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Book
210 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This title provides a radically interdisciplinary inquiry into the origins of human consciousness, community, and potential. "The Cradle of Humanity" collects essays and lectures by Georges Bataille spanning thirty years of research in anthropology, comparative religion, aesthetics, and philosophy. These were neither idle nor idyllic years; the discovery of Lascaux in 1940 coincides with the bloodiest war in history - with new machines of death, Auschwitz, and Hiroshima. Bataille's reflections on the possible origins of humanity coincide with the intensified threat of its possible extinction. For Bataille, prehistory is universal history; it is the history of a human community before its fall into separation, into nations and races. The art of prehistory offers the earliest traces of nascent yet fully human consciousness - of consciousness not yet fully separated from natural flora and fauna, or from the energetic forces of the universe. A play of identities, the art of prehistory is the art of a consciousness struggling against itself, of a human spirit struggling against brute animal physicality. Prehistory is the cradle of humanity, the birth of tragedy. Bataille reaches beyond disciplinary specializations to imagine a moment when thought was universal. Bataille's work provides a model for interdisciplinary inquiry in our own day, a universal imagination and thought for our own potential community. "The Cradle of Humanity" speaks to philosophers and historians of thought, to anthropologists interested in the history of their discipline and in new methodologies, to theologians and religious comparatists interested in the origins and nature of man's encounter with the sacred, and to art historians and aestheticians grappling with the place of prehistory in the canons of art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This title provides a radically interdisciplinary inquiry into the origins of human consciousness, community, and potential. "The Cradle of Humanity" collects essays and lectures by Georges Bataille spanning thirty years of research in anthropology, comparative religion, aesthetics, and philosophy. These were neither idle nor idyllic years; the discovery of Lascaux in 1940 coincides with the bloodiest war in history - with new machines of death, Auschwitz, and Hiroshima. Bataille's reflections on the possible origins of humanity coincide with the intensified threat of its possible extinction. For Bataille, prehistory is universal history; it is the history of a human community before its fall into separation, into nations and races. The art of prehistory offers the earliest traces of nascent yet fully human consciousness - of consciousness not yet fully separated from natural flora and fauna, or from the energetic forces of the universe. A play of identities, the art of prehistory is the art of a consciousness struggling against itself, of a human spirit struggling against brute animal physicality. Prehistory is the cradle of humanity, the birth of tragedy. Bataille reaches beyond disciplinary specializations to imagine a moment when thought was universal. Bataille's work provides a model for interdisciplinary inquiry in our own day, a universal imagination and thought for our own potential community. "The Cradle of Humanity" speaks to philosophers and historians of thought, to anthropologists interested in the history of their discipline and in new methodologies, to theologians and religious comparatists interested in the origins and nature of man's encounter with the sacred, and to art historians and aestheticians grappling with the place of prehistory in the canons of art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N5310 .B382 2005 Unknown
Book
viii, 269 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
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N5310 .N447 2004 Unknown
Book
239 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), maps ; 29 cm.
While some prehistoric sites - notably the painted caves at Lascaux in France and at Altamira in northern Spain - are familiar, many more such places are almost unknown. In fact, remains left by prehistoric men and women are far more numerous and have been found over a much greater territory - including Eurasia, Africa, Australia and the Americas - than most people are aware. These remains include paintings and engravings in caves and rock shelters, but also decorated tools, weapons, statuettes, personal ornaments and even musical instruments made of stone, ivory, antler, shell, bone and fired clay. In "Prehistoric Art", anthropologist Randall White presents a global survey, starting with the first explosion of imagery that occurred approximately 40,000 years ago but also including the creations of essentially "prehistoric" peoples living as recently as the early 20th century. Drawing on up-to-date research, White places these discoveries in context and discusses possible uses and meanings for the objects and images.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
While some prehistoric sites - notably the painted caves at Lascaux in France and at Altamira in northern Spain - are familiar, many more such places are almost unknown. In fact, remains left by prehistoric men and women are far more numerous and have been found over a much greater territory - including Eurasia, Africa, Australia and the Americas - than most people are aware. These remains include paintings and engravings in caves and rock shelters, but also decorated tools, weapons, statuettes, personal ornaments and even musical instruments made of stone, ivory, antler, shell, bone and fired clay. In "Prehistoric Art", anthropologist Randall White presents a global survey, starting with the first explosion of imagery that occurred approximately 40,000 years ago but also including the creations of essentially "prehistoric" peoples living as recently as the early 20th century. Drawing on up-to-date research, White places these discoveries in context and discusses possible uses and meanings for the objects and images.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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N5310 .W48 2003 Available
Book
xxxii, 302 p. : ill. (some col), maps ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The 'discovery' of prehistoric art-- 2. The nineteenth century: prehistoric art comes into its own-- 3. Bodies and objets d'art - the art of the object-- 4. Art on rocks and walls-- 5. Putting things in order: dating techniques and criteria-- 6. Matters of the body: objects of art-- 7. Matters of the mind: reasons for art-- 8. The future of prehistoric art-- Epilogue-- Glossary-- Further reading-- Map of sites-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Beautifully illustrated in colour with many rare and unique photographs, prints, and drawings, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art presents the first balanced and truly world-wide survey of prehistoric art. The book also offers the first detailed account of how the world of scholarship became aware of the existence of prehistoric art, reproducing the very earliest drawings by explorers and surveyors from the 1600s onwards to create a unique pictorial as well as discursive resource. With this powerful combination of illustration and analysis, Paul Bahn describes what prehistoric art is and the different ways in which it can shed light on the lives and preoccupations of our ancestors: sexual, humorous, social, economic, and religious.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- 1. The 'discovery' of prehistoric art-- 2. The nineteenth century: prehistoric art comes into its own-- 3. Bodies and objets d'art - the art of the object-- 4. Art on rocks and walls-- 5. Putting things in order: dating techniques and criteria-- 6. Matters of the body: objects of art-- 7. Matters of the mind: reasons for art-- 8. The future of prehistoric art-- Epilogue-- Glossary-- Further reading-- Map of sites-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Beautifully illustrated in colour with many rare and unique photographs, prints, and drawings, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art presents the first balanced and truly world-wide survey of prehistoric art. The book also offers the first detailed account of how the world of scholarship became aware of the existence of prehistoric art, reproducing the very earliest drawings by explorers and surveyors from the 1600s onwards to create a unique pictorial as well as discursive resource. With this powerful combination of illustration and analysis, Paul Bahn describes what prehistoric art is and the different ways in which it can shed light on the lives and preoccupations of our ancestors: sexual, humorous, social, economic, and religious.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N5310 .B34 1998 Unknown
Book
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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N5310 .G65 1980 Available
Book
103 p. illus. (part col.), maps. 28 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Art & Architecture Library Status
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N5310 .G65 Unknown
Book
176 p. illus. (part col.) maps. 30 cm.
Green Library
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N5310 .L683 Unknown

8. Cave art [1991]

Book
64 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
  • Introduction-- Discovery and acceptance-- content-- Interpretation-- Places to visit-- Further reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
When the painted cave of Altamira in northern Sapin was discovered in the late nineteenth century few believed that the decoration was the work of stone age man. As further discoveries were made in France and Spain and archaeologists proved the antiquity of the remarkable art, modern man realised the great skill and artistic ability of his forebears during the extreme cold at the end of the ice age. Between 35,000 and 12,000 years ago, hunters penetrated deep into caves to paint and engrave images of wild animals, many of them, like the mammoth and wooly rhinoceros, now long extinct. Because of the risks involved, this was clearly done for some special, perhaps religious or ceremonial purpose. At caves like Lascaux in France many parts of the walls and ceilings were covered with spectacular and colourful paintings, while other caves were carved or engraved with the lifelike figures. This book describes the evidence of the way of life of the artists and how archaeologists pieced together the evidence of this remote period. It analyses how the art was executed and is dated, what it portrays and where it is to be found. The animals depicted are described and the interpretations behind the decoration explored. The book is written as an introduction to a complex and fascinating subject which is seldom presented and explained in an uncomplicated fashion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- Discovery and acceptance-- content-- Interpretation-- Places to visit-- Further reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
When the painted cave of Altamira in northern Sapin was discovered in the late nineteenth century few believed that the decoration was the work of stone age man. As further discoveries were made in France and Spain and archaeologists proved the antiquity of the remarkable art, modern man realised the great skill and artistic ability of his forebears during the extreme cold at the end of the ice age. Between 35,000 and 12,000 years ago, hunters penetrated deep into caves to paint and engrave images of wild animals, many of them, like the mammoth and wooly rhinoceros, now long extinct. Because of the risks involved, this was clearly done for some special, perhaps religious or ceremonial purpose. At caves like Lascaux in France many parts of the walls and ceilings were covered with spectacular and colourful paintings, while other caves were carved or engraved with the lifelike figures. This book describes the evidence of the way of life of the artists and how archaeologists pieced together the evidence of this remote period. It analyses how the art was executed and is dated, what it portrays and where it is to be found. The animals depicted are described and the interpretations behind the decoration explored. The book is written as an introduction to a complex and fascinating subject which is seldom presented and explained in an uncomplicated fashion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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Stacks
N5310.5 .F7 L38 1991 Unknown
Book
40, [40] p. illus., map. 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
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N5310.5.D5 G4 Unknown
Book
xv, 260 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • I. THE PROBLEM WITH PREHISTORIC ART-- 1. The division of the spoils-- 2. Pattern and purpose-- II. IMAGE AND AUDIENCE IN MEGALITHIC ART-- 3. Notes from underground-- 4. The lives of statues-- 5. In open country-- III. IMAGE AND AUDIENCE IN BRONZE AGE SCANDINAVIA-- 6. Ships on bronzes, ships on stones-- 7. Crossing the water-- 8. The origin of fire-- IV. PREHISTORIC ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY-- 9. Losses in translation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
There have been many accounts of prehistoric 'art', but nearly all of them begin by assuming that the concept is a useful one. In this extensively illustrated study, Richard Bradley asks why ancient objects were created and when and how they were used. He considers how the first definitions of prehistoric artworks were made, and the ways in which they might be related to practices in the visual arts today. Extended case studies of two immensely popular and much-visited sites illustrate his argument: one considers the megalithic tombs of Western Europe, whilst the other investigates the decorated metalwork and rock carvings of Bronze Age Scandinavia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • I. THE PROBLEM WITH PREHISTORIC ART-- 1. The division of the spoils-- 2. Pattern and purpose-- II. IMAGE AND AUDIENCE IN MEGALITHIC ART-- 3. Notes from underground-- 4. The lives of statues-- 5. In open country-- III. IMAGE AND AUDIENCE IN BRONZE AGE SCANDINAVIA-- 6. Ships on bronzes, ships on stones-- 7. Crossing the water-- 8. The origin of fire-- IV. PREHISTORIC ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY-- 9. Losses in translation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
There have been many accounts of prehistoric 'art', but nearly all of them begin by assuming that the concept is a useful one. In this extensively illustrated study, Richard Bradley asks why ancient objects were created and when and how they were used. He considers how the first definitions of prehistoric artworks were made, and the ways in which they might be related to practices in the visual arts today. Extended case studies of two immensely popular and much-visited sites illustrate his argument: one considers the megalithic tombs of Western Europe, whilst the other investigates the decorated metalwork and rock carvings of Bronze Age Scandinavia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N5310 .B623 2009 Unknown
Book
iv, 75 p. : ill., map ; 30 cm.
Green Library
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Green Library Status
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N5310 .I515 2006 F Unknown
Book
v, 123 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
Green Library
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N5310 .P75 2008 F Unknown
Book
xi, 378 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
"Beyond Art" addresses the appearance and distribution of image and symbol encoded in material culture in prehistory. Using analytic methods and insights developed in archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and archeometry, this volume explores the differential patterns of the appearance, development, and disappearance of image-making among many Late Pleistocene and Holocene peoples. The contributors, specialists in the field from Africa, Australia, Europe, and North America, document the reality that there is no one "Paleolithic Art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Beyond Art" addresses the appearance and distribution of image and symbol encoded in material culture in prehistory. Using analytic methods and insights developed in archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and archeometry, this volume explores the differential patterns of the appearance, development, and disappearance of image-making among many Late Pleistocene and Holocene peoples. The contributors, specialists in the field from Africa, Australia, Europe, and North America, document the reality that there is no one "Paleolithic Art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
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N5310 .B49 1997 Unknown
Book
176 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Approaches to the art-- the human image as archetype-- dancing and trancing-- paintings of potency-- gods and spirits-- animals in San belief and art-- emblems-- relationships between paintings.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
A survey of the rock art of the San peoples of prehistoric Zimbabwe. The prehistoric rock-painting of these peoples are amongst the world's greatest artistic and cultural treasures. There are many thousands of paintings in the granite hills and caves, most of them until recently undiscovered and unrecorded. Created many hundreds of years ago by societies that have long since disappeared, these paintings represent an important artistic tradition. In this book, Peter Garlake studies the images painted and the different techniques and styles used. He summarises academic interpretation of African rock art over the last century and offers an evaluation of its importance and aesthetic value. The perceptions and beliefs of ancient San society are revealed through a study of its art and the author illustrates his views with numerous drawings copied from the originals and with colour photographs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Approaches to the art-- the human image as archetype-- dancing and trancing-- paintings of potency-- gods and spirits-- animals in San belief and art-- emblems-- relationships between paintings.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
A survey of the rock art of the San peoples of prehistoric Zimbabwe. The prehistoric rock-painting of these peoples are amongst the world's greatest artistic and cultural treasures. There are many thousands of paintings in the granite hills and caves, most of them until recently undiscovered and unrecorded. Created many hundreds of years ago by societies that have long since disappeared, these paintings represent an important artistic tradition. In this book, Peter Garlake studies the images painted and the different techniques and styles used. He summarises academic interpretation of African rock art over the last century and offers an evaluation of its importance and aesthetic value. The perceptions and beliefs of ancient San society are revealed through a study of its art and the author illustrates his views with numerous drawings copied from the originals and with colour photographs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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N5310.5 .Z55 G36 1995B Unknown
Book
165 p. illus. (part col.) 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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N5310.5.S6.L4 1974 F Available
Book
165 p. illus. (part col.), map (on lining papers) 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
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N5310.5 .S6 L4 F Unknown
Book
xi, 278 p. illus., maps., 60 col. plates. 26 x 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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N5310.5.S6 R8 F Available
Book
311 p. : ill., maps, plans ; 21 cm.
  • Part 1 Historical summary: Neolithic-- early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.)-- middle Bronze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - the shaft grave period on the mainland (c. 1575-1475 B.C.), the eruption of Thera, and the conquest of Crete c. 1450 B.C.-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards). Part 2 Pottery: Neolithic - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- middle Bronze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- coffins and bathtubs. Part 3 Painting: Crete and the Cyclades - miniature frescoes, relief frescoes-- the mainland-- technique. Part 4 Sculpture: Neolithic-- earlier Bonze Age (c. 3000-1700 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- later Bronze Age (c. 1700-1100 B.C.) - Crete, the mainland, clay statues and figurines, bronze figurines. Part 5 Wood, shell, bone and ivory - faience - glass: wood, shell, bone, and ivory - early and middle Bronze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.) - Crete, the mainland, later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- faience - early middle and Bronze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.) - the temple repositories, the Mycenae shaft graves, later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- glass. Part 6 Stone vases: materials, methods of manufacture, lamps. Part 7 Metal vases: early Middle Bonze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.)-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- copper and bronze vessels-- technique. Part 8 Arms: early and middle Bronze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.) - Crete, the mainland, the Mycenae shaft graves-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards). Part 9 Jewellery: Neolithic-- early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- middle Bonze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland, the Mycenae shaft graves-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- technique. Part 10 Seals and gems: early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- middle Bronze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- materials and techniques. Part 11 Conclusion: the early Bronze Age koine in the Aegean-- the Minoan art of Crete-- Mycenaean art-- end of the Bronze Age (from c. 1200 B.C. onwards).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
A survey of how the Aegean peoples expressed themselves during a period of some 5000 years after the end of the Bronze Age (circa 1100 BC), and before the rise of Greek art. Work produced in the ambience of the palaces of Crete (including the palace of Minos at Knossos) and of Mycenae on the mainland is fully described and illustrated. For purposes of clarity the arts are considered by function and material rather than by geographical region or chronological period; but the main political upheavals affecting them are kept in mind. Little wall-painting has survived, and the so-called minor arts are examined for the light they thow on it, as well as to assess artistic development in the Aegean as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part 1 Historical summary: Neolithic-- early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.)-- middle Bronze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - the shaft grave period on the mainland (c. 1575-1475 B.C.), the eruption of Thera, and the conquest of Crete c. 1450 B.C.-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards). Part 2 Pottery: Neolithic - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- middle Bronze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- coffins and bathtubs. Part 3 Painting: Crete and the Cyclades - miniature frescoes, relief frescoes-- the mainland-- technique. Part 4 Sculpture: Neolithic-- earlier Bonze Age (c. 3000-1700 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- later Bronze Age (c. 1700-1100 B.C.) - Crete, the mainland, clay statues and figurines, bronze figurines. Part 5 Wood, shell, bone and ivory - faience - glass: wood, shell, bone, and ivory - early and middle Bronze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.) - Crete, the mainland, later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- faience - early middle and Bronze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.) - the temple repositories, the Mycenae shaft graves, later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- glass. Part 6 Stone vases: materials, methods of manufacture, lamps. Part 7 Metal vases: early Middle Bonze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.)-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- copper and bronze vessels-- technique. Part 8 Arms: early and middle Bronze Age (until c. 1450 B.C.) - Crete, the mainland, the Mycenae shaft graves-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards). Part 9 Jewellery: Neolithic-- early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- middle Bonze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland, the Mycenae shaft graves-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- technique. Part 10 Seals and gems: early Bronze Age (c. 3000-2000 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- middle Bronze Age (c. 2000-1450 B.C.) - Crete, the Cyclades, the mainland-- later Bronze Age (c. 1450 B.C. onwards)-- materials and techniques. Part 11 Conclusion: the early Bronze Age koine in the Aegean-- the Minoan art of Crete-- Mycenaean art-- end of the Bronze Age (from c. 1200 B.C. onwards).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
A survey of how the Aegean peoples expressed themselves during a period of some 5000 years after the end of the Bronze Age (circa 1100 BC), and before the rise of Greek art. Work produced in the ambience of the palaces of Crete (including the palace of Minos at Knossos) and of Mycenae on the mainland is fully described and illustrated. For purposes of clarity the arts are considered by function and material rather than by geographical region or chronological period; but the main political upheavals affecting them are kept in mind. Little wall-painting has survived, and the so-called minor arts are examined for the light they thow on it, as well as to assess artistic development in the Aegean as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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N5310.5 .G8 H66X 1994 Available
Book
508 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
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N5310.5.E8 S3 1985 Unknown
Book
311 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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N5310.5.G8.H66 Unknown

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