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Book
xxii, 826 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
"The 7th Edition of Gary Christian's Analytical Chemistry focuses on more in-depth coverage and information about Quantitative Analysis (aka Analytical Chemistry) and related fields. The content builds upon previous editions with more enhanced content that deals with principles and techniques of quantitative analysis with more examples of analytical techniques drawn from areas such as clinical chemistry, life sciences, air and water pollution, and industrial analyses"-- Provided by publisher.
"The 7th Edition of Gary Christian's Analytical Chemistry focuses on more in-depth coverage and information about Quantitative Analysis (aka Analytical Chemistry) and related fields. The content builds upon previous editions with more enhanced content that deals with principles and techniques of quantitative analysis with more examples of analytical techniques drawn from areas such as clinical chemistry, life sciences, air and water pollution, and industrial analyses"-- Provided by publisher.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD101.2 .C57 2014 Unknown
Book
xxix, 507 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
"This thoroughly updated fourth edition is designed to be a powerful training tool for entry-level chemistry technicians. This book explains analytical chemistry and instrumental analysis principles and how to apply them in the real world. Over 50 updated workplace scene sidebars with stories and photographs of technicians and chemists working with the equipment or performing the techniques discussed in the text brings the workplace of the chemical technician into the classroom. In addition, supplemental material is now available for download on the web. The text includes more than 60 experiments specifically relevant to the laboratory technician, along with questions and problems in each chapter"-- Provided by publisher.
"This thoroughly updated fourth edition is designed to be a powerful training tool for entry-level chemistry technicians. This book explains analytical chemistry and instrumental analysis principles and how to apply them in the real world. Over 50 updated workplace scene sidebars with stories and photographs of technicians and chemists working with the equipment or performing the techniques discussed in the text brings the workplace of the chemical technician into the classroom. In addition, supplemental material is now available for download on the web. The text includes more than 60 experiments specifically relevant to the laboratory technician, along with questions and problems in each chapter"-- Provided by publisher.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
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QD75.22 .K445 2014 Unknown
Book
viii, 461 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 28 cm
This supplement can be used in any analytical chemistry course. The exercises teaches how to use Microsoft Excel using applications from statistics, data analysis equilibrium calculations, curve fitting, and more.
This supplement can be used in any analytical chemistry course. The exercises teaches how to use Microsoft Excel using applications from statistics, data analysis equilibrium calculations, curve fitting, and more.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .E4 C76 2014 Unknown
Book
xx, 555 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
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QD75.22 .S624 2012 Unknown
Book
xvi, 696 p., 12 p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD271.7 .H34 2011 Unknown
QD271.7 .H34 2011 Unknown
Book
xviii, 869 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
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QD78 .B78 2011 Unknown
Book
xii, 319 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to green chemistry-- Chapter 2: Concepts and trends in green analytical chemistry-- Chapter 3: "Greening" sample preparation-- Chapter 4: Green instrumental analysis-- Chapter 5: Separation methods in analytical chemistry-- Chapter 6: Greening analytical chemistry by improving signal acquisition and processing-- Chapter 7: Conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Concerns about environmental pollution, global warming and hazards to human health have increased demands for chemical analysis. The development of analytical chemistry continues apace and every new discovery in chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and materials science brings new applications. Contemporary analytical chemistry does not consume resources optimally. Indeed, usage of toxic compounds is at its highest rate to date. This makes the emerging field of green chemistry a hot topic in industrial and governmental laboratories as well as in academia. The book starts by introducing the twelve principles of green chemistry. It then goes on to discuss how the principles of green chemistry can be used to assess the 'greenness' of analytical methodologies. The 'green profile' proposed by the ACS Green Chemistry Institute is also presented. A chapter on "Greening" sample preparation describes approaches to minimizing toxic solvent use, using non-toxic alternatives, and saving energy. The chapter on instrumental analysis describes existing analytical methods that are inherently green and how to make non-green methods greener. The final chapter on signal acquisition describes how quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) ideas could reduce experimental work thus making analysis greener. The book concludes with a discussion of how green chemistry is both possible and necessary. Green Analytical Chemistry is aimed at managers of analytical laboratories but will also interest teachers of analytical chemistry and green politicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to green chemistry-- Chapter 2: Concepts and trends in green analytical chemistry-- Chapter 3: "Greening" sample preparation-- Chapter 4: Green instrumental analysis-- Chapter 5: Separation methods in analytical chemistry-- Chapter 6: Greening analytical chemistry by improving signal acquisition and processing-- Chapter 7: Conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Concerns about environmental pollution, global warming and hazards to human health have increased demands for chemical analysis. The development of analytical chemistry continues apace and every new discovery in chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and materials science brings new applications. Contemporary analytical chemistry does not consume resources optimally. Indeed, usage of toxic compounds is at its highest rate to date. This makes the emerging field of green chemistry a hot topic in industrial and governmental laboratories as well as in academia. The book starts by introducing the twelve principles of green chemistry. It then goes on to discuss how the principles of green chemistry can be used to assess the 'greenness' of analytical methodologies. The 'green profile' proposed by the ACS Green Chemistry Institute is also presented. A chapter on "Greening" sample preparation describes approaches to minimizing toxic solvent use, using non-toxic alternatives, and saving energy. The chapter on instrumental analysis describes existing analytical methods that are inherently green and how to make non-green methods greener. The final chapter on signal acquisition describes how quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) ideas could reduce experimental work thus making analysis greener. The book concludes with a discussion of how green chemistry is both possible and necessary. Green Analytical Chemistry is aimed at managers of analytical laboratories but will also interest teachers of analytical chemistry and green politicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.22 .K64 2010 Unknown
Book
xvi, 278 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction 1.1 Analytical problems 1.2 Errors in qunatitative analysis 1.3 Types of error 1.4 Random and systematic errors in titrimetric analysis 1.5 Handling systematic errors 1.6 Planning and design of experiments 1.7 Calculators and computers in statistical calculations 2. Statistics of Repeated Measurements 2.1 Mean and standard deviation 2.2 The distribution of repeated measurements 2.3 Log-normal distribution 2.4 Definition of a 'sample' 2.5 The sampling distribution of the mean 2.6 Confidence limits of the mean for large samples 2.7 Confidence limits of the mean for small samples 2.8 Presentation of results 2.9 Other uses of confidence limits 2.10 Confidence limits of the geometric mean for a log-normal distribution 2.11 Propagation of random errors 2.12 Propagation of systematic errors 3. Significance Tests 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Comparison of an experimental mean with a known value 3.3 Comparison of two experimental means 3.4 Paired t-test 3.5 One-sided and two-sided tests 3.6 F-test for the comparison of standard deviations 3.7 Outliers 3.8 Analysis of variance 3.9 Comparison of several means 3.10 The arithmetic of ANOVA calculations 3.11 The chi-squared test 3.12 Testing for normality of distribution 3.13 Conclusions from significance tests 3.14 Bayesian Statistics 4. The Quality of Analytical Measurements 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Sampling 4.3 Separation and estimation of variances using ANOVA 4.4 Sampling strategy 4.5 Quality control methods - Introduction 4.6 Stewhart charts for mean values 4.7 Stewhart charts for ranges 4.8 Establishing the process capability 4.9 Average run length: cusum charts 4.10 Zone control charts (J-charts) 4.11 Proficiency testing schemes 4.12 Method performance studies (collaborative trials) 4.13 Uncertainty 4.14 Acceptable sampling 4.15 Method validation 5. Calibration Methods in Instumental Analysis 5.1 Introduction: instrumentational analysis 5.2 Calibration graphs in instrumental analysis 5.3 The product-moment correlation coefficient 5.4 The line of regression of y on x 5.5 Errors in the slope and intercept of the regression line 5.6 Calculation of a concentration and its random error 5.7 Limits of detection 5.8 The method of standard additions 5.9 Use of regression lines for comparing analytical methods 5.10 Weighted regression lines 5.11 Intersection of two straight lines 5.12 ANOVA and regression calculations 5.13 Curvilinear regression methods - Introduction 5.14 Curve fitting 5.15 Outliers in regression 6. Non-parametric and Robust Methods 6.1 Introduction 6.2 The median: initial data analysis 6.3 The sign test 6.4 The Wald-Wolfowitz runs test 6.5 The Wilcoxon signed rank test 6.6 Simple tests for two independent samples 6.7 Non-parametric tests for more than two samples 6.8 Rank correlation 6.9 Non-parametric regression methods 6.10 Robust methods: introduction 6.11 Simple robust methods: trimming and winsorization 6.12 Further robust estimates of location and spread 6.13 Robust ANOVA 6.14 Robust regression methods 6.15 Re-sampling statistics 6.16 Conclusions 7. Experiimental Design and Optimization 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Randomization and blocking 7.3 Two-way ANOVA 7.4 Latin squares and other designs 7.5 Interactions 7.6 Identifying the important factors: factorial designs 7.7 Fractional factorial designs 7.8 Optimization: basic principles and univariate methods 7.9 Optimization using the alternating variable search method 7.10 The method of steepest ascent 7.11 Simplex optimization 7.12 Simulated annealing 8. Multivariate Analysis 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Initial analysis 8.3 Prinicipal component analysis 8.4 Cluster analysis 8.5 Discriminant analysis 8.6 K-nearest neighbour method 8.7 Disjoint class modelling 8.8 Regression methods 8.9 Multiple linear regression 8.10 Principal component regression 8.11 Partial least squares regression 8.12 Natural computation methods-- artificial neural networks 8.13 Conclusions Solutions to Exercises Appendix 1 Commonly used statistical significance tests Appendix 2 Statistical tables Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This popular textbook gives a clear account of the principles of the main statistical methods used in modern analytical laboratories. Such methods underpin high quality analyses in areas such as the safety of food, water and medicines, environmental monitoring, and chemical manufacturing. The treatment throughout emphasises the underlying statistical ideas, and no detailed knowledge of mathematics is required. There are numerous worked examples, including the use of Microsoft Excel and Minitab, and a large number of student exercises, many of them based on examples from the analytical literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction 1.1 Analytical problems 1.2 Errors in qunatitative analysis 1.3 Types of error 1.4 Random and systematic errors in titrimetric analysis 1.5 Handling systematic errors 1.6 Planning and design of experiments 1.7 Calculators and computers in statistical calculations 2. Statistics of Repeated Measurements 2.1 Mean and standard deviation 2.2 The distribution of repeated measurements 2.3 Log-normal distribution 2.4 Definition of a 'sample' 2.5 The sampling distribution of the mean 2.6 Confidence limits of the mean for large samples 2.7 Confidence limits of the mean for small samples 2.8 Presentation of results 2.9 Other uses of confidence limits 2.10 Confidence limits of the geometric mean for a log-normal distribution 2.11 Propagation of random errors 2.12 Propagation of systematic errors 3. Significance Tests 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Comparison of an experimental mean with a known value 3.3 Comparison of two experimental means 3.4 Paired t-test 3.5 One-sided and two-sided tests 3.6 F-test for the comparison of standard deviations 3.7 Outliers 3.8 Analysis of variance 3.9 Comparison of several means 3.10 The arithmetic of ANOVA calculations 3.11 The chi-squared test 3.12 Testing for normality of distribution 3.13 Conclusions from significance tests 3.14 Bayesian Statistics 4. The Quality of Analytical Measurements 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Sampling 4.3 Separation and estimation of variances using ANOVA 4.4 Sampling strategy 4.5 Quality control methods - Introduction 4.6 Stewhart charts for mean values 4.7 Stewhart charts for ranges 4.8 Establishing the process capability 4.9 Average run length: cusum charts 4.10 Zone control charts (J-charts) 4.11 Proficiency testing schemes 4.12 Method performance studies (collaborative trials) 4.13 Uncertainty 4.14 Acceptable sampling 4.15 Method validation 5. Calibration Methods in Instumental Analysis 5.1 Introduction: instrumentational analysis 5.2 Calibration graphs in instrumental analysis 5.3 The product-moment correlation coefficient 5.4 The line of regression of y on x 5.5 Errors in the slope and intercept of the regression line 5.6 Calculation of a concentration and its random error 5.7 Limits of detection 5.8 The method of standard additions 5.9 Use of regression lines for comparing analytical methods 5.10 Weighted regression lines 5.11 Intersection of two straight lines 5.12 ANOVA and regression calculations 5.13 Curvilinear regression methods - Introduction 5.14 Curve fitting 5.15 Outliers in regression 6. Non-parametric and Robust Methods 6.1 Introduction 6.2 The median: initial data analysis 6.3 The sign test 6.4 The Wald-Wolfowitz runs test 6.5 The Wilcoxon signed rank test 6.6 Simple tests for two independent samples 6.7 Non-parametric tests for more than two samples 6.8 Rank correlation 6.9 Non-parametric regression methods 6.10 Robust methods: introduction 6.11 Simple robust methods: trimming and winsorization 6.12 Further robust estimates of location and spread 6.13 Robust ANOVA 6.14 Robust regression methods 6.15 Re-sampling statistics 6.16 Conclusions 7. Experiimental Design and Optimization 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Randomization and blocking 7.3 Two-way ANOVA 7.4 Latin squares and other designs 7.5 Interactions 7.6 Identifying the important factors: factorial designs 7.7 Fractional factorial designs 7.8 Optimization: basic principles and univariate methods 7.9 Optimization using the alternating variable search method 7.10 The method of steepest ascent 7.11 Simplex optimization 7.12 Simulated annealing 8. Multivariate Analysis 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Initial analysis 8.3 Prinicipal component analysis 8.4 Cluster analysis 8.5 Discriminant analysis 8.6 K-nearest neighbour method 8.7 Disjoint class modelling 8.8 Regression methods 8.9 Multiple linear regression 8.10 Principal component regression 8.11 Partial least squares regression 8.12 Natural computation methods-- artificial neural networks 8.13 Conclusions Solutions to Exercises Appendix 1 Commonly used statistical significance tests Appendix 2 Statistical tables Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This popular textbook gives a clear account of the principles of the main statistical methods used in modern analytical laboratories. Such methods underpin high quality analyses in areas such as the safety of food, water and medicines, environmental monitoring, and chemical manufacturing. The treatment throughout emphasises the underlying statistical ideas, and no detailed knowledge of mathematics is required. There are numerous worked examples, including the use of Microsoft Excel and Minitab, and a large number of student exercises, many of them based on examples from the analytical literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .C45 M54 2010 Unknown
Book
xiv, 323 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
  • PREFACE. 1 SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULAR SAMPLE PREPARATION METHODS. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Comparison of Sample Preparation Methods. 1.3 Summary. References. 2 BASIC MODES OF OPERATION FOR SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 2.1 Basic Principles of SME. 2.2 Extraction Modes. 2.3 Solvents. 3 THEORY OF SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 Thermodynamics. 3.3 Kinetics. 3.4 Calibration Methods. 3.5 Summary. References. 4 PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR USING SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 General Recommendations. 4.3 General Questions to Consider Before Performing an Analysis. 4.4 Choosing the SME Mode. 4.5 Extraction Solvent. 4.6 Sample Volumes. 4.7 Syringe and Microdrop. 4.8 Chromatography and Detector Requirements. 4.9 Additional Extraction Parameters. 4.10 Calculation Examples for SDME. 4.11 Calculation Examples for DLLME and HFME. 4.12 Calculation Examples for the Effect of Ionic Strength on SDME. 4.13 Calculation Examples for HS-SDME. 4.14 Calculation Examples for the Effect of Ionic Strength on HS-SDME. 4.15 Calculation Examples for Static Headspace Extraction. 4.16 Calculation Examples for Solvent Solubility. References. 5 METHOD DEVELOPMENT IN SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Extraction Mode Selection. 5.3 Static vs. Dynamic Extraction. 5.4 Selection of Manual vs. Automated Extraction. 5.5 Selection of Direct vs. Derivatization SME. 5.6 Extraction Solvent Selection. 5.7 Selection of Final Determination Method. 5.8 Selection of Extraction Optimization Method. 5.9 Optimization of Extraction Conditions. References. 6 APPLICATIONS. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Gaseous Samples. 6.3 Liquid Samples. 6.4 Solid Samples. 6.5 Environmental Applications of SME. 6.6 Clinical and Forensic Applications of SME. 6.7 Application of SME in Food and Beverage Analysis. 6.8 Application of SME in the Analysis of Plant Material. 6.9 Application of SME in the Analysis of Consumer Products and Pharmaceuticals. 6.10 Outlook for Future Analytical Applications of SME. 6.11 Physicochemical Applications of SME. References. 7 SME EXPERIMENTS. 7.1 Introduction. 7.2 Recommended Experimental Conditions. 7.3 Determination of Gasoline Diluents in Motor Oil by HS-SDME. 7.4 Determination of BTEX in Water by HS-SDME. 7.5 Analysis of Halogenated Disinfection By-Products by SDME and HS-SDME. 7.6 Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds by SDME and HS-SDME. 7.7 Analysis of Residual Solvents in Drug Products by HS-SDME. 7.8 Arson Accelerant Analyses by HS-SDME. 7.9 Analysis of PAHs by SDME. 7.10 Determination of Acetone in Aqueous Solutions by Derivatization HS-SDME. 7.11 Determination of Pesticides in Soil by HF(2)ME. 7.12 Determination of PAHs and HOCs by DLLME. 7.13 Dynamic Headspace and Direct Immersion Extractions (DY-SME). References. ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS. APPENDIX SME MODES: CLASSIFICATION AND GLOSSARY. INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book offers both a practical as well a theoretical approach to Solvent Microextraction (SME) and will help analytical chemists to evaluate SME for a given sample preparation. Introductory chapters overview a comparison of SME with other sample preparation methods, a summary of the technical aspects, and a detailed theoretical treatment of SME. The book then describes the practical aspects of the technique, with detailed 'how to' chapters devoted to the preparation and analysis of atmospheric, solid and liquid environmental, clinical and industrial samples. This text will serve as both a handy laboratory desk-reference and an indispensable instructional tool.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • PREFACE. 1 SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULAR SAMPLE PREPARATION METHODS. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Comparison of Sample Preparation Methods. 1.3 Summary. References. 2 BASIC MODES OF OPERATION FOR SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 2.1 Basic Principles of SME. 2.2 Extraction Modes. 2.3 Solvents. 3 THEORY OF SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 Thermodynamics. 3.3 Kinetics. 3.4 Calibration Methods. 3.5 Summary. References. 4 PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR USING SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 General Recommendations. 4.3 General Questions to Consider Before Performing an Analysis. 4.4 Choosing the SME Mode. 4.5 Extraction Solvent. 4.6 Sample Volumes. 4.7 Syringe and Microdrop. 4.8 Chromatography and Detector Requirements. 4.9 Additional Extraction Parameters. 4.10 Calculation Examples for SDME. 4.11 Calculation Examples for DLLME and HFME. 4.12 Calculation Examples for the Effect of Ionic Strength on SDME. 4.13 Calculation Examples for HS-SDME. 4.14 Calculation Examples for the Effect of Ionic Strength on HS-SDME. 4.15 Calculation Examples for Static Headspace Extraction. 4.16 Calculation Examples for Solvent Solubility. References. 5 METHOD DEVELOPMENT IN SOLVENT MICROEXTRACTION. 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Extraction Mode Selection. 5.3 Static vs. Dynamic Extraction. 5.4 Selection of Manual vs. Automated Extraction. 5.5 Selection of Direct vs. Derivatization SME. 5.6 Extraction Solvent Selection. 5.7 Selection of Final Determination Method. 5.8 Selection of Extraction Optimization Method. 5.9 Optimization of Extraction Conditions. References. 6 APPLICATIONS. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Gaseous Samples. 6.3 Liquid Samples. 6.4 Solid Samples. 6.5 Environmental Applications of SME. 6.6 Clinical and Forensic Applications of SME. 6.7 Application of SME in Food and Beverage Analysis. 6.8 Application of SME in the Analysis of Plant Material. 6.9 Application of SME in the Analysis of Consumer Products and Pharmaceuticals. 6.10 Outlook for Future Analytical Applications of SME. 6.11 Physicochemical Applications of SME. References. 7 SME EXPERIMENTS. 7.1 Introduction. 7.2 Recommended Experimental Conditions. 7.3 Determination of Gasoline Diluents in Motor Oil by HS-SDME. 7.4 Determination of BTEX in Water by HS-SDME. 7.5 Analysis of Halogenated Disinfection By-Products by SDME and HS-SDME. 7.6 Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds by SDME and HS-SDME. 7.7 Analysis of Residual Solvents in Drug Products by HS-SDME. 7.8 Arson Accelerant Analyses by HS-SDME. 7.9 Analysis of PAHs by SDME. 7.10 Determination of Acetone in Aqueous Solutions by Derivatization HS-SDME. 7.11 Determination of Pesticides in Soil by HF(2)ME. 7.12 Determination of PAHs and HOCs by DLLME. 7.13 Dynamic Headspace and Direct Immersion Extractions (DY-SME). References. ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS. APPENDIX SME MODES: CLASSIFICATION AND GLOSSARY. INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book offers both a practical as well a theoretical approach to Solvent Microextraction (SME) and will help analytical chemists to evaluate SME for a given sample preparation. Introductory chapters overview a comparison of SME with other sample preparation methods, a summary of the technical aspects, and a detailed theoretical treatment of SME. The book then describes the practical aspects of the technique, with detailed 'how to' chapters devoted to the preparation and analysis of atmospheric, solid and liquid environmental, clinical and industrial samples. This text will serve as both a handy laboratory desk-reference and an indispensable instructional tool.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD63 .E88 K65 2009 Unknown
Book
xiii, 157 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
  • Preface. List of Contributors. 1. The Power of Ultrasound (Hugo Miguel Santos, Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Cavitation. 1.3 Common Ultrasonic Devices Used in Analytical Chemistry. 1.4 Current Ultrasonic Devices for New Analytical Applications. References. 2. Ultrasonic Energy as a Tool for Sample Treatment for the Analysis of Elements and Elemental Speciation (Hugo Miguel Santos, Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 Parameters Influencing Element Ultrasonic Solid-Liquid Extraction. 2.3 US-SLE from Soils and Sediments. 2.4 US-SLE from Sewage Sludge. 2.5 US-SLE Extraction from Plants. 2.6 Extraction from Soft Tissues. 2.7 Total Element Determination. 2.8 Elemental Fractionation and Elemental Speciation. 2.9 On-Line Applications. 2.10 Current Trends. 2.11 Conclusion. References. 3. Ultrasonic Assisted Extraction for the Analysis of Organic Compounds by Chromatographic Techniques (Raquel Rial-Otero). 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 Overview of Classic and Modern Extraction Procedures for Organics. 3.3 Ultrasonic Assisted Extraction (UAE). 3.4 Coupling Ultrasound with Other Extraction Techniques. 3.5 Comparison between UAE and Other Extraction Techniques. 3.6 Conclusion. References. 4. Electrochemical Applications of Power Ultrasound (Neil Vaughan Rees and Richard Guy Compton). 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Electrochemical Cell and Experimental Setup. 4.3 Voltammetry Under Insonation. 4.4 Trace Detection by Stripping Voltammetry. 4.5 Biphasic Sonoelectroanalysis. 4.6 Microelectrodes and Ultrasound. 4.7 Conclusion. References. 5. Power Ultrasound Meets Protemics (Hugo Miguel Santos, Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Protein Identification through Mass-Based Spectrometry Techniques and Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.3 Classic In-Gel Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.4 Ultrasonic Energy for the Acceleration of In-Gel Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.5 Classic In-Solution Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.6 Ultrasonic Energy for the Acceleration of the In-Solution Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.7 Conclusion. References. 6. Beyond Analytical Chemistry (Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Sonochemistry for Organic Synthesis. 6.3 Ultrasonic Enhanced Synthesis of Inorganic Nanomaterials. 6.4 Sonochemistry Applied to Polymer Science. 6.5 Conclusion. References. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This comprehensive reference and handbook covers all aspects of ultrasound for analytical applications. Besides classical extraction techniques, it also provides an overview of ultrasound applications and devotes two chapters to proteomics and polymer technology. This title is of great interest to researchers in academia and industry, as well as analytical and natural products chemists, and those working in trace analysis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface. List of Contributors. 1. The Power of Ultrasound (Hugo Miguel Santos, Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Cavitation. 1.3 Common Ultrasonic Devices Used in Analytical Chemistry. 1.4 Current Ultrasonic Devices for New Analytical Applications. References. 2. Ultrasonic Energy as a Tool for Sample Treatment for the Analysis of Elements and Elemental Speciation (Hugo Miguel Santos, Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 Parameters Influencing Element Ultrasonic Solid-Liquid Extraction. 2.3 US-SLE from Soils and Sediments. 2.4 US-SLE from Sewage Sludge. 2.5 US-SLE Extraction from Plants. 2.6 Extraction from Soft Tissues. 2.7 Total Element Determination. 2.8 Elemental Fractionation and Elemental Speciation. 2.9 On-Line Applications. 2.10 Current Trends. 2.11 Conclusion. References. 3. Ultrasonic Assisted Extraction for the Analysis of Organic Compounds by Chromatographic Techniques (Raquel Rial-Otero). 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 Overview of Classic and Modern Extraction Procedures for Organics. 3.3 Ultrasonic Assisted Extraction (UAE). 3.4 Coupling Ultrasound with Other Extraction Techniques. 3.5 Comparison between UAE and Other Extraction Techniques. 3.6 Conclusion. References. 4. Electrochemical Applications of Power Ultrasound (Neil Vaughan Rees and Richard Guy Compton). 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Electrochemical Cell and Experimental Setup. 4.3 Voltammetry Under Insonation. 4.4 Trace Detection by Stripping Voltammetry. 4.5 Biphasic Sonoelectroanalysis. 4.6 Microelectrodes and Ultrasound. 4.7 Conclusion. References. 5. Power Ultrasound Meets Protemics (Hugo Miguel Santos, Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Protein Identification through Mass-Based Spectrometry Techniques and Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.3 Classic In-Gel Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.4 Ultrasonic Energy for the Acceleration of In-Gel Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.5 Classic In-Solution Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.6 Ultrasonic Energy for the Acceleration of the In-Solution Protein Sample Treatment for Protein Identification through Peptide Mass Fingerprint. 5.7 Conclusion. References. 6. Beyond Analytical Chemistry (Carlos Lodeiro, and Jose-Luis Capelo-Martinez). 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Sonochemistry for Organic Synthesis. 6.3 Ultrasonic Enhanced Synthesis of Inorganic Nanomaterials. 6.4 Sonochemistry Applied to Polymer Science. 6.5 Conclusion. References. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This comprehensive reference and handbook covers all aspects of ultrasound for analytical applications. Besides classical extraction techniques, it also provides an overview of ultrasound applications and devotes two chapters to proteomics and polymer technology. This title is of great interest to researchers in academia and industry, as well as analytical and natural products chemists, and those working in trace analysis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD801 .U486 2009 Unknown
Book
707 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Survey of Excel-- 2. Simple linear least squares-- 3. Further linear least squares-- 4. Non-linear least squares-- 5. Fourier transformation-- 6. Convolution, deconvolution & time-frequency analysis-- 7. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations-- 8. Write your own macros-- 9. Some common mathematical operations-- 10. Matrix operations-- 11. Spreadsheet reliability-- A. SOME ASPECTS OF EXCEL-- B. SOME DETAILS OF MATRIX.XLA-- C. MACROBUNDLES & MACROMORSELS-- D. TRANSITIONING TO EXCEL 2007-- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Excel is by far the most widely distributed data analysis software, but few users are aware of its full powers. This book takes off where most other books dealing with scientific applications of Excel end. It focuses on three areas: least squares, Fourier transformation, and digital simulation, and illustrates these with extensive examples, often taken from the literature. It also includes and describes a number of sample macros and functions to facilitate common data analysis tasks. These macros and functions are provided in uncompiled, computer-readable, easily modifiable form, and readers can therefore use them as starting points for making their own, personalized data analysis tools. The second edition of Advanced Excel addresses two recent developments. First, the new version of Excel, introduced at the beginning of 2007, has many more columns (16,384) than the present version (256), making it a much better environment for matrix operations, a staple of advanced mathematical methods in science and engineering, and a natural for a wide spreadsheet. The second edition includes a chapter explaining and illustrating matrix algebra in Excel.The second recent development is one outside Microsoft. An Italian engineer, Leonardo Volpi, has developed software with which Excel calculations can be made much more precise. With this freely downloadable tool, which de Levie has already used quite extensively, Excel can be made into a highly precise instrument, not only for scientific data analysis, but also for statistics, something it has not been in the past. This edition includes a new chapter on numerical methods (mostly devoted to working with matrices) and a new chapter on spreadsheet reliability (with emphasis on using Volpi's high-precision tools).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Survey of Excel-- 2. Simple linear least squares-- 3. Further linear least squares-- 4. Non-linear least squares-- 5. Fourier transformation-- 6. Convolution, deconvolution & time-frequency analysis-- 7. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations-- 8. Write your own macros-- 9. Some common mathematical operations-- 10. Matrix operations-- 11. Spreadsheet reliability-- A. SOME ASPECTS OF EXCEL-- B. SOME DETAILS OF MATRIX.XLA-- C. MACROBUNDLES & MACROMORSELS-- D. TRANSITIONING TO EXCEL 2007-- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Excel is by far the most widely distributed data analysis software, but few users are aware of its full powers. This book takes off where most other books dealing with scientific applications of Excel end. It focuses on three areas: least squares, Fourier transformation, and digital simulation, and illustrates these with extensive examples, often taken from the literature. It also includes and describes a number of sample macros and functions to facilitate common data analysis tasks. These macros and functions are provided in uncompiled, computer-readable, easily modifiable form, and readers can therefore use them as starting points for making their own, personalized data analysis tools. The second edition of Advanced Excel addresses two recent developments. First, the new version of Excel, introduced at the beginning of 2007, has many more columns (16,384) than the present version (256), making it a much better environment for matrix operations, a staple of advanced mathematical methods in science and engineering, and a natural for a wide spreadsheet. The second edition includes a chapter explaining and illustrating matrix algebra in Excel.The second recent development is one outside Microsoft. An Italian engineer, Leonardo Volpi, has developed software with which Excel calculations can be made much more precise. With this freely downloadable tool, which de Levie has already used quite extensively, Excel can be made into a highly precise instrument, not only for scientific data analysis, but also for statistics, something it has not been in the past. This edition includes a new chapter on numerical methods (mostly devoted to working with matrices) and a new chapter on spreadsheet reliability (with emphasis on using Volpi's high-precision tools).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .E4 D43 2008 Unknown
Status of items at Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Marine Biology Library (Miller) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .E4 D43 2008 Unknown
Book
xiv, 328 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1 What is Chemometrics?1.1 The Computer-based Laboratory.1.2 Statistics and Data Interpretation.1.3 Computer-based Information Systems/Artificial Intelligence.1.4 General Reading.2 Basic Statistics.2.1 Descriptive Statistics.2.2 Statistical Tests.2.3 Analysis of Variance.2.4 General Reading.3 Signal Processing and Time-Series Analysis.3.1 Signal Processing.3.2 Times Series Analysis.3.3 General Reading.4 Optimization and Experimental Design.4.1 Objective Functions and Factors.4.2 Experimental Designs and Response Surface Methods.4.2.1 Fundamentals.4.2.2 Two-level designs: screening designs.4.2.3 Three-level designs: response surface designs.4.3 Sequential Optimization: Simplex Method.4.4 General Reading.5 Pattern Recognition and Classification.5.1 Preprocessing of Data.5.2 Unsupervised Methods.5.2.1 Factorial methods.5.2.2 Cluster analysis.5.2.3 Graphical methods.5.3 Supervised Methods.5.3.1 Linear learning machine.5.3.2 Discriminant analysis.5.3.3 -nearest neighbor method.5.3.4 SIMCA.5.3.5 Support vector machines.5.4 General Reading.6 Modeling.6.1 Univariate Linear Regression.6.2 Multiple Linear Regression.6.2.1 Ordinary test squares regression.6.2.2 Biased parameter estimations: PCR and PLS.6.2.3 Applications for multicomponent analysis.6.2.4 Regression diagnostics.6.2.5 Multiway regression (modeling).6.3 Nonlinear Methods.6.3.1 Nonlinear regression analysis.6.3.2 Nonparametric methods.6.4 General Reading.7 Analytical Databases.7.1 Representation of Analytical Information.7.2 Library Search.7.3 General Reading.8 Knowledge Processing and Soft Computing.8.1 Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.8.2 Neural Networks.8.3 Fuzzy Theory.8.4 Genetic Algorithms and Other Global Search Strategies.8.5 General Reading.9 Quality Assurance and Good Laboratory Practice.9.1 Validation and Quality Control.9.2 Accreditation and Good Laboratory Practice.9.3 General Reading.Appendix.Statistical Distributions.Digital filters.Experimental Designs.Matrix Algebra.Software.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This new edition contains 10 percent more worked examples as well as the addition of modern chemometric developments, such as support vector machines, wavelet transformations and multi-way analysis. With its inclusion of statistics, fuzzy theory, databases, and quality assurance, this remains the textbook with the broadest coverage, and retains such proven features as additional information provided in the margin, a glossary of terms plus an overview of suitable chemometric software. While ideal for students of chemistry, pharmacy, biochemistry and ecology, this is equally useful for scientists in industry and research institutes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1 What is Chemometrics?1.1 The Computer-based Laboratory.1.2 Statistics and Data Interpretation.1.3 Computer-based Information Systems/Artificial Intelligence.1.4 General Reading.2 Basic Statistics.2.1 Descriptive Statistics.2.2 Statistical Tests.2.3 Analysis of Variance.2.4 General Reading.3 Signal Processing and Time-Series Analysis.3.1 Signal Processing.3.2 Times Series Analysis.3.3 General Reading.4 Optimization and Experimental Design.4.1 Objective Functions and Factors.4.2 Experimental Designs and Response Surface Methods.4.2.1 Fundamentals.4.2.2 Two-level designs: screening designs.4.2.3 Three-level designs: response surface designs.4.3 Sequential Optimization: Simplex Method.4.4 General Reading.5 Pattern Recognition and Classification.5.1 Preprocessing of Data.5.2 Unsupervised Methods.5.2.1 Factorial methods.5.2.2 Cluster analysis.5.2.3 Graphical methods.5.3 Supervised Methods.5.3.1 Linear learning machine.5.3.2 Discriminant analysis.5.3.3 -nearest neighbor method.5.3.4 SIMCA.5.3.5 Support vector machines.5.4 General Reading.6 Modeling.6.1 Univariate Linear Regression.6.2 Multiple Linear Regression.6.2.1 Ordinary test squares regression.6.2.2 Biased parameter estimations: PCR and PLS.6.2.3 Applications for multicomponent analysis.6.2.4 Regression diagnostics.6.2.5 Multiway regression (modeling).6.3 Nonlinear Methods.6.3.1 Nonlinear regression analysis.6.3.2 Nonparametric methods.6.4 General Reading.7 Analytical Databases.7.1 Representation of Analytical Information.7.2 Library Search.7.3 General Reading.8 Knowledge Processing and Soft Computing.8.1 Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.8.2 Neural Networks.8.3 Fuzzy Theory.8.4 Genetic Algorithms and Other Global Search Strategies.8.5 General Reading.9 Quality Assurance and Good Laboratory Practice.9.1 Validation and Quality Control.9.2 Accreditation and Good Laboratory Practice.9.3 General Reading.Appendix.Statistical Distributions.Digital filters.Experimental Designs.Matrix Algebra.Software.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This new edition contains 10 percent more worked examples as well as the addition of modern chemometric developments, such as support vector machines, wavelet transformations and multi-way analysis. With its inclusion of statistics, fuzzy theory, databases, and quality assurance, this remains the textbook with the broadest coverage, and retains such proven features as additional information provided in the margin, a glossary of terms plus an overview of suitable chemometric software. While ideal for students of chemistry, pharmacy, biochemistry and ecology, this is equally useful for scientists in industry and research institutes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .C45 O88 2007 Unknown
Book
xii, 308 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
  • Preface.Contributors.Chapter 1. Is One Enough (Andrew C. Beveridge, James H. Jett, and Richard A. Keller)?Chapter 2. Dissecting Cellular Activity from Single Genes to Single mRNAs (Xavier Darzacq, Robert H. Singer, and Yaron Shav-Tal).Chapter 3. Probing Membrane Transport of Single Live Cells Using Single Molecule Detection and Single Nanoparticle Assay (Xiao-Hong Nancy Xu, Yujun Song, and Prakash D. Nallathamby).Chapter 4. Nanoparticle Probes for Ultrasensitive Biological Detection and Imaging (Amit Agrawal, Tushar Sathe, and Shuming Nie).Chapter 5. Tailoring Nanoparticles for the Recognition of Biomacromolecule Surfaces (Mrinmoy De, Rochelle R. Arvizo, Ayush Verma and Vincent M. Rotello).Chapter 6. Nanoscale Chemical Analysis of Individual Subcellular Compartments (Gina S. Fiorini and Daniel T. Chiu).Chapter 7. Ultra-sensitive Time-resolved Near-IR Fluorescence for Multiplexed Bioanalysis (Li Zhu and Steven A. Soper).Chapter 8. Ultra-Sensitive Microarray Detection of DNA using Enzymatically Amplified SPR Imaging (Hye Jin Lee, Alastair W. Wark and Robert M. Corn).Chapter 9. Ultrasensitive Analysis of Metal Ions and Small Molecules in Living Cells (Richard B. Thompson).Chapter 10. Electrochemistry Inside and Outside Single Nerve Cells (Daniel J. Eves and Andrew G. Ewing).Chapter 11. New Bioanalytical Applications of Electrochemiluminescence (Yanbing Zu and Xiao-Hong Nancy Xu).Chapter 12. Single Cell Measurements with Mass Spectrometry (Eric B. Monroe, John C. Jurchen, Stanislav Rubakhin, and Jonathan V. Sweedler).Chapter 13. Outlooks of Ultrasensitive Detection in Bioanalysis (Xiao-Hong Nancy Xu).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book provides an overview of current research and developments in ultrasensitive bioanalysis. New platforms of ultrasensitive analysis of biomolecules and single living cells using multiplexing, single nanoparticle sensing, nano fluidics, and single molecule detection are advancing every scientific discipline at an unprecedented pace. With chapters written by a diverse group of scientists working in the forefront of ultrasensitive bioanalysis, this book provides an overview of the current status and an in depth understanding of the objectives and future research directions of ultrasensitive bioanalysis. Spanning a wide spectrum of new research approaches, this book introduces new theories, ideas, methodologies, technologies, and applications of ultrasensitive bioanalysis in a wide variety of research fields. It includes background, fundamentals, and descriptions of instrumentation and techniques behind every experimental design and approach to help readers explore the promising applications of new tools. It covers single molecule detection (SMD), single living cell analysis, multi functional nanoparticle probes, miniaturization, multiplexing, quantitative and qualitative analysis of metal ions and small molecules, and more. It discusses techniques such as single molecule microscope and spectroscopy, single nanoparticle optics, single nanoparticle sensors, micro and nano fluidics, microarray detection, ultramicroelectrodes, electrochemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, and more. This book will be a useful resource and an inspiration for scientists and graduate and undergraduate students in a wide variety of research fields, including chemistry, biology, biomedical science and engineering, and materials science and engineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface.Contributors.Chapter 1. Is One Enough (Andrew C. Beveridge, James H. Jett, and Richard A. Keller)?Chapter 2. Dissecting Cellular Activity from Single Genes to Single mRNAs (Xavier Darzacq, Robert H. Singer, and Yaron Shav-Tal).Chapter 3. Probing Membrane Transport of Single Live Cells Using Single Molecule Detection and Single Nanoparticle Assay (Xiao-Hong Nancy Xu, Yujun Song, and Prakash D. Nallathamby).Chapter 4. Nanoparticle Probes for Ultrasensitive Biological Detection and Imaging (Amit Agrawal, Tushar Sathe, and Shuming Nie).Chapter 5. Tailoring Nanoparticles for the Recognition of Biomacromolecule Surfaces (Mrinmoy De, Rochelle R. Arvizo, Ayush Verma and Vincent M. Rotello).Chapter 6. Nanoscale Chemical Analysis of Individual Subcellular Compartments (Gina S. Fiorini and Daniel T. Chiu).Chapter 7. Ultra-sensitive Time-resolved Near-IR Fluorescence for Multiplexed Bioanalysis (Li Zhu and Steven A. Soper).Chapter 8. Ultra-Sensitive Microarray Detection of DNA using Enzymatically Amplified SPR Imaging (Hye Jin Lee, Alastair W. Wark and Robert M. Corn).Chapter 9. Ultrasensitive Analysis of Metal Ions and Small Molecules in Living Cells (Richard B. Thompson).Chapter 10. Electrochemistry Inside and Outside Single Nerve Cells (Daniel J. Eves and Andrew G. Ewing).Chapter 11. New Bioanalytical Applications of Electrochemiluminescence (Yanbing Zu and Xiao-Hong Nancy Xu).Chapter 12. Single Cell Measurements with Mass Spectrometry (Eric B. Monroe, John C. Jurchen, Stanislav Rubakhin, and Jonathan V. Sweedler).Chapter 13. Outlooks of Ultrasensitive Detection in Bioanalysis (Xiao-Hong Nancy Xu).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book provides an overview of current research and developments in ultrasensitive bioanalysis. New platforms of ultrasensitive analysis of biomolecules and single living cells using multiplexing, single nanoparticle sensing, nano fluidics, and single molecule detection are advancing every scientific discipline at an unprecedented pace. With chapters written by a diverse group of scientists working in the forefront of ultrasensitive bioanalysis, this book provides an overview of the current status and an in depth understanding of the objectives and future research directions of ultrasensitive bioanalysis. Spanning a wide spectrum of new research approaches, this book introduces new theories, ideas, methodologies, technologies, and applications of ultrasensitive bioanalysis in a wide variety of research fields. It includes background, fundamentals, and descriptions of instrumentation and techniques behind every experimental design and approach to help readers explore the promising applications of new tools. It covers single molecule detection (SMD), single living cell analysis, multi functional nanoparticle probes, miniaturization, multiplexing, quantitative and qualitative analysis of metal ions and small molecules, and more. It discusses techniques such as single molecule microscope and spectroscopy, single nanoparticle optics, single nanoparticle sensors, micro and nano fluidics, microarray detection, ultramicroelectrodes, electrochemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, and more. This book will be a useful resource and an inspiration for scientists and graduate and undergraduate students in a wide variety of research fields, including chemistry, biology, biomedical science and engineering, and materials science and engineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QP519.7 .N49 2007 Unknown
Book
xxii, 293 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface. Acknowledgements. Abbreviations, Acronyms and Symbols. 1. The Need for Reliable Results. 2. General Principles of Quality Assurance and Quality Control. 3. Sampling. 4. Preparing for Analysis. 5. Making Measurements. 6. Data Treatment. 7. Benchmarking Your Laboratory. 8. Documentation and its Management. 9. Managing Quality. Appendix: Two-Tailed Critical Values for Student t -Tests. Responses to Self Assessment Questions. Bibliography. Glossary of Terms. SI Units and Physical Constants Periodic Table. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The issue of quality assurance in the analytical chemistry laboratory has become of great importance in recent years. "Quality Assurance in Analytical Chemistry" introduces the reader to the whole concept of quality assurance. It discusses how all aspects of chemical analysis, from sampling and method selection to choice of equipment and the taking and reporting of measurements affect the quality of analytical data. Finally, the implementation and use of quality systems are covered.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface. Acknowledgements. Abbreviations, Acronyms and Symbols. 1. The Need for Reliable Results. 2. General Principles of Quality Assurance and Quality Control. 3. Sampling. 4. Preparing for Analysis. 5. Making Measurements. 6. Data Treatment. 7. Benchmarking Your Laboratory. 8. Documentation and its Management. 9. Managing Quality. Appendix: Two-Tailed Critical Values for Student t -Tests. Responses to Self Assessment Questions. Bibliography. Glossary of Terms. SI Units and Physical Constants Periodic Table. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The issue of quality assurance in the analytical chemistry laboratory has become of great importance in recent years. "Quality Assurance in Analytical Chemistry" introduces the reader to the whole concept of quality assurance. It discusses how all aspects of chemical analysis, from sampling and method selection to choice of equipment and the taking and reporting of measurements affect the quality of analytical data. Finally, the implementation and use of quality systems are covered.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .Q34 P75 2007 Unknown
Book
1 v. (various pagings) ; 29 cm.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD101.2 .H37 2007 Unknown
QD101.2 .H37 2007 Unknown
Book
x, 138 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface.Acknowledgements.Introduction.1 What Instrumental Approaches are Available.1.1 Ion Sources.1.1.1 Electron Ionization.1.1.2 Chemical Ionization.1.1.3 Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.1.1.4 Electrospray Ionization.1.1.5 Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.1.1.6 Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization.1.2 Mass Analysers.1.2.1 Mass Resolution.1.2.2 Sector Analysers.1.2.3 Quadrupole Analysers.1.2.4 Time-of-flight.1.3 GC/MS.1.3.1 Total Ion Current (TIC) Chromatogram.1.3.2 Reconstructed Ion Chromatogram (RIC).1.3.3 Multiple Ion Detection (MID).1.4 LC/MS.1.5 MS/MS.1.5.1 MS/MS by Double Focusing Instruments.1.5.2 MS/MS by Triple Quadrupoles.1.5.3 MS/MS by Ion Traps.1.5.4 MS/MS by Q-TOF.References.2 How to Design a Quantitative Analysis.2.1 General Strategy.2.1.1 Project.2.1.2 Sampling.2.1.3 Sample Treatment.2.1.4 Instrumental Analysis.2.1.5 Method Validation.References.3 How to Improve Specificity.3.1 Choice of a Suitable Chromatographic Procedure.3.1.1 GC/MS Measurements in Low and High Resolution Conditions.3.1.2 LC/ESI/MS and LC/APCI/MS Measurements.3.2 Choice of a Suitable Ionization Method.3.3 An Example of High Specificity and Selectivity Methods: The Dioxin Analysis.3.3.1 Use of High Resolution MID Analysis.3.3.2 NICI in the Analysis of Dioxins, Furans and PCBs.3.3.3 MS/MS in the Detection of Dioxins, Furans and PCBs.3.4 An Example of MALDI/MS in Quantitative Analysis of Polypeptides: Substance P.References.4 Some Thoughts on Calibration and Data Analysis.4.1 Calibration Designs.4.2 Homoscedastic and Heteroscedastic Data.4.2.1 Variance Model.4.3 Calibration Models.4.3.1 Unweighted Regression.4.3.2 Weighted Regression.4.3.3 A Practical Example.4.4 Different Approaches to Estimate Detection and Quantification Limits.References.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This text presents the information needed to design a successful quantitative analysis using mass spectrometric techniques currently available and widely employed. It is devoted to the researchers of different areas, who use mass spectrometry as a detector suitable for the measurements of their interest. It is an essential book for the practicing mass spectroscopist and a genuine how to text for the practitioner focusing on quantification rather than instrumental design and techniques. It contains up-to-date structured text describing methods, experimental strategy, capabilities and limitations, with data analysis and interpretation and brings together material widely dispersed in the pertinent literature into one unique source. It is written by internationally recognized group of authors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface.Acknowledgements.Introduction.1 What Instrumental Approaches are Available.1.1 Ion Sources.1.1.1 Electron Ionization.1.1.2 Chemical Ionization.1.1.3 Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.1.1.4 Electrospray Ionization.1.1.5 Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.1.1.6 Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization.1.2 Mass Analysers.1.2.1 Mass Resolution.1.2.2 Sector Analysers.1.2.3 Quadrupole Analysers.1.2.4 Time-of-flight.1.3 GC/MS.1.3.1 Total Ion Current (TIC) Chromatogram.1.3.2 Reconstructed Ion Chromatogram (RIC).1.3.3 Multiple Ion Detection (MID).1.4 LC/MS.1.5 MS/MS.1.5.1 MS/MS by Double Focusing Instruments.1.5.2 MS/MS by Triple Quadrupoles.1.5.3 MS/MS by Ion Traps.1.5.4 MS/MS by Q-TOF.References.2 How to Design a Quantitative Analysis.2.1 General Strategy.2.1.1 Project.2.1.2 Sampling.2.1.3 Sample Treatment.2.1.4 Instrumental Analysis.2.1.5 Method Validation.References.3 How to Improve Specificity.3.1 Choice of a Suitable Chromatographic Procedure.3.1.1 GC/MS Measurements in Low and High Resolution Conditions.3.1.2 LC/ESI/MS and LC/APCI/MS Measurements.3.2 Choice of a Suitable Ionization Method.3.3 An Example of High Specificity and Selectivity Methods: The Dioxin Analysis.3.3.1 Use of High Resolution MID Analysis.3.3.2 NICI in the Analysis of Dioxins, Furans and PCBs.3.3.3 MS/MS in the Detection of Dioxins, Furans and PCBs.3.4 An Example of MALDI/MS in Quantitative Analysis of Polypeptides: Substance P.References.4 Some Thoughts on Calibration and Data Analysis.4.1 Calibration Designs.4.2 Homoscedastic and Heteroscedastic Data.4.2.1 Variance Model.4.3 Calibration Models.4.3.1 Unweighted Regression.4.3.2 Weighted Regression.4.3.3 A Practical Example.4.4 Different Approaches to Estimate Detection and Quantification Limits.References.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This text presents the information needed to design a successful quantitative analysis using mass spectrometric techniques currently available and widely employed. It is devoted to the researchers of different areas, who use mass spectrometry as a detector suitable for the measurements of their interest. It is an essential book for the practicing mass spectroscopist and a genuine how to text for the practitioner focusing on quantification rather than instrumental design and techniques. It contains up-to-date structured text describing methods, experimental strategy, capabilities and limitations, with data analysis and interpretation and brings together material widely dispersed in the pertinent literature into one unique source. It is written by internationally recognized group of authors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD96 .M3 Q83 2006 Unknown
Book
x, 325 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
This supplement contains many spreadsheet exercises correlating directly with sections in the text. The exercises teach students how to use Microsoft(r) Excel(r) using applications from statistics, data analysis equilibrium calculations, curve fitting, and more. Operations include everything from basic arithmetic and cell formatting to Solver, Goal Seek, and the Data Analysis Toolpak. The authors show students how to use a spreadsheet to construct log diagrams and to plot the results. Statistical data treatment includes descriptive statistics, linear regression, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. Tutorial exercises include nonlinear regression such as fitting the Van Deemter equation, fitting kinetics data, determining error coefficients in spectrophotometry, and calculating titration curves. Additional features include solving complex systems of equilibrium equations and advanced graphical methods: error bars, charts with insets, matrices and determinants, and much more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This supplement contains many spreadsheet exercises correlating directly with sections in the text. The exercises teach students how to use Microsoft(r) Excel(r) using applications from statistics, data analysis equilibrium calculations, curve fitting, and more. Operations include everything from basic arithmetic and cell formatting to Solver, Goal Seek, and the Data Analysis Toolpak. The authors show students how to use a spreadsheet to construct log diagrams and to plot the results. Statistical data treatment includes descriptive statistics, linear regression, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. Tutorial exercises include nonlinear regression such as fitting the Van Deemter equation, fitting kinetics data, determining error coefficients in spectrophotometry, and calculating titration curves. Additional features include solving complex systems of equilibrium equations and advanced graphical methods: error bars, charts with insets, matrices and determinants, and much more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.4 .E4 C76 2004 Unknown
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
Extensive coverage of the prinicples and practices of quantative chemistry and includes applications throughout industry, medicine and all the sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Extensive coverage of the prinicples and practices of quantative chemistry and includes applications throughout industry, medicine and all the sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.22 .F865 2004 Unknown
QD75.22 .F865 2004 Unknown
Book
xi, 259 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Vanity - no more wrinkles?-- 2. Vitality - food for thought-- 3. Virility, sterility, and Viagra-- 4. Germs warfare-- 5. It's all in the mind-- 6. Polymers in unlikely guises-- Postscript - a risk worth taking?-- Glossary-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Vanity, Vitality, and Virility" is essentially a collection of 'portraits' loosely arranged into 'galleries' that bring together related themes. While it will not advise you what to do if you want to improve your looks, your health, your peace of mind, or your sex life, it does explain the science behind many of the products that claim to be able to do just that. It looks at a range of products and ingredients that impinge on our everyday life and explains in plain language how 30 commonly encountered chemicals work, and how and why we use them. Chapter one, Vanity - no more wrinkles? has an entry on alpha-hydroxy acids. Advertisers call them 'natural fruit acids' but they are products of the chemical industry. They can improve the skin by penetrating the outer layer and stimulating the growth of new skin. But do they really remove wrinkles? Chapter two, Vitality - food for thought, tackles dietary fats: trans fats, essential fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6 fats), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which some say is a necessary preventive against breast cancer despite coming only from animal fats. Chapter three, Virility, Sterility, and Viagra, has a section on 'more and better sex': what natural substances act as aphrodisiacs and can chemists improve upon them? There are substances that can enhance sexual performance and heighten orgasm. How to they work, and are they safe? Chapter four, Germ warfare, contains a section on Hypochlorite: so-called chlorine bleach. It doesn't actually contain chlorine but hypochlorite, and it is this that gives it the power to 'kill all germs stone dead'. But there have been campaigns to ban it because it produces other chemicals when added to water. Chapter five, It's all in the mind, deals with depression and anti-depressants: Prozac, Lithium (used to treat manic depression: the odd thing is that lithium shouldn't work, but does), and Aluminium, once wrongly convicted of causing Alzheimer's Disease. Chapter six, Polymers in unlikely guises, ranges from super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) used in tampons and nappies, to 'whispering asphalt' which modifies bitumen by adding polymers, resulting in road surfaces which are quieter and which produce less spray.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- 1. Vanity - no more wrinkles?-- 2. Vitality - food for thought-- 3. Virility, sterility, and Viagra-- 4. Germs warfare-- 5. It's all in the mind-- 6. Polymers in unlikely guises-- Postscript - a risk worth taking?-- Glossary-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Vanity, Vitality, and Virility" is essentially a collection of 'portraits' loosely arranged into 'galleries' that bring together related themes. While it will not advise you what to do if you want to improve your looks, your health, your peace of mind, or your sex life, it does explain the science behind many of the products that claim to be able to do just that. It looks at a range of products and ingredients that impinge on our everyday life and explains in plain language how 30 commonly encountered chemicals work, and how and why we use them. Chapter one, Vanity - no more wrinkles? has an entry on alpha-hydroxy acids. Advertisers call them 'natural fruit acids' but they are products of the chemical industry. They can improve the skin by penetrating the outer layer and stimulating the growth of new skin. But do they really remove wrinkles? Chapter two, Vitality - food for thought, tackles dietary fats: trans fats, essential fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6 fats), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which some say is a necessary preventive against breast cancer despite coming only from animal fats. Chapter three, Virility, Sterility, and Viagra, has a section on 'more and better sex': what natural substances act as aphrodisiacs and can chemists improve upon them? There are substances that can enhance sexual performance and heighten orgasm. How to they work, and are they safe? Chapter four, Germ warfare, contains a section on Hypochlorite: so-called chlorine bleach. It doesn't actually contain chlorine but hypochlorite, and it is this that gives it the power to 'kill all germs stone dead'. But there have been campaigns to ban it because it produces other chemicals when added to water. Chapter five, It's all in the mind, deals with depression and anti-depressants: Prozac, Lithium (used to treat manic depression: the odd thing is that lithium shouldn't work, but does), and Aluminium, once wrongly convicted of causing Alzheimer's Disease. Chapter six, Polymers in unlikely guises, ranges from super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) used in tampons and nappies, to 'whispering asphalt' which modifies bitumen by adding polymers, resulting in road surfaces which are quieter and which produce less spray.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD75.22 .E47 2004 Unknown
Book
xii, 603 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Contributors.Preface.1 Introduction.1.1 Considering the Role of X-ray Spectrometry in Chemical Analysis and Outlining the Volume.2 X-Ray Sources.2.1 Micro X-ray Sources.2.2 New Synchrotron Radiation Sources.2.3 Laser-driven X-ray Sources.3 X-Ray Optics.3.1 Multilayers for Soft and Hard X-rays.3.2 Single Capillaries X-ray Optics.3.3 Polycapillary X-ray Optics.3.4 Parabolic Compound Refractive X-ray Lenses.4 X-Ray Detectors.4.1 Semiconductor Detectors for (Imaging) X-ray Spectroscopy.4.2 Gas Proportional Scintillation Counters for X-ray Spectrometry.4.3 Superconducting Tunnel Junctions.4.4 Cryogenic Microcalorimeters.4.5 Position Sensitive Semiconductor Strip Detectors.5 Special Configurations.5.1 Grazing-incidence X-ray Spectrometry.5.2 Grazing-exit X-ray Spectrometry.5.3 Portable Equipment for X-ray Fluorescence Analysis.5.4 Synchrotron Radiation for Microscopic X-ray Fluorescence Analysis.5.5 High-energy X-ray Fluorescence.5.6 Low-energy Electron Probe Microanalysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy.5.7 Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis in Scanning and Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy.5.8 X-Ray Absorption Techniques.6 New Computerisation Methods.6.1 Monte Carlo Simulation for X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy.6.2 Spectrum Evaluation.7 New Applications.7.1 X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis in Medical Sciences.7.2 Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for Semiconductors and Thin Films.7.3 X-Ray Spectrometry in Archaeometry.7.4 X-Ray Spectrometry in Forensic Research.7.5 Speciation and Surface Analysis of Single Particles Using Electron-excited X-ray Emission Spectrometry.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"X-Ray Spectrometry: Recent Technological Advances" covers the latest developments and areas of research in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x-ray spectrometry. It includes the most advanced and high-tech aspects of the chemical analysis techniques based on x-rays. It introduces new types of X-ray optics and X-ray detectors, covering history, principles, characteristics and future trends. It is written by internationally recognized scientists, all of whom are eminent specialists in each of the sub-fields. Sections include: X-Ray Sources, X-Ray Optics, X-Ray Detectors, Special Configurations, New Computerization Methods, and New Applications. This valuable book will assist all analytical chemists and other users of x-ray spectrometry to fully exploit the capabilities of this set of powerful analytical tools and to further expand applications in such fields as material and environmental sciences, medicine, toxicology, forensics, archaeometry and many others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Contributors.Preface.1 Introduction.1.1 Considering the Role of X-ray Spectrometry in Chemical Analysis and Outlining the Volume.2 X-Ray Sources.2.1 Micro X-ray Sources.2.2 New Synchrotron Radiation Sources.2.3 Laser-driven X-ray Sources.3 X-Ray Optics.3.1 Multilayers for Soft and Hard X-rays.3.2 Single Capillaries X-ray Optics.3.3 Polycapillary X-ray Optics.3.4 Parabolic Compound Refractive X-ray Lenses.4 X-Ray Detectors.4.1 Semiconductor Detectors for (Imaging) X-ray Spectroscopy.4.2 Gas Proportional Scintillation Counters for X-ray Spectrometry.4.3 Superconducting Tunnel Junctions.4.4 Cryogenic Microcalorimeters.4.5 Position Sensitive Semiconductor Strip Detectors.5 Special Configurations.5.1 Grazing-incidence X-ray Spectrometry.5.2 Grazing-exit X-ray Spectrometry.5.3 Portable Equipment for X-ray Fluorescence Analysis.5.4 Synchrotron Radiation for Microscopic X-ray Fluorescence Analysis.5.5 High-energy X-ray Fluorescence.5.6 Low-energy Electron Probe Microanalysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy.5.7 Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis in Scanning and Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy.5.8 X-Ray Absorption Techniques.6 New Computerisation Methods.6.1 Monte Carlo Simulation for X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy.6.2 Spectrum Evaluation.7 New Applications.7.1 X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis in Medical Sciences.7.2 Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for Semiconductors and Thin Films.7.3 X-Ray Spectrometry in Archaeometry.7.4 X-Ray Spectrometry in Forensic Research.7.5 Speciation and Surface Analysis of Single Particles Using Electron-excited X-ray Emission Spectrometry.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"X-Ray Spectrometry: Recent Technological Advances" covers the latest developments and areas of research in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x-ray spectrometry. It includes the most advanced and high-tech aspects of the chemical analysis techniques based on x-rays. It introduces new types of X-ray optics and X-ray detectors, covering history, principles, characteristics and future trends. It is written by internationally recognized scientists, all of whom are eminent specialists in each of the sub-fields. Sections include: X-Ray Sources, X-Ray Optics, X-Ray Detectors, Special Configurations, New Computerization Methods, and New Applications. This valuable book will assist all analytical chemists and other users of x-ray spectrometry to fully exploit the capabilities of this set of powerful analytical tools and to further expand applications in such fields as material and environmental sciences, medicine, toxicology, forensics, archaeometry and many others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Status of items at Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) Status
Stacks
QD96 .X2 X28 2004 Unknown

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