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1. Hans Holbein [2014]

Book
406 pages : ill. (some color) ; 22 cm
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John

2. Bruegel [2012]

Book
351 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
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ND673 .B73 R62513 2012 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xvii, 357 p., [40] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 x 28 cm.
  • Introduction: The triptych as a "painting with doors"
  • pt. 1. Origins and the first half of the fifteenth century. The emergence of the early Netherlandish triptych I : Robert Campin (and his associates) ; The emergence of the early Netherlandish triptych II : Jan van Eyck
  • pt. 2. The second half of the fifteenth century. The triptych reformulated : Rogier Van der Weyden ; The triptych popularized : painters of the second half of the fifteenth century ; The triptych unified : Memling, David, and later fifteenth-century painters in Bruges
  • pt. 3. The sixteenth century and beyond. The world triptych : Hieronymus Bosch ; The triptych in the age of the Renaissance and the Reformation
  • Coda. The triptych in the age of Rubens.
"A study of Netherlandish triptychs from the early fifteenth century through the early seventeenth century, covering works by Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, and Peter Paul Rubens. Explores how the triptych format structures and generates meaning"--Provided by publisher.
  • Introduction: The triptych as a "painting with doors"
  • pt. 1. Origins and the first half of the fifteenth century. The emergence of the early Netherlandish triptych I : Robert Campin (and his associates) ; The emergence of the early Netherlandish triptych II : Jan van Eyck
  • pt. 2. The second half of the fifteenth century. The triptych reformulated : Rogier Van der Weyden ; The triptych popularized : painters of the second half of the fifteenth century ; The triptych unified : Memling, David, and later fifteenth-century painters in Bruges
  • pt. 3. The sixteenth century and beyond. The world triptych : Hieronymus Bosch ; The triptych in the age of the Renaissance and the Reformation
  • Coda. The triptych in the age of Rubens.
"A study of Netherlandish triptychs from the early fifteenth century through the early seventeenth century, covering works by Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, and Peter Paul Rubens. Explores how the triptych format structures and generates meaning"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library
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Request at circulation desk
ND644 .J33 2012 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
287 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
  • Her Roman beginnings between the work of her father and her gaze towards his colleagues and rivals The Florentine years-- The 1620s in Rome, her father in absentia, she herself becomes a leading figure among the surviving naturalists Nearly a quarter of a century of Neapolitan activity Public works and adequate national and international acclaim of her qualities.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Artemisia Gentileschi (Rome 1593-Naples 1652/53) was one of the few successful female painters of the Sixteenth century. She was adopted by the feminist movement as a standard-bearer and through a distorted psychoanalytic reading she was believed to be exacting her revenge through her cathartic brushstrokes, transforming herself into Judith slaying Holofernes/Agostino Tassi. Her paintings, along with those of her father were exhibited in Florence, Rome, New York and Saint Louis. The exhibition planned from September 2011 to January 2012 in Milan aims to, at last, make amends for the unfair favours attributed to her otherwise excellent father and will provide the visitor with each essential knot in the pictorial evolution of his vibrant and chameleon-like daughter. This book, along with the exhibition, will finally allow the reader and viewer to draw their own conclusion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Her Roman beginnings between the work of her father and her gaze towards his colleagues and rivals The Florentine years-- The 1620s in Rome, her father in absentia, she herself becomes a leading figure among the surviving naturalists Nearly a quarter of a century of Neapolitan activity Public works and adequate national and international acclaim of her qualities.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Artemisia Gentileschi (Rome 1593-Naples 1652/53) was one of the few successful female painters of the Sixteenth century. She was adopted by the feminist movement as a standard-bearer and through a distorted psychoanalytic reading she was believed to be exacting her revenge through her cathartic brushstrokes, transforming herself into Judith slaying Holofernes/Agostino Tassi. Her paintings, along with those of her father were exhibited in Florence, Rome, New York and Saint Louis. The exhibition planned from September 2011 to January 2012 in Milan aims to, at last, make amends for the unfair favours attributed to her otherwise excellent father and will provide the visitor with each essential knot in the pictorial evolution of his vibrant and chameleon-like daughter. This book, along with the exhibition, will finally allow the reader and viewer to draw their own conclusion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Request at circulation desk
ND623 .G364 A4 2011 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
736 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 30 cm.
  • Preface Chapter 1 PRELUDE: ITALY AND ITALIAN ART 16 Representing This World 17 The Role of Antiquity 18 The Cities 20 The Guilds and the Status of the Artist 24 The Artist at Work 25 The Products of the Painter's Bottega 25 The Practice of Drawing 27 The Practice of Painting 28 The Practice of Sculpture 33 The Practice of Architecture 34 Printmaking in the Renaissance 36 The Practice of History 36 The Practice of Art History: Giorgio Vasari 37 PART ONE: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES Chapter 2 DUECENTO ART IN TUSCANY AND ROME 40 Painting in Pisa 42 Painting in Lucca 44 Painting in Florence 45 Painting in Rome 53 Sculpture 57 Architecture 64 Chapter 3 FLORENTINE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 72 Giotto 73 Florentine Painters after Giotto 95 Sculpture 100 Chapter 4 SIENESE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 102 Duccio 103 Simone Martini 110 Pietro Lorenzetti 119 Ambrogio Lorenzetti 122 Orvieto Cathedral 128 The Master of the Triumph of Death 134 Chapter 5 LATER GOTHIC ART IN TUSCANY AND NORTHERN ITALY 136 Mid-Trecento Art in Florence 138 Late Gothic Painting and the International Style 145 Painting and Sculpture in Northern Italy 149 PART TWO: THE QUATTROCENTO Chapter 6 THE RENAISSANCE BEGINS: ARCHITECTURE 158 The Role of the Medici Family 160 Filippo Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective 161 The Dome of Florence Cathedral 164 The Ospedale degli Innocenti 168 Brunelleschi's Sacristy for San Lorenzo 170 San Lorenzo and Santo Spirito 170 Santa Maria degli Angeli 173 The Pazzi Chapel 174 The Medici Palace and Michelozzi di Bartolommeo 174 Chapter 7 TRANSITIONS IN TUSCAN SCULPTURE 180 The Competition Panels 181 Ghiberti to 1425 183 Donatello to 1420 188 Nanni di Banco 193 Donatello (c. 1420 to c. 1435) 196 Jacopo della Quercia 199 Chapter 8 TRANSITIONS IN FLORENTINE PAINTING 202 Gentile da Fabriano 203 Masolino and Masaccio 206 Popular Devotion and Prints 220 Chapter 9 THE HERITAGE OF MASACCIO: FRA ANGELICO AND FRA FILIPPO LIPPI 222 Fra Angelico 224 Fra Filippo Lippi 232 Chapter 10 FLORENTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, c. 1430--1455 238 Alberti 239 Ghiberti after 1425 249 Luca della Robbia 251 Donatello (c. 1433 to c. 1455) 254 Florentine Tomb Sculpture 261 The Portrait Bust 261 Chapter 11 FLORENTINE PAINTING AT MID-CENTURY 262 Paolo Uccello 263 Domenico Veneziano 267 Andrea del Castagno 271 Piero della Francesca 278 Chapter 12 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI I 294 Donatello after 1453 298 Desiderio da Settignano 302 The Chapel of the Cardinal of Portugal 303 Benedetto and Giuliano da Maiano 306 Giuliano da Sangallo 309 Benozzo Gozzoli 312 Baldovinetti and Pesellino 313 Chapter 13 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI II 318 Antonio del Pollaiuolo 320 Andrea del Verrocchio 327 Renaissance Cassoni 331 Alessandro Botticelli 332 Filippino Lippi 347 Domenico del Ghirlandaio 350 Piero di Cosimo 356 Chapter 14 THE RENAISSANCE IN CENTRAL ITALY 358 Siena 359 Sassetta 361 Domenico di Bartolo 362 Matteo di Giovanni 364 Vecchietta 364 Francesco di Giorgio 365 Neroccio de' Landi 367 Perugia 369 Perugino 369 Pintoricchio 374 Melozzo da ForlA-- 376 The Laurana Brothers and Urbino 378 Naples 384 Luca Signorelli 385 Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY 388 Pisanello 389 Early Quattrocento Art and Architecture in Venice 393 Jacopo Bellini 395 Andrea Mantegna 397 Mantegna and Isabella d'Este 408 Gentile Bellini 411 Antonello da Messina 412 Giovanni Bellini 415 Vittore Carpaccio 421 Carlo Crivelli 425 Venetian Fabrics 426 Venetian Publishing 426 Late Quattrocento Sculpture and Architecture in Venice 428 Late Quattrocento Art in Milan 433 Vincenzo Foppa 433 Filarete 433 Quattrocento Painting in Ferrara 434 North Italian Terra-Cotta Sculpture 440 PART THREE: THE CINQUECENTO Chapter 16 THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH RENAISSANCE 442 Leonardo da Vinci 443 Michelangelo to 1505 469 Raphael in Perugia and Florence 480 Fra Bartolommeo 484 Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME 486 Donato Bramante 489 Michelangelo 1505 to 1516 496 Raphael in Rome 515 Chapter 18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS c. 1520--50 542 Michelangelo 1516 to 1533 544 Andrea del Sarto 555 Pontormo 558 Rosso Fiorentino 563 Perino del Vaga 565 Domenico Beccafumi 567 Properzia de' Rossi 570 Correggio 572 Parmigianino 577 Pordenone 580 Antonio da Sangallo the Elder and the Younger 581 Baldassare Peruzzi 586 Giulio Romano 586 Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND 590 Giorgione 592 Titian 596 Lorenzo Lotto 613 Tullio Lombardo 616 Painting in Northern Italy 617 Tintoretto 624 Paolo Veronese 632 Jacopo Bassano 639 Michele Sanmicheli 639 Jacopo Sansovino 641 Andrea Palladio 643 Alessandro Vittoria 647 Chapter 20 THE LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 648 Michelangelo after 1534 649 Art at the Medici Court 660 Benvenuto Cellini 662 Bartolommeo Ammanati 665 Giovanni Bologna 667 Agnolo Bronzino and Francesco Salviati 669 Later Ceramic Production 674 Giorgio Vasari and the Studiolo 676 Developments Elsewhere 681 Giuseppe Arcimboldo 681 Lavinia Fontana 682 Giacomo da Vignola and Giacomo della Porta 683 Federico Barocci 687 Fede Galizia 689 Caravaggio 689 Sixtus V and the Urban Plan of Rome 691 Glossary 692 Bibliography 700 Locating Works of Renaissance Art 715 Index 716 Photo Credits 735 Literary Credits 736.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
For survey courses in Italian Renaissance art. A broad survey of art and architecture in Italy between c. 1250 and 1600, this book approaches the works from the point of view of the artist as individual creator and as an expression of the city within which the artist was working. History of Italian Renaissance Art, Seventh Edition, brings you an updated understanding of this pivotal period as it incorporates new research and current art historical thinking, while also maintaining the integrity of the story that Frederick Hartt first told so enthusiastically many years ago. Choosing to retain Frederick Hartt's traditional framework, David Wilkins' incisive revisions keep the book fresh and up-to-date.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface Chapter 1 PRELUDE: ITALY AND ITALIAN ART 16 Representing This World 17 The Role of Antiquity 18 The Cities 20 The Guilds and the Status of the Artist 24 The Artist at Work 25 The Products of the Painter's Bottega 25 The Practice of Drawing 27 The Practice of Painting 28 The Practice of Sculpture 33 The Practice of Architecture 34 Printmaking in the Renaissance 36 The Practice of History 36 The Practice of Art History: Giorgio Vasari 37 PART ONE: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES Chapter 2 DUECENTO ART IN TUSCANY AND ROME 40 Painting in Pisa 42 Painting in Lucca 44 Painting in Florence 45 Painting in Rome 53 Sculpture 57 Architecture 64 Chapter 3 FLORENTINE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 72 Giotto 73 Florentine Painters after Giotto 95 Sculpture 100 Chapter 4 SIENESE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 102 Duccio 103 Simone Martini 110 Pietro Lorenzetti 119 Ambrogio Lorenzetti 122 Orvieto Cathedral 128 The Master of the Triumph of Death 134 Chapter 5 LATER GOTHIC ART IN TUSCANY AND NORTHERN ITALY 136 Mid-Trecento Art in Florence 138 Late Gothic Painting and the International Style 145 Painting and Sculpture in Northern Italy 149 PART TWO: THE QUATTROCENTO Chapter 6 THE RENAISSANCE BEGINS: ARCHITECTURE 158 The Role of the Medici Family 160 Filippo Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective 161 The Dome of Florence Cathedral 164 The Ospedale degli Innocenti 168 Brunelleschi's Sacristy for San Lorenzo 170 San Lorenzo and Santo Spirito 170 Santa Maria degli Angeli 173 The Pazzi Chapel 174 The Medici Palace and Michelozzi di Bartolommeo 174 Chapter 7 TRANSITIONS IN TUSCAN SCULPTURE 180 The Competition Panels 181 Ghiberti to 1425 183 Donatello to 1420 188 Nanni di Banco 193 Donatello (c. 1420 to c. 1435) 196 Jacopo della Quercia 199 Chapter 8 TRANSITIONS IN FLORENTINE PAINTING 202 Gentile da Fabriano 203 Masolino and Masaccio 206 Popular Devotion and Prints 220 Chapter 9 THE HERITAGE OF MASACCIO: FRA ANGELICO AND FRA FILIPPO LIPPI 222 Fra Angelico 224 Fra Filippo Lippi 232 Chapter 10 FLORENTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, c. 1430--1455 238 Alberti 239 Ghiberti after 1425 249 Luca della Robbia 251 Donatello (c. 1433 to c. 1455) 254 Florentine Tomb Sculpture 261 The Portrait Bust 261 Chapter 11 FLORENTINE PAINTING AT MID-CENTURY 262 Paolo Uccello 263 Domenico Veneziano 267 Andrea del Castagno 271 Piero della Francesca 278 Chapter 12 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI I 294 Donatello after 1453 298 Desiderio da Settignano 302 The Chapel of the Cardinal of Portugal 303 Benedetto and Giuliano da Maiano 306 Giuliano da Sangallo 309 Benozzo Gozzoli 312 Baldovinetti and Pesellino 313 Chapter 13 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI II 318 Antonio del Pollaiuolo 320 Andrea del Verrocchio 327 Renaissance Cassoni 331 Alessandro Botticelli 332 Filippino Lippi 347 Domenico del Ghirlandaio 350 Piero di Cosimo 356 Chapter 14 THE RENAISSANCE IN CENTRAL ITALY 358 Siena 359 Sassetta 361 Domenico di Bartolo 362 Matteo di Giovanni 364 Vecchietta 364 Francesco di Giorgio 365 Neroccio de' Landi 367 Perugia 369 Perugino 369 Pintoricchio 374 Melozzo da ForlA-- 376 The Laurana Brothers and Urbino 378 Naples 384 Luca Signorelli 385 Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY 388 Pisanello 389 Early Quattrocento Art and Architecture in Venice 393 Jacopo Bellini 395 Andrea Mantegna 397 Mantegna and Isabella d'Este 408 Gentile Bellini 411 Antonello da Messina 412 Giovanni Bellini 415 Vittore Carpaccio 421 Carlo Crivelli 425 Venetian Fabrics 426 Venetian Publishing 426 Late Quattrocento Sculpture and Architecture in Venice 428 Late Quattrocento Art in Milan 433 Vincenzo Foppa 433 Filarete 433 Quattrocento Painting in Ferrara 434 North Italian Terra-Cotta Sculpture 440 PART THREE: THE CINQUECENTO Chapter 16 THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH RENAISSANCE 442 Leonardo da Vinci 443 Michelangelo to 1505 469 Raphael in Perugia and Florence 480 Fra Bartolommeo 484 Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME 486 Donato Bramante 489 Michelangelo 1505 to 1516 496 Raphael in Rome 515 Chapter 18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS c. 1520--50 542 Michelangelo 1516 to 1533 544 Andrea del Sarto 555 Pontormo 558 Rosso Fiorentino 563 Perino del Vaga 565 Domenico Beccafumi 567 Properzia de' Rossi 570 Correggio 572 Parmigianino 577 Pordenone 580 Antonio da Sangallo the Elder and the Younger 581 Baldassare Peruzzi 586 Giulio Romano 586 Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND 590 Giorgione 592 Titian 596 Lorenzo Lotto 613 Tullio Lombardo 616 Painting in Northern Italy 617 Tintoretto 624 Paolo Veronese 632 Jacopo Bassano 639 Michele Sanmicheli 639 Jacopo Sansovino 641 Andrea Palladio 643 Alessandro Vittoria 647 Chapter 20 THE LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 648 Michelangelo after 1534 649 Art at the Medici Court 660 Benvenuto Cellini 662 Bartolommeo Ammanati 665 Giovanni Bologna 667 Agnolo Bronzino and Francesco Salviati 669 Later Ceramic Production 674 Giorgio Vasari and the Studiolo 676 Developments Elsewhere 681 Giuseppe Arcimboldo 681 Lavinia Fontana 682 Giacomo da Vignola and Giacomo della Porta 683 Federico Barocci 687 Fede Galizia 689 Caravaggio 689 Sixtus V and the Urban Plan of Rome 691 Glossary 692 Bibliography 700 Locating Works of Renaissance Art 715 Index 716 Photo Credits 735 Literary Credits 736.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
For survey courses in Italian Renaissance art. A broad survey of art and architecture in Italy between c. 1250 and 1600, this book approaches the works from the point of view of the artist as individual creator and as an expression of the city within which the artist was working. History of Italian Renaissance Art, Seventh Edition, brings you an updated understanding of this pivotal period as it incorporates new research and current art historical thinking, while also maintaining the integrity of the story that Frederick Hartt first told so enthusiastically many years ago. Choosing to retain Frederick Hartt's traditional framework, David Wilkins' incisive revisions keep the book fresh and up-to-date.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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Request at circulation desk
N6915 .H37 2011 F In-library use On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
320 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 25 cm.
  • Preface-- Interpretation-- Preamble-- Glosses on the Garden of Earthly Delights Double Images in Bosch's Epigones-- The Mouth of Hell-- Upper and Under-World-- The Creator, Man and Woman-- Visual Typology-- The Fountain of Life-- Mnemonic Imagery-- The Root of Evil-- Wonders of Nature-- The Burgeoning of Evil-- Somnium and Insomnium-- Marching Mountains-- L'Espace de l'Artifice-- Courtly Amusement: Park Hesdin-- Entremets-- Courtly Love-- L'Etat Sauvage-- Ye Shall Know Them by Their Fruits-- Through a Glass, Darkly-- A Glimpse of Hell-- The Tree-Man-- The Region of Dissemblance-- Lucifer's Rule-- The Land of Unlikeness-- Spectators and Speculators-- Princely Mirror-- Notes-- Bibliography-- Credits.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hieronymus Bosch's 'Garden of Earthly Delights' is one of the most enigmatic paintings in the history of western art. Apart from a brief description by an eyewitness in 1517, there are no contemporary records that tell us anything about the original commission of the painting, its placement, function or audience. Reindert Falkenburg now offers a detailed analysis of Bosch's eye- and mind boggling play with pictorial traditions. He argues that the painting was created towards the end of the fifteenth century as a conversation piece for an audience of Burgundian nobles. He suggests that the Garden of Earthly Delights served as a multifaceted mirror for viewers to reflect on how humanity, while created in the image and likeness of God, in the course of history has lost its original identity and tends towards becoming one with a world that is susceptible to an all-perverting force of evil origin. This debatable nature of Bosch's imagery is central to any engaged viewership, historical or modern.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface-- Interpretation-- Preamble-- Glosses on the Garden of Earthly Delights Double Images in Bosch's Epigones-- The Mouth of Hell-- Upper and Under-World-- The Creator, Man and Woman-- Visual Typology-- The Fountain of Life-- Mnemonic Imagery-- The Root of Evil-- Wonders of Nature-- The Burgeoning of Evil-- Somnium and Insomnium-- Marching Mountains-- L'Espace de l'Artifice-- Courtly Amusement: Park Hesdin-- Entremets-- Courtly Love-- L'Etat Sauvage-- Ye Shall Know Them by Their Fruits-- Through a Glass, Darkly-- A Glimpse of Hell-- The Tree-Man-- The Region of Dissemblance-- Lucifer's Rule-- The Land of Unlikeness-- Spectators and Speculators-- Princely Mirror-- Notes-- Bibliography-- Credits.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hieronymus Bosch's 'Garden of Earthly Delights' is one of the most enigmatic paintings in the history of western art. Apart from a brief description by an eyewitness in 1517, there are no contemporary records that tell us anything about the original commission of the painting, its placement, function or audience. Reindert Falkenburg now offers a detailed analysis of Bosch's eye- and mind boggling play with pictorial traditions. He argues that the painting was created towards the end of the fifteenth century as a conversation piece for an audience of Burgundian nobles. He suggests that the Garden of Earthly Delights served as a multifaceted mirror for viewers to reflect on how humanity, while created in the image and likeness of God, in the course of history has lost its original identity and tends towards becoming one with a world that is susceptible to an all-perverting force of evil origin. This debatable nature of Bosch's imagery is central to any engaged viewership, historical or modern.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Request at circulation desk
ND653 .B65 F355 2011 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John

7. Pieter Bruegel [2011]

Book
464 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 34 cm.
  • Introduction
  • God in the details : Christ carrying the cross (1564)
  • Bruegel at Antwerp
  • Hieronymus Cock, Bruegel's printmaker
  • Bruegel as a landscape architect
  • The "second Bosch": Bruegel adapts a tradition
  • Parables, proverbs, and pastimes
  • Religion and tradition : Antwerp, early 1560s
  • Religious imagery in a time of troubles
  • Bruegel's peasant festivity
  • Social stresses and strains
  • Bruegel's legacy
  • Conclusion.
The recent rediscovery in Spain of Pieter Bruegel the ElderGCOs lost painting, The Wine of Saint MartinGCOs Day, has created even more interest in this much-loved artist, who was one of the NetherlandsGCO two great masters of satire and fantasy, along with Hieronymus Bosch. Although these two artists never met each otherGCoBruegel was born around 1525, a decade after BoschGCOs deathGConumerous features link them; indeed, Bruegel painted several demon-infested hellscapes directly inspired by the older master, and he was known in Antwerp as a GCGBPsecond Bosch.GC[yen] But Bruegel is most famous for his peasant scenes, often humorous and packed with anecdote, and for his landscapes, which poignantly evoke NatureGCOs changing seasons. His legacy to Netherlandish art was the enduring popularity of both these genres, as well as the artistic dynasty he founded, beginning with his painter sons Pieter the Younger and Jan Brueghel.Critics have often remarked how BruegelGCOs art, so keenly observed and richly detailed, seems to preserve a world in miniature. In this new monograph, Larry Silver, an eminent historian of Northern Renaissance art, serves as our guide to that world. He leads us expertly through BruegelGCOs complex and fascinating iconography, allowing us to see his paintings and drawings from the same perspective as his sixteenth-century countrymen. Silver situates Bruegel within the visual culture of his timeGCoexploring, for example, his relationship with the print publisher Hieronymus CockGCoand within the broader context of Netherlandish history. All of BruegelGCOs surviving paintings are reproduced here, with many full-page details, as well as all of his prints and representative works by his contemporaries and followers.This volume on Bruegel complements SilverGCOs widely praised monograph on Hieronymus Bosch, which was published by Abbeville Press in 2006. These two books are the most authoritative and best-illustrated studies of their respective subjects, and together they present us with a panorama of Netherlandish artGCOs emergence into the distinctive form of the Northern Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction
  • God in the details : Christ carrying the cross (1564)
  • Bruegel at Antwerp
  • Hieronymus Cock, Bruegel's printmaker
  • Bruegel as a landscape architect
  • The "second Bosch": Bruegel adapts a tradition
  • Parables, proverbs, and pastimes
  • Religion and tradition : Antwerp, early 1560s
  • Religious imagery in a time of troubles
  • Bruegel's peasant festivity
  • Social stresses and strains
  • Bruegel's legacy
  • Conclusion.
The recent rediscovery in Spain of Pieter Bruegel the ElderGCOs lost painting, The Wine of Saint MartinGCOs Day, has created even more interest in this much-loved artist, who was one of the NetherlandsGCO two great masters of satire and fantasy, along with Hieronymus Bosch. Although these two artists never met each otherGCoBruegel was born around 1525, a decade after BoschGCOs deathGConumerous features link them; indeed, Bruegel painted several demon-infested hellscapes directly inspired by the older master, and he was known in Antwerp as a GCGBPsecond Bosch.GC[yen] But Bruegel is most famous for his peasant scenes, often humorous and packed with anecdote, and for his landscapes, which poignantly evoke NatureGCOs changing seasons. His legacy to Netherlandish art was the enduring popularity of both these genres, as well as the artistic dynasty he founded, beginning with his painter sons Pieter the Younger and Jan Brueghel.Critics have often remarked how BruegelGCOs art, so keenly observed and richly detailed, seems to preserve a world in miniature. In this new monograph, Larry Silver, an eminent historian of Northern Renaissance art, serves as our guide to that world. He leads us expertly through BruegelGCOs complex and fascinating iconography, allowing us to see his paintings and drawings from the same perspective as his sixteenth-century countrymen. Silver situates Bruegel within the visual culture of his timeGCoexploring, for example, his relationship with the print publisher Hieronymus CockGCoand within the broader context of Netherlandish history. All of BruegelGCOs surviving paintings are reproduced here, with many full-page details, as well as all of his prints and representative works by his contemporaries and followers.This volume on Bruegel complements SilverGCOs widely praised monograph on Hieronymus Bosch, which was published by Abbeville Press in 2006. These two books are the most authoritative and best-illustrated studies of their respective subjects, and together they present us with a panorama of Netherlandish artGCOs emergence into the distinctive form of the Northern Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Request at circulation desk
ND673 .B73 S53 2011 F Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xiv, 244 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
"Explores how the Renaissance artist Hans Holbein the Younger came to develop his mature artistic styles through the key historical contexts framing his work: the controversies of the Reformation and Renaissance debates about rhetoric"--Provided by publisher.
"Explores how the Renaissance artist Hans Holbein the Younger came to develop his mature artistic styles through the key historical contexts framing his work: the controversies of the Reformation and Renaissance debates about rhetoric"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Request at circulation desk
N6888 .H664 N84 2011 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xi, 248 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 25 cm.
  • Prologue-- Proverbs and patrons-- Collections for collectors-- Making connections-- Living dangerously-- Turning point-- Epilogue-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The art Bruegel produced between 1559 and 1563 presents a rare opportunity to investigate a concentrated period of productivity by one of the world's greatest artists. In this brief period Bruegel produced some of his most original works - the first pictorial collection of contemporary customs in Carnival and Lent, the first painting with children's activities as its subject in Children's Games, the first large-scale painting of a proverb collection, the unique and enigmatic Dulle Griet (Mad Meg), and the extraordinary Triumph of Death, his disturbing vision of men and women fighting off the onslaught of death. In this comprehensive study, Margaret Sullivan accounts for this burst of creativity, its intensity, innovation and brevity, by taking all aspects of the creative process into consideration - from the technical demands of picture-making to the constraints imposed by the dangerous religious and political situation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Prologue-- Proverbs and patrons-- Collections for collectors-- Making connections-- Living dangerously-- Turning point-- Epilogue-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The art Bruegel produced between 1559 and 1563 presents a rare opportunity to investigate a concentrated period of productivity by one of the world's greatest artists. In this brief period Bruegel produced some of his most original works - the first pictorial collection of contemporary customs in Carnival and Lent, the first painting with children's activities as its subject in Children's Games, the first large-scale painting of a proverb collection, the unique and enigmatic Dulle Griet (Mad Meg), and the extraordinary Triumph of Death, his disturbing vision of men and women fighting off the onslaught of death. In this comprehensive study, Margaret Sullivan accounts for this burst of creativity, its intensity, innovation and brevity, by taking all aspects of the creative process into consideration - from the technical demands of picture-making to the constraints imposed by the dangerous religious and political situation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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ND673 .B73 S74 2010 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xxiii, 440 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. map ; 30 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1 Italy: The Decline of Mannerism-- Architecture and City Planning in Rome, 1585-1625-- Bolognese Painting: The Carracci Reform-- Painting in Rome, 1585-1610 (Annibale Carracci in Rome, 1595-1609)-- Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio-- Caravaggio's Italian Followers-- The Carracci Succession in Rome and Bologna-- Architecture and City Planning in Rome, 1625-1680-- Italian Sculpture-- Painting in Rome, 1623-1680-- Painting in Naples-- 2 Flanders: Peter Paul Rubens-- Anthony van Dyck-- Jacob Jordaens-- Still-Life Genre Painters-- 3 Spain: Spanish Architecture-- Spanish Sculpture-- Spanish Painting, 1600-1650-- Spanish Painting, 1650-1700-- 4 France: Architecture and City Planning-- French Sculpture-- 5 The Dutch Republic: Haarlem and the Creation of a Dutch National Style-- The Utrecht "Caravaggisti"-- Frans Hals and Dutch Portraiture-- Town Planning and Architectural Developments in Haarlem and Amsterdam-- Painting in Amsterdam-- Rembrandt van Rijn and his School-- Dutch Genre Painting before 1650-- Dutch Genre Painting after 1650-- Landscape Painting before 1650-- Landscape Painting after 1650-- 6 England: English Painting-- Palladianism and Architectural-- Planning in London-- Epilogue-- Notes-- Timeline-- Bibliography-- Credits-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This excellent introduction to the major developments in art and architecture that emerged from seventeenth-century Western Europe bridges the gap between the specialized study and a more general survey. "Seventeenth-Century Art and Architecture" encompasses the socio-political and cultural background of the period. In the process it examines the careers of the most significant painters, sculptors, and architects, and those of less well-known artists. Major artists covered include Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Carracci, Claude, Girardon, Guercino, Hals, Jones, Le Brun, Le Vau, Murillo, Poussin, Rembrandt, Reni, Ribera, Rubens, Ruisdael, Steen, Van Dyck, Velazquez, Vermeer, Wren, and Zurbaran. The seventeenth century also witnessed the emergence of successful women painters such as Artemisia Gentileschi and Clara Peeters, who receive due attention here.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- 1 Italy: The Decline of Mannerism-- Architecture and City Planning in Rome, 1585-1625-- Bolognese Painting: The Carracci Reform-- Painting in Rome, 1585-1610 (Annibale Carracci in Rome, 1595-1609)-- Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio-- Caravaggio's Italian Followers-- The Carracci Succession in Rome and Bologna-- Architecture and City Planning in Rome, 1625-1680-- Italian Sculpture-- Painting in Rome, 1623-1680-- Painting in Naples-- 2 Flanders: Peter Paul Rubens-- Anthony van Dyck-- Jacob Jordaens-- Still-Life Genre Painters-- 3 Spain: Spanish Architecture-- Spanish Sculpture-- Spanish Painting, 1600-1650-- Spanish Painting, 1650-1700-- 4 France: Architecture and City Planning-- French Sculpture-- 5 The Dutch Republic: Haarlem and the Creation of a Dutch National Style-- The Utrecht "Caravaggisti"-- Frans Hals and Dutch Portraiture-- Town Planning and Architectural Developments in Haarlem and Amsterdam-- Painting in Amsterdam-- Rembrandt van Rijn and his School-- Dutch Genre Painting before 1650-- Dutch Genre Painting after 1650-- Landscape Painting before 1650-- Landscape Painting after 1650-- 6 England: English Painting-- Palladianism and Architectural-- Planning in London-- Epilogue-- Notes-- Timeline-- Bibliography-- Credits-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This excellent introduction to the major developments in art and architecture that emerged from seventeenth-century Western Europe bridges the gap between the specialized study and a more general survey. "Seventeenth-Century Art and Architecture" encompasses the socio-political and cultural background of the period. In the process it examines the careers of the most significant painters, sculptors, and architects, and those of less well-known artists. Major artists covered include Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Carracci, Claude, Girardon, Guercino, Hals, Jones, Le Brun, Le Vau, Murillo, Poussin, Rembrandt, Reni, Ribera, Rubens, Ruisdael, Steen, Van Dyck, Velazquez, Vermeer, Wren, and Zurbaran. The seventeenth century also witnessed the emergence of successful women painters such as Artemisia Gentileschi and Clara Peeters, who receive due attention here.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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N6410 .H37 2008 F Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John

11. Hieronymus Bosch [2006]

Book
424 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 34 cm.
  • The garden of earthly delights- and mortal sins
  • Artistic foundations : the spiritual world of fifteenth-century Netherlandish art
  • Documents and early works
  • The infancy and passion of Christ : Gospel triptychs
  • Voices in the wilderness : Bosch's saints
  • Allegories of avarice and lust : morality triptychs
  • Drawings and development
  • Conclusion : late-medieval end-time
  • Bosch's afterlife in sixteenth-century art.
  • The garden of earthly delights- and mortal sins
  • Artistic foundations : the spiritual world of fifteenth-century Netherlandish art
  • Documents and early works
  • The infancy and passion of Christ : Gospel triptychs
  • Voices in the wilderness : Bosch's saints
  • Allegories of avarice and lust : morality triptychs
  • Drawings and development
  • Conclusion : late-medieval end-time
  • Bosch's afterlife in sixteenth-century art.
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ND653 .B65 S55 2006 F Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John

12. Botticelli [2005]

Book
191 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 21 cm.
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ND623 .B7 B34 2005 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xii, 578 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm.
  • I. INTERNATIONAL CURRENTS IN THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY. 1. Bohemia. 2. The Valois Court and the Low Countries. 3. Germany. II. FIFTEENTH-CENTURY INNOVATIONS. 4. The Rhineland. 5. Jan van Eyck. 6. Robert Campin and Rogier van der Weyden. 7. Flanders at Midcentury. 8. Ghent. 9. The Northern Netherlands. 10. Bruges. 11. French Art. 12. German Art of the Later Fifteenth Century. III. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. 13. Albrecht Durer. 14. Responses to Albrecht Durer. 15. Augsburg and Basel. Excursus: Visitors to England. 16. Hieronymus Bosch. 17. The Northern Netherlands. 18. Antwerp. 19. Flemish Renaissance Courts. 20. Later Trends in Antwerp. 21. Netherlandish Renaissance. 22. Pieter Bruegel the Elder.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
For courses in Northern Renaissance Art, and Introduction to Dutch/German Art. The only comprehensive survey available for the study of Northern Renaissance Art, this text presents stylistic and iconographical themes, art historical scholarship, and valuable analyses for todays students. The coverage and rich color capture the author's lasting excitement for the period and its artists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • I. INTERNATIONAL CURRENTS IN THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY. 1. Bohemia. 2. The Valois Court and the Low Countries. 3. Germany. II. FIFTEENTH-CENTURY INNOVATIONS. 4. The Rhineland. 5. Jan van Eyck. 6. Robert Campin and Rogier van der Weyden. 7. Flanders at Midcentury. 8. Ghent. 9. The Northern Netherlands. 10. Bruges. 11. French Art. 12. German Art of the Later Fifteenth Century. III. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. 13. Albrecht Durer. 14. Responses to Albrecht Durer. 15. Augsburg and Basel. Excursus: Visitors to England. 16. Hieronymus Bosch. 17. The Northern Netherlands. 18. Antwerp. 19. Flemish Renaissance Courts. 20. Later Trends in Antwerp. 21. Netherlandish Renaissance. 22. Pieter Bruegel the Elder.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
For courses in Northern Renaissance Art, and Introduction to Dutch/German Art. The only comprehensive survey available for the study of Northern Renaissance Art, this text presents stylistic and iconographical themes, art historical scholarship, and valuable analyses for todays students. The coverage and rich color capture the author's lasting excitement for the period and its artists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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N6370 .S6 2005 F In-library use On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John

14. Holbein and England [2004]

Book
308 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
  • Holbein
  • England
  • Decoration and design
  • Holbein and the English Reformation
  • Holbein the portraitist.
One of the greatest artists of sixteenth-century Europe, Hans Holbein the Younger earned high acclaim for his work both in the city of Basel and in England for Henry VIII and other patrons. This book is the first to explore the full range of the artist's English body of work as well as the relation of this work to the visual and material culture of Tudor England. Providing a detailed account of the paintings, drawings and woodcuts that Holbein produced in England, the book demonstrates convincingly that that country was not as remote from a common European culture as is often assumed: rather, it was an unmistakable part of that culture. Susan Foister discusses not only Holbein's well-known portraits but also his decorative paintings and murals, now lost, his designs for goldsmiths, and the works that can be associated with the English Reformation. In addition, she considers Holbein's religious and secular images, his techniques and practices, his status as an official court painter, and a variety of other intriguing topics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Holbein
  • England
  • Decoration and design
  • Holbein and the English Reformation
  • Holbein the portraitist.
One of the greatest artists of sixteenth-century Europe, Hans Holbein the Younger earned high acclaim for his work both in the city of Basel and in England for Henry VIII and other patrons. This book is the first to explore the full range of the artist's English body of work as well as the relation of this work to the visual and material culture of Tudor England. Providing a detailed account of the paintings, drawings and woodcuts that Holbein produced in England, the book demonstrates convincingly that that country was not as remote from a common European culture as is often assumed: rather, it was an unmistakable part of that culture. Susan Foister discusses not only Holbein's well-known portraits but also his decorative paintings and murals, now lost, his designs for goldsmiths, and the works that can be associated with the English Reformation. In addition, she considers Holbein's religious and secular images, his techniques and practices, his status as an official court painter, and a variety of other intriguing topics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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N6888 .H664 F65 2004 F Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
447 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Art, Artists and the Marketplace-- 2. Court Art and the Ars Nova-- 3. Art in the Cities-- 4. Early Independent Portraiture and Domestic Art-- 5. Private and Devotional Art-- 6. Faith in Art-- 7. The Art of Dying Well-- 8. Prints-- 9. The Knowledgeable Artist-- 10. The Art of Nature and Human Nature-- 11. Art and the Reformation-- 12. Courts and Cities-- Glossary-- Brief Biographies-- Key Dates-- Map-- Further Reading-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
An exploration of a highly innovative and exciting period of art following the careers of artists such as Van Eyck, Durer and Holbein. Jeffrey Chipps Smith analyses the context of the time, such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas. He offers the reader an insight into domestic, civic and court life illustrated by some of the most exquisite artworks ever created. In the years from 1380 to 1580 northern Europe witnessed a period of artistic innovation as dynamic as contemporary developments in Italy. Stimulated by the atmosphere of intellectual curiosity about the individual and the natural world, Northern Renaissance artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Hans Holbein, mastered the new techniques of oil painting and printmaking to produce some of the most exquisite art of all time. It was also a period of political, religious and social turmoil, which profoundly changed the patronage, production and subject matter of art. At all levels of society art was a part of everyday life. Jeffrey Chipps Smith writes lucidly about these changes and the objects themselves. The works range from tapestries, altarpieces and illuminated manuscripts to churches, palaces and civic architecture. He discusses the audiences and functions of art from across nothern Europe, including not only Germany, France and the Low Countries, but also Britain and Austria. He explores major cultural and historic events such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas and looks at how they widened intellectual and religious horizons. The result is a book that reveals how the Northern Renaissance masters laid the foundations for the art of succeeding centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- 1. Art, Artists and the Marketplace-- 2. Court Art and the Ars Nova-- 3. Art in the Cities-- 4. Early Independent Portraiture and Domestic Art-- 5. Private and Devotional Art-- 6. Faith in Art-- 7. The Art of Dying Well-- 8. Prints-- 9. The Knowledgeable Artist-- 10. The Art of Nature and Human Nature-- 11. Art and the Reformation-- 12. Courts and Cities-- Glossary-- Brief Biographies-- Key Dates-- Map-- Further Reading-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
An exploration of a highly innovative and exciting period of art following the careers of artists such as Van Eyck, Durer and Holbein. Jeffrey Chipps Smith analyses the context of the time, such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas. He offers the reader an insight into domestic, civic and court life illustrated by some of the most exquisite artworks ever created. In the years from 1380 to 1580 northern Europe witnessed a period of artistic innovation as dynamic as contemporary developments in Italy. Stimulated by the atmosphere of intellectual curiosity about the individual and the natural world, Northern Renaissance artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Hans Holbein, mastered the new techniques of oil painting and printmaking to produce some of the most exquisite art of all time. It was also a period of political, religious and social turmoil, which profoundly changed the patronage, production and subject matter of art. At all levels of society art was a part of everyday life. Jeffrey Chipps Smith writes lucidly about these changes and the objects themselves. The works range from tapestries, altarpieces and illuminated manuscripts to churches, palaces and civic architecture. He discusses the audiences and functions of art from across nothern Europe, including not only Germany, France and the Low Countries, but also Britain and Austria. He explores major cultural and historic events such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas and looks at how they widened intellectual and religious horizons. The result is a book that reveals how the Northern Renaissance masters laid the foundations for the art of succeeding centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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N6370 .S65 2004 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John

16. Bosch [2003]

Book
351 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), map ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction - 1 The Enigma of Hieronymus Bosch - 2 The Spectacle of Human Folly: Bosch as Moralist - 3 A Tale of Two Triptychs - 4 Redemption through Emulation: The Imitation of Christ - 5 Martyrdom and Melancholy: The Suffering of the Saints - 6 An Apothecary's Vision? The St Anthony Triptych - 7 The Crucible of God: Bosch and Chemistry - 8 Salvation through Science: The Garden of Earthly Delights - 9 Mirroring the Millennium: Bosch's Apocalyptic Visions - 10 Lost and Found: The Legacy of Hieronymus Bosch.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), one of the major artists of the Northern Renaissance, had a seemingly inexhaustible imagination. Known as the creator of disturbing demons and spectacular hellscapes, he also painted the "Garden of Earthly Delights", where gleeful naked youths feast on giant strawberries. Little is known of Bosch's life and his art has remained enigmatic, variously interpreted as the hallucinations of a madman or the secret language of a heretical sect. The Surrealists claimed Bosch as a predecessor, seeing in his work the imagery of dream, fantasy and the subconscious. Laurinda Dixon argues, however, that to understand and appreciate Bosch's art, we must return to the era in which he lived. Dixon presents Bosch as an artist of his times, knowledgeable about the latest techniques of painting, active in the religious life of his community and conversant with the scientific developments of his day. She draws on popular culture, religious texts and contemporary medicine, astrology, astronomy and chemistry - especially alchemy, now discounted but then of interest to serious thinkers - to investigate the meaning of Bosch's art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction - 1 The Enigma of Hieronymus Bosch - 2 The Spectacle of Human Folly: Bosch as Moralist - 3 A Tale of Two Triptychs - 4 Redemption through Emulation: The Imitation of Christ - 5 Martyrdom and Melancholy: The Suffering of the Saints - 6 An Apothecary's Vision? The St Anthony Triptych - 7 The Crucible of God: Bosch and Chemistry - 8 Salvation through Science: The Garden of Earthly Delights - 9 Mirroring the Millennium: Bosch's Apocalyptic Visions - 10 Lost and Found: The Legacy of Hieronymus Bosch.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), one of the major artists of the Northern Renaissance, had a seemingly inexhaustible imagination. Known as the creator of disturbing demons and spectacular hellscapes, he also painted the "Garden of Earthly Delights", where gleeful naked youths feast on giant strawberries. Little is known of Bosch's life and his art has remained enigmatic, variously interpreted as the hallucinations of a madman or the secret language of a heretical sect. The Surrealists claimed Bosch as a predecessor, seeing in his work the imagery of dream, fantasy and the subconscious. Laurinda Dixon argues, however, that to understand and appreciate Bosch's art, we must return to the era in which he lived. Dixon presents Bosch as an artist of his times, knowledgeable about the latest techniques of painting, active in the religious life of his community and conversant with the scientific developments of his day. She draws on popular culture, religious texts and contemporary medicine, astrology, astronomy and chemistry - especially alchemy, now discounted but then of interest to serious thinkers - to investigate the meaning of Bosch's art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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N6953 .B66 D59 2003 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
Course
SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
Instructor(s)
Watkins, Gregory John
Book
183 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), ports. (chiefly col.) ; 32 cm.
  • Introductory essay by Stephanie Buck on Holbein's activities as a portraitist. She focuses on the role Erasmus played in Holbein's early career, and the later English period during which he portrayed both the royals and their circle as well as civilians. Buck also writes about his development as a portrait painter, his forerunners (Durer, Metsys), and about his book illustrations for Erasmus's Praise of Folly. Essay by Jochen Sander focusing on the so-called Darmstadt Madonna, which sheds new light on the creation of this painting. 40 paintings including full-page colour details Who's Who in the Life and Times of Hans Holbein explains forty essential figures and fifteen essential ideas/movements in texts varying from 80 to 250 words.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is followed by an essay by Jochen Sander focusing on the so-called "Darmstadt Madonna", which sheds light on the creation of this painting. Forty paintings are then shown, including full-page colour details. The book is completed by a who's who in the life and times of Hans Holbein. This explains 40 essential figures and 15 essential ideas/movements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introductory essay by Stephanie Buck on Holbein's activities as a portraitist. She focuses on the role Erasmus played in Holbein's early career, and the later English period during which he portrayed both the royals and their circle as well as civilians. Buck also writes about his development as a portrait painter, his forerunners (Durer, Metsys), and about his book illustrations for Erasmus's Praise of Folly. Essay by Jochen Sander focusing on the so-called Darmstadt Madonna, which sheds new light on the creation of this painting. 40 paintings including full-page colour details Who's Who in the Life and Times of Hans Holbein explains forty essential figures and fifteen essential ideas/movements in texts varying from 80 to 250 words.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is followed by an essay by Jochen Sander focusing on the so-called "Darmstadt Madonna", which sheds light on the creation of this painting. Forty paintings are then shown, including full-page colour details. The book is completed by a who's who in the life and times of Hans Holbein. This explains 40 essential figures and 15 essential ideas/movements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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ND588 .H7 A4 2003 F Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
SLE-92-01
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John
Book
125 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
Hans Belting here offers his own interpretation of "The Garden of Earthly Delights", the luminous triptych by the Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch, which he sees not as apocalyptic, but utopian. Taking readers through each panel, Belting discusses various schools of thought and explores Bosch's life and times. He compares Bosch's vision with the humanistic theories of Thomas More and Willibald Pirckheimer and suggests that the painter's aim was not to evoke the end of the world, but to investigate how the world would exist had the Fall not happened. The book includes a fold-out reproduction of the original painting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hans Belting here offers his own interpretation of "The Garden of Earthly Delights", the luminous triptych by the Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch, which he sees not as apocalyptic, but utopian. Taking readers through each panel, Belting discusses various schools of thought and explores Bosch's life and times. He compares Bosch's vision with the humanistic theories of Thomas More and Willibald Pirckheimer and suggests that the painter's aim was not to evoke the end of the world, but to investigate how the world would exist had the Fall not happened. The book includes a fold-out reproduction of the original painting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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ND653 .B65 A65 2002 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xxii, 179 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Mary D. Garrard, author of the acclaimed Artemisia Gentileschi, furthers her study of the seventeenth-century artist in this ground-breaking investigation of two little-known paintings. Taking as case studies the Seville Mary Magdalene and the Burghley House Susanna and the Elders, paintings of circa 1621-22 attributed to Artemisia. Garrard examines the ways that identity, gender, and market pressures interact both in the artist's work and in the criticism and connoisseurship that have surrounded it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mary D. Garrard, author of the acclaimed Artemisia Gentileschi, furthers her study of the seventeenth-century artist in this ground-breaking investigation of two little-known paintings. Taking as case studies the Seville Mary Magdalene and the Burghley House Susanna and the Elders, paintings of circa 1621-22 attributed to Artemisia. Garrard examines the ways that identity, gender, and market pressures interact both in the artist's work and in the criticism and connoisseurship that have surrounded it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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ND623 .G364 G368 2001 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John
Book
xx, 476 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Father and daughter Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi were unusual and gifted artists. Orazio Gentileschi (1563-1639) was the most talented follower of Caravaggio and a figure of international renown, active at the courts of Marie de' Medici in France, Charles 1 in England, and in Rome, Genoa, and Turin. Artemisia (1593-1652/3) was the first Italian woman artist who was not only praised for her art by her contemporaries but whose paintings influenced the work of later generations. She is today a key figure in gender studies. Essays by an international group of art historians not only explore the development of each of these two painters individually but also compare their work, showing how both were influenced by their times and milieus. The book also includes new transcriptions of key parts of the notorious rape trial of Artemisia. This beautiful book is the catalogue for the first full-scale exhibition of the works of Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi, held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from 14th February to 12th May 2002, travelling thereafter to the St Louis Art Museum and to Rome.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Father and daughter Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi were unusual and gifted artists. Orazio Gentileschi (1563-1639) was the most talented follower of Caravaggio and a figure of international renown, active at the courts of Marie de' Medici in France, Charles 1 in England, and in Rome, Genoa, and Turin. Artemisia (1593-1652/3) was the first Italian woman artist who was not only praised for her art by her contemporaries but whose paintings influenced the work of later generations. She is today a key figure in gender studies. Essays by an international group of art historians not only explore the development of each of these two painters individually but also compare their work, showing how both were influenced by their times and milieus. The book also includes new transcriptions of key parts of the notorious rape trial of Artemisia. This beautiful book is the catalogue for the first full-scale exhibition of the works of Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi, held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from 14th February to 12th May 2002, travelling thereafter to the St Louis Art Museum and to Rome.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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ND623 .G366 A4 2001 Unknown On Reserve 2-hour loan
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SLE-92-01 -- Structured Liberal Education
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Watkins, Gregory John