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Book
xviii, 207 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 20 cm.
The fifteenth century saw the evolution of a distinct and powerfully influential European artistic culture. But what does the familiar phrase Renaissance Art actually refer to? Through engaging discussion of timeless works by artists such as Jan van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo, and supported by illustrations including colour plates, Tom Nichols offers a masterpiece of his own as he explores the truly original and diverse character of the art of the Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The fifteenth century saw the evolution of a distinct and powerfully influential European artistic culture. But what does the familiar phrase Renaissance Art actually refer to? Through engaging discussion of timeless works by artists such as Jan van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo, and supported by illustrations including colour plates, Tom Nichols offers a masterpiece of his own as he explores the truly original and diverse character of the art of the Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N6370 .N45 2010 Unknown

2. Renaissance [2008]

Book
287 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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N6370 .M37 2008 F Unknown
Book
429 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 22 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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N6370 .Z83 2007 Unknown
Book
157 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
  • 1. Whose Renaissance? Whose art?-- 2. The art of the altarpiece-- 3. Story-telling in Renaissance Art-- 4. The challenge of nature and the antique-- 5. Portraiture and the rise of 'Renaissance Man'-- 6. The story of a square-- 7. Objects and images for the domestic sphere-- 8. Did women have a Renaissance?-- 9. Michelangelo and the birth of the Artist...and of Art History.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Botticelli, Holbein, Leonardo, Durer, Michelangelo: the names are familiar, as are the works, such as the Last Supper fresco, or the monumental marble statue of David. But who were these artists, why did they produce such memorable images, and how would their original beholders have viewed these objects? Was the Renaissance only about great masters and masterpieces, or were "mistresses" also involved, such as women artists and patrons? And what about the 'minor'-pieces that Renaissance men and women would have encountered in homes, churches and civic spaces? This exciting and stimulating volume will answer such questions by considering both famous and lesser-known artists, patrons and works of art within the cultural and historical context of Renaissance Europe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Whose Renaissance? Whose art?-- 2. The art of the altarpiece-- 3. Story-telling in Renaissance Art-- 4. The challenge of nature and the antique-- 5. Portraiture and the rise of 'Renaissance Man'-- 6. The story of a square-- 7. Objects and images for the domestic sphere-- 8. Did women have a Renaissance?-- 9. Michelangelo and the birth of the Artist...and of Art History.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Botticelli, Holbein, Leonardo, Durer, Michelangelo: the names are familiar, as are the works, such as the Last Supper fresco, or the monumental marble statue of David. But who were these artists, why did they produce such memorable images, and how would their original beholders have viewed these objects? Was the Renaissance only about great masters and masterpieces, or were "mistresses" also involved, such as women artists and patrons? And what about the 'minor'-pieces that Renaissance men and women would have encountered in homes, churches and civic spaces? This exciting and stimulating volume will answer such questions by considering both famous and lesser-known artists, patrons and works of art within the cultural and historical context of Renaissance Europe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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Reference (non-circulating)
N6370 .J64 2005 In-library use
Book
447 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Art, Artists and the Marketplace-- 2. Court Art and the Ars Nova-- 3. Art in the Cities-- 4. Early Independent Portraiture and Domestic Art-- 5. Private and Devotional Art-- 6. Faith in Art-- 7. The Art of Dying Well-- 8. Prints-- 9. The Knowledgeable Artist-- 10. The Art of Nature and Human Nature-- 11. Art and the Reformation-- 12. Courts and Cities-- Glossary-- Brief Biographies-- Key Dates-- Map-- Further Reading-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
An exploration of a highly innovative and exciting period of art following the careers of artists such as Van Eyck, Durer and Holbein. Jeffrey Chipps Smith analyses the context of the time, such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas. He offers the reader an insight into domestic, civic and court life illustrated by some of the most exquisite artworks ever created. In the years from 1380 to 1580 northern Europe witnessed a period of artistic innovation as dynamic as contemporary developments in Italy. Stimulated by the atmosphere of intellectual curiosity about the individual and the natural world, Northern Renaissance artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Hans Holbein, mastered the new techniques of oil painting and printmaking to produce some of the most exquisite art of all time. It was also a period of political, religious and social turmoil, which profoundly changed the patronage, production and subject matter of art. At all levels of society art was a part of everyday life. Jeffrey Chipps Smith writes lucidly about these changes and the objects themselves. The works range from tapestries, altarpieces and illuminated manuscripts to churches, palaces and civic architecture. He discusses the audiences and functions of art from across nothern Europe, including not only Germany, France and the Low Countries, but also Britain and Austria. He explores major cultural and historic events such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas and looks at how they widened intellectual and religious horizons. The result is a book that reveals how the Northern Renaissance masters laid the foundations for the art of succeeding centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- 1. Art, Artists and the Marketplace-- 2. Court Art and the Ars Nova-- 3. Art in the Cities-- 4. Early Independent Portraiture and Domestic Art-- 5. Private and Devotional Art-- 6. Faith in Art-- 7. The Art of Dying Well-- 8. Prints-- 9. The Knowledgeable Artist-- 10. The Art of Nature and Human Nature-- 11. Art and the Reformation-- 12. Courts and Cities-- Glossary-- Brief Biographies-- Key Dates-- Map-- Further Reading-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
An exploration of a highly innovative and exciting period of art following the careers of artists such as Van Eyck, Durer and Holbein. Jeffrey Chipps Smith analyses the context of the time, such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas. He offers the reader an insight into domestic, civic and court life illustrated by some of the most exquisite artworks ever created. In the years from 1380 to 1580 northern Europe witnessed a period of artistic innovation as dynamic as contemporary developments in Italy. Stimulated by the atmosphere of intellectual curiosity about the individual and the natural world, Northern Renaissance artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Hans Holbein, mastered the new techniques of oil painting and printmaking to produce some of the most exquisite art of all time. It was also a period of political, religious and social turmoil, which profoundly changed the patronage, production and subject matter of art. At all levels of society art was a part of everyday life. Jeffrey Chipps Smith writes lucidly about these changes and the objects themselves. The works range from tapestries, altarpieces and illuminated manuscripts to churches, palaces and civic architecture. He discusses the audiences and functions of art from across nothern Europe, including not only Germany, France and the Low Countries, but also Britain and Austria. He explores major cultural and historic events such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas and looks at how they widened intellectual and religious horizons. The result is a book that reveals how the Northern Renaissance masters laid the foundations for the art of succeeding centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N6370 .S65 2004 Unknown

6. Renaissance art [1999]

Book
143 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
The works of great artists such a Titian, Botticelli, Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Durer still have the power to captivate, such was the extraordinary creativity of the Renaissance period and the mastery of these artists. With reproductions of their work and that of many other artists, this book charts a course through this significant period of art history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The works of great artists such a Titian, Botticelli, Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Durer still have the power to captivate, such was the extraordinary creativity of the Renaissance period and the mastery of these artists. With reproductions of their work and that of many other artists, this book charts a course through this significant period of art history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N6370 .L3813 2004 Unknown
Book
xiv, 241 p. : ill., 1 map ; 24 cm.
  • The price of quality - factors influencing the cost of pigments during the Renaissance-- "artefici" and "huomini intendenti" - questions of artistic value in 16th-century Italy-- "Dante Alighieri poeta fiorentino" - cultural values in the 1481 "Divine Comedy"-- Mantegna's "Parnassus" - reading, collecting and the "studiolo"-- Alfonso I. d'Este, Michelangelo and the man who bought pigs-- new, old and second-hand culture - the case of the Renaissance sleeve-- evaluating textiles in Renaissance Venice-- re-valuing dress in history paintings for quattrocento Florence-- the Madonna and child, a host of saints and domestic devolution in renaissance Florence-- images of St Catherine - a re-evaluation of Cosimo Rosselli and the influence of his art on the woodcut and metal engraving images of the Dominican Third Order-- voting with their feet - art, pilgrimage and ratings in the Renaissance-- madness, reason, vision and the cosmos - evaluating the drawings of Opicinus de Canistris (1296-c 1351).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Michelangelo gave his painting of "Leda and the Swan" to an apprentice rather than hand it over to the emissary of the Duke of Ferrar, who had commissioned it. He was apparently disgusted by the failure of the emissary - who was probably more used to buying pigs than discussing art - to accord the picture and the artist the value they deserved. Any discussion of works of art and material culture implicitly assigns them a set of values. Whether these values be monetary, cultural or religious, they tend to constrict the ways in which such works can be discussed. The variety of potential forms of valuation becomes particularly apparent during the Italian Renaissance, when relations between the visual arts and humanistic studies were undergoing rapid changes against an equally fluid social, economic and political background. In this volume, 13 scholars explicitly examine some of the complex ways in which a variety of values might be associated with Italian Renaissance material culture. Papers range from a consideration of the basic values of the materials employed by artists, to the manifestation of cultural values in attitudes to dress and domestic devotion. By illuminating some of the ways in which values were constructed, they provide a broader context within which to evaluate Renaissance material culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • The price of quality - factors influencing the cost of pigments during the Renaissance-- "artefici" and "huomini intendenti" - questions of artistic value in 16th-century Italy-- "Dante Alighieri poeta fiorentino" - cultural values in the 1481 "Divine Comedy"-- Mantegna's "Parnassus" - reading, collecting and the "studiolo"-- Alfonso I. d'Este, Michelangelo and the man who bought pigs-- new, old and second-hand culture - the case of the Renaissance sleeve-- evaluating textiles in Renaissance Venice-- re-valuing dress in history paintings for quattrocento Florence-- the Madonna and child, a host of saints and domestic devolution in renaissance Florence-- images of St Catherine - a re-evaluation of Cosimo Rosselli and the influence of his art on the woodcut and metal engraving images of the Dominican Third Order-- voting with their feet - art, pilgrimage and ratings in the Renaissance-- madness, reason, vision and the cosmos - evaluating the drawings of Opicinus de Canistris (1296-c 1351).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Michelangelo gave his painting of "Leda and the Swan" to an apprentice rather than hand it over to the emissary of the Duke of Ferrar, who had commissioned it. He was apparently disgusted by the failure of the emissary - who was probably more used to buying pigs than discussing art - to accord the picture and the artist the value they deserved. Any discussion of works of art and material culture implicitly assigns them a set of values. Whether these values be monetary, cultural or religious, they tend to constrict the ways in which such works can be discussed. The variety of potential forms of valuation becomes particularly apparent during the Italian Renaissance, when relations between the visual arts and humanistic studies were undergoing rapid changes against an equally fluid social, economic and political background. In this volume, 13 scholars explicitly examine some of the complex ways in which a variety of values might be associated with Italian Renaissance material culture. Papers range from a consideration of the basic values of the materials employed by artists, to the manifestation of cultural values in attitudes to dress and domestic devotion. By illuminating some of the ways in which values were constructed, they provide a broader context within which to evaluate Renaissance material culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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N6370 .R42 2000 Unknown
Book
859 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
A collection of essays by the art historian Aby Warburg, these essays look beyond iconography to more psychological aspects of artistic creation: the conditions under which art was practised; its social and cultural contexts; and its conceivable historical meaning.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
A collection of essays by the art historian Aby Warburg, these essays look beyond iconography to more psychological aspects of artistic creation: the conditions under which art was practised; its social and cultural contexts; and its conceivable historical meaning.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
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Stacks
N6370 .W3313 1999 Unknown
Book
188 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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ND170 .V46 1998 Unknown
Book
608 p. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N6370 .J4713 1995 F Unknown
Book
196 p. illus. 23 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N6370 .W8513 Unknown
Book
468 p., 68 col. plates. illus. 28 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N5300.P745 V.8 Unknown

13. Renaissance art. [1970]

Book
xxi, 247 p. illus. 21 cm.
  • Introduction, by C. Gilbert.--Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini portrait, by E. Panofsky.--Muscipula Diaboli: The symbolism of the Mérode altarpiece, by M. Schapiro.--Light as form and symbol in some fifteenth-century paintings, by M. Meiss.--The painter Niccolò Pizzolo, by E. Rigoni.--The hall of the Great Council of Florence, by J. Wilde.--The architectural theory of Francesco di Giorgio, by H. Millon.--Architectural practice in the Italian Renaissance, by J. S. Ackerman.--The importance of Sammicheli in the formation of Palladio, by G. C. Argan.--Maniera as an aesthetic ideal, by J. Shearman.--Jacopo Bassano: 1568-69, by W. R. Rearick.
  • Introduction, by C. Gilbert.--Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini portrait, by E. Panofsky.--Muscipula Diaboli: The symbolism of the Mérode altarpiece, by M. Schapiro.--Light as form and symbol in some fifteenth-century paintings, by M. Meiss.--The painter Niccolò Pizzolo, by E. Rigoni.--The hall of the Great Council of Florence, by J. Wilde.--The architectural theory of Francesco di Giorgio, by H. Millon.--Architectural practice in the Italian Renaissance, by J. S. Ackerman.--The importance of Sammicheli in the formation of Palladio, by G. C. Argan.--Maniera as an aesthetic ideal, by J. Shearman.--Jacopo Bassano: 1568-69, by W. R. Rearick.
Art & Architecture Library
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Stacks
N6370 .G46 Unknown
Book
xii, 417 p. : ill. (part fold. col.), fold. maps ; 28 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Art & Architecture Library Status
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N6915 .C512 Unknown
Book
242 p. 28 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Art & Architecture Library Status
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N6370 .P28 1965 Unknown
Book
286 p. illus. (part col.), ports. (part col.) 22 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
N6370 .M97 Unknown
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N6370 .M97 Unknown
Journal/Periodical
26 v. plates. 42-48 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
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Locked Stacks, Large
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.16 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.14-15 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.13 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.12 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.11 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.10 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.9 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.8 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.7 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.6 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.5 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.4 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.3 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.2 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.2:V.1 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.10 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.9 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.8 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.7 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.6 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.5 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.4 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.3 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.2 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 SER.1:V.1 In-library use
NC1020 .V32 INDEX In-library use
Book
xiii, 238 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. A historiographical overview; 3. Not only rebirth; 4. Truth and likeness; 5. Visualizing ideas; 6. Why did the high Renaissance happen?; 7. Revolutionary norms of beauty; 8. "Genius"; 9. Epilogue.
"Why did Renaissance art come to matter so much, so widely, and for so long? Patricia Emison's answer depends on a recalibrated view of the long Renaissance from 1300 to 1600 synthesizing the considerable evolution in our understanding of the epoch since the foundational 19th-century studies of Burckhardt and Wölfflin. Demonstrating that the imitation of nature and of antiquity must no longer define its limits, she exposes Renaissance style self-consciously modern aspect. She sets the art against the literary and political interests of the time, and analyzes works both of very familiar artists Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael and of lesser-known figures, including Cima and Barocci. An understanding emerges of both the period's long-standing fame and its various historical debts. Moving beyond the Renaissance, Emison unfolds the varying and layered significance it has held from the Old Master era through Impressionism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism"--Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. A historiographical overview; 3. Not only rebirth; 4. Truth and likeness; 5. Visualizing ideas; 6. Why did the high Renaissance happen?; 7. Revolutionary norms of beauty; 8. "Genius"; 9. Epilogue.
"Why did Renaissance art come to matter so much, so widely, and for so long? Patricia Emison's answer depends on a recalibrated view of the long Renaissance from 1300 to 1600 synthesizing the considerable evolution in our understanding of the epoch since the foundational 19th-century studies of Burckhardt and Wölfflin. Demonstrating that the imitation of nature and of antiquity must no longer define its limits, she exposes Renaissance style self-consciously modern aspect. She sets the art against the literary and political interests of the time, and analyzes works both of very familiar artists Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael and of lesser-known figures, including Cima and Barocci. An understanding emerges of both the period's long-standing fame and its various historical debts. Moving beyond the Renaissance, Emison unfolds the varying and layered significance it has held from the Old Master era through Impressionism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library
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N6915 .E468 2012 Unknown
Book
xvi, 449 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Notes on Contributors.Preface.Introduction.Part I: Making Renaissance Art.Drawing and Workshop Practice.Cennino Cennini on Drawing.Alberti on Drawing Figures.Francesco Squarcione Details the Drawing Regime for his Pupils.Gerard Horenbout takes on two Apprentices.A Master's Duty of Care for his Apprentices.Leonardo da Vinci on Drawing.Durer gives Drawings as Gifts and Uses them to pay day-to-day Expenses.Durer Lists the Qualities Required to be a Painter.Joachim Camerarius Praises Durer's Drawings.Linear Perspective.Cennino Cennini's Method for Depicting Buildings in a Painting.Alberti and the Earliest Written Description of Single-point Perspective.Lorenzo Ghiberti Lists the Sources for Perspective.Filarete's Method for Making Drawings of Buildings.Piero Della Francesca's Perspective for Painters.Manetti's Descriptions of Brunelleschi's Experiments.Leonardo da Vinci on single-point and Aerial Perspective.Sculpture.Posthumous Inventory of Tournai Sculptor Colart le Cat.Michelozzo and Donatello are Contracted to make the Prato Pulpit.Report on Donatello's Progress on the Prato Pulpit.The Brussels Painters' Guild Claims Exclusive Rights to Market Painted Works of Art.Extracts from De Statua by Leon Battista Alberti.1470 regulations of the Antwerp Guild of St Luke.Utrecht Sculptor Adriaen van Wesel makes a Carved Altarpiece for the Confraternity of Our Ladys' Hertogenbosch.Architecture.Filarete's System of Architecture.Brunelleschi's Practice of Architecture.Panel Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint Drapery in a Fresco Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Acquire the Skills to Paint on Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Prepare and Size a Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint a Panel.Contract for Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.A Fee is fixed for Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Second Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Final Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Contract for Enguerrand Quarton's Coronation of the Virgin Altarpiece.Prints and Printmaking.An ordinance from the Stadsarchief, Leuven, Concerning Printmaker Jan van den Berghe.The Hard Business of Printing.A Printer tries to Protect his Creative Rights.Durer's Letter to Jakob Heller.A Letter from block-cutter Jost de Negker to Maximilian I.The Purchase of the Contents of an Antwerp Printer's Workshop.Erasmus's Eulogy on Durer.Robert Peril's Agreement Regarding the Manufacture of Printed Playing Cards in Antwerp.Vasari's life of Marcantonio Raimondi.Treatises, Histories, Artists and Education.Lorenzo Ghiberti on the Education Required for Making Sculpture.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (1) Antonio Manetti.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (2) Leonardo da Vinci.Books known or Owned by Leonardo da Vinci.Courtiers Discuss the Merits of Painting and Sculpture.Part II: Locating Renaissance Art.Florence and Rome.Domenico Veneziano looks for Work in Florence.The Contract for Wall Paintings at the Sistine Chapel.The Valuation of the first four Narratives at the Sistine Chapel.Botticelli Pursues Outstanding Payments for his work in the Sistine Chapel.Filippino Lippi works for Cardinal Carafa in Rome at Lorenzo de' Medici's. Suggestion.Filippino Lippi Explains to Filippo Strozzi why he has gone to Rome.A dialogue between Florence and Rome against Savonarola.The Duke of Milan's Agent Reports on Florentine Artists.Michelangelo's Letter to Lorenzo de' Pierfrancesco de' Medici from Rome.A Cultural Tourist Describes Some of the Sites in Rome.Netherlandish Networks.Pedro Tafur's Impressions of the Netherlands in the 1430s.Lluis Dalmau is Contracted to make an Altarpiece for the Councillors' Chapel in Barcelona.Ciriaco d'Ancona's Comments on a Deposition Triptych by Rogier van der Weyden.Bartlommeo Facio's Description of the Work of Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden.Marcantonio Michiel Records Netherlandish Paintings in the Homes of Collectors in Venice and Padua in the Early Sixteenth Century.Pietro Summonte Describes to Marcantonio Michiel Works by Van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden in Naples.Tapestries.Statutes of the Tapestry-Makers' Guild in Brussels.The Signoria of Florence Recommends a Weaver from Bruges.A Dispute Between the Painters' Guild and the Tapestry-Makers' Guild.Siena.Ghiberti's Admiration for Early Sienese Art.The Commission for the Reconstructed Altar and Altarpiece for the Cappella dei Signori.Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini and International Politics.Pius II's Canonization of Saint Catherine of Siena.Pius II's Description of his Cathedral in Pienza and its Interior.The Post-Byzantine Renaissance.The Will of the Painter Angelos Akotantos.Ioannes Akotantos Sells the Drawings of his Brother, Angelos Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Loannes Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Andreas Pavias.Andreas Pavias Intervenes to Secure the Return of an Icon Painted by Angelos Akotantos.The Commission from the Venetian Ruler of Nauplio, for a Pala A'altare.On the Making of Anthibola (Imprinted Cartoons).How to Plaster a Wall.Venice.Extract From the Mariegola (rule-book) of the Mercers Company in Venice.Gentile Bellini Undertakes the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Gentile Bellini is sent on a Mission to Constantinople.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Decorate the Grand Council Chamber.Giovanni Bellini is Exempted from Duties in the Painters' Guild.Alvise Vivarini's Petition to Work on the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Extract from Marin Sanudo's Praise of the City of Venice.Extract from The Memoirs of Philippe de Commynes.Extract from Pietro Casola's Account of a Pilgrimage to Jerusalem.The Bellini Brothers are Contracted to Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Gentile Bellini agrees to Continue Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Complete his Brother's Work.Durer's Correspondence on Venice, and on Venetian Art and Artists.From Francesco Sansovino's Dialogue on All the Notable Things which are in Venice.Architectural Treatises.Vitruvius' Ideas on Architecture.Alberti Improves on Vitruvius.Part III: Viewing Renaissance Art.Art, Class and Wealth.Treasures in the Ducal Chapel of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy.The Camera Grande of Doctor Bartolo di Tura.Luxury goods in the Rooms of Lorenzo the Magnificent.Views on Art in Florence.The Florentine Merchant, Giovanni Rucellai, Discusses his Spending.A Coppersmith Describes the Festivities in Florence for St John the Baptist.Fra Girolamo Savonarola warns Florentines against the Dangers of the New type of Painting.The Cloth Merchants' Guild Commission a New Sculpture for the Florentine Baptistery.A Meeting About Where to Place Michelangelo's David.Illuminated Manuscripts.The Manuscripts in the Library of the Duke of Urbino.The Contract between Attavante and a Florentine Merchant for an Illuminated. Manuscript.The Chequered History of the Sforza Hours.The Preface to Sala's Poetry Book.Art and Monarchy in France.The Tomb of Louis XI.Bourdichon: 'Painter to the King'.Jean Robertet's Poem About the Worst Painter in the World.Henri Baude's 'Moral Sayings for Making Tapestries'.Jean Lemaire de Belges.Jean Perreal de Paris: Painter and Poet.Michel Colombe's Contract for a Tomb Project at Brou.The Travel Journal of Antonio de Beatis.The Market in Icons.John of Damascus on Images.The Will of Andreas Cornaros.Three Cretan Painters are Commissioned to Make 700 Icons of the Virgin.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Commission for 10 Triptychs.Vasari's Views on the 'Greek' Style.Art and Death.Leonardo Bruni Condemns the Tomb of the Poet Bartolommeo Aragazzi.John Lydgate's Version of 'The Dance of Death' for the Cloister of St Paul's. Cathedral, London.The Foundation Statutes of the Chantry at Ewelme.The Will of John Baret of Bury St Edmunds.The Choice of Artist for the Monument to Cardinal Niccolo Forteguerri in Pistoia.Cardinal Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini Prepares for his Death.The Wills of the 'Catholic Monarchs', Isabella and Ferdinand.The Reform of Images.Andreas Karlstadt, On the Removal of Images.Extract from Hieromymus Emser's response to Karlstadt.Ulrich Zwingli's Criticisms of Religious Images.Zurich Council Orders the Removal of Images from Churches.Luther States his Own Position on Religious Images.Sir Thomas More Defends the Use of Images.William Tyndale Responds to Sir Thomas More.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Renaissance Art Reconsidered" showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement. This is a major new anthology, bringing to life the places, works, media, and issues that define Renaissance art. It is ideal for use on Renaissance studies courses and for reference by students of art history. It moves beyond the borders of Italy to consider European, Mediterranean, and post Byzantine art, widening the traditional focus of Renaissance art. It includes letters, treatises, contracts, inventories, and other public documents, many of which are translated into English for the first time in this volume. It showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement, providing crucial insight into the art and the context in which it was produced.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Notes on Contributors.Preface.Introduction.Part I: Making Renaissance Art.Drawing and Workshop Practice.Cennino Cennini on Drawing.Alberti on Drawing Figures.Francesco Squarcione Details the Drawing Regime for his Pupils.Gerard Horenbout takes on two Apprentices.A Master's Duty of Care for his Apprentices.Leonardo da Vinci on Drawing.Durer gives Drawings as Gifts and Uses them to pay day-to-day Expenses.Durer Lists the Qualities Required to be a Painter.Joachim Camerarius Praises Durer's Drawings.Linear Perspective.Cennino Cennini's Method for Depicting Buildings in a Painting.Alberti and the Earliest Written Description of Single-point Perspective.Lorenzo Ghiberti Lists the Sources for Perspective.Filarete's Method for Making Drawings of Buildings.Piero Della Francesca's Perspective for Painters.Manetti's Descriptions of Brunelleschi's Experiments.Leonardo da Vinci on single-point and Aerial Perspective.Sculpture.Posthumous Inventory of Tournai Sculptor Colart le Cat.Michelozzo and Donatello are Contracted to make the Prato Pulpit.Report on Donatello's Progress on the Prato Pulpit.The Brussels Painters' Guild Claims Exclusive Rights to Market Painted Works of Art.Extracts from De Statua by Leon Battista Alberti.1470 regulations of the Antwerp Guild of St Luke.Utrecht Sculptor Adriaen van Wesel makes a Carved Altarpiece for the Confraternity of Our Ladys' Hertogenbosch.Architecture.Filarete's System of Architecture.Brunelleschi's Practice of Architecture.Panel Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint Drapery in a Fresco Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Acquire the Skills to Paint on Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Prepare and Size a Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint a Panel.Contract for Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.A Fee is fixed for Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Second Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Final Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Contract for Enguerrand Quarton's Coronation of the Virgin Altarpiece.Prints and Printmaking.An ordinance from the Stadsarchief, Leuven, Concerning Printmaker Jan van den Berghe.The Hard Business of Printing.A Printer tries to Protect his Creative Rights.Durer's Letter to Jakob Heller.A Letter from block-cutter Jost de Negker to Maximilian I.The Purchase of the Contents of an Antwerp Printer's Workshop.Erasmus's Eulogy on Durer.Robert Peril's Agreement Regarding the Manufacture of Printed Playing Cards in Antwerp.Vasari's life of Marcantonio Raimondi.Treatises, Histories, Artists and Education.Lorenzo Ghiberti on the Education Required for Making Sculpture.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (1) Antonio Manetti.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (2) Leonardo da Vinci.Books known or Owned by Leonardo da Vinci.Courtiers Discuss the Merits of Painting and Sculpture.Part II: Locating Renaissance Art.Florence and Rome.Domenico Veneziano looks for Work in Florence.The Contract for Wall Paintings at the Sistine Chapel.The Valuation of the first four Narratives at the Sistine Chapel.Botticelli Pursues Outstanding Payments for his work in the Sistine Chapel.Filippino Lippi works for Cardinal Carafa in Rome at Lorenzo de' Medici's. Suggestion.Filippino Lippi Explains to Filippo Strozzi why he has gone to Rome.A dialogue between Florence and Rome against Savonarola.The Duke of Milan's Agent Reports on Florentine Artists.Michelangelo's Letter to Lorenzo de' Pierfrancesco de' Medici from Rome.A Cultural Tourist Describes Some of the Sites in Rome.Netherlandish Networks.Pedro Tafur's Impressions of the Netherlands in the 1430s.Lluis Dalmau is Contracted to make an Altarpiece for the Councillors' Chapel in Barcelona.Ciriaco d'Ancona's Comments on a Deposition Triptych by Rogier van der Weyden.Bartlommeo Facio's Description of the Work of Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden.Marcantonio Michiel Records Netherlandish Paintings in the Homes of Collectors in Venice and Padua in the Early Sixteenth Century.Pietro Summonte Describes to Marcantonio Michiel Works by Van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden in Naples.Tapestries.Statutes of the Tapestry-Makers' Guild in Brussels.The Signoria of Florence Recommends a Weaver from Bruges.A Dispute Between the Painters' Guild and the Tapestry-Makers' Guild.Siena.Ghiberti's Admiration for Early Sienese Art.The Commission for the Reconstructed Altar and Altarpiece for the Cappella dei Signori.Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini and International Politics.Pius II's Canonization of Saint Catherine of Siena.Pius II's Description of his Cathedral in Pienza and its Interior.The Post-Byzantine Renaissance.The Will of the Painter Angelos Akotantos.Ioannes Akotantos Sells the Drawings of his Brother, Angelos Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Loannes Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Andreas Pavias.Andreas Pavias Intervenes to Secure the Return of an Icon Painted by Angelos Akotantos.The Commission from the Venetian Ruler of Nauplio, for a Pala A'altare.On the Making of Anthibola (Imprinted Cartoons).How to Plaster a Wall.Venice.Extract From the Mariegola (rule-book) of the Mercers Company in Venice.Gentile Bellini Undertakes the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Gentile Bellini is sent on a Mission to Constantinople.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Decorate the Grand Council Chamber.Giovanni Bellini is Exempted from Duties in the Painters' Guild.Alvise Vivarini's Petition to Work on the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Extract from Marin Sanudo's Praise of the City of Venice.Extract from The Memoirs of Philippe de Commynes.Extract from Pietro Casola's Account of a Pilgrimage to Jerusalem.The Bellini Brothers are Contracted to Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Gentile Bellini agrees to Continue Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Complete his Brother's Work.Durer's Correspondence on Venice, and on Venetian Art and Artists.From Francesco Sansovino's Dialogue on All the Notable Things which are in Venice.Architectural Treatises.Vitruvius' Ideas on Architecture.Alberti Improves on Vitruvius.Part III: Viewing Renaissance Art.Art, Class and Wealth.Treasures in the Ducal Chapel of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy.The Camera Grande of Doctor Bartolo di Tura.Luxury goods in the Rooms of Lorenzo the Magnificent.Views on Art in Florence.The Florentine Merchant, Giovanni Rucellai, Discusses his Spending.A Coppersmith Describes the Festivities in Florence for St John the Baptist.Fra Girolamo Savonarola warns Florentines against the Dangers of the New type of Painting.The Cloth Merchants' Guild Commission a New Sculpture for the Florentine Baptistery.A Meeting About Where to Place Michelangelo's David.Illuminated Manuscripts.The Manuscripts in the Library of the Duke of Urbino.The Contract between Attavante and a Florentine Merchant for an Illuminated. Manuscript.The Chequered History of the Sforza Hours.The Preface to Sala's Poetry Book.Art and Monarchy in France.The Tomb of Louis XI.Bourdichon: 'Painter to the King'.Jean Robertet's Poem About the Worst Painter in the World.Henri Baude's 'Moral Sayings for Making Tapestries'.Jean Lemaire de Belges.Jean Perreal de Paris: Painter and Poet.Michel Colombe's Contract for a Tomb Project at Brou.The Travel Journal of Antonio de Beatis.The Market in Icons.John of Damascus on Images.The Will of Andreas Cornaros.Three Cretan Painters are Commissioned to Make 700 Icons of the Virgin.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Commission for 10 Triptychs.Vasari's Views on the 'Greek' Style.Art and Death.Leonardo Bruni Condemns the Tomb of the Poet Bartolommeo Aragazzi.John Lydgate's Version of 'The Dance of Death' for the Cloister of St Paul's. Cathedral, London.The Foundation Statutes of the Chantry at Ewelme.The Will of John Baret of Bury St Edmunds.The Choice of Artist for the Monument to Cardinal Niccolo Forteguerri in Pistoia.Cardinal Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini Prepares for his Death.The Wills of the 'Catholic Monarchs', Isabella and Ferdinand.The Reform of Images.Andreas Karlstadt, On the Removal of Images.Extract from Hieromymus Emser's response to Karlstadt.Ulrich Zwingli's Criticisms of Religious Images.Zurich Council Orders the Removal of Images from Churches.Luther States his Own Position on Religious Images.Sir Thomas More Defends the Use of Images.William Tyndale Responds to Sir Thomas More.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
"Renaissance Art Reconsidered" showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement. This is a major new anthology, bringing to life the places, works, media, and issues that define Renaissance art. It is ideal for use on Renaissance studies courses and for reference by students of art history. It moves beyond the borders of Italy to consider European, Mediterranean, and post Byzantine art, widening the traditional focus of Renaissance art. It includes letters, treatises, contracts, inventories, and other public documents, many of which are translated into English for the first time in this volume. It showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement, providing crucial insight into the art and the context in which it was produced.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N6370 .R375 2007 Unknown
Book
xxv, 294 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
Art & Architecture Library
Status of items at Art & Architecture Library
Art & Architecture Library Status
Stacks
N6915 .R69 2005 Unknown

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