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Book
3 v. : ill., map ; 21-30 cm
  • Vol. 1. Interpretation
  • v. 2. Supplement
  • v. 3. Plates
  • Vol. 1. Interpretation
  • v. 2. Supplement
  • v. 3. Plates
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ND2829 .A4 S3 2013 F V.1 Unknown
ND2829 .A4 S3 2013 F V.2 Unknown
ND2829 .A4 S3 2013 F V.3 Unknown
Book
113 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN772.22 .G7 B47 2012 Unknown
Book
248 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), maps ; 21 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
GN803 .B336 2012 Unknown
Book
xii, 169 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Acknowledgements
  • Outside
  • Cave Opening
  • Doxa
  • Caves
  • Doxa
  • Caves
  • Caves and Doxa
  • Outside
  • Again
  • Notes
  • References
  • Index
  • Names and Caves.
"In the late 19th century in northern Spain and southern France prehistoric mural paintings and engravings were discovered. Cave Art, Perception and Knowledge inquires into epistemic questions related to images, depicting and perception that this rich and much debated material has given rise to. Focusing respectively on the historical and scientific circumstances and controversies and on the epistemic and perceptual problems and questions the discovery of these paintings and engravings gave rise to, the book traces the outline of the doxa of cave art studies. It criticizes the different ways of trying to make sense of the cave art. Furthermore it suggests, with the help of both Cornelius Castoriadis's concept of technique and Ernst Cassirer's notion of symbolic form, a yet untried way out of the hermeneutical impasse where the interpretation of the paleolithic pictures finds itself today"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Acknowledgements
  • Outside
  • Cave Opening
  • Doxa
  • Caves
  • Doxa
  • Caves
  • Caves and Doxa
  • Outside
  • Again
  • Notes
  • References
  • Index
  • Names and Caves.
"In the late 19th century in northern Spain and southern France prehistoric mural paintings and engravings were discovered. Cave Art, Perception and Knowledge inquires into epistemic questions related to images, depicting and perception that this rich and much debated material has given rise to. Focusing respectively on the historical and scientific circumstances and controversies and on the epistemic and perceptual problems and questions the discovery of these paintings and engravings gave rise to, the book traces the outline of the doxa of cave art studies. It criticizes the different ways of trying to make sense of the cave art. Furthermore it suggests, with the help of both Cornelius Castoriadis's concept of technique and Ernst Cassirer's notion of symbolic form, a yet untried way out of the hermeneutical impasse where the interpretation of the paleolithic pictures finds itself today"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
N5310.5 .S7 R67 2012 Unknown

5. Avalokitesvara [2011]

Book
14 unnumbered pages : all black and white illustrations ; 48 cm
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Locked Stacks, Large
TR655 .C656 2011 F In-library use

6. San rock art [2011]

Book
157 p. : ill., map ; 18 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
DT1058 .S36 L482 2011 Unknown
Book
xviii, 516 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
ND2849 .D86 I58 2004 Unknown
Book
xix, 222 p., 8 p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
  • Freshly plowed fields in the Vézère Valley
  • Font de Gaume
  • Millions of years ago
  • Neanderthals and Homo sapiens
  • Combarelles
  • Venus figures, blades, beads, and bone
  • Rouffignac
  • Laurel leaves and needles
  • Cap Blanc
  • Art at its peak
  • Bernifal.
Well-written and eminently accessible, this book explores and celebrates the Upper Palaeolithic art of the Dordogne, admirably conveying the author's enthusiasm for her subject. Desdemaines-Hugon's text reads as a personalised guided tour to five famous sites, all of which are still open to the public: Font de Gaume, Combralles, Cap Blanc, Rouffignac and Bernifal. The descriptions are beautifully done, marrying the art with its setting, and portable and decorative arts are also covered, giving the reader a real feel for the sophistication of Cro-magnon culture, as well as insights as to its development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Freshly plowed fields in the Vézère Valley
  • Font de Gaume
  • Millions of years ago
  • Neanderthals and Homo sapiens
  • Combarelles
  • Venus figures, blades, beads, and bone
  • Rouffignac
  • Laurel leaves and needles
  • Cap Blanc
  • Art at its peak
  • Bernifal.
Well-written and eminently accessible, this book explores and celebrates the Upper Palaeolithic art of the Dordogne, admirably conveying the author's enthusiasm for her subject. Desdemaines-Hugon's text reads as a personalised guided tour to five famous sites, all of which are still open to the public: Font de Gaume, Combralles, Cap Blanc, Rouffignac and Bernifal. The descriptions are beautifully done, marrying the art with its setting, and portable and decorative arts are also covered, giving the reader a real feel for the sophistication of Cro-magnon culture, as well as insights as to its development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N5310.5 .F7 D47 2010 Unknown
Book
xiv, 242 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • Preface. Acknowledgments. 1. The Adventure of Niaux. 2. The Greatest Mystery. 3. The Neanderthal Enigma. 4. The Roots of Language. 5. Abbe Breuil. 6. Font-de-Gaume and Combarelles. 7. The Tale of a Missing Dog. 8. The Sign of the Bull and the Legend of the Minotaur. 9. Rouffignac and Pech Merle. 10. The Discovery of Lascaux. 11. The Enigma of the Pit. 12. The Groundbreaking Work of Annette Laming-Emperaire. 13. Prehistoric Objets d'Art. 14. The Sign of the Hand. 15. The Legend of the White Lady. 16. Shamans of the Tundra. 17. Stonehenge and Signs in the Sky. 18. The Mediterranean, Australia, and Patagonia. 19. Leroi-Gourhan's Theory. 20. The Relationship between Signs and Animals. 21. The Chauvet Cave. Notes. References. Illustration Credits. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
What France's ancient cave drawings may reveal about the origin of language, art, and human thought - insights into one of the greatest mysteries in anthropology. They roam deep underground in the recesses of French (and some Spanish) caves: Bulls and bison. Horses and stags. Rhinos, bears, human-like creatures, and more. Painted, drawn, or engraved, these incredible images are 32,000 years old, yet they seem full of personality and life. Who were the artists? How did they make these paintings miles into labyrinthine caves with only stone candles to light the way? Why did the artists make them and what do they mean? What about the undecipherable signs accompanying the art? Popular science writer Amir Aczel examines the cave drawings and the theories scientists have put forward to explain them, including religious iconography, hunting trophies, and a leap in human brain development. Drawing on years of research and his own visits to Paleolithic caves, Aczel takes us underground on an unforgettable journey of discovery at the crossroads of art, science, and history in the quest to solve the mysteries of this Stone Age art and deepen our understanding of human evolution. Amir D. Aczel (Brookline, MA) is a research fellow in the history of science at Boston University and former visiting scholar at Harvard University. He is the author of 14 books, including "Fermat's Last Theorem" (978-0-385-31946-1), "Descartes' Secret Notebook" (978-0-7679-2034-6), and "The Jesuit and the Skull" (978-1-59448-956-3). He has appeared on the "CBS Evening News", CNN, CNBC, and "ABC's Nightline", as well as "NPR's Weekend Edition" and "Morning Edition".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface. Acknowledgments. 1. The Adventure of Niaux. 2. The Greatest Mystery. 3. The Neanderthal Enigma. 4. The Roots of Language. 5. Abbe Breuil. 6. Font-de-Gaume and Combarelles. 7. The Tale of a Missing Dog. 8. The Sign of the Bull and the Legend of the Minotaur. 9. Rouffignac and Pech Merle. 10. The Discovery of Lascaux. 11. The Enigma of the Pit. 12. The Groundbreaking Work of Annette Laming-Emperaire. 13. Prehistoric Objets d'Art. 14. The Sign of the Hand. 15. The Legend of the White Lady. 16. Shamans of the Tundra. 17. Stonehenge and Signs in the Sky. 18. The Mediterranean, Australia, and Patagonia. 19. Leroi-Gourhan's Theory. 20. The Relationship between Signs and Animals. 21. The Chauvet Cave. Notes. References. Illustration Credits. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
What France's ancient cave drawings may reveal about the origin of language, art, and human thought - insights into one of the greatest mysteries in anthropology. They roam deep underground in the recesses of French (and some Spanish) caves: Bulls and bison. Horses and stags. Rhinos, bears, human-like creatures, and more. Painted, drawn, or engraved, these incredible images are 32,000 years old, yet they seem full of personality and life. Who were the artists? How did they make these paintings miles into labyrinthine caves with only stone candles to light the way? Why did the artists make them and what do they mean? What about the undecipherable signs accompanying the art? Popular science writer Amir Aczel examines the cave drawings and the theories scientists have put forward to explain them, including religious iconography, hunting trophies, and a leap in human brain development. Drawing on years of research and his own visits to Paleolithic caves, Aczel takes us underground on an unforgettable journey of discovery at the crossroads of art, science, and history in the quest to solve the mysteries of this Stone Age art and deepen our understanding of human evolution. Amir D. Aczel (Brookline, MA) is a research fellow in the history of science at Boston University and former visiting scholar at Harvard University. He is the author of 14 books, including "Fermat's Last Theorem" (978-0-385-31946-1), "Descartes' Secret Notebook" (978-0-7679-2034-6), and "The Jesuit and the Skull" (978-1-59448-956-3). He has appeared on the "CBS Evening News", CNN, CNBC, and "ABC's Nightline", as well as "NPR's Weekend Edition" and "Morning Edition".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN771 .A28 2009 Unknown
Book
322 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • Preface-- Foreword-- The World#s Earliest Cave Art-- Inside Chauvet-- The Dating Game-- Finding Coa-- The Myth of Ecstasy & the Origins of Religion -- Entry into the Volp Caves-- Creativity & the Emotional Life of the Shamans-- Art Beyond Belief: Creativity & Religion in Perspective-- Endnotes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The magnificent prehistoric art discovered in caves throughout France and Spain raises many questions about early human culture. What do these superbly rendered paintings of horses, bison, and enigmatic human figures and symbols mean? How can we explain the sudden flourishing of artistic creativity at such a high level? And in what ways does this artwork reflect the underlying belief system, worldview, and life of the people who created it? In this fascinating discussion of ancient art and religion, Dr David S Whitley - one of the world's leading experts on cave paintings - guides the reader in an exploration of these intriguing questions, while sharing his firsthand experiences in visiting these exquisite, breath-taking sites.To grasp what drove these ancient artists to create these masterpieces, and to understand the origin of myth and religion, as Whitley explains, is to appreciate what makes us human. Moreover, he broadens our understanding of the genesis of creativity and myth by proposing a radically new and original theory that weds two seemingly warring camps from separate disciplines. On the one hand, archaeologists specialising in prehistoric cave paintings have argued that the visionary rituals of shamans led to the creation of this expressive art. They consider shamanism to be the earliest known form of religion. By contrast, evolutionary psychologists view the emergence of religious beliefs as a normal expression of the human mind. In their eyes, the wild and ecstatic trances of shamans were a form of aberrant behaviour.Far from being typical representatives of ancient religion, shamans were exceptions to the normal rule of early religion. Whitley resolves the controversy by interweaving the archaeological evidence with the latest findings of cutting-edge neuroscience. He thereby rewrites our understanding of shamanism and its connection with artistic creativity, myth, and religion. Combining a colourful narrative describing Whitley's personal explorations at key archaeological sites with robust scientific research, "Cave Paintings and the Human Spirit" makes for engrossing reading. It provides a profound and poignant perspective on what it means to be human.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface-- Foreword-- The World#s Earliest Cave Art-- Inside Chauvet-- The Dating Game-- Finding Coa-- The Myth of Ecstasy & the Origins of Religion -- Entry into the Volp Caves-- Creativity & the Emotional Life of the Shamans-- Art Beyond Belief: Creativity & Religion in Perspective-- Endnotes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The magnificent prehistoric art discovered in caves throughout France and Spain raises many questions about early human culture. What do these superbly rendered paintings of horses, bison, and enigmatic human figures and symbols mean? How can we explain the sudden flourishing of artistic creativity at such a high level? And in what ways does this artwork reflect the underlying belief system, worldview, and life of the people who created it? In this fascinating discussion of ancient art and religion, Dr David S Whitley - one of the world's leading experts on cave paintings - guides the reader in an exploration of these intriguing questions, while sharing his firsthand experiences in visiting these exquisite, breath-taking sites.To grasp what drove these ancient artists to create these masterpieces, and to understand the origin of myth and religion, as Whitley explains, is to appreciate what makes us human. Moreover, he broadens our understanding of the genesis of creativity and myth by proposing a radically new and original theory that weds two seemingly warring camps from separate disciplines. On the one hand, archaeologists specialising in prehistoric cave paintings have argued that the visionary rituals of shamans led to the creation of this expressive art. They consider shamanism to be the earliest known form of religion. By contrast, evolutionary psychologists view the emergence of religious beliefs as a normal expression of the human mind. In their eyes, the wild and ecstatic trances of shamans were a form of aberrant behaviour.Far from being typical representatives of ancient religion, shamans were exceptions to the normal rule of early religion. Whitley resolves the controversy by interweaving the archaeological evidence with the latest findings of cutting-edge neuroscience. He thereby rewrites our understanding of shamanism and its connection with artistic creativity, myth, and religion. Combining a colourful narrative describing Whitley's personal explorations at key archaeological sites with robust scientific research, "Cave Paintings and the Human Spirit" makes for engrossing reading. It provides a profound and poignant perspective on what it means to be human.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN803 .W495 2009 Unknown
Book
xix, 332 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N5310 .E57 2009 Unknown

12. Cave art [2008]

Book
326 p. : col. ill., maps ; 29 cm.
  • The book is arranged chronologically and geographically, by caves. It is divided into four parts. The first three chapters correspond to three major periods of time, each named after a famous cave: Time of Chauvet (35 000 - 22 000 BP), Time of Lascaux (22 000 - 17 000 BP) and Time of Niaux (17 000 - 11 000 BP Within each chapter, the first section is devoted to the emblematic cave of that period, which often yielded spectacular finds, and is followed by a guided tour of other caves of that same period. In total 85 caves are explored. The last chapter examines examples of similar prehistoric artistic expressions around the world after the ice age.Time of Chauvet 35 000 - 22 000 BPTime of Lascaux 22 000 - 17 000 BPTime of Niaux 17 000 - 11 000 BPAfter the Ice Age 11 000 -.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Ever since they were discovered over a hundred years ago, the paintings and rock engravings deep in the caves of Europe have captured the public imagination, provoking wonder and amazement at their great age, their technical mastery and their sheer beauty. Some of the oldest art known to man turns out to be highly accomplished, and also to have been made in extremely difficult conditions in absurdly inaccessible locations. These facts have presented a puzzle and a challenge that have never ceased to exercise the imagination of both scholars and the wider public. This interest is kept alive by the beauty, vivacity and realism of these mammoths, bison, horses and other animals, which have the same power and freshness to modern eyes that they must have had for their creators. Jean Clottes' book is the first one to provide a simple, accessible, orderly and easy to use pictorial introduction to this remarkable art.A concise introduction tells the story of the discovery of the caves, and gives a clear outline of current knowledge and research. It also discusses the modern debates about the meaning and purpose of the art, and sets these debates in the wider context of prehistory. The author also raises questions about this art in relation to modern sensibilities - why do we find it so compelling? The core of the book is a carefully selected and organized sequence of 300 images, presenting the finest examples of cave art, including not only the most famous caves such as Lascaux, Altamira, Pech-Merle and Niaux, but also dozens of others that have yielded remarkable finds. A wonderful range of animals is presented, as well as the mysterious abstract signs, and the puzzlingly crude and schematized representations of human beings. Some examples of portable art and sculpture are also included in order to make important comparisons and links.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The book is arranged chronologically and geographically, by caves. It is divided into four parts. The first three chapters correspond to three major periods of time, each named after a famous cave: Time of Chauvet (35 000 - 22 000 BP), Time of Lascaux (22 000 - 17 000 BP) and Time of Niaux (17 000 - 11 000 BP Within each chapter, the first section is devoted to the emblematic cave of that period, which often yielded spectacular finds, and is followed by a guided tour of other caves of that same period. In total 85 caves are explored. The last chapter examines examples of similar prehistoric artistic expressions around the world after the ice age.Time of Chauvet 35 000 - 22 000 BPTime of Lascaux 22 000 - 17 000 BPTime of Niaux 17 000 - 11 000 BPAfter the Ice Age 11 000 -.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Ever since they were discovered over a hundred years ago, the paintings and rock engravings deep in the caves of Europe have captured the public imagination, provoking wonder and amazement at their great age, their technical mastery and their sheer beauty. Some of the oldest art known to man turns out to be highly accomplished, and also to have been made in extremely difficult conditions in absurdly inaccessible locations. These facts have presented a puzzle and a challenge that have never ceased to exercise the imagination of both scholars and the wider public. This interest is kept alive by the beauty, vivacity and realism of these mammoths, bison, horses and other animals, which have the same power and freshness to modern eyes that they must have had for their creators. Jean Clottes' book is the first one to provide a simple, accessible, orderly and easy to use pictorial introduction to this remarkable art.A concise introduction tells the story of the discovery of the caves, and gives a clear outline of current knowledge and research. It also discusses the modern debates about the meaning and purpose of the art, and sets these debates in the wider context of prehistory. The author also raises questions about this art in relation to modern sensibilities - why do we find it so compelling? The core of the book is a carefully selected and organized sequence of 300 images, presenting the finest examples of cave art, including not only the most famous caves such as Lascaux, Altamira, Pech-Merle and Niaux, but also dozens of others that have yielded remarkable finds. A wonderful range of animals is presented, as well as the mysterious abstract signs, and the puzzlingly crude and schematized representations of human beings. Some examples of portable art and sculpture are also included in order to make important comparisons and links.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N5310.5 .E8 C56 2008 Unknown
Book
xxiii, 247 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
  • Elements : a graphic ice age vocabulary
  • Basic structures : a graphic ice age syntax
  • Illusion : making the imagined seem real
  • Analogy : finding likeness in the unlike
  • Ambiguity : playing with multiple meanings
  • Paradox : reconciling the irreconcilable.
  • Elements : a graphic ice age vocabulary
  • Basic structures : a graphic ice age syntax
  • Illusion : making the imagined seem real
  • Analogy : finding likeness in the unlike
  • Ambiguity : playing with multiple meanings
  • Paradox : reconciling the irreconcilable.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N5310 .A47 2008 Unknown
Book
xv, 292 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Prologue-- 2. The historical background to the discovery of cave art at Creswell Crags-- 3. The Palaeolithic rock art of Creswell Crags: prelude to a systematic study-- 4. Verification of the age of the Palaeolithic cave art at Creswell Crags-- 5. 3D laser scanning at Church Hole, Creswell Crags-- 6. Zoological perspectives on the Late Glacial-- 7. Cave archaeology and palaeontology in the Creswell region-- 8. The Stone Age archaeology of Church Hole, Creswell Crags-- 9. Cultural context and form of some of the Creswell images: an interpretative model-- 10. The engravings of Gouy: France's northernmost decorated cave-- 11. Palaeolithic art in isolation: the case of Sicily and Sardinia-- 12. The horse in the Palaeolithic parietal art of the Quercy: outline of a stylistic study-- 13. A topographical approach to parietal figures: the monumental sculptures of the Roc-aux-Sorciers (Vienne, France)-- 14. Dating Magdalenian art in North Spain: the current situation-- 15. Rock art and the Coa Valley Archaeological Park: a case study in the preservation of Portugal's prehistoric rupestral heritage-- 16. Rewriting the history books: the Magdalenian art of Creswell Crags.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Cave art is a subject of perennial interest among archaeologists. Until recently it was assumed that it was largely restricted to southern France and northern Iberia, although in recent years new discoveries have demonstrated that it originally had a much wider distribution. The discovery in 2003 of the UK's first examples of cave art, in two caves at Creswell Crags on the Derbyshire/Nottinghamshire border, was the most surprising illustration of this. The discoverers (the editors of the book) brought together in 2004 a number of Palaeolithic archaeologists and rock art specialists from across the world to study the Creswell art and debate its significance, and its similarities and contrasts with contemporary Late Pleistocene ('Ice Age') art on the Continent. This comprehensively illustrated book presents the Creswell art itself, the archaeology of the caves and the region, and the wider context of the Upper Palaeolithic era in Britain, as well as a number of up-to-date studies of Palaeolithic cave art in Spain, Portugal, France, and Italy which serve to contextualize the British examples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Prologue-- 2. The historical background to the discovery of cave art at Creswell Crags-- 3. The Palaeolithic rock art of Creswell Crags: prelude to a systematic study-- 4. Verification of the age of the Palaeolithic cave art at Creswell Crags-- 5. 3D laser scanning at Church Hole, Creswell Crags-- 6. Zoological perspectives on the Late Glacial-- 7. Cave archaeology and palaeontology in the Creswell region-- 8. The Stone Age archaeology of Church Hole, Creswell Crags-- 9. Cultural context and form of some of the Creswell images: an interpretative model-- 10. The engravings of Gouy: France's northernmost decorated cave-- 11. Palaeolithic art in isolation: the case of Sicily and Sardinia-- 12. The horse in the Palaeolithic parietal art of the Quercy: outline of a stylistic study-- 13. A topographical approach to parietal figures: the monumental sculptures of the Roc-aux-Sorciers (Vienne, France)-- 14. Dating Magdalenian art in North Spain: the current situation-- 15. Rock art and the Coa Valley Archaeological Park: a case study in the preservation of Portugal's prehistoric rupestral heritage-- 16. Rewriting the history books: the Magdalenian art of Creswell Crags.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Cave art is a subject of perennial interest among archaeologists. Until recently it was assumed that it was largely restricted to southern France and northern Iberia, although in recent years new discoveries have demonstrated that it originally had a much wider distribution. The discovery in 2003 of the UK's first examples of cave art, in two caves at Creswell Crags on the Derbyshire/Nottinghamshire border, was the most surprising illustration of this. The discoverers (the editors of the book) brought together in 2004 a number of Palaeolithic archaeologists and rock art specialists from across the world to study the Creswell art and debate its significance, and its similarities and contrasts with contemporary Late Pleistocene ('Ice Age') art on the Continent. This comprehensively illustrated book presents the Creswell art itself, the archaeology of the caves and the region, and the wider context of the Upper Palaeolithic era in Britain, as well as a number of up-to-date studies of Palaeolithic cave art in Spain, Portugal, France, and Italy which serve to contextualize the British examples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN772.22 .G7 P34 2007 Unknown
Book
266 p. : col. ill., map ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
F2519.3 .A7 J67 2006 F Unknown
Book
278 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 22 cm.
In his new book, Gregory Curtis introduces us to the spectacular cave paintings of France and Spain--to the men and women who rediscovered them, to the varied theories about their origins, to their remarkable beauty and their continuing fascination. He takes us with him on his own journey of discovery, making us see the astonishing sophistication and power of the paintings, telling us what is known about their creators, the Cro-Magnon people who settled the area some 40,000 years ago. Beginning in 1879 with Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola, who found the astonishing paintings on the ceiling of a cave at Altamira, Curtis takes us among the scholars of prehistory, the archaeologists, the art historians who devoted their lives to studying and writing about the paintings. Among them: the famous Abbe Henri Breuil, who lay on his back in damp caves lit only by a lantern held patiently aloft by his faithful--and silent--female assistant, to produce the exquisite tracings that are the most reproduced renderings of the art; Max Raphael, the art historian who first understood that the animals on the walls were not single portraits but part of larger compositions; the beautiful Annette Lamming-Emperaire, resistance fighter turned archaeologist, whose doctoral thesis was so important that all theory since has flowed from her work; Jean Clottes and others still working as new caves and information come to light. In his own search for the caves' meaning, Curtis takes us through the major theories--that the art was part of fertility or hunting rituals, or used for religious or shamanistic purposes, or was clan mythology--examining the ways in which ethnography, archaeology, and religion have influenced the thinking about the cave paintings over time. "The Cave Painters" is rich in detail, personalities, and history--and permeated with the mystery at the core of this art created so many thousands of years ago by human beings who had developed, perhaps for the first time, both the ability for abstract thought and a profound and beautiful way to express it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In his new book, Gregory Curtis introduces us to the spectacular cave paintings of France and Spain--to the men and women who rediscovered them, to the varied theories about their origins, to their remarkable beauty and their continuing fascination. He takes us with him on his own journey of discovery, making us see the astonishing sophistication and power of the paintings, telling us what is known about their creators, the Cro-Magnon people who settled the area some 40,000 years ago. Beginning in 1879 with Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola, who found the astonishing paintings on the ceiling of a cave at Altamira, Curtis takes us among the scholars of prehistory, the archaeologists, the art historians who devoted their lives to studying and writing about the paintings. Among them: the famous Abbe Henri Breuil, who lay on his back in damp caves lit only by a lantern held patiently aloft by his faithful--and silent--female assistant, to produce the exquisite tracings that are the most reproduced renderings of the art; Max Raphael, the art historian who first understood that the animals on the walls were not single portraits but part of larger compositions; the beautiful Annette Lamming-Emperaire, resistance fighter turned archaeologist, whose doctoral thesis was so important that all theory since has flowed from her work; Jean Clottes and others still working as new caves and information come to light. In his own search for the caves' meaning, Curtis takes us through the major theories--that the art was part of fertility or hunting rituals, or used for religious or shamanistic purposes, or was clan mythology--examining the ways in which ethnography, archaeology, and religion have influenced the thinking about the cave paintings over time. "The Cave Painters" is rich in detail, personalities, and history--and permeated with the mystery at the core of this art created so many thousands of years ago by human beings who had developed, perhaps for the first time, both the ability for abstract thought and a profound and beautiful way to express it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N5310.5 .F7 C87 2006 Unknown
Book
xv, 192 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN818 .B84 B48 2006 F Unknown
Book
xii, 507 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
A richly illustrated study provides the most comprehensive representation of Paleolithic art ever published and offers a radical new way of interpreting the art and artifacts of these prehistoric cultures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
A richly illustrated study provides the most comprehensive representation of Paleolithic art ever published and offers a radical new way of interpreting the art and artifacts of these prehistoric cultures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN772 .G87 2005 Unknown
Book
xv, 249 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Rock art and gender on the margins
  • Recognizing sex and gender
  • Engendering and degendering paleolithic Europe's cave paintings
  • Regendering fertility shrines in the West
  • Separate spheres: who made rock art?
  • Life cycles and puberty rites
  • "Maidens" and flute players in the southwest
  • Sacred landscapes and social landscapes
  • Women, men, ritual, and rock art
  • Shamans with history
  • Taking rock art seriously.
A significant contribution to the relatively unexplored field of gender in rock art, this volume contains information for those interested in past gender systems. Hays-Gilpin argues that art is both a product of its physical and social environment and a tool of influence in shaping behavior and ideas within a society. Rock art is often one of the strongest lines of evidence available to scholars in understanding ritual practices, gender roles, and ideological constructs of prehistoric peoples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Rock art and gender on the margins
  • Recognizing sex and gender
  • Engendering and degendering paleolithic Europe's cave paintings
  • Regendering fertility shrines in the West
  • Separate spheres: who made rock art?
  • Life cycles and puberty rites
  • "Maidens" and flute players in the southwest
  • Sacred landscapes and social landscapes
  • Women, men, ritual, and rock art
  • Shamans with history
  • Taking rock art seriously.
A significant contribution to the relatively unexplored field of gender in rock art, this volume contains information for those interested in past gender systems. Hays-Gilpin argues that art is both a product of its physical and social environment and a tool of influence in shaping behavior and ideas within a society. Rock art is often one of the strongest lines of evidence available to scholars in understanding ritual practices, gender roles, and ideological constructs of prehistoric peoples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GN799 .P4 H38 2004 Unknown
Book
117 p. : ill. (some col., col. map ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
N5310.5 .B6 B37 2004 Unknown

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