
  • The European Union, multilateralism, and the use of force / Anne Deighton
  • Robots at war : the new battlefield / Peter W. Singer
  • The civilian in modern war / Adam Roberts
  • Killing civilians / Uwe Steinhoff
  • The status and protections of prisoners of war and detainees / Sibylle Scheipers
  • The challenge of the child soldier / Guy S. Goodwin-Gill
  • American strategic culture : problems and prospects / Antulio J Echevarria II
  • Morality and law in war / David Rodin
  • Target-selection norms, torture norms, and growing US permissiveness / Henry Shue
  • The return of realism? : war and changing concepts of the political / Patricia Owens
  • Strategy in the twenty-first century / Hew Strachan
  • Conclusion: Absent war studies? War, knowledge, and critique / Tarak Barkawi and Shane Brighton.
Over the last decade (and indeed ever since the Cold War), the rise of insurgents and non-state actors in war, and their readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting, have led commentators to speak of 'new wars'. They have assumed that the 'old wars' were waged solely between states, and were accordingly fought between comparable and 'symmetrical' armed forces. Much of this commentary has lacked context or sophistication. It has been bounded by norms and theories more than the messiness of reality. Fed by the impact of the 9/11 attacks, it has privileged some wars and certain trends over others. Most obviously it has been historically unaware. But it has also failed to consider many of the other dimensions which help us to define what war is - legal, ethical, religious, and social. The Changing Character of War, the fruit of a five-year interdisciplinary programme at Oxford of the same name, draws together all these themes, in order to distinguish between what is really changing about war and what only seems to be changing. Self-evidently, as the product of its own times, the character of each war is always changing. But if war's character is in flux, its underlying nature contains its own internal consistency. Each war is an adversarial business, capable of generating its own dynamic, and therefore of spiralling in directions that are never totally predictable. War is both utilitarian, the tool of policy, and dysfunctional. This book brings together scholars with world-wide reputations, drawn from a clutch of different disciplines, but united by a common intellectual goal: that of understanding a problem of extraordinary importance for our times. This book is a project of the Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: The changing character of war / Hew Strachan and Sibylle Scheipers
  • The changing character of war / Azar Gat
  • Had a distinct template for a "Western way of war" been established before 1800? / David Parrott
  • Changes in war : the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars / Michael Broers
  • The change from within / Gil-li Vardi
  • "Killing is easy" : the atomic bomb and the temptation of terror / Gerard J. DeGroot
  • The "new wars" thesis revisited / Mats Berdal
  • What is really changing? : change and continuity in global terrorism / Audrey Kurth Cronin
  • Humanitarian intervention / D.J.B. Trim
  • Democracy and war in the strategic thought of Giulio Douhet / Thomas Hippler
  • Religion in the War on Terror / Alia Brahimi
  • The changing character of civil wars, 1800-2009 / Stathis N. Kalyvas
  • Crime versus war / William Reno
  • War without the people / Pascal Vennesson
  • The changing character of private force / Sarah Percy
  • Who fights? : a comparative demographic depiction of terrorists and insurgents in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries / Bruce Hoffman
  • Warlords / Kimberly Marten
  • The European Union, multilateralism, and the use of force / Anne Deighton
  • Robots at war : the new battlefield / Peter W. Singer
  • The civilian in modern war / Adam Roberts
  • Killing civilians / Uwe Steinhoff
  • The status and protections of prisoners of war and detainees / Sibylle Scheipers
  • The challenge of the child soldier / Guy S. Goodwin-Gill
  • American strategic culture : problems and prospects / Antulio J Echevarria II
  • Morality and law in war / David Rodin
  • Target-selection norms, torture norms, and growing US permissiveness / Henry Shue
  • The return of realism? : war and changing concepts of the political / Patricia Owens
  • Strategy in the twenty-first century / Hew Strachan
  • Conclusion: Absent war studies? War, knowledge, and critique / Tarak Barkawi and Shane Brighton.
Over the last decade (and indeed ever since the Cold War), the rise of insurgents and non-state actors in war, and their readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting, have led commentators to speak of 'new wars'. They have assumed that the 'old wars' were waged solely between states, and were accordingly fought between comparable and 'symmetrical' armed forces. Much of this commentary has lacked context or sophistication. It has been bounded by norms and theories more than the messiness of reality. Fed by the impact of the 9/11 attacks, it has privileged some wars and certain trends over others. Most obviously it has been historically unaware. But it has also failed to consider many of the other dimensions which help us to define what war is - legal, ethical, religious, and social. The Changing Character of War, the fruit of a five-year interdisciplinary programme at Oxford of the same name, draws together all these themes, in order to distinguish between what is really changing about war and what only seems to be changing. Self-evidently, as the product of its own times, the character of each war is always changing. But if war's character is in flux, its underlying nature contains its own internal consistency. Each war is an adversarial business, capable of generating its own dynamic, and therefore of spiralling in directions that are never totally predictable. War is both utilitarian, the tool of policy, and dysfunctional. This book brings together scholars with world-wide reputations, drawn from a clutch of different disciplines, but united by a common intellectual goal: that of understanding a problem of extraordinary importance for our times. This book is a project of the Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
U21.2 .C4435 2011 Unknown

12. War is a lie [2010]

Book
367 p. ; 23 cm
  • Introduction
  • Wars are not fought against evil
  • Wars are not launched in defense
  • Wars are not waged out of generosity
  • Wars are not unavoidable
  • Warriors are not heroes
  • War makers do not have noble motives
  • Wars are not prolonged for the good of soldiers
  • Wars are not fought on battlefields
  • Wars are not won, and are not ended by enlarging them
  • War news does not come from disinterested observers
  • War does not bring security and is not sustainable
  • Wars are not legal
  • Wars cannot be both planned and avoided
  • War is over if you want it.
Not a single thing we commonly believe about wars that helps keep them around is true. Wars cannot be good or glorious. Nor can they be justified as a means of achieving peace or anything else of value. The reasons given for wars, before, during, and after, are all false. Because there can be no good reason for war, having gone to war, we are participating in a lie. -- Introduction.
  • Introduction
  • Wars are not fought against evil
  • Wars are not launched in defense
  • Wars are not waged out of generosity
  • Wars are not unavoidable
  • Warriors are not heroes
  • War makers do not have noble motives
  • Wars are not prolonged for the good of soldiers
  • Wars are not fought on battlefields
  • Wars are not won, and are not ended by enlarging them
  • War news does not come from disinterested observers
  • War does not bring security and is not sustainable
  • Wars are not legal
  • Wars cannot be both planned and avoided
  • War is over if you want it.
Not a single thing we commonly believe about wars that helps keep them around is true. Wars cannot be good or glorious. Nor can they be justified as a means of achieving peace or anything else of value. The reasons given for wars, before, during, and after, are all false. Because there can be no good reason for war, having gone to war, we are participating in a lie. -- Introduction.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
U21.2 .S93 2010 Unknown
Book
vi, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The problem
  • Force
  • Battle
  • War as an instrument
  • War as possible impossibility
  • Basic forms of war
  • Sovereignty and peace
  • War without God.
This book provides an English translation of philosopher Heimo Hofmeister's book, "Der Wille zum Krieg, oder die Ohnmacht der Politik", which traces the connection between war and the individual or group awareness of differences among 'others' which leads to inevitable and serious disagreement. Analyzing the relations of strength, force and power on the one hand and state, politics and war on the other, Hofmeister shows that while conflict is inevitable, war is not. Ironically, the same diversity that exists among humanity and the conflicts that arise from the awareness of such are just as much the foundation of harmony, friendship and love as they are that of war and hate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The problem
  • Force
  • Battle
  • War as an instrument
  • War as possible impossibility
  • Basic forms of war
  • Sovereignty and peace
  • War without God.
This book provides an English translation of philosopher Heimo Hofmeister's book, "Der Wille zum Krieg, oder die Ohnmacht der Politik", which traces the connection between war and the individual or group awareness of differences among 'others' which leads to inevitable and serious disagreement. Analyzing the relations of strength, force and power on the one hand and state, politics and war on the other, Hofmeister shows that while conflict is inevitable, war is not. Ironically, the same diversity that exists among humanity and the conflicts that arise from the awareness of such are just as much the foundation of harmony, friendship and love as they are that of war and hate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B105 .W3 H6413 2007 Unknown
Book
xv, 210 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
JZ6390 .C87 2006 Unknown
Book
vii, 99 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction - William A. Galston-- I: Traditional Paradigms and their Limits-- The Ethics of Retaliation - Judith Lichtenberg-- Terrorism, Innocence, and War - Robert K. Fullinwider-- II: The Moral Hazards of Military Response-- The Paradox of Riskless Warfare - Paul W. Kahn-- The War on Terrorism and the End of Human Rights - David Luban-- III. Looking Ahead: The Possibility of a Comprehensive Approach-- Is Development an Effective Way to Fight Terrorism? - Lloyd J. Dumas-- The War of All against All: Terror and the Politics of Fear - Benjamin R. Barber.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
What are the limits of justified retaliation against aggression? What actions are morally permissible in preventing future aggression? Against whom may retaliation be aimed? These questions have long been part of the debate over the ethics of warfare. They all took on new meaning after terrorists hijacked four US airliners on September 11, 2001. This work considers the just aims and legitimate limits of the United States' response to the terrorist attacks. Six essayists from the University of Maryland's Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy pair off to discuss three ethical questions in this context. Judith Lichtenberg and Robert Fullinwider explore the moral challenges posed by terrorism. Paul Kahn and David Luban question whether modern terrorism can be addressed within existing paradigms of just war and international law. Finally, Lloyd Dumas and Benjamin Barber ask whether the US response should be military, and if not, what it might look like. As a whole, these six essays ask the fundamental question, how should the United States use its power to combat terrorism?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction - William A. Galston-- I: Traditional Paradigms and their Limits-- The Ethics of Retaliation - Judith Lichtenberg-- Terrorism, Innocence, and War - Robert K. Fullinwider-- II: The Moral Hazards of Military Response-- The Paradox of Riskless Warfare - Paul W. Kahn-- The War on Terrorism and the End of Human Rights - David Luban-- III. Looking Ahead: The Possibility of a Comprehensive Approach-- Is Development an Effective Way to Fight Terrorism? - Lloyd J. Dumas-- The War of All against All: Terror and the Politics of Fear - Benjamin R. Barber.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
What are the limits of justified retaliation against aggression? What actions are morally permissible in preventing future aggression? Against whom may retaliation be aimed? These questions have long been part of the debate over the ethics of warfare. They all took on new meaning after terrorists hijacked four US airliners on September 11, 2001. This work considers the just aims and legitimate limits of the United States' response to the terrorist attacks. Six essayists from the University of Maryland's Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy pair off to discuss three ethical questions in this context. Judith Lichtenberg and Robert Fullinwider explore the moral challenges posed by terrorism. Paul Kahn and David Luban question whether modern terrorism can be addressed within existing paradigms of just war and international law. Finally, Lloyd Dumas and Benjamin Barber ask whether the US response should be military, and if not, what it might look like. As a whole, these six essays ask the fundamental question, how should the United States use its power to combat terrorism?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B105 .W3 W37 2003 Unknown

16. From war to peace [1992]

Book
291 p.
  • Part 1 The reality of war: the world order, and God's order-- desire and war-- nature, destiny and war-- freedom and war. Part 2 Utopias of peace: conjecture on natural peace-- original peace and civil peace-- perpetual peace. Part 3 Toward peace: the ontological rift-- a neglected ontology-- authentic speech and peace.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
What are the fundamental causes of war and why is it so firmly rooted in human experience? This book traces the answers to these questions to biblical accounts of the genesis of the sexes and to Plato's conception of the united self, and then explores the failure of modern political theory to come to terms with the warlike nature of humans. The book combines political theory, gender analysis and human psychology, and examines the thought of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Hegel, Nietzsche, La Boetie, Rousseau, Kant and Marx.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part 1 The reality of war: the world order, and God's order-- desire and war-- nature, destiny and war-- freedom and war. Part 2 Utopias of peace: conjecture on natural peace-- original peace and civil peace-- perpetual peace. Part 3 Toward peace: the ontological rift-- a neglected ontology-- authentic speech and peace.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
What are the fundamental causes of war and why is it so firmly rooted in human experience? This book traces the answers to these questions to biblical accounts of the genesis of the sexes and to Plato's conception of the united self, and then explores the failure of modern political theory to come to terms with the warlike nature of humans. The book combines political theory, gender analysis and human psychology, and examines the thought of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Hegel, Nietzsche, La Boetie, Rousseau, Kant and Marx.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
B105 .P4 C4313 1992 Available
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks
Request
U1 .J69 V.5 2012 Available
U1 .J69 V.4 2011 Available
U1 .J69 V.3 2010 Available
U1 .J69 V.2 2009 Available
U1 .J69 V.1 2008 Available
Book
ix, 325 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. Historical Background: 1. Jus ad bellum Gregory Reichberg-- 2. Jus in bello Nicholas Rengger-- Part II. Initiating War: 3. The principle of just cause Larry May-- 4. Aggression and punishment Jeff McMahan-- 5. Responding to humanitarian crises Cindy Holder-- 6. War and democracy James Bohman-- Part III. Waging War: 7. Proportionality and necessity Thomas Hurka-- 8. Collateral damage David Lefkowitz-- 9. Weapons of mass destruction Steven Lee-- 10. Justifying torture as an act of war Michael Davis-- 11. Terrorism: definition, defense, and women Marilyn Friedman-- Part IV. Ending War: 12. Reconciliation and war's aftermath Trudy Govier-- 13. Amnesties and international law Kit Wellman-- 14. War crimes: the law of hell David Luban-- 15. Revenge and demonization Nancy Sherman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
War has been a key topic of speculation and theorising ever since the invention of philosophy in classical antiquity. This anthology brings together the work of distinguished contemporary political philosophers and theorists who address the leading normative and conceptual issues concerning war. The book is divided into three parts: initiating war, waging war, and ending war. The contributors aim to provide a comprehensive introduction to each of these main areas of dispute concerning war. Each essay is an original contribution to ongoing debates on various aspects of war and also provides a survey of the main topics in each subfield. Serving as a companion to the theoretical issues pertaining to war, this volume also is an important contribution to debates in political philosophy. It can serve as a textbook for relevant courses on war offered in philosophy departments, religious studies programs, and law schools.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Historical Background: 1. Jus ad bellum Gregory Reichberg-- 2. Jus in bello Nicholas Rengger-- Part II. Initiating War: 3. The principle of just cause Larry May-- 4. Aggression and punishment Jeff McMahan-- 5. Responding to humanitarian crises Cindy Holder-- 6. War and democracy James Bohman-- Part III. Waging War: 7. Proportionality and necessity Thomas Hurka-- 8. Collateral damage David Lefkowitz-- 9. Weapons of mass destruction Steven Lee-- 10. Justifying torture as an act of war Michael Davis-- 11. Terrorism: definition, defense, and women Marilyn Friedman-- Part IV. Ending War: 12. Reconciliation and war's aftermath Trudy Govier-- 13. Amnesties and international law Kit Wellman-- 14. War crimes: the law of hell David Luban-- 15. Revenge and demonization Nancy Sherman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
War has been a key topic of speculation and theorising ever since the invention of philosophy in classical antiquity. This anthology brings together the work of distinguished contemporary political philosophers and theorists who address the leading normative and conceptual issues concerning war. The book is divided into three parts: initiating war, waging war, and ending war. The contributors aim to provide a comprehensive introduction to each of these main areas of dispute concerning war. Each essay is an original contribution to ongoing debates on various aspects of war and also provides a survey of the main topics in each subfield. Serving as a companion to the theoretical issues pertaining to war, this volume also is an important contribution to debates in political philosophy. It can serve as a textbook for relevant courses on war offered in philosophy departments, religious studies programs, and law schools.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B105 .W3 W36 2008 Unknown
Book
253 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
B105 .W3 M67 2014 Unknown
Book
[4], 24 p.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
MFILM 015:4 Unknown

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