Search results

136,976 results

View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Software/Multimedia
1 computer optical disc : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Lead your country to FIFA World Cup glory while experiencing all the fun, excitement and drama of soccer's greatest event.
Lead your country to FIFA World Cup glory while experiencing all the fun, excitement and drama of soccer's greatest event.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4029 Unknown
Book
online resource (website)
Interactive self-assessment section of AccessSurgery website. Allows users to create and take custom tests based on standard review texts.
Interactive self-assessment section of AccessSurgery website. Allows users to create and take custom tests based on standard review texts.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
ACCESSSURGERY Unknown
Book
online resource (website)
Interactive self-assessment section of AccessSurgery website. Allows users to create and take custom tests based on standard review texts.
Interactive self-assessment section of AccessSurgery website. Allows users to create and take custom tests based on standard review texts.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Medical Library (Lane) catalog for status
ACCESSSURGERY Unknown
Journal/Periodical
1 online resource : map
  • Arctic Alaska
  • US Northeast Atlantic
  • US North Central
  • US New Southwest
  • US Pacific Northwest
  • US South.
Digitized materials pertaining to Native Americans in the collection of the Law Library of Congress. Web page and interactive map offers links to over 400 American Indian legal materials, spanning both 19th century items and constitutions, by-laws, and charters drafted after the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act.
  • Arctic Alaska
  • US Northeast Atlantic
  • US North Central
  • US New Southwest
  • US Pacific Northwest
  • US South.
Digitized materials pertaining to Native Americans in the collection of the Law Library of Congress. Web page and interactive map offers links to over 400 American Indian legal materials, spanning both 19th century items and constitutions, by-laws, and charters drafted after the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Online resource
(no call number) Unknown
Physical extent
1 videodisc (114 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; surround. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; region 1.
Deep fractures within a family dynamic begin to surface during a getaway to the Isles of Scilly.
Deep fractures within a family dynamic begin to surface during a getaway to the Isles of Scilly.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
In 2025, we expect an “Internet of Things” to exist, in which shoes might talk to gym bags and smart watches can push status updates. A decade from now, automated cars will exist but less automated driver-assistive technologies will be much more common in use. Despite the existence of automated driving, the responsibility will still remain with the driver. Wearable technologies containing a myriad of biometric sensors are just being introduced to the market today, and will likely be ubiquitous in several years. These sensors track a variety of information, from heart rate to activity level. After exploring many different future needs and technologies, we realized that these sensors could be used to monitor health and safety in this future world. New technological features in automobiles are plentiful, but these features often come with the cost of safety by creating distractions. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road crashes each year and as many as 50 million are injured. These figures will likely increase by about 65% over the next 20 years unless there is new commitment to prevention. As the number of wheels on the road increases and drivers become less experienced due to the adoption of automated or semi-automated cars, we need to ensure that advances in accident response and prevention keep abreast of other technologies newly available in the car. As it stands today, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is notified of auto accidents when a bystander calls 911 and speaks with a dispatcher. The dispatcher sends EMS an “accident code” which relays the basics of the accident without direct communication. The information they receive typically lacks an exact GPS location, information about the number of people involved, and how critically injured they are. This leads to wasted time searching for the crash and a failure to accurately divert resources to the scene. Approximately 50% of the information currently received is incorrect. During the last several months, we have refined our scenario: In 2025, you have just bought a new self-driving Audi. Although you have the latest safety features in your Audi, you cannot avoid all accidents. After a sudden encounter with a large animal, you are knocked unconscious. It is dark and there are no other cars on the highway. Your car then jumps into action to save your life. Through the same system of sensors, the car gathers information about you and the car. It then packages the information and sends it to first responders. Accident Response: We wanted to build a system that could be completely independent of the vehicle itself, such that in the case of an accident we would not have to depend on the vehicle’s power source and electronics. A GPS continuously tracks the car’s position, and records latitude and longitude measurements on an Arduino. Each passenger wears a Basis watch, which collects data about each passenger’s heart rate and movement, as well as the current air temperature. The Basis watch syncs once per minute via Bluetooth, using a square wave produced by the Tiny Lily (a small Arduino). We outfitted an Audi with four seat belt covers containing accelerometers, in order to measure the accelerations experienced by all passengers. Each accelerometer is attached to an Arduino Mini Pro, which can wirelessly send information to our computer. The computer, an Intel NUC, uses Processing to compile all the data from the GPS, accelerometers, and Basis Bands. Prior to an accident, the user interface for the driver displays relevant data about the users in the car on an iPad mini on the vehicle’s dashboard. With this platform, further applications can be developed to track health and prevent accidents caused by stress and other medical incidents. An accident is triggered when the seat belt accelerometers log above-threshold values. At this point, the latest data is sent to EMS and then continuously updated until they arrive on the scene. The GUI for EMS displays information about the car’s location on a map and the current injury status of each passenger in the car. This interface also includes a webcam for two-way communication with the passengers in the vehicle, so that EMS can get further information about the people in the car along with reassure the passengers that they are on their way. The world of 2025 could bring some major changes in our lifestyles, but given current trends we expect people to want data collection and analysis on all aspects of their lives. This formidable bank of information could translate into more efficient emergency response as well as machine learning to better customize the car during everyday driving. This platform, which incorporates biometric sensors into the car, will streamline and integrate this data into the driving experience. Accident Prevention: Exploring beyond accident response, we wanted to expand the AudiResponse as a platform for further applications using the myriad of sensor information found in 2025. One example for a future application and need is accident prevention for the driver during major health events. The wearable would be able to determine a heart attack, a hypoglycemic event, or a seizure and alerts the car appropriately to inform medical services and safely maneuvers the car to either the shoulder or the hospital. Continued additional applications such as autonomous driving preferences or wearable induced temperature control could be implemented by adding more input sensors for new user needs.
In 2025, we expect an “Internet of Things” to exist, in which shoes might talk to gym bags and smart watches can push status updates. A decade from now, automated cars will exist but less automated driver-assistive technologies will be much more common in use. Despite the existence of automated driving, the responsibility will still remain with the driver. Wearable technologies containing a myriad of biometric sensors are just being introduced to the market today, and will likely be ubiquitous in several years. These sensors track a variety of information, from heart rate to activity level. After exploring many different future needs and technologies, we realized that these sensors could be used to monitor health and safety in this future world. New technological features in automobiles are plentiful, but these features often come with the cost of safety by creating distractions. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 1.2 million people are killed in road crashes each year and as many as 50 million are injured. These figures will likely increase by about 65% over the next 20 years unless there is new commitment to prevention. As the number of wheels on the road increases and drivers become less experienced due to the adoption of automated or semi-automated cars, we need to ensure that advances in accident response and prevention keep abreast of other technologies newly available in the car. As it stands today, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is notified of auto accidents when a bystander calls 911 and speaks with a dispatcher. The dispatcher sends EMS an “accident code” which relays the basics of the accident without direct communication. The information they receive typically lacks an exact GPS location, information about the number of people involved, and how critically injured they are. This leads to wasted time searching for the crash and a failure to accurately divert resources to the scene. Approximately 50% of the information currently received is incorrect. During the last several months, we have refined our scenario: In 2025, you have just bought a new self-driving Audi. Although you have the latest safety features in your Audi, you cannot avoid all accidents. After a sudden encounter with a large animal, you are knocked unconscious. It is dark and there are no other cars on the highway. Your car then jumps into action to save your life. Through the same system of sensors, the car gathers information about you and the car. It then packages the information and sends it to first responders. Accident Response: We wanted to build a system that could be completely independent of the vehicle itself, such that in the case of an accident we would not have to depend on the vehicle’s power source and electronics. A GPS continuously tracks the car’s position, and records latitude and longitude measurements on an Arduino. Each passenger wears a Basis watch, which collects data about each passenger’s heart rate and movement, as well as the current air temperature. The Basis watch syncs once per minute via Bluetooth, using a square wave produced by the Tiny Lily (a small Arduino). We outfitted an Audi with four seat belt covers containing accelerometers, in order to measure the accelerations experienced by all passengers. Each accelerometer is attached to an Arduino Mini Pro, which can wirelessly send information to our computer. The computer, an Intel NUC, uses Processing to compile all the data from the GPS, accelerometers, and Basis Bands. Prior to an accident, the user interface for the driver displays relevant data about the users in the car on an iPad mini on the vehicle’s dashboard. With this platform, further applications can be developed to track health and prevent accidents caused by stress and other medical incidents. An accident is triggered when the seat belt accelerometers log above-threshold values. At this point, the latest data is sent to EMS and then continuously updated until they arrive on the scene. The GUI for EMS displays information about the car’s location on a map and the current injury status of each passenger in the car. This interface also includes a webcam for two-way communication with the passengers in the vehicle, so that EMS can get further information about the people in the car along with reassure the passengers that they are on their way. The world of 2025 could bring some major changes in our lifestyles, but given current trends we expect people to want data collection and analysis on all aspects of their lives. This formidable bank of information could translate into more efficient emergency response as well as machine learning to better customize the car during everyday driving. This platform, which incorporates biometric sensors into the car, will streamline and integrate this data into the driving experience. Accident Prevention: Exploring beyond accident response, we wanted to expand the AudiResponse as a platform for further applications using the myriad of sensor information found in 2025. One example for a future application and need is accident prevention for the driver during major health events. The wearable would be able to determine a heart attack, a hypoglycemic event, or a seizure and alerts the car appropriately to inform medical services and safely maneuvers the car to either the shoulder or the hospital. Continued additional applications such as autonomous driving preferences or wearable induced temperature control could be implemented by adding more input sensors for new user needs.
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
Panasonic Corp. has growing interest in senior care, defined generally as care for those older than age 65. This stems from the increasingly unbalanced demographic situation in Japan where 24.8% of individuals are already 65 or older and 38% are expected to be over 65 by 2050 . The demographics of most developed countries and cities, including those for the United States, are expected to follow a similar aging trend. Aggravating this issue, seniors are more prone to diseases and ailments due to their often frail nature. The burden on healthcare providers and systems will become greatly skewed towards care for the elderly. Panasonic Corp. recognizes the potential to develop innovative solutions in this field. According to the Stanford Center on Longevity, most surveys show that over 80% of older adults want to age-in-place. However, the tremendous amount of Baby Boomers (estimated at 75.8 million) will vastly overfill the 3 million residential care beds present in the US. The financial burden for seniors and their healthcare providers is also very high. The cost of 24-hour supervised care can also range from $6,000 to more than $10,000 per month depending on the setting (e.g. assisted living vs. in-home care). These worsening problems create chasms the team desires to fill with innovative product solutions. The team considered many stakeholders in this senior-focus problem. Primarily, the senior patients themselves are a focus of the project; however, a patient's family members (including children, grandchildren, siblings, and spouses) also play a significant role in care and well-being. Additionally, healthcare providers such as doctors, nurses, and hospital facility staff or also administrators and home health agents were considered throughout this design process. To create a user-accepted solution, the technological adeptness of seniors was considered. Many seniors are not comfortable with advanced technological devices. It is assumed that seniors of the future will be more likely to accept technology because of the integrated lifestyle patterns of many adults; however, the need for simplicity is still crucial. After considering many needs that were demonstrated and learned through visits to senior homes, as well as interviews with seniors and elderly caretakers, the team identified how depression and sadness are linked to other factors of life. Many other common senior issues are either the direct cause or effect of depression. For example, loss of physical mobility often leads to depression. Similarly, high levels of sadness and depression are linked to reduced medication compliance, which can in turn degrade the physical condition of the patient. Considering the enjoyed hobbies and activities of able-bodied seniors that prevent depression led to the exploration of immersive multimedia "walks." For many seniors, physical or mental limitations, or possibly harsh weather conditions prevent outdoor walking. Thus, the design team decided to simulate walking experiences and treat symptoms of depression and sadness by giving back in some ways the experience of walking. An immersive multimedia experience of walking through a park is simulated through the use of Aura, the final prototype shown. Users are able to pedal a recumbent exercise bike to traverse through picturesque sceneries. The video play rate speeds up or slows down according to the speed at which the user pedals. In addition to visual progression through the scenery, a user will feel a simulated breeze that varies in intensity according to the pedaling rate of the user. Other incorporated senses include listening to surround nature sounds, mimicking outdoor lighting colors with Hue lights, and smelling the scents of the jungle with scented oils. This experience resulted in excited and interested users during multiple rounds of user testing at a local senior center. Many users asked for how much the Aura was selling and were interested in bringing Aura to confined family members or physically injured audiences. The team believes that a full product would be desired by care facilities, hospitals, and therapy facilities to be used among large groups of people.
Panasonic Corp. has growing interest in senior care, defined generally as care for those older than age 65. This stems from the increasingly unbalanced demographic situation in Japan where 24.8% of individuals are already 65 or older and 38% are expected to be over 65 by 2050 . The demographics of most developed countries and cities, including those for the United States, are expected to follow a similar aging trend. Aggravating this issue, seniors are more prone to diseases and ailments due to their often frail nature. The burden on healthcare providers and systems will become greatly skewed towards care for the elderly. Panasonic Corp. recognizes the potential to develop innovative solutions in this field. According to the Stanford Center on Longevity, most surveys show that over 80% of older adults want to age-in-place. However, the tremendous amount of Baby Boomers (estimated at 75.8 million) will vastly overfill the 3 million residential care beds present in the US. The financial burden for seniors and their healthcare providers is also very high. The cost of 24-hour supervised care can also range from $6,000 to more than $10,000 per month depending on the setting (e.g. assisted living vs. in-home care). These worsening problems create chasms the team desires to fill with innovative product solutions. The team considered many stakeholders in this senior-focus problem. Primarily, the senior patients themselves are a focus of the project; however, a patient's family members (including children, grandchildren, siblings, and spouses) also play a significant role in care and well-being. Additionally, healthcare providers such as doctors, nurses, and hospital facility staff or also administrators and home health agents were considered throughout this design process. To create a user-accepted solution, the technological adeptness of seniors was considered. Many seniors are not comfortable with advanced technological devices. It is assumed that seniors of the future will be more likely to accept technology because of the integrated lifestyle patterns of many adults; however, the need for simplicity is still crucial. After considering many needs that were demonstrated and learned through visits to senior homes, as well as interviews with seniors and elderly caretakers, the team identified how depression and sadness are linked to other factors of life. Many other common senior issues are either the direct cause or effect of depression. For example, loss of physical mobility often leads to depression. Similarly, high levels of sadness and depression are linked to reduced medication compliance, which can in turn degrade the physical condition of the patient. Considering the enjoyed hobbies and activities of able-bodied seniors that prevent depression led to the exploration of immersive multimedia "walks." For many seniors, physical or mental limitations, or possibly harsh weather conditions prevent outdoor walking. Thus, the design team decided to simulate walking experiences and treat symptoms of depression and sadness by giving back in some ways the experience of walking. An immersive multimedia experience of walking through a park is simulated through the use of Aura, the final prototype shown. Users are able to pedal a recumbent exercise bike to traverse through picturesque sceneries. The video play rate speeds up or slows down according to the speed at which the user pedals. In addition to visual progression through the scenery, a user will feel a simulated breeze that varies in intensity according to the pedaling rate of the user. Other incorporated senses include listening to surround nature sounds, mimicking outdoor lighting colors with Hue lights, and smelling the scents of the jungle with scented oils. This experience resulted in excited and interested users during multiple rounds of user testing at a local senior center. Many users asked for how much the Aura was selling and were interested in bringing Aura to confined family members or physically injured audiences. The team believes that a full product would be desired by care facilities, hospitals, and therapy facilities to be used among large groups of people.
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
The Q is a meeting experience that reinvents executive decision making to be more productive, data-centric, and enjoyable. We have created a physical environment that fosters teamwork, combined with a software system that provides instant access to live data and allows control of the meeting through a dynamic agenda. This integrated system embeds all required technology so executives have a predictable and uncomplicated user experience. The Q accommodates eight people and consists of a table, a suspended overhead frame with eight displays, and a computer application. The hardware components forge a non-hierarchal condition for collaboration and decision making. By elevating state-of-the-art technology overhead, we remove physical barriers to inter-personal communication and furthermore allows easy viewing transition between the meeting content and the other meeting participants. The software components link key messages and live company data together for viewing on the communal displays. The meeting is controlled and progressed through using the interactive agenda on participants’ tablets. The story on the screen, the messages, and the live data that goes along with it are all shown on the overhead displays, and synchronized between all the tablets. Participants can discuss the data and story at once, drill down into it together, and annotate any of the content. But even more than this, we have built a system that provides instant access to live data through natural language querying. So one can just ask a question like ``Show me the revenue in Canada for April 2013,'' and an up-to-date result is instantly returned for everyone to view and discuss. This lets management have in-­depth discussions even for unexpected issues, because queries are issued to the system using natural language with no specialized knowledge to retrieve data. Executives will use the Q to make better decisions, faster.
The Q is a meeting experience that reinvents executive decision making to be more productive, data-centric, and enjoyable. We have created a physical environment that fosters teamwork, combined with a software system that provides instant access to live data and allows control of the meeting through a dynamic agenda. This integrated system embeds all required technology so executives have a predictable and uncomplicated user experience. The Q accommodates eight people and consists of a table, a suspended overhead frame with eight displays, and a computer application. The hardware components forge a non-hierarchal condition for collaboration and decision making. By elevating state-of-the-art technology overhead, we remove physical barriers to inter-personal communication and furthermore allows easy viewing transition between the meeting content and the other meeting participants. The software components link key messages and live company data together for viewing on the communal displays. The meeting is controlled and progressed through using the interactive agenda on participants’ tablets. The story on the screen, the messages, and the live data that goes along with it are all shown on the overhead displays, and synchronized between all the tablets. Participants can discuss the data and story at once, drill down into it together, and annotate any of the content. But even more than this, we have built a system that provides instant access to live data through natural language querying. So one can just ask a question like ``Show me the revenue in Canada for April 2013,'' and an up-to-date result is instantly returned for everyone to view and discuss. This lets management have in-­depth discussions even for unexpected issues, because queries are issued to the system using natural language with no specialized knowledge to retrieve data. Executives will use the Q to make better decisions, faster.
Book
1 volume (loose-leaf) : illustrations ; 26 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
KFC780 .A975 Unknown
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
We now live in a digital world. More and more people now own electronic devices, whether it’s a computer, a smartphone, or a tablet. We are now used to a new generation of technological interfaces, including touchscreens, keyboards, and many forms of ―smart‖ products. The cars of today are evolving to have capabilities of interacting with their user, exchange information with the road, and even talk to each other. Each day, the cars on the road continue to become more efficient, more secure and more fun to drive. We are also becoming increasingly more dependent on our surrounding network. In our current world, few can afford to live without internet access anymore. Many people even experience the fear of missing out after just a few hours offline. People want to send and receive emails, text messages, and have access to their social networks everywhere on the go, at any given time. According to some of the interviews we’ve conducted, spending time in traffic jams would be bearable only if it doesn’t interrupt the flow of information where users exchange with the world. At some point, this becomes a problem: Amongst other issues, texting while driving causes 1.6 million accident every year, and 6000 person lose their life. Unfortunately in the driver’s mind, sometimes putting his or her own life in danger could be more attractive than doing nothing. In order to be more productive, we now have the habit to give the tasks we don’t want to do to the machines. They are in the process of replacing humans in many of the repetitive, dangerous or mundane jobs. It all started in the manufacturing industry, but now even our everyday life is impacted: just the pressing of a button and an espresso machine will prepare you the best coffee, while your hoover will turn itself on and cross your house searching for something to clean. Valeo, a world leader in car supplies, understood that and brought automation to car driving. They started with Park4U, an iPhone app coupled with the car system that allows the driver to have the car do the parking operations by itself. And continuing with Park4U Valet, it would free the user from having to even search for an available parking place. But Valeo is now thinking even further ahead, by working on a car that can drive itself autonomously at low speeds, enabling the driver fully focus on whatever he wants to do during tedious traffic jam situations. They will then be able to take hands their away from the wheel and keep their eyes off the road to do various activities from browsing the internet to even exercising. In turn, the space and functions of the cockpit will need to adapt to those new possibilities. That’s why our most important job is to define exactly what the future users of such cars will need or want. But people aren’t totally ready yet: give over control of the wheel in a moving car is still psychologically difficult even if the system has been successfully tested. Developing trust in new machine technologies could be hard for people, especially when it is used in a potentially dangerous environment. And it could take years before laws and public minds to follow. In the meantime, in order for the Valeo’s technology to be widely accepted, we will need to design the user experience to allow the driver to fully understand what’s happening and feel in control of the situation and safe at all time. And what can make you feel more in control of a product than knowing exactly how to use it at first sight? Apple’s legendary success in the past 20 years came hugely due to their revolutionary vision to drastically improve intuitivity of all their devices. They managed to turn an opaque world of computers into a line of sophisticated toys that even a 3-years-old kid can use. While the telecommunication world is evolving at an ever-growing speed, the design of automotive seems to go around in circles. While phones keep getting simpler, faster, becoming more intuitive and customizable, the cockpit of the car are evolving to look more and more like airplane cockpits. The driver is being drawn under an avalanche of buttons, control panels, dashboard features and blinking screens, adding to the time they need to find what they truly want. How can we invert this tendency? Possibly by making a car in a similar fashion as how we would make a smartphone: A tangible device that reduces the number of interaction steps by deleting the unnecessary functions, and merges the physical and digital world together so that the actions we perform fit perfectly with the instinctive gestures that correspond to it. A flexible platform that can evolve through app-like modules and adapt exactly to the user’s behaviors and preferences, displaying exactly what he or she needs and wants in times of convenience, and can be personalized to satisfy the ever-changing desires of the driver.
We now live in a digital world. More and more people now own electronic devices, whether it’s a computer, a smartphone, or a tablet. We are now used to a new generation of technological interfaces, including touchscreens, keyboards, and many forms of ―smart‖ products. The cars of today are evolving to have capabilities of interacting with their user, exchange information with the road, and even talk to each other. Each day, the cars on the road continue to become more efficient, more secure and more fun to drive. We are also becoming increasingly more dependent on our surrounding network. In our current world, few can afford to live without internet access anymore. Many people even experience the fear of missing out after just a few hours offline. People want to send and receive emails, text messages, and have access to their social networks everywhere on the go, at any given time. According to some of the interviews we’ve conducted, spending time in traffic jams would be bearable only if it doesn’t interrupt the flow of information where users exchange with the world. At some point, this becomes a problem: Amongst other issues, texting while driving causes 1.6 million accident every year, and 6000 person lose their life. Unfortunately in the driver’s mind, sometimes putting his or her own life in danger could be more attractive than doing nothing. In order to be more productive, we now have the habit to give the tasks we don’t want to do to the machines. They are in the process of replacing humans in many of the repetitive, dangerous or mundane jobs. It all started in the manufacturing industry, but now even our everyday life is impacted: just the pressing of a button and an espresso machine will prepare you the best coffee, while your hoover will turn itself on and cross your house searching for something to clean. Valeo, a world leader in car supplies, understood that and brought automation to car driving. They started with Park4U, an iPhone app coupled with the car system that allows the driver to have the car do the parking operations by itself. And continuing with Park4U Valet, it would free the user from having to even search for an available parking place. But Valeo is now thinking even further ahead, by working on a car that can drive itself autonomously at low speeds, enabling the driver fully focus on whatever he wants to do during tedious traffic jam situations. They will then be able to take hands their away from the wheel and keep their eyes off the road to do various activities from browsing the internet to even exercising. In turn, the space and functions of the cockpit will need to adapt to those new possibilities. That’s why our most important job is to define exactly what the future users of such cars will need or want. But people aren’t totally ready yet: give over control of the wheel in a moving car is still psychologically difficult even if the system has been successfully tested. Developing trust in new machine technologies could be hard for people, especially when it is used in a potentially dangerous environment. And it could take years before laws and public minds to follow. In the meantime, in order for the Valeo’s technology to be widely accepted, we will need to design the user experience to allow the driver to fully understand what’s happening and feel in control of the situation and safe at all time. And what can make you feel more in control of a product than knowing exactly how to use it at first sight? Apple’s legendary success in the past 20 years came hugely due to their revolutionary vision to drastically improve intuitivity of all their devices. They managed to turn an opaque world of computers into a line of sophisticated toys that even a 3-years-old kid can use. While the telecommunication world is evolving at an ever-growing speed, the design of automotive seems to go around in circles. While phones keep getting simpler, faster, becoming more intuitive and customizable, the cockpit of the car are evolving to look more and more like airplane cockpits. The driver is being drawn under an avalanche of buttons, control panels, dashboard features and blinking screens, adding to the time they need to find what they truly want. How can we invert this tendency? Possibly by making a car in a similar fashion as how we would make a smartphone: A tangible device that reduces the number of interaction steps by deleting the unnecessary functions, and merges the physical and digital world together so that the actions we perform fit perfectly with the instinctive gestures that correspond to it. A flexible platform that can evolve through app-like modules and adapt exactly to the user’s behaviors and preferences, displaying exactly what he or she needs and wants in times of convenience, and can be personalized to satisfy the ever-changing desires of the driver.
Software/Multimedia
1 DVD-ROM : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
"In Castlevania: Lords of Shadow, the origin of Dracula and his legendary connection with the Belmonts was revealed. In Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2, fans can expect thrilling new twists and challenges. In this shocking conclusion to the Lords of Shadow saga, Dracula returns once again, weakened and yearning for release from his immortal bonds. Facing a new and powerful threat, the vampire lord must reacquire his old powers--and only his castle holds the key. However, the famed Belmont clan also seek his ultimate destruction"--From www.metacritic.com.
"In Castlevania: Lords of Shadow, the origin of Dracula and his legendary connection with the Belmonts was revealed. In Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2, fans can expect thrilling new twists and challenges. In this shocking conclusion to the Lords of Shadow saga, Dracula returns once again, weakened and yearning for release from his immortal bonds. Facing a new and powerful threat, the vampire lord must reacquire his old powers--and only his castle holds the key. However, the famed Belmont clan also seek his ultimate destruction"--From www.metacritic.com.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4032 Unknown

12. CityEngine [2014]

Software/Multimedia
1 computer disc ; 4 3/4 in.
"Esri CityEngine is a stand-alone software product that provides professional users in architecture, urban planning, entertainment, GIS and general 3D content production with a unique conceptual design and modeling solution for the efficient creation of 3D cities and buildings."--Esri WWW site.
"Esri CityEngine is a stand-alone software product that provides professional users in architecture, urban planning, entertainment, GIS and general 3D content production with a unique conceptual design and modeling solution for the efficient creation of 3D cities and buildings."--Esri WWW site.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Status of items at Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner) Status
Media
T385 .C47 2013 Unknown
Software/Multimedia
1 computer optical disc : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Afflicted by an ancient curse of the undead, explore a world of grave danger and clash with other players in online play.
Afflicted by an ancient curse of the undead, explore a world of grave danger and clash with other players in online play.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4014 Unknown
Software/Multimedia
1 computer disc : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital $b optical $2 rda.
"The first expansion for Blizzard's popular RPG Diablo III, Reaper of Souls raises the level cap from 60 to 70, adds one new character class and one new artisan, adds a fifth act to the campaign, and introduces the new Adventure mode. The new Crusader class offers heavy armor, strong weapons, and holy magic as players battle a variety of new enemies and attempt to prevent the Angel of Death from destroying humanity. The Mystic artisan can enhance character equipment, and the Adventure mode lets gamers freely roam the entire world to accept bounties and explore dungeons."--AllGame guide.
"The first expansion for Blizzard's popular RPG Diablo III, Reaper of Souls raises the level cap from 60 to 70, adds one new character class and one new artisan, adds a fifth act to the campaign, and introduces the new Adventure mode. The new Crusader class offers heavy armor, strong weapons, and holy magic as players battle a variety of new enemies and attempt to prevent the Angel of Death from destroying humanity. The Mystic artisan can enhance character equipment, and the Adventure mode lets gamers freely roam the entire world to accept bounties and explore dungeons."--AllGame guide.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 3994 Unavailable In process

15. Don Pasquale [2014]

Video
1 videodisc (128 min.) : DVD video, sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Recordings
(no call number) Unavailable In process

16. Doshitemo furetakunai [2014 - ]

Video
2 videodiscs.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Collection
ME310 Project Based Engineering Design
Embraer, the Brazilian airline manufacturer, decided to partner with Stanford University and the University of Sao Paulo to solve the problem of improving the entire air travel experience for persons with limited mobility. In collaboration, we started this journey toward a solution through extensive needfinding and benchmarking. The needfinding centered on conducting user interviews for both the disabled passenger and the flight crew, while benchmarking focused on analyzing analogous situations, patents, regulations, and current concepts and solutions in place today. We then went through numerous prototyping cycles, gathering feedback from users as well as more information as we moved forward. Eventually we created 2 products that completely disrupt a wheelchair user's flying experience - a platform for storing their wheelchair that ensures it will arrive safely at their destination and a redesigned aisle wheelchair that provides increased comfort and support as our user moves thorough the cabin.
Embraer, the Brazilian airline manufacturer, decided to partner with Stanford University and the University of Sao Paulo to solve the problem of improving the entire air travel experience for persons with limited mobility. In collaboration, we started this journey toward a solution through extensive needfinding and benchmarking. The needfinding centered on conducting user interviews for both the disabled passenger and the flight crew, while benchmarking focused on analyzing analogous situations, patents, regulations, and current concepts and solutions in place today. We then went through numerous prototyping cycles, gathering feedback from users as well as more information as we moved forward. Eventually we created 2 products that completely disrupt a wheelchair user's flying experience - a platform for storing their wheelchair that ensures it will arrive safely at their destination and a redesigned aisle wheelchair that provides increased comfort and support as our user moves thorough the cabin.
Book
volume (loose-leaf) ; 26 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Stacks 1
Latest: year2014 (2014)
KF1439 .B6822 Unknown
Software/Multimedia
1 Blu-ray disc : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Final fantasy X: In the world of Spira, join the summoner Yuna in her quest to destroy the monster Sin.
Final fantasy X-2: Yuna seeks to resolve various conflicts among factions that are developing as the world of Spira changes.
Final fantasy X: In the world of Spira, join the summoner Yuna in her quest to destroy the monster Sin.
Final fantasy X-2: Yuna seeks to resolve various conflicts among factions that are developing as the world of Spira changes.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Media & Microtext Center (Lower level) Find it
ZMS 4023 Unknown