Search results

139,848 results

View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
1 volume (loose-leaf) ; 20 cm
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
KJJ2714 2014 Unknown
Book
1 volume (loose-leaf) ; 20 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
Latest: lfg.75 (2015:November)
KJJ2714 2014 Unknown
Software/Multimedia
1 computer disc : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 volume (45 pages : color illustrations ; 18 cm) + 1 inflatable toy (48 cm) + 11 cards (13 cm) Sound: digital $b optical $2 rda. Video: NTSC.
"The game begins a day after the conclusion of Persona 4 Arena, in the fictional rural Japanese town of Inaba. Unlike in the prequel that focused on the TV World, the game's events occur in the real world. However, due to the enemies' interference, Inaba is shrouded by red fog and turns into a labyrinth that mixes with the places of Persona 3 such as Moonlight Bridge, Club Escapade, and Tartarus."--Wikipedia
"The game begins a day after the conclusion of Persona 4 Arena, in the fictional rural Japanese town of Inaba. Unlike in the prequel that focused on the TV World, the game's events occur in the real world. However, due to the enemies' interference, Inaba is shrouded by red fog and turns into a labyrinth that mixes with the places of Persona 3 such as Moonlight Bridge, Club Escapade, and Tartarus."--Wikipedia
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4195 Unknown
Software/Multimedia
1 computer disc : digital, sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 booklet Sound: digital $b optical; Dolby $2 rda.
Play with your favorite teams from France, Italy, Spain, and Brazil.
Play with your favorite teams from France, Italy, Spain, and Brazil.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4199 Unknown

105. Piracy trials [2014 - ]

Journal/Periodical
1 online resource.
Digitized materials of pre-1923 piracy trial collection at the Law Library of Congress. The collection illustrates how the various nations of the world handled piracy issues before the year 1900.
Digitized materials of pre-1923 piracy trial collection at the Law Library of Congress. The collection illustrates how the various nations of the world handled piracy issues before the year 1900.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Online resource
INTERNET RESOURCE PIRACY TRIALS Unknown
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
Bags are essential for active young adults, or urban travelers, who live in urban environments and need to carry or transport items for work, school, or recreational activities. The design team has created the experience of a smart container for the future urban traveler, moving beyond the bags that are available today. The product offers a new, smart, and connected experience that is unlike any existing product. Upon extensive user testing and needfinding, the team identified the following significant needs: (1) a reliable way to prevent forgotten items such as a laptop charger or a notebook and (2) a way to confirm that one has everything needed for a given activity. Based on these needs, the team developed the Totto Embrace. The Embrace is a system that can track items and prevent the user from forgetting items that will be needed over the course of the day. The main features of the product are summarized below. RFID scanning: The Embrace features an RFID scanning system at the heart of the item tracking technology. The bag features a custom loop antenna that allows the system to know when any tagged item has entered or exited the bag. Phone app: The software application allows the user to register new RFID tags, check what items are currently in the bag, and create events on a calendar and associate items with those events. The application communicates with the Embrace using Bluetooth communication. Feedback: The Embrace is fitted with a haptic feedback system that notifies the user when an item is forgotten. This feedback will alert the user that something is missing from the bag. The user can then consult the application to determine which item is missing.
Bags are essential for active young adults, or urban travelers, who live in urban environments and need to carry or transport items for work, school, or recreational activities. The design team has created the experience of a smart container for the future urban traveler, moving beyond the bags that are available today. The product offers a new, smart, and connected experience that is unlike any existing product. Upon extensive user testing and needfinding, the team identified the following significant needs: (1) a reliable way to prevent forgotten items such as a laptop charger or a notebook and (2) a way to confirm that one has everything needed for a given activity. Based on these needs, the team developed the Totto Embrace. The Embrace is a system that can track items and prevent the user from forgetting items that will be needed over the course of the day. The main features of the product are summarized below. RFID scanning: The Embrace features an RFID scanning system at the heart of the item tracking technology. The bag features a custom loop antenna that allows the system to know when any tagged item has entered or exited the bag. Phone app: The software application allows the user to register new RFID tags, check what items are currently in the bag, and create events on a calendar and associate items with those events. The application communicates with the Embrace using Bluetooth communication. Feedback: The Embrace is fitted with a haptic feedback system that notifies the user when an item is forgotten. This feedback will alert the user that something is missing from the bag. The user can then consult the application to determine which item is missing.
Video
1 videodisc
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Video
1 videodisc
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
(no call number) Unavailable In process
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
Just as we have traveled to the far reaches of the wearable tech design space in our ME 310 exploration, so too have we realized our own needs to travel the far reaches of the physical world. Be it known or unknown territory, to explore is a human desire that has stood the test of time and been fundamental (and at times detrimental) to the development of modern society. With the technology, infrastructure, and transportation options of today, many people are more mobile than ever, free to wander wherever time and money will allow. In recognizing this need, Team Microsoft also found an ideal design direction for which to build a robust and refined wearable product. Although mobility is at an all time high, both for leisure and professionally, there is still the issue of navigating a little known or totally foreign area. Conveniently, the paper maps of old have been digitized, and even more conveniently, they can now be accessed on-the-go by anyone with a smartphone - which today is over half of all Americans. However, receiving directions by phone is not without complications, especially when on foot. For one, maps apps can only provide user feedback via auditory or visual means. This not only detracts from the experience and pleasure of taking in new scenery during travel, but also puts the user at risk of danger in their surroundings by using up precious bandwidth on two main sensory pathways. In addition, holding an expensive phone out to navigate an unknown area openly signals vulnerability. With this knowledge, gained through social observation, needfinding, and some experimentation, our team designed a wearable that aims to make pedestrian travel safer and more immersive through discreet, yet clear haptic navigation signals. Enter ROMU... The idea behind the product is simple: people can travel more safely, efficiently, and enjoyably if they can pay more attention to the world they’re in. Imagine you travel frequently for pleasure or for your career, but if possible, always opt to go to new and exciting locations. You have a smartphone and can get directions to various attractions, but in many areas you fear being targeted as a tourist and possibly getting your phone stolen. And even if you do choose to navigate by phone - how can you soak in the sights if you are always absorbed in your maps app, looking for the next turn? Instead, you put on your ROMU, plug in your destination to your phone, and go. Vibration signals from the armband provide directional cues to your end location, allowing you to focus on the sights and sounds around you. After all, it’s more about the journey than the destination. To elaborate on the technology, ROMU is a comfortable, arm-mounted wearable product containing an array of vibration motors as well as onboard microcontroller, sensors, and Bluetooth electronics. This hardware package is accompanied by a software counterpart in the form of an Android application. The system goes as follows: 1. ROMU armband is placed around the upper-left arm and adjusted for comfort and orientation, then turned on. 2. The user opens the ROMU app and searches for their device via Bluetooth. 3. Once connected, a destination is searched for and confirmed in the maps view. 4. Once the destination is chosen, a route is drawn and the user may start navigation. 5. During navigation, the phone uses various data services to figure out the best route, including the position of the next best waypoint (turn). 6. This data is used to send periodic commands to the device, the contents of which depend on the bearing and heading of the user. 7. Commands received by the device from the phone are processed by the microcontroller and translated to intuitive patterns and arrays of vibrations produced by the motors. 8. The user interprets these haptic signals and uses them to successfully navigate to the destination! 9. At any point during use, the user may double tap the electronics enclosure on the device to pause navigation, or may pause/quit from the phone. Upon completion of the quarter, ROMU is a functional product and one Team Microsoft is very proud of. EXPE went smoothly and we received lots of good feedback about the project - concerning both what people liked and where we had room for improvement. Overwhelmingly, there was a sense of enjoyment of the concept and experience behind ROMU. Should future work be performed on the project, which is currently being discussed by the Stanford team, there is a desire to fine tune functionality and add several features that were initially considered but then dropped due to time constraints, including: consolidating on-band electronics into a PCB (which was attempted by USTC but did not fit the physical design envelope), reworking the wiring layout, tightening up the navigation algorithms, and adding a social aspect to app functionality.
Just as we have traveled to the far reaches of the wearable tech design space in our ME 310 exploration, so too have we realized our own needs to travel the far reaches of the physical world. Be it known or unknown territory, to explore is a human desire that has stood the test of time and been fundamental (and at times detrimental) to the development of modern society. With the technology, infrastructure, and transportation options of today, many people are more mobile than ever, free to wander wherever time and money will allow. In recognizing this need, Team Microsoft also found an ideal design direction for which to build a robust and refined wearable product. Although mobility is at an all time high, both for leisure and professionally, there is still the issue of navigating a little known or totally foreign area. Conveniently, the paper maps of old have been digitized, and even more conveniently, they can now be accessed on-the-go by anyone with a smartphone - which today is over half of all Americans. However, receiving directions by phone is not without complications, especially when on foot. For one, maps apps can only provide user feedback via auditory or visual means. This not only detracts from the experience and pleasure of taking in new scenery during travel, but also puts the user at risk of danger in their surroundings by using up precious bandwidth on two main sensory pathways. In addition, holding an expensive phone out to navigate an unknown area openly signals vulnerability. With this knowledge, gained through social observation, needfinding, and some experimentation, our team designed a wearable that aims to make pedestrian travel safer and more immersive through discreet, yet clear haptic navigation signals. Enter ROMU... The idea behind the product is simple: people can travel more safely, efficiently, and enjoyably if they can pay more attention to the world they’re in. Imagine you travel frequently for pleasure or for your career, but if possible, always opt to go to new and exciting locations. You have a smartphone and can get directions to various attractions, but in many areas you fear being targeted as a tourist and possibly getting your phone stolen. And even if you do choose to navigate by phone - how can you soak in the sights if you are always absorbed in your maps app, looking for the next turn? Instead, you put on your ROMU, plug in your destination to your phone, and go. Vibration signals from the armband provide directional cues to your end location, allowing you to focus on the sights and sounds around you. After all, it’s more about the journey than the destination. To elaborate on the technology, ROMU is a comfortable, arm-mounted wearable product containing an array of vibration motors as well as onboard microcontroller, sensors, and Bluetooth electronics. This hardware package is accompanied by a software counterpart in the form of an Android application. The system goes as follows: 1. ROMU armband is placed around the upper-left arm and adjusted for comfort and orientation, then turned on. 2. The user opens the ROMU app and searches for their device via Bluetooth. 3. Once connected, a destination is searched for and confirmed in the maps view. 4. Once the destination is chosen, a route is drawn and the user may start navigation. 5. During navigation, the phone uses various data services to figure out the best route, including the position of the next best waypoint (turn). 6. This data is used to send periodic commands to the device, the contents of which depend on the bearing and heading of the user. 7. Commands received by the device from the phone are processed by the microcontroller and translated to intuitive patterns and arrays of vibrations produced by the motors. 8. The user interprets these haptic signals and uses them to successfully navigate to the destination! 9. At any point during use, the user may double tap the electronics enclosure on the device to pause navigation, or may pause/quit from the phone. Upon completion of the quarter, ROMU is a functional product and one Team Microsoft is very proud of. EXPE went smoothly and we received lots of good feedback about the project - concerning both what people liked and where we had room for improvement. Overwhelmingly, there was a sense of enjoyment of the concept and experience behind ROMU. Should future work be performed on the project, which is currently being discussed by the Stanford team, there is a desire to fine tune functionality and add several features that were initially considered but then dropped due to time constraints, including: consolidating on-band electronics into a PCB (which was attempted by USTC but did not fit the physical design envelope), reworking the wiring layout, tightening up the navigation algorithms, and adding a social aspect to app functionality.
Video
1 videadisc
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request

113. SAP Engage Online

Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
SAP, a global leader in the delivery and support of enterprise resource management software, seeks to improve the way businesses, big and small, run their day-to-day activities in order to increase efficiency, and ultimately, profitability. Given the far-reaching scope and massive scale of their typical customers, their software is understandably complex with a steep learning curve. This has lead to the development of SAP’s Active Global Support, or AGS network, which provides 24/7 support to SAP customers regardless of time zone. SAP is on a mission to grow their user base to 1 billion end-users in the next 5 years. As their user base expands, their support network must also evolve to meet rising demand. The challenge posed to this year’s ME310 team is to look into this evolution and better define what key changes need to happen in order for SAP to support 1 billion users. A team consisting of three students from Stanford University in Stanford, CA, USA and four students from Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland has come together to work toward a solution to this very big challenge. Together, they developed a product called SAP Engage. SAP Engage, we are able to put the dispatcher and customer virtually side-by- side. Creating a sense that SAP is “on your side” versus the more traditional face-to- face telepresence setup, the side-by-side telepresence is a system designed specifically for technical support. This simulates in-person support scenarios where both participants are focused on the problem in front of them, collaborating towards a solution. As a kiosk at every client’s office and as a quad workstation for support, our future vision is that SAP Engage will bring customer and support together to provide the ultimate experience in technical support.
SAP, a global leader in the delivery and support of enterprise resource management software, seeks to improve the way businesses, big and small, run their day-to-day activities in order to increase efficiency, and ultimately, profitability. Given the far-reaching scope and massive scale of their typical customers, their software is understandably complex with a steep learning curve. This has lead to the development of SAP’s Active Global Support, or AGS network, which provides 24/7 support to SAP customers regardless of time zone. SAP is on a mission to grow their user base to 1 billion end-users in the next 5 years. As their user base expands, their support network must also evolve to meet rising demand. The challenge posed to this year’s ME310 team is to look into this evolution and better define what key changes need to happen in order for SAP to support 1 billion users. A team consisting of three students from Stanford University in Stanford, CA, USA and four students from Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland has come together to work toward a solution to this very big challenge. Together, they developed a product called SAP Engage. SAP Engage, we are able to put the dispatcher and customer virtually side-by- side. Creating a sense that SAP is “on your side” versus the more traditional face-to- face telepresence setup, the side-by-side telepresence is a system designed specifically for technical support. This simulates in-person support scenarios where both participants are focused on the problem in front of them, collaborating towards a solution. As a kiosk at every client’s office and as a quad workstation for support, our future vision is that SAP Engage will bring customer and support together to provide the ultimate experience in technical support.
Video
1 sound disc
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
(no call number) Unavailable In process
Book
1 volume (loose-leaf) ; 25 cm
  • Securities regulation / Kay Moller Todd
  • The Uniform Commercial Code / Jonathan A. Franklin
  • Federal income taxation / Mary A. Hotchkiss
  • Copyright law / William H. Manz
  • Federal labor and employment law / Kay M. Todd
  • Law of environmental protection / Tami Gierloff
  • Admiralty and maritime law / Sarah K. Wiant
  • Immigration law / Lourdes Fuentes and Ann Hemmens
  • Military and veterans law / Vicenç F. Feliú
  • Banking law / Penny A. Hazelton
  • Federal patent and trademark law / Harold F. See
  • Federal government contracts / Jody H. Kelley, Kate Martin, Deborah Vergara
  • Customs law / Joseph J. Mattera.
  • Securities regulation / Kay Moller Todd
  • The Uniform Commercial Code / Jonathan A. Franklin
  • Federal income taxation / Mary A. Hotchkiss
  • Copyright law / William H. Manz
  • Federal labor and employment law / Kay M. Todd
  • Law of environmental protection / Tami Gierloff
  • Admiralty and maritime law / Sarah K. Wiant
  • Immigration law / Lourdes Fuentes and Ann Hemmens
  • Military and veterans law / Vicenç F. Feliú
  • Banking law / Penny A. Hazelton
  • Federal patent and trademark law / Harold F. See
  • Federal government contracts / Jody H. Kelley, Kate Martin, Deborah Vergara
  • Customs law / Joseph J. Mattera.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Reference Desk (non-circulating)
KF240 .S692 In-library use
Software/Multimedia
x, 313 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Learning disabilities : definitions and facts
  • Neuropsychology abnormalities underlying specific learning disabilities
  • Biological theories of specific learning disabilities
  • Brain correlates of learning
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities I
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities II
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities III
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities IV
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities V
  • Neurophysiological studies of SLD : the genetics of learning disabilities
  • Genetics of SLD
  • Dyscalculia
  • Non-verbal learning disabilities
  • Not only learning disabilities
  • The diagnostic process
  • Treatment and outcome of specific learning disabilities.
  • Learning disabilities : definitions and facts
  • Neuropsychology abnormalities underlying specific learning disabilities
  • Biological theories of specific learning disabilities
  • Brain correlates of learning
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities I
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities II
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities III
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities IV
  • Neuroanatomy of specific learning disabilities V
  • Neurophysiological studies of SLD : the genetics of learning disabilities
  • Genetics of SLD
  • Dyscalculia
  • Non-verbal learning disabilities
  • Not only learning disabilities
  • The diagnostic process
  • Treatment and outcome of specific learning disabilities.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Status of items at SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) Status
Stacks Request
RC394 .L37 F73 2014 Unknown
Journal/Periodical
1 online resource : color illustrations
Website of the UCHS task force which created the report "Advancing Safety Culture in the University Laboratory / A report of the Task Force for Advancing the Culture of Laboratory Safety at Stanford University." Contains information on the task force, the report and its appendicies, and background information and context.
Website of the UCHS task force which created the report "Advancing Safety Culture in the University Laboratory / A report of the Task Force for Advancing the Culture of Laboratory Safety at Stanford University." Contains information on the task force, the report and its appendicies, and background information and context.
Book
online resource (website)
  • 1. Thyroid exam
  • 2. Gait abnormalities
  • 3. Examination of the spleen
  • 4. Examination of the liver
  • 5. Liver disease, head to foot
  • 6. Ascites & venous patterns
  • 7. Knee exam
  • 8. Shoulder exam
  • 9. Lymph node exam
  • 10. Deep tendon reflexes
  • 11. Cerebellar exam
  • 12. Fundoscopic exam
  • 13. Pulmonary exam
  • 14. Precordial movements
  • 15. Cardiac second sounds
  • 16. Neck veins & wave forms
  • 17. BP & pulsus parodoxus
  • 18. Ankle brachial index
  • 19. The hand in diagnosis
  • 20. Bedside ultrasound
  • 21. Rectal exam
  • 22. Pupillary responses
  • 23. Involuntary movements
  • 24. Internal capsule stroke
  • 25. The tongue in diagnosis.
Stanford medicine 25 is an initiative to revive the culture of bedside medicine. Geared toward 3rd and 4th year medical students and residents, practice of "The 25" entails hands-on teaching sessions to develop proper technique. The website provides summaries of key learning points for each session and other resources-- including guidelines, color images, videos and clinical pearls by Stanford medical faculty.
  • 1. Thyroid exam
  • 2. Gait abnormalities
  • 3. Examination of the spleen
  • 4. Examination of the liver
  • 5. Liver disease, head to foot
  • 6. Ascites & venous patterns
  • 7. Knee exam
  • 8. Shoulder exam
  • 9. Lymph node exam
  • 10. Deep tendon reflexes
  • 11. Cerebellar exam
  • 12. Fundoscopic exam
  • 13. Pulmonary exam
  • 14. Precordial movements
  • 15. Cardiac second sounds
  • 16. Neck veins & wave forms
  • 17. BP & pulsus parodoxus
  • 18. Ankle brachial index
  • 19. The hand in diagnosis
  • 20. Bedside ultrasound
  • 21. Rectal exam
  • 22. Pupillary responses
  • 23. Involuntary movements
  • 24. Internal capsule stroke
  • 25. The tongue in diagnosis.
Stanford medicine 25 is an initiative to revive the culture of bedside medicine. Geared toward 3rd and 4th year medical students and residents, practice of "The 25" entails hands-on teaching sessions to develop proper technique. The website provides summaries of key learning points for each session and other resources-- including guidelines, color images, videos and clinical pearls by Stanford medical faculty.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
(no call number) Unknown
Database topics
Uncategorized
Physical extent
1 online resource.
Full-text searchable database of state court opinions for all fifty states in the U.S.
Full-text searchable database of state court opinions for all fifty states in the U.S.
www.heinonline.org For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Online resource
INTERNET RESOURCE STATE REPTS HIST ARCHI Unknown
Software/Multimedia
1 CD-ROM : color illustrations ; 12 cm
"This CD contains SunWise resources, including the SunWise Took Kit with over 50 standards-based, cross-curricular activities for grades K-8; posters, videos, policy guidelines, fact sheets, brochures, story and activity books, and more. Please visit www.epa.gov/sunwise for additional information"--container.
"This CD contains SunWise resources, including the SunWise Took Kit with over 50 standards-based, cross-curricular activities for grades K-8; posters, videos, policy guidelines, fact sheets, brochures, story and activity books, and more. Please visit www.epa.gov/sunwise for additional information"--container.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4172 Unknown