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Book
1 online resource (487 p.)
  • Front Matter
  • Bionanomaterials. Synthesis of Colloidal Gold and Silver Nanoparticles and their Properties / Christian Pfeiffer, Wolfgang J Parak, Jose Maria Montenegro
  • Ceramic Smart Drug Delivery Nanomaterials / Alejandro Baeza, María Vallet-Regí
  • Polymersomes and their Biological Implications / Regina Bleul, Michael Maskos
  • MOFs in Pharmaceutical Technology / C Tamames-Tabar, A García-Márquez, M J Blanco-Prieto, C Serre, P Horcajada
  • Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles for Biomedicine / Fernando Novio, Daniel Ruiz-Molina, Julia Lorenzo
  • Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia and Controlled Drug Delivery / Pablo Guardia, Andreas Riedinger, Hamilton Kakwere, Florence Gazeau, Teresa Pellegrino
  • Photothermal Effect of Gold Nanostructures for Application in Bioimaging and Therapy / Loredana Latterini, Luigi Tarpani
  • Nanomaterial-Based Bioimaging Probes / Christian Buchwalder, Katayoun Saatchi, Urs O Häfeli
  • Molecular Bases of Nanotoxicology / Angela Tino, Alfredo Ambrosone, Valentina Marchesano, Claudia Tortiglione
  • Bioinspired Materials : Bioinspired Materials for Technological Application. Bioinspired Interfaces for Self-cleaning Technologies / Victoria Dutschk
  • Catechol-Based Biomimetic Functional Materials and their Applications / Félix Busqué, Josep Sedó, Daniel Ruiz-Molina, Javier Saiz-Poseu
  • Current Approaches to Designing Nanomaterials Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins / Hao Meng, Joseph Gazella, Bruce P Lee
  • Bioinspired Materials : Bioinspired Materials for Biomedical Applications. Functional Gradients in Biological Composites / André R Studart, Rafael Libanori, Randall M Erb
  • Novel Bioinspired Phospholipid Polymer Biomaterials for Nanobioengineering / Kazuhiko Ishihara
  • Bioinspired Functionalized Nanoparticles as Tools for Detection, Quantification and Targeting of Biomolecules / Carlos Lodeiro, Elisabete Oliveira, Cristina Núñez, Hugo M Santos, Javier Fernández-Lodeiro, Jose Luis Capelo
  • Engineering Protein Based Nanoparticles for Applications in Tissue Engineering / Witold I Tatkiewicz, Joaquin Seras-Franzoso, Cesar Díez-Gil, Elena García Fruitós, Esther Vázquez, Imma Ratera, Antoni Villaverde, Jaume Veciana.
A comprehensive overview of nanomaterials that are inspired by or targeted at biology, including some of the latest breakthrough research. Throughout, valuable contributions from top-level scientists illustrate how bionanomaterials could lead to novel devices or structures with unique properties. The first and second part cover the most relevant synthetic and bioinspired nanomaterials, including surfaces with extreme wettability properties, functional materials with improved adhesion or structural and functional systems based on the complex and hierarchical organization of natural composites.
  • Front Matter
  • Bionanomaterials. Synthesis of Colloidal Gold and Silver Nanoparticles and their Properties / Christian Pfeiffer, Wolfgang J Parak, Jose Maria Montenegro
  • Ceramic Smart Drug Delivery Nanomaterials / Alejandro Baeza, María Vallet-Regí
  • Polymersomes and their Biological Implications / Regina Bleul, Michael Maskos
  • MOFs in Pharmaceutical Technology / C Tamames-Tabar, A García-Márquez, M J Blanco-Prieto, C Serre, P Horcajada
  • Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles for Biomedicine / Fernando Novio, Daniel Ruiz-Molina, Julia Lorenzo
  • Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia and Controlled Drug Delivery / Pablo Guardia, Andreas Riedinger, Hamilton Kakwere, Florence Gazeau, Teresa Pellegrino
  • Photothermal Effect of Gold Nanostructures for Application in Bioimaging and Therapy / Loredana Latterini, Luigi Tarpani
  • Nanomaterial-Based Bioimaging Probes / Christian Buchwalder, Katayoun Saatchi, Urs O Häfeli
  • Molecular Bases of Nanotoxicology / Angela Tino, Alfredo Ambrosone, Valentina Marchesano, Claudia Tortiglione
  • Bioinspired Materials : Bioinspired Materials for Technological Application. Bioinspired Interfaces for Self-cleaning Technologies / Victoria Dutschk
  • Catechol-Based Biomimetic Functional Materials and their Applications / Félix Busqué, Josep Sedó, Daniel Ruiz-Molina, Javier Saiz-Poseu
  • Current Approaches to Designing Nanomaterials Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins / Hao Meng, Joseph Gazella, Bruce P Lee
  • Bioinspired Materials : Bioinspired Materials for Biomedical Applications. Functional Gradients in Biological Composites / André R Studart, Rafael Libanori, Randall M Erb
  • Novel Bioinspired Phospholipid Polymer Biomaterials for Nanobioengineering / Kazuhiko Ishihara
  • Bioinspired Functionalized Nanoparticles as Tools for Detection, Quantification and Targeting of Biomolecules / Carlos Lodeiro, Elisabete Oliveira, Cristina Núñez, Hugo M Santos, Javier Fernández-Lodeiro, Jose Luis Capelo
  • Engineering Protein Based Nanoparticles for Applications in Tissue Engineering / Witold I Tatkiewicz, Joaquin Seras-Franzoso, Cesar Díez-Gil, Elena García Fruitós, Esther Vázquez, Imma Ratera, Antoni Villaverde, Jaume Veciana.
A comprehensive overview of nanomaterials that are inspired by or targeted at biology, including some of the latest breakthrough research. Throughout, valuable contributions from top-level scientists illustrate how bionanomaterials could lead to novel devices or structures with unique properties. The first and second part cover the most relevant synthetic and bioinspired nanomaterials, including surfaces with extreme wettability properties, functional materials with improved adhesion or structural and functional systems based on the complex and hierarchical organization of natural composites.
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 353 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Chemistry: The Key to our Sustainable Future is a collection of selected contributed papers by participants of the International Conference on Pure and Applied Chemistry (ICPAC 2012) on the theme of "Chemistry: The Key for our Future" held in Mauritius in July 2012. In light of the significant contribution of chemistry to benefit of mankind, this book is a collection of recent results generated from research in chemistry and interdisciplinary areas. It covers topics ranging from nanotechnology, natural product chemistry to analytical and environmental chemistry. Chemistry: The Key to our Sustainable Future is written for graduates, postgraduates, researchers in industry and academia who have an interest in the fields ranging from fundamental to applied chemistry.
Chemistry: The Key to our Sustainable Future is a collection of selected contributed papers by participants of the International Conference on Pure and Applied Chemistry (ICPAC 2012) on the theme of "Chemistry: The Key for our Future" held in Mauritius in July 2012. In light of the significant contribution of chemistry to benefit of mankind, this book is a collection of recent results generated from research in chemistry and interdisciplinary areas. It covers topics ranging from nanotechnology, natural product chemistry to analytical and environmental chemistry. Chemistry: The Key to our Sustainable Future is written for graduates, postgraduates, researchers in industry and academia who have an interest in the fields ranging from fundamental to applied chemistry.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Introduction
  • Rationale of the study
  • Results and Discussion
  • Interviews with Experimental Group Students
  • Conclusions and Educational Implications
  • References.
  • Introduction
  • Rationale of the study
  • Results and Discussion
  • Interviews with Experimental Group Students
  • Conclusions and Educational Implications
  • References.
Book
1 online resource (2 volumes).
  • Silsesquioxanes.- Penta- and Hexacoordinate Molecular Silanes.- Molecular Silicon Clusters.- Multiple bonds with Silicon.- Silylenes.- Silylenium Cations.- Silyl Anions.- Oligosilanes.- Silicon Pharmaceuticals.- NHC-stabilized low valent silicon compounds.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The series Structure and Bonding publishes critical reviews on topics of research concerned with chemical structure and bonding. The scope of the series spans the entire Periodic Table and addresses structure and bonding issues associated with all of the elements. It also focuses attention on new and developing areas of modern structural and theoretical chemistry such as nanostructures, molecular electronics, designed molecular solids, surfaces, metal clusters and supramolecular structures. Physical and spectroscopic techniques used to determine, examine and model structures fall within the purview of Structure and Bonding to the extent that the focus is on the scientific results obtained and not on specialist information concerning the techniques themselves. Issues associated with the development of bonding models and generalizations that illuminate the reactivity pathways and rates of chemical processes are also relevant. The individual volumes in the series are thematic. The goal of each volume is to give the reader, whether at a university or in industry, a comprehensive overview of an area where new insights are emerging that are of interest to a larger scientific audience. Thus each review within the volume critically surveys one aspect of that topic and places it within the context of the volume as a whole. The most significant developments of the last 5 to 10 years should be presented using selected examples to illustrate the principles discussed. A description of the physical basis of the experimental techniques that have been used to provide the primary data may also be appropriate, if it has not been covered in detail elsewhere. The coverage need not be exhaustive in data, but should rather be conceptual, concentrating on the new principles being developed that will allow the reader, who is not a specialist in the area covered, to understand the data presented. Discussion of possible future research directions in the area is welcomed. Review articles for the individual volumes are invited by the volume editors. Readership: research scientists at universities or in industry, graduate students Special offer For all customers who have a standing order to the print version of Structure and Bonding, we offer free access to the electronic volumes of the Series published in the current year via SpringerLink.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Silsesquioxanes.- Penta- and Hexacoordinate Molecular Silanes.- Molecular Silicon Clusters.- Multiple bonds with Silicon.- Silylenes.- Silylenium Cations.- Silyl Anions.- Oligosilanes.- Silicon Pharmaceuticals.- NHC-stabilized low valent silicon compounds.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The series Structure and Bonding publishes critical reviews on topics of research concerned with chemical structure and bonding. The scope of the series spans the entire Periodic Table and addresses structure and bonding issues associated with all of the elements. It also focuses attention on new and developing areas of modern structural and theoretical chemistry such as nanostructures, molecular electronics, designed molecular solids, surfaces, metal clusters and supramolecular structures. Physical and spectroscopic techniques used to determine, examine and model structures fall within the purview of Structure and Bonding to the extent that the focus is on the scientific results obtained and not on specialist information concerning the techniques themselves. Issues associated with the development of bonding models and generalizations that illuminate the reactivity pathways and rates of chemical processes are also relevant. The individual volumes in the series are thematic. The goal of each volume is to give the reader, whether at a university or in industry, a comprehensive overview of an area where new insights are emerging that are of interest to a larger scientific audience. Thus each review within the volume critically surveys one aspect of that topic and places it within the context of the volume as a whole. The most significant developments of the last 5 to 10 years should be presented using selected examples to illustrate the principles discussed. A description of the physical basis of the experimental techniques that have been used to provide the primary data may also be appropriate, if it has not been covered in detail elsewhere. The coverage need not be exhaustive in data, but should rather be conceptual, concentrating on the new principles being developed that will allow the reader, who is not a specialist in the area covered, to understand the data presented. Discussion of possible future research directions in the area is welcomed. Review articles for the individual volumes are invited by the volume editors. Readership: research scientists at universities or in industry, graduate students Special offer For all customers who have a standing order to the print version of Structure and Bonding, we offer free access to the electronic volumes of the Series published in the current year via SpringerLink.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (ix, 282 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • A historical introduction
  • Theoretical studies on gold clusters and nanoparticles
  • Gold Nanoclusters: Size-Controlled Synthesis and Crystal Structures
  • Progress in the Synthesis and Characterization of Gold Nanoclusters
  • Structural aspects of phosphine-coordinated ultrasmall gold clusters: the next generation
  • Structure & Bonding in the Metal-Rich Gold-Thiolate Cluster Compounds
  • Gold nano-alloys
  • Model catalysts based on Au clusters and nano particles
  • Gold clusters in the gas phase
  • Gas phase formation, structure and reactivity of gold cluster ions.
The series Structure and Bonding publishes critical reviews on topics of research concerned with chemical structure and bonding. The scope of the series spans the entire Periodic Table and addresses structure and bonding issues associated with all of the elements. It also focuses attention on new and developing areas of modern structural and theoretical chemistry such as nanostructures, molecular electronics, designed molecular solids, surfaces, metal clusters and supramolecular structures. Physical and spectroscopic techniques used to determine, examine and model structures fall within the purview of Structure and Bonding to the extent that the focus is on the scientific results obtained and not on specialist information concerning the techniques themselves. Issues associated with the development of bonding models and generalizations that illuminate the reactivity pathways and rates of chemical processes are also relevant. The individual volumes in the series are thematic. The goal of each volume is to give the reader, whether at a university or in industry, a comprehensive overview of an area where new insights are emerging that are of interest to a larger scientific audience. Thus each review within the volume critically surveys one aspect of that topic and places it within the context of the volume as a whole. The most significant developments of the last 5 to 10 years should be presented using selected examples to illustrate the principles discussed. A description of the physical basis of the experimental techniques that have been used to provide the primary data may also be appropriate, if it has not been covered in detail elsewhere. The coverage need not be exhaustive in data, but should rather be conceptual, concentrating on the new principles being developed that will allow the reader, who is not a specialist in the area covered, to understand the data presented. Discussion of possible future research directions in the area is welcomed. Review articles for the individual volumes are invited by the volume editors. Readership: research scientists at universities or in industry, graduate students Special offer For all customers who have a standing order to the print version of Structure and Bonding, we offer free access to the electronic volumes of the Series published in the current year via SpringerLink.
  • A historical introduction
  • Theoretical studies on gold clusters and nanoparticles
  • Gold Nanoclusters: Size-Controlled Synthesis and Crystal Structures
  • Progress in the Synthesis and Characterization of Gold Nanoclusters
  • Structural aspects of phosphine-coordinated ultrasmall gold clusters: the next generation
  • Structure & Bonding in the Metal-Rich Gold-Thiolate Cluster Compounds
  • Gold nano-alloys
  • Model catalysts based on Au clusters and nano particles
  • Gold clusters in the gas phase
  • Gas phase formation, structure and reactivity of gold cluster ions.
The series Structure and Bonding publishes critical reviews on topics of research concerned with chemical structure and bonding. The scope of the series spans the entire Periodic Table and addresses structure and bonding issues associated with all of the elements. It also focuses attention on new and developing areas of modern structural and theoretical chemistry such as nanostructures, molecular electronics, designed molecular solids, surfaces, metal clusters and supramolecular structures. Physical and spectroscopic techniques used to determine, examine and model structures fall within the purview of Structure and Bonding to the extent that the focus is on the scientific results obtained and not on specialist information concerning the techniques themselves. Issues associated with the development of bonding models and generalizations that illuminate the reactivity pathways and rates of chemical processes are also relevant. The individual volumes in the series are thematic. The goal of each volume is to give the reader, whether at a university or in industry, a comprehensive overview of an area where new insights are emerging that are of interest to a larger scientific audience. Thus each review within the volume critically surveys one aspect of that topic and places it within the context of the volume as a whole. The most significant developments of the last 5 to 10 years should be presented using selected examples to illustrate the principles discussed. A description of the physical basis of the experimental techniques that have been used to provide the primary data may also be appropriate, if it has not been covered in detail elsewhere. The coverage need not be exhaustive in data, but should rather be conceptual, concentrating on the new principles being developed that will allow the reader, who is not a specialist in the area covered, to understand the data presented. Discussion of possible future research directions in the area is welcomed. Review articles for the individual volumes are invited by the volume editors. Readership: research scientists at universities or in industry, graduate students Special offer For all customers who have a standing order to the print version of Structure and Bonding, we offer free access to the electronic volumes of the Series published in the current year via SpringerLink.
Book
1 online resource (ix, 233 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Structural and Bonding Issues in Clusters and Nano-clusters
  • Gold nano-alloys
  • Model catalysts based on Au clusters and nano particles
  • Gas phase formation, structure and reactivity of gold cluster ions.
The series Structure and Bonding publishes critical reviews on topics of research concerned with chemical structure and bonding. The scope of the series spans the entire Periodic Table and addresses structure and bonding issues associated with all of the elements. It also focuses attention on new and developing areas of modern structural and theoretical chemistry such as nanostructures, molecular electronics, designed molecular solids, surfaces, metal clusters and supramolecular structures. Physical and spectroscopic techniques used to determine, examine and model structures fall within the purview of Structure and Bonding to the extent that the focus is on the scientific results obtained and not on specialist information concerning the techniques themselves. Issues associated with the development of bonding models and generalizations that illuminate the reactivity pathways and rates of chemical processes are also relevant. The individual volumes in the series are thematic. The goal of each volume is to give the reader, whether at a university or in industry, a comprehensive overview of an area where new insights are emerging that are of interest to a larger scientific audience. Thus each review within the volume critically surveys one aspect of that topic and places it within the context of the volume as a whole. The most significant developments of the last 5 to 10 years should be presented using selected examples to illustrate the principles discussed. A description of the physical basis of the experimental techniques that have been used to provide the primary data may also be appropriate, if it has not been covered in detail elsewhere. The coverage need not be exhaustive in data, but should rather be conceptual, concentrating on the new principles being developed that will allow the reader, who is not a specialist in the area covered, to understand the data presented. Discussion of possible future research directions in the area is welcomed. Review articles for the individual volumes are invited by the volume editors. Readership: research scientists at universities or in industry, graduate students Special offer For all customers who have a standing order to the print version of Structure and Bonding, we offer free access to the electronic volumes of the Series published in the current year via SpringerLink.com.
  • Structural and Bonding Issues in Clusters and Nano-clusters
  • Gold nano-alloys
  • Model catalysts based on Au clusters and nano particles
  • Gas phase formation, structure and reactivity of gold cluster ions.
The series Structure and Bonding publishes critical reviews on topics of research concerned with chemical structure and bonding. The scope of the series spans the entire Periodic Table and addresses structure and bonding issues associated with all of the elements. It also focuses attention on new and developing areas of modern structural and theoretical chemistry such as nanostructures, molecular electronics, designed molecular solids, surfaces, metal clusters and supramolecular structures. Physical and spectroscopic techniques used to determine, examine and model structures fall within the purview of Structure and Bonding to the extent that the focus is on the scientific results obtained and not on specialist information concerning the techniques themselves. Issues associated with the development of bonding models and generalizations that illuminate the reactivity pathways and rates of chemical processes are also relevant. The individual volumes in the series are thematic. The goal of each volume is to give the reader, whether at a university or in industry, a comprehensive overview of an area where new insights are emerging that are of interest to a larger scientific audience. Thus each review within the volume critically surveys one aspect of that topic and places it within the context of the volume as a whole. The most significant developments of the last 5 to 10 years should be presented using selected examples to illustrate the principles discussed. A description of the physical basis of the experimental techniques that have been used to provide the primary data may also be appropriate, if it has not been covered in detail elsewhere. The coverage need not be exhaustive in data, but should rather be conceptual, concentrating on the new principles being developed that will allow the reader, who is not a specialist in the area covered, to understand the data presented. Discussion of possible future research directions in the area is welcomed. Review articles for the individual volumes are invited by the volume editors. Readership: research scientists at universities or in industry, graduate students Special offer For all customers who have a standing order to the print version of Structure and Bonding, we offer free access to the electronic volumes of the Series published in the current year via SpringerLink.com.
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 213 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Principles of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis
  • Kinetic Concepts of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis
  • Mechanistic Principles of Photocatalytic reaction
  • Origin of the Activity of Semiconductor Photocatalysts
  • Perspectives and Advances in Photocatalysis
  • Photocatalytic Routes to Organic Compounds.
This book underscores the essential principles of photocatalysis and provides an update on its scientific foundations, research advances, and current opinions, and interpretations. It consists of an introduction to the concepts that form the backbone of photocatalysis, from the principles of solid-state chemistry and physics to the role of reactive oxidizing species. Having recognised the organic link with chemical kinetics, part of the book describes kinetic concepts as they apply to photocatalysis. The dependence of rate on the reaction conditions and parameters is detailed, the retrospective and prospective aspects of the mechanism of photocatalysis are highlighted, and the adsorption models, photocatalytic rate expressions, and kinetic disguises are examined. This book also discusses the structure, property, and activity relationship of prototypical semiconductor photocatalysts and reviews how to extend their spectral absorption to the visible region to enable the effective use of visible solar spectrum. Lastly, it presents strategies for deriving substantially improved photoactivity from semiconductor materials to support the latest applications and potential trends.
  • Principles of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis
  • Kinetic Concepts of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis
  • Mechanistic Principles of Photocatalytic reaction
  • Origin of the Activity of Semiconductor Photocatalysts
  • Perspectives and Advances in Photocatalysis
  • Photocatalytic Routes to Organic Compounds.
This book underscores the essential principles of photocatalysis and provides an update on its scientific foundations, research advances, and current opinions, and interpretations. It consists of an introduction to the concepts that form the backbone of photocatalysis, from the principles of solid-state chemistry and physics to the role of reactive oxidizing species. Having recognised the organic link with chemical kinetics, part of the book describes kinetic concepts as they apply to photocatalysis. The dependence of rate on the reaction conditions and parameters is detailed, the retrospective and prospective aspects of the mechanism of photocatalysis are highlighted, and the adsorption models, photocatalytic rate expressions, and kinetic disguises are examined. This book also discusses the structure, property, and activity relationship of prototypical semiconductor photocatalysts and reviews how to extend their spectral absorption to the visible region to enable the effective use of visible solar spectrum. Lastly, it presents strategies for deriving substantially improved photoactivity from semiconductor materials to support the latest applications and potential trends.
Book
1 online resource.
  • General Introduction.- Luminescence Properties of Thermostable Lanthanide Coordination Polymers with Intermolecular Interactions.- Chameleon Luminophore for a Wide Range Temperature-Sensor Composed of Lanthanide Coordination Polymers.- Characteristic Structures and Photophysical Properties of Nona-coordinated Eu(III) Complexes with Tridentate Phosphine Oxides.- Photophysical Properties of Lanthanide Complexes with Asymmetric Dodecahedron Structures.- Solvent-dependent Luminescence of Octa-coordinated Eu(III) Complexes.- Summary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This thesis deals with strongly luminescent lanthanide complexes having novel coordination structures. Luminescent lanthanide complexes are promising candidates as active materials for EL devices, lasers, and bio-sensing applications. The organic ligands in lanthanide complexes control geometrical and vibrational frequency structures that are closely related to the luminescent properties. In most of the previous work, however, lanthanide complexes have high-vibrational frequency C-H units close to the metal center for radiationless transition. In this thesis, the luminescent properties of lanthanide complexes with low-vibrational frequency C-F and P=O units are elucidated in terms of geometrical, vibrational, and chemical structures. The author also describes lanthanide coordination polymers with both high thermal stability (decomposition point > 300 C) and strong-luminescent properties (emission quantum yield > 80%). The author believes that novel studies on the characteristic structures and photophysical properties of lanthanide complexes may open up a frontier field in photophysical, coordination and material chemistry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • General Introduction.- Luminescence Properties of Thermostable Lanthanide Coordination Polymers with Intermolecular Interactions.- Chameleon Luminophore for a Wide Range Temperature-Sensor Composed of Lanthanide Coordination Polymers.- Characteristic Structures and Photophysical Properties of Nona-coordinated Eu(III) Complexes with Tridentate Phosphine Oxides.- Photophysical Properties of Lanthanide Complexes with Asymmetric Dodecahedron Structures.- Solvent-dependent Luminescence of Octa-coordinated Eu(III) Complexes.- Summary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This thesis deals with strongly luminescent lanthanide complexes having novel coordination structures. Luminescent lanthanide complexes are promising candidates as active materials for EL devices, lasers, and bio-sensing applications. The organic ligands in lanthanide complexes control geometrical and vibrational frequency structures that are closely related to the luminescent properties. In most of the previous work, however, lanthanide complexes have high-vibrational frequency C-H units close to the metal center for radiationless transition. In this thesis, the luminescent properties of lanthanide complexes with low-vibrational frequency C-F and P=O units are elucidated in terms of geometrical, vibrational, and chemical structures. The author also describes lanthanide coordination polymers with both high thermal stability (decomposition point > 300 C) and strong-luminescent properties (emission quantum yield > 80%). The author believes that novel studies on the characteristic structures and photophysical properties of lanthanide complexes may open up a frontier field in photophysical, coordination and material chemistry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface ix 1 Introduction and General Overview of Polyvalent IodineCompounds 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Classification and Nomenclature of Polyvalent IodineCompounds 3 1.3 Hypervalent Bonding 4 1.4 General Structural Features 8 1.4.1 Experimental Structural Studies 9 1.4.2 Computational Studies 11 1.5 General Principles of Reactivity 12 1.5.1 Ligand Exchange and Reductive Elimination 13 1.5.2 Radical Reactions 14 1.5.3 Single-Electron Transfer (SET) Reactions 15 References 15 2 Preparation, Structure, and Properties of Polyvalent IodineCompounds 21 2.1 Iodine(III) Compounds 21 2.1.1 Inorganic Iodine(III) Derivatives 21 2.1.2 Organoiodine(III) Fluorides 23 2.1.3 Organoiodine(III) Chlorides 27 2.1.4 Organo-Iodosyl Compounds 31 2.1.5 Organoiodine(III) Carboxylates 35 2.1.6 [Hydroxy(Organosulfonyloxy)Iodo]Arenes 43 2.1.7 Organoiodine(III) Derivatives of Strong Acids 48 2.1.8 Iodine(III) Heterocycles 50 2.1.9 Iodonium Salts 76 2.1.10 Iodonium Ylides 99 2.1.11 Iodine(III) Species with Three Carbon Ligands 107 2.1.12 Iodine(III) Species with I N Bonds 107 2.2 Iodine(V) Compounds 114 2.2.1 Inorganic Iodine(V) Derivatives 114 2.2.2 Noncyclic and Pseudocyclic Iodylarenes 115 2.2.3 Iodine(V) Heterocycles 120 2.2.4 Organoiodine(V) Fluorides 126 2.3 Iodine(VII) Compounds 127 References 128 3 Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Organic Synthesis145 3.1 Reactions of Iodine(III) Compounds 145 3.1.1 Fluorinations 146 3.1.2 Chlorinations 152 3.1.3 Brominations 158 3.1.4 Iodinations 160 3.1.5 Oxidation of Alcohols 164 3.1.6 Oxidative Functionalization of Carbonyl Compounds 168 3.1.7 Oxidative Functionalization of Silyl Enol Ethers 171 3.1.8 Oxidation of Alkenes and Alkynes 173 3.1.9 Oxidations at the Benzylic or Allylic Position 181 3.1.10 Oxidative Functionalization of Aromatic Compounds 182 3.1.11 Oxidative Dearomatization of Phenols and RelatedSubstrates 183 3.1.12 Oxidative Coupling of Aromatic Substrates 196 3.1.13 Oxidative Cationic Cyclizations, Rearrangements, andFragmentations 201 3.1.14 Oxidations at Nitrogen, Sulfur, and other Heteroatoms216 3.1.15 Azidations 222 3.1.16 Aminations 230 3.1.17 Thiocyanations and Arylselenations 232 3.1.18 Radical Fragmentations, Rearrangements, and Cyclizations236 3.1.19 Reactions via Alkyliodine(III) Intermediates 248 3.1.20 Transition Metal Catalyzed Oxidations 250 3.1.21 Transition Metal Catalyzed Aziridinations and Amidations253 3.1.22 Reactions of Iodonium Salts and C-SubstitutedBenziodoxoles 260 3.1.23 Reactions of Iodonium Ylides 278 3.2 Synthetic Applications of Iodine(V) Compounds 282 3.2.1 Noncyclic and Pseudocyclic Iodylarenes 283 3.2.2 2-Iodoxybenzoic Acid (IBX) 288 3.2.3 Dess Martin Periodinane (DMP) 296 3.2.4 Inorganic Iodine(V) Reagents 302 3.3 Synthetic Applications of Iodine(VII) Compounds 303 References 307 4 Hypervalent Iodine Catalysis 337 4.1 Catalytic Cycles Based on Iodine(III) Species 337 4.1.1 Oxidative Functionalization of Carbonyl Compounds 338 4.1.2 Oxidative Functionalization of Alkenes and Alkynes 342 4.1.3 Oxidative Bromination of Aromatic Compounds 346 4.1.4 Oxidative Amination of Aromatic Compounds 347 4.1.5 Oxidation of Phenolic Substrates to Quinones and Quinols349 4.1.6 Oxidative Spirocyclization of Aromatic Substrates 350 4.1.7 Carbon Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions 354 4.1.8 Hofmann Rearrangement of Carboxamides 355 4.1.9 Oxidation of Anilines 357 4.2 Catalytic Cycles Based on Iodine(V) Species 358 4.3 Tandem Catalytic Systems Involving Hypervalent Iodine andother Co-catalysts 364 4.4 Catalytic Cycles Involving Iodide Anion or Elemental Iodineas Pre-catalysts 368 References 377 5 Recyclable Hypervalent Iodine Reagents 381 5.1 Polymer-Supported Iodine(III) Reagents 381 5.2 Polymer-Supported Iodine(V) Reagents 389 5.3 Recyclable Nonpolymeric Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents391 5.3.1 Recyclable Iodine(III) Reagents with Insoluble ReducedForm 393 5.3.2 Recovery of the Reduced Form of a Hypervalent IodineReagent Using Ion-Exchange Resins 397 5.3.3 Ionic-Liquid-Supported Recyclable Hypervalent Iodine(III)Reagents 400 5.3.4 Magnetic Nanoparticle-Supported Recyclable HypervalentIodine(III) Reagent 401 5.3.5 Fluorous Recyclable Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents402 5.4 Recyclable Nonpolymeric Hypervalent Iodine(V) Reagents405 5.5 Recyclable Iodine Catalytic Systems 406 References 409 6 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Green Solventsand under Solvent-Free Conditions 413 6.1 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Water 413 6.2 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in RecyclableOrganic Solvents 418 6.3 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents under Solvent-FreeConditions 420 References 422 7 Practical Applications of Polyvalent Iodine Compounds425 7.1 Applications of Inorganic Polyvalent Iodine Derivatives425 7.2 Applications of Hypervalent Iodine(III) Compounds asPolymerization Initiators 426 7.3 Application of Iodonium Salts for Fluoridation in PositronEmission Tomography (PET) 431 7.4 Biological Activity of Polyvalent Iodine Compounds 440 References 443 Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hypervalent Iodine Chemistry is the first comprehensivetext covering all of the main aspects of the chemistry of organicand inorganic polyvalent iodine compounds, including applicationsin chemical research, medicine, and industry. Providing a comprehensive overview of the preparation, properties, and synthetic applications of this important class ofreagents, the text is presented in the following way: * The introductory chapter provides a historicalbackground and describes the general classification ofiodine compounds, nomenclature, hypervalent bonding, structuralfeatures, and the principles of reactivity of polyvalent iodinecompounds. * Chapter 2 gives a detailed description of thepreparative methods and structural features of all knownclasses of organic and inorganic derivatives of polyvalentiodine. * Chapter 3, the key chapter of the book, deals with themany applications of hypervalent iodine reagents in organicsynthesis. * Chapter 4 describes the most recent achievementsin hypervalent iodine catalysis. * Chapter 5 deals with recyclable polymer-supportedand nonpolymeric hypervalent iodine reagents. * Chapter 6 covers the "green" reactions ofhypervalent iodine reagents under solvent-free conditions or inaqueous solutions. * The final chapter provides an overview of the importantpractical applications of polyvalent iodine compounds inmedicine and industry. This book is aimed at all chemists interested in iodinecompounds, including academic and industrial researchers ininorganic, organic, physical, medicinal, and biological chemistry.It will be particularly useful to synthetic organic and inorganicchemists, including graduate and advanced undergraduate students.It comprehensively covers the green chemistry aspects ofhypervalent iodine chemistry, making it especially useful forindustrial chemists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface ix 1 Introduction and General Overview of Polyvalent IodineCompounds 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Classification and Nomenclature of Polyvalent IodineCompounds 3 1.3 Hypervalent Bonding 4 1.4 General Structural Features 8 1.4.1 Experimental Structural Studies 9 1.4.2 Computational Studies 11 1.5 General Principles of Reactivity 12 1.5.1 Ligand Exchange and Reductive Elimination 13 1.5.2 Radical Reactions 14 1.5.3 Single-Electron Transfer (SET) Reactions 15 References 15 2 Preparation, Structure, and Properties of Polyvalent IodineCompounds 21 2.1 Iodine(III) Compounds 21 2.1.1 Inorganic Iodine(III) Derivatives 21 2.1.2 Organoiodine(III) Fluorides 23 2.1.3 Organoiodine(III) Chlorides 27 2.1.4 Organo-Iodosyl Compounds 31 2.1.5 Organoiodine(III) Carboxylates 35 2.1.6 [Hydroxy(Organosulfonyloxy)Iodo]Arenes 43 2.1.7 Organoiodine(III) Derivatives of Strong Acids 48 2.1.8 Iodine(III) Heterocycles 50 2.1.9 Iodonium Salts 76 2.1.10 Iodonium Ylides 99 2.1.11 Iodine(III) Species with Three Carbon Ligands 107 2.1.12 Iodine(III) Species with I N Bonds 107 2.2 Iodine(V) Compounds 114 2.2.1 Inorganic Iodine(V) Derivatives 114 2.2.2 Noncyclic and Pseudocyclic Iodylarenes 115 2.2.3 Iodine(V) Heterocycles 120 2.2.4 Organoiodine(V) Fluorides 126 2.3 Iodine(VII) Compounds 127 References 128 3 Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Organic Synthesis145 3.1 Reactions of Iodine(III) Compounds 145 3.1.1 Fluorinations 146 3.1.2 Chlorinations 152 3.1.3 Brominations 158 3.1.4 Iodinations 160 3.1.5 Oxidation of Alcohols 164 3.1.6 Oxidative Functionalization of Carbonyl Compounds 168 3.1.7 Oxidative Functionalization of Silyl Enol Ethers 171 3.1.8 Oxidation of Alkenes and Alkynes 173 3.1.9 Oxidations at the Benzylic or Allylic Position 181 3.1.10 Oxidative Functionalization of Aromatic Compounds 182 3.1.11 Oxidative Dearomatization of Phenols and RelatedSubstrates 183 3.1.12 Oxidative Coupling of Aromatic Substrates 196 3.1.13 Oxidative Cationic Cyclizations, Rearrangements, andFragmentations 201 3.1.14 Oxidations at Nitrogen, Sulfur, and other Heteroatoms216 3.1.15 Azidations 222 3.1.16 Aminations 230 3.1.17 Thiocyanations and Arylselenations 232 3.1.18 Radical Fragmentations, Rearrangements, and Cyclizations236 3.1.19 Reactions via Alkyliodine(III) Intermediates 248 3.1.20 Transition Metal Catalyzed Oxidations 250 3.1.21 Transition Metal Catalyzed Aziridinations and Amidations253 3.1.22 Reactions of Iodonium Salts and C-SubstitutedBenziodoxoles 260 3.1.23 Reactions of Iodonium Ylides 278 3.2 Synthetic Applications of Iodine(V) Compounds 282 3.2.1 Noncyclic and Pseudocyclic Iodylarenes 283 3.2.2 2-Iodoxybenzoic Acid (IBX) 288 3.2.3 Dess Martin Periodinane (DMP) 296 3.2.4 Inorganic Iodine(V) Reagents 302 3.3 Synthetic Applications of Iodine(VII) Compounds 303 References 307 4 Hypervalent Iodine Catalysis 337 4.1 Catalytic Cycles Based on Iodine(III) Species 337 4.1.1 Oxidative Functionalization of Carbonyl Compounds 338 4.1.2 Oxidative Functionalization of Alkenes and Alkynes 342 4.1.3 Oxidative Bromination of Aromatic Compounds 346 4.1.4 Oxidative Amination of Aromatic Compounds 347 4.1.5 Oxidation of Phenolic Substrates to Quinones and Quinols349 4.1.6 Oxidative Spirocyclization of Aromatic Substrates 350 4.1.7 Carbon Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions 354 4.1.8 Hofmann Rearrangement of Carboxamides 355 4.1.9 Oxidation of Anilines 357 4.2 Catalytic Cycles Based on Iodine(V) Species 358 4.3 Tandem Catalytic Systems Involving Hypervalent Iodine andother Co-catalysts 364 4.4 Catalytic Cycles Involving Iodide Anion or Elemental Iodineas Pre-catalysts 368 References 377 5 Recyclable Hypervalent Iodine Reagents 381 5.1 Polymer-Supported Iodine(III) Reagents 381 5.2 Polymer-Supported Iodine(V) Reagents 389 5.3 Recyclable Nonpolymeric Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents391 5.3.1 Recyclable Iodine(III) Reagents with Insoluble ReducedForm 393 5.3.2 Recovery of the Reduced Form of a Hypervalent IodineReagent Using Ion-Exchange Resins 397 5.3.3 Ionic-Liquid-Supported Recyclable Hypervalent Iodine(III)Reagents 400 5.3.4 Magnetic Nanoparticle-Supported Recyclable HypervalentIodine(III) Reagent 401 5.3.5 Fluorous Recyclable Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents402 5.4 Recyclable Nonpolymeric Hypervalent Iodine(V) Reagents405 5.5 Recyclable Iodine Catalytic Systems 406 References 409 6 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Green Solventsand under Solvent-Free Conditions 413 6.1 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Water 413 6.2 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in RecyclableOrganic Solvents 418 6.3 Reactions of Hypervalent Iodine Reagents under Solvent-FreeConditions 420 References 422 7 Practical Applications of Polyvalent Iodine Compounds425 7.1 Applications of Inorganic Polyvalent Iodine Derivatives425 7.2 Applications of Hypervalent Iodine(III) Compounds asPolymerization Initiators 426 7.3 Application of Iodonium Salts for Fluoridation in PositronEmission Tomography (PET) 431 7.4 Biological Activity of Polyvalent Iodine Compounds 440 References 443 Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hypervalent Iodine Chemistry is the first comprehensivetext covering all of the main aspects of the chemistry of organicand inorganic polyvalent iodine compounds, including applicationsin chemical research, medicine, and industry. Providing a comprehensive overview of the preparation, properties, and synthetic applications of this important class ofreagents, the text is presented in the following way: * The introductory chapter provides a historicalbackground and describes the general classification ofiodine compounds, nomenclature, hypervalent bonding, structuralfeatures, and the principles of reactivity of polyvalent iodinecompounds. * Chapter 2 gives a detailed description of thepreparative methods and structural features of all knownclasses of organic and inorganic derivatives of polyvalentiodine. * Chapter 3, the key chapter of the book, deals with themany applications of hypervalent iodine reagents in organicsynthesis. * Chapter 4 describes the most recent achievementsin hypervalent iodine catalysis. * Chapter 5 deals with recyclable polymer-supportedand nonpolymeric hypervalent iodine reagents. * Chapter 6 covers the "green" reactions ofhypervalent iodine reagents under solvent-free conditions or inaqueous solutions. * The final chapter provides an overview of the importantpractical applications of polyvalent iodine compounds inmedicine and industry. This book is aimed at all chemists interested in iodinecompounds, including academic and industrial researchers ininorganic, organic, physical, medicinal, and biological chemistry.It will be particularly useful to synthetic organic and inorganicchemists, including graduate and advanced undergraduate students.It comprehensively covers the green chemistry aspects ofhypervalent iodine chemistry, making it especially useful forindustrial chemists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xxi, 409 pages)
  • New applications of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography in chemical biology / Rachel Codd, Jiesi Gu, Najwa Ejje, Tulip Lifa
  • Metal complexes as tools for structural biology / Michael D. Lee, Bim Graham and James D. Swarbrick
  • AAS, XRF and MS methods in chemical biology of metal complexes / Ingo Ott, Christophe Biot and Christian Hartinger
  • Metal complexes for cell and organism imaging / Kenneth Yin Zhang and Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo
  • Cellular imaging with metal carbonyl complexes / Luca Quaroni and Fabio Zobi
  • Probing DNA using metal complexes / Lionel Marclis, Willem Vanderlinden, Andre Kirsch De Mesmaeker
  • Visualization of proteins and cells using dithiol-reactive metal complexes / Danielle Park, Ivan Ho Shon, Minh Hua, Vivien M. Chen, Philip J. Hogg
  • Detection of metal ions, anions and small molecules using metal complexes / Qin Wang and Katherine J. Franz
  • Photo-release of metal ions in living cells / Celina Gwizdala and Shawn C. Burdette
  • Release of bioactive molecules using metal complexes / Peter Simpson and Ulrich Schatzschneider
  • Metal complexes as enzyme inhibitors and catalysts in living cells / Julien Furrer, Gregory S. Smith and Bruno Therrien
  • Other applications of metal complexes in chemical biology / Tanmaya Joshi, Malay Patra and Gilles Gasser.
Understanding, identifying and influencing the biological systems are the primary objectives of chemical biology. From this perspective, metal complexes have always been of great assistance to chemical biologists, for example, in structural identification and purification of essential biomolecules, for visualizing cellular organelles or to inhibit specific enzymes. This inorganic side of chemical biology, which continues to receive considerable attention, is referred to as inorganic chemical biology.
  • New applications of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography in chemical biology / Rachel Codd, Jiesi Gu, Najwa Ejje, Tulip Lifa
  • Metal complexes as tools for structural biology / Michael D. Lee, Bim Graham and James D. Swarbrick
  • AAS, XRF and MS methods in chemical biology of metal complexes / Ingo Ott, Christophe Biot and Christian Hartinger
  • Metal complexes for cell and organism imaging / Kenneth Yin Zhang and Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo
  • Cellular imaging with metal carbonyl complexes / Luca Quaroni and Fabio Zobi
  • Probing DNA using metal complexes / Lionel Marclis, Willem Vanderlinden, Andre Kirsch De Mesmaeker
  • Visualization of proteins and cells using dithiol-reactive metal complexes / Danielle Park, Ivan Ho Shon, Minh Hua, Vivien M. Chen, Philip J. Hogg
  • Detection of metal ions, anions and small molecules using metal complexes / Qin Wang and Katherine J. Franz
  • Photo-release of metal ions in living cells / Celina Gwizdala and Shawn C. Burdette
  • Release of bioactive molecules using metal complexes / Peter Simpson and Ulrich Schatzschneider
  • Metal complexes as enzyme inhibitors and catalysts in living cells / Julien Furrer, Gregory S. Smith and Bruno Therrien
  • Other applications of metal complexes in chemical biology / Tanmaya Joshi, Malay Patra and Gilles Gasser.
Understanding, identifying and influencing the biological systems are the primary objectives of chemical biology. From this perspective, metal complexes have always been of great assistance to chemical biologists, for example, in structural identification and purification of essential biomolecules, for visualizing cellular organelles or to inhibit specific enzymes. This inorganic side of chemical biology, which continues to receive considerable attention, is referred to as inorganic chemical biology.
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of Contributors xiii Foreword xv Preface xvii Acknowledgements xxi 1 Hydrazine and Its Inorganic Derivatives 1 Tanu Mimani Rattan and K. C. Patil 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 10 1.3 Characterization of Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 28 1.4 Applications of Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 32 References 33 2 Hydrazine Salts 37 Singanahally T. Aruna and Kashinath C. Patil 2.1 Introduction 37 2.2 Salts of the Monovalent Cation (N2H5+ ) N2H5A 39 2.3 Salts of the Divalent Cation [(N2H5)2 2+ and N2H6 2+] 49 2.4 Salts of Monovalent (N2H5 + ) and Divalent Cations ((N2H5)22+, N2H6 2+) 53 2.5 Hydrazine Salts of Organic Acids 76 2.6 Summary 78 References 80 3 Metal Hydrazines 83 Dasaratharam Gajapathy and Tanu Mimani Rattan 3.1 Introduction 83 3.2 Metal Hydrazines MX(N2H4)n, M=metal, X=SO4, SO3, N3, NCS, NO3, Clo4, RCOO, and so on, (n=1 3) 84 3.3 Reactivity of Metal Salt Hydrazines (from Detonation toDeflagration to Decomposition) 128 3.4 Summary 129 References 129 4 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylates 133 K. C. Patil and Tanu Mimani Rattan 4.1 Introduction 133 4.2 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylates M(N2H3COO)2 134 4.3 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylate Hydrates M(N2H3COO)n?xH2O-- n=2, 3 136 4.4 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylate Hydrazines M(N2H3COO)2?(N2H4)2 152 4.5 Hydrazinium Metal Hydrazine Carboxylate Hydrates N2H5M(N2H3COO)3?H2O 155 4.6 Solid Solutions of Hydrazinium Metal Hydrazine CarboxylateHydrates N2H5M1=3(Co/Fe/ Mn)2=3(N2H3COO)3?H2O 160 4.7 Summary 168 References 168 5 Hydrazinium Metal Complexes 171 S. Govindrajan and Singanahally T. Aruna 5.1 Introduction 171 5.2 Hydrazinium Metal Sulfates 172 5.3 Hydrazinium Metal Oxalates 182 5.4 Hydrazinium Metal Halides 195 5.5 Hydrazinium Metal Thiocyanates (N2H5)2M(NCS)4?2H2O, M= Co and Ni 208 5.6 Recent Studies on Hydrazinium Metal Complexes 214 5.7 Summary 216 References 216 6 Applications of Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 219 K. C. Patil and Tanu Mimani Rattan 6.1 Introduction 219 6.2 Applications of Hydrazine Salts 220 6.3 Energetic Materials 229 6.4 Combustible Metal Hydrazine Complexes 234 6.5 Miscellaneous Applications 245 References 249 Index 253.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Traditionally, interest in the chemistry of hydrazine and its derivatives has been focused on the development of propellants and explosives, but in recent years a wide variety of new applications have emerged in fields such as polymers, pharmaceuticals, water treatment, agriculture and medicine. Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives: Synthesis, Properties and Applications presents a comprehensive review of the research carried out in this field during the last four decades. Methods for synthesizing inorganic hydrazine derivatives and complexes are systematically presented, together with details of their characterization, spectra, thermal analysis, crystal structure, and applications. Strong emphasis is given to controlling the reactivity of hydrazine derivatives from detonation to deflagration to decomposition. The monograph also highlights current developments and applications of inorganic hydrazine derivatives, including the synthesis of nanostructured materials. Topics covered include: an introduction to hydrazine and its inorganic derivatives; Hydrazine salts; Metal hydrazines; Metal hydrazine carboxylates; Hydrazinium metal complexes; and Applications of inorganic hydrazine derivatives. This applications-based handbook is a valuable resource for academics and industry professionals researching and developing hydrazine compounds, high energy materials, nanomaterials, and pharmaceuticals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Contributors xiii Foreword xv Preface xvii Acknowledgements xxi 1 Hydrazine and Its Inorganic Derivatives 1 Tanu Mimani Rattan and K. C. Patil 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 10 1.3 Characterization of Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 28 1.4 Applications of Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 32 References 33 2 Hydrazine Salts 37 Singanahally T. Aruna and Kashinath C. Patil 2.1 Introduction 37 2.2 Salts of the Monovalent Cation (N2H5+ ) N2H5A 39 2.3 Salts of the Divalent Cation [(N2H5)2 2+ and N2H6 2+] 49 2.4 Salts of Monovalent (N2H5 + ) and Divalent Cations ((N2H5)22+, N2H6 2+) 53 2.5 Hydrazine Salts of Organic Acids 76 2.6 Summary 78 References 80 3 Metal Hydrazines 83 Dasaratharam Gajapathy and Tanu Mimani Rattan 3.1 Introduction 83 3.2 Metal Hydrazines MX(N2H4)n, M=metal, X=SO4, SO3, N3, NCS, NO3, Clo4, RCOO, and so on, (n=1 3) 84 3.3 Reactivity of Metal Salt Hydrazines (from Detonation toDeflagration to Decomposition) 128 3.4 Summary 129 References 129 4 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylates 133 K. C. Patil and Tanu Mimani Rattan 4.1 Introduction 133 4.2 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylates M(N2H3COO)2 134 4.3 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylate Hydrates M(N2H3COO)n?xH2O-- n=2, 3 136 4.4 Metal Hydrazine Carboxylate Hydrazines M(N2H3COO)2?(N2H4)2 152 4.5 Hydrazinium Metal Hydrazine Carboxylate Hydrates N2H5M(N2H3COO)3?H2O 155 4.6 Solid Solutions of Hydrazinium Metal Hydrazine CarboxylateHydrates N2H5M1=3(Co/Fe/ Mn)2=3(N2H3COO)3?H2O 160 4.7 Summary 168 References 168 5 Hydrazinium Metal Complexes 171 S. Govindrajan and Singanahally T. Aruna 5.1 Introduction 171 5.2 Hydrazinium Metal Sulfates 172 5.3 Hydrazinium Metal Oxalates 182 5.4 Hydrazinium Metal Halides 195 5.5 Hydrazinium Metal Thiocyanates (N2H5)2M(NCS)4?2H2O, M= Co and Ni 208 5.6 Recent Studies on Hydrazinium Metal Complexes 214 5.7 Summary 216 References 216 6 Applications of Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives 219 K. C. Patil and Tanu Mimani Rattan 6.1 Introduction 219 6.2 Applications of Hydrazine Salts 220 6.3 Energetic Materials 229 6.4 Combustible Metal Hydrazine Complexes 234 6.5 Miscellaneous Applications 245 References 249 Index 253.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Traditionally, interest in the chemistry of hydrazine and its derivatives has been focused on the development of propellants and explosives, but in recent years a wide variety of new applications have emerged in fields such as polymers, pharmaceuticals, water treatment, agriculture and medicine. Inorganic Hydrazine Derivatives: Synthesis, Properties and Applications presents a comprehensive review of the research carried out in this field during the last four decades. Methods for synthesizing inorganic hydrazine derivatives and complexes are systematically presented, together with details of their characterization, spectra, thermal analysis, crystal structure, and applications. Strong emphasis is given to controlling the reactivity of hydrazine derivatives from detonation to deflagration to decomposition. The monograph also highlights current developments and applications of inorganic hydrazine derivatives, including the synthesis of nanostructured materials. Topics covered include: an introduction to hydrazine and its inorganic derivatives; Hydrazine salts; Metal hydrazines; Metal hydrazine carboxylates; Hydrazinium metal complexes; and Applications of inorganic hydrazine derivatives. This applications-based handbook is a valuable resource for academics and industry professionals researching and developing hydrazine compounds, high energy materials, nanomaterials, and pharmaceuticals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xxvi, 333 pages)
Book
1 online resource (vii, 153 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Book
1 online resource.
"Applications include energy conversion (solar cells and fuel cells), heat storage, green solvents, metallurgy, nuclear industry, pharmaceutics and biotechnology"-- Provided by publisher.
"Applications include energy conversion (solar cells and fuel cells), heat storage, green solvents, metallurgy, nuclear industry, pharmaceutics and biotechnology"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
1 online resource (xxii, 681 pages) : illustrations (some color)
In this fifth edition of Jack Jie Li's seminal "Name Reactions", the author has added twenty-seven new name reactions to reflect the recent advances in organic chemistry. As in previous editions, each reaction is delineated by its detailed step-by-step, electron-pushing mechanism and supplemented with the original and the latest references, especially from review articles. Now with addition of many synthetic applications, this book is not only an indispensable resource for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, but is also a good reference book for all organic chemists in both industry and academia. Unlike other books on name reactions in organic chemistry, Name Reactions, A Collection of Detailed Reaction Mechanisms and Synthetic Applications focuses on the reaction mechanisms. It covers over 320 classical as well as contemporary name reactions.
In this fifth edition of Jack Jie Li's seminal "Name Reactions", the author has added twenty-seven new name reactions to reflect the recent advances in organic chemistry. As in previous editions, each reaction is delineated by its detailed step-by-step, electron-pushing mechanism and supplemented with the original and the latest references, especially from review articles. Now with addition of many synthetic applications, this book is not only an indispensable resource for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, but is also a good reference book for all organic chemists in both industry and academia. Unlike other books on name reactions in organic chemistry, Name Reactions, A Collection of Detailed Reaction Mechanisms and Synthetic Applications focuses on the reaction mechanisms. It covers over 320 classical as well as contemporary name reactions.
Book
1 online resource (346 pages) : illustrations.
  • Introduction
  • Thermal Evolution of Kaolinite
  • Thermal Methods
  • Extraction Techniques
  • X-Ray Methods
  • Electron Microscopy Study
  • I.R. Study
  • XRF Study
  • Radial Electron Density Distribution (RED)
  • Density & Surface Area Measurement
  • Crystallization Studies of Preheated Metakaolinite
  • Thermodynamic Approach
  • MAS NMR
  • QXRD Studies of Phases Formed
  • Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) Study
  • Hot Pressing (RHP) Study
  • NAOH Leaching Study
  • Various Ways of Characterization of Alkali Leached Residue
  • Meta Kaolinite Phase
  • Spinel Phase
  • Mullite Phase
  • Reasons for First and Second Exothermic Peaks
  • Cristobalite Phase
  • Topotaxy in K-MK-AL/SI Spinel-Mullite Reaction Series
  • Dehydroxylation Mechanism
  • Final Conclusion on the Thermal Effects of Kaolinite
  • Bibliography.
  • Introduction
  • Thermal Evolution of Kaolinite
  • Thermal Methods
  • Extraction Techniques
  • X-Ray Methods
  • Electron Microscopy Study
  • I.R. Study
  • XRF Study
  • Radial Electron Density Distribution (RED)
  • Density & Surface Area Measurement
  • Crystallization Studies of Preheated Metakaolinite
  • Thermodynamic Approach
  • MAS NMR
  • QXRD Studies of Phases Formed
  • Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) Study
  • Hot Pressing (RHP) Study
  • NAOH Leaching Study
  • Various Ways of Characterization of Alkali Leached Residue
  • Meta Kaolinite Phase
  • Spinel Phase
  • Mullite Phase
  • Reasons for First and Second Exothermic Peaks
  • Cristobalite Phase
  • Topotaxy in K-MK-AL/SI Spinel-Mullite Reaction Series
  • Dehydroxylation Mechanism
  • Final Conclusion on the Thermal Effects of Kaolinite
  • Bibliography.

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