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Book
viii, 297 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Histories of jazz in France
  • Hugues Panassié's supernatural swing : criticism, politics and the iconic jazz recording
  • Jazz between art and entertainment : André Hodeir and Thelonious Monk
  • Cool going cold : Miles Davis and Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
  • Barney Wilen : phantoms and freedom
  • Looking for something we don't yet know : towards a French jazz
  • A good jazzman is a dead jazzman.
  • Histories of jazz in France
  • Hugues Panassié's supernatural swing : criticism, politics and the iconic jazz recording
  • Jazz between art and entertainment : André Hodeir and Thelonious Monk
  • Cool going cold : Miles Davis and Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
  • Barney Wilen : phantoms and freedom
  • Looking for something we don't yet know : towards a French jazz
  • A good jazzman is a dead jazzman.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3509 .F7 P47 2015 Unknown
Book
103 pages : many photographs ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
In process Request
ML3509 .G38 K377 2015 Available
Book
72 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 x 30 cm
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Book
ix, 229 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Prelude
  • Memphis soil
  • Out West, and then East
  • Marquee trajectory
  • The wilderness years
  • The Munich connection
  • Dialoguing with master Higgins
  • New millennial dance steps
  • Postlude : horizons on the run.
  • Prelude
  • Memphis soil
  • Out West, and then East
  • Marquee trajectory
  • The wilderness years
  • The Munich connection
  • Dialoguing with master Higgins
  • New millennial dance steps
  • Postlude : horizons on the run.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Book
xvi, 194 pages ; 23 cm
  • Setting up
  • A rhetorical aesthetic of jazz
  • What jazz is
  • Where jazz comes from
  • What jazz does
  • How jazz works
  • So what?
Jazz is born of collaboration, improvisation, and listening. In much the same way, the American democratic experience is rooted in the interaction of individuals. It is these two seemingly disparate, but ultimately thoroughly American, conceits that Gregory Clark examines in Civic Jazz. Melding Kenneth Burke's concept of rhetorical communication and jazz music's aesthetic encounters with a rigorous sort of democracy, this book weaves an innovative argument about how individuals can preserve and improve civic life in a democratic culture. Jazz music, Clark argues, demonstrates how this aesthetic rhetoric of identification can bind people together through their shared experience in a common project. While such shared experience does not demand agreement-indeed, it often has an air of competition-it does align people in practical effort and purpose. Similarly, Clark shows, Burke considered Americans inhabitants of a persistently rhetorical situation, in which each must choose constantly to identify with some and separate from others. Thought-provoking and path-breaking, Clark's harmonic mashup of music and rhetoric will appeal to scholars across disciplines as diverse as political science, performance studies, musicology, and literary criticism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Setting up
  • A rhetorical aesthetic of jazz
  • What jazz is
  • Where jazz comes from
  • What jazz does
  • How jazz works
  • So what?
Jazz is born of collaboration, improvisation, and listening. In much the same way, the American democratic experience is rooted in the interaction of individuals. It is these two seemingly disparate, but ultimately thoroughly American, conceits that Gregory Clark examines in Civic Jazz. Melding Kenneth Burke's concept of rhetorical communication and jazz music's aesthetic encounters with a rigorous sort of democracy, this book weaves an innovative argument about how individuals can preserve and improve civic life in a democratic culture. Jazz music, Clark argues, demonstrates how this aesthetic rhetoric of identification can bind people together through their shared experience in a common project. While such shared experience does not demand agreement-indeed, it often has an air of competition-it does align people in practical effort and purpose. Similarly, Clark shows, Burke considered Americans inhabitants of a persistently rhetorical situation, in which each must choose constantly to identify with some and separate from others. Thought-provoking and path-breaking, Clark's harmonic mashup of music and rhetoric will appeal to scholars across disciplines as diverse as political science, performance studies, musicology, and literary criticism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3508 .C53 2015 Unknown
Book
xii, 250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: Jazz as a Collective Problem Nicholas Gebhardt 2. Complaining Time is Over:" Network and Collective Strategies of The New York Musicians Organization Michael C. Heller 3. Playing politics: Dutch improvising musicians facing the authorities Loes Rusch 4. Sound Visions and Free Initiatives: The Cultural Politics of Creative Improvised Music Collectives A. Scott Currie 5. Musical Hybridity in the New European City: The Jazz Hip Hop Collectives of C-Mon & Kypski and Kytopia Kristin McGee 6. Collective Cultures and Live Jazz in Birmingham Tim Wall and Simon Barber 7. San Francisco State University's Music Federation: The Political Machine behind a Jazz Cooperative for Teachers Meredith Eliassen 8. MINNET: Transcending Genre Boundaries, Organizing Diversity Alf Arvidsson and Jorgen Adolfsson 9. 'Wonderbrass' as a South Wales Community Jazz Collective Rob Smith 10. Jazz networks in Austria - the young initiative JazzWerkstatt Christa Bruckner-Haring and Michael Kahr 11. Improvisational conduct and case studies from the margins - an insider's view on negotiating the collective Petter Frost Fadnes 12. Collective practice and digital mediation Andrew Dubber 13. Conclusion: Towards a Collective Jazz Studies Tony Whyton.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music documents the emergence of collective movements in jazz and improvised music. Jazz history is most often portrayed as a site for individual expression and revolves around the celebration of iconic figures, while the networks and collaborations that enable the music to maintain and sustain its cultural status are surprisingly under-investigated. This collection explores the history of musician-led collectives and the ways in which they offer a powerful counter-model for rethinking jazz practices in the post-war period. It includes studies of groups including the New York Musicians Organization, Sweden's Ett minne for livet, Wonderbrass from South Wales, the contemporary Dutch jazz-hip hop scene, and Austria's JazzWerkstatt. With an international list of contributors and examples from Europe and the United States, these twelve essays and case studies examine issues of shared aesthetic vision, socioeconomic and political factors, local education, and cultural values among improvising musicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction: Jazz as a Collective Problem Nicholas Gebhardt 2. Complaining Time is Over:" Network and Collective Strategies of The New York Musicians Organization Michael C. Heller 3. Playing politics: Dutch improvising musicians facing the authorities Loes Rusch 4. Sound Visions and Free Initiatives: The Cultural Politics of Creative Improvised Music Collectives A. Scott Currie 5. Musical Hybridity in the New European City: The Jazz Hip Hop Collectives of C-Mon & Kypski and Kytopia Kristin McGee 6. Collective Cultures and Live Jazz in Birmingham Tim Wall and Simon Barber 7. San Francisco State University's Music Federation: The Political Machine behind a Jazz Cooperative for Teachers Meredith Eliassen 8. MINNET: Transcending Genre Boundaries, Organizing Diversity Alf Arvidsson and Jorgen Adolfsson 9. 'Wonderbrass' as a South Wales Community Jazz Collective Rob Smith 10. Jazz networks in Austria - the young initiative JazzWerkstatt Christa Bruckner-Haring and Michael Kahr 11. Improvisational conduct and case studies from the margins - an insider's view on negotiating the collective Petter Frost Fadnes 12. Collective practice and digital mediation Andrew Dubber 13. Conclusion: Towards a Collective Jazz Studies Tony Whyton.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music documents the emergence of collective movements in jazz and improvised music. Jazz history is most often portrayed as a site for individual expression and revolves around the celebration of iconic figures, while the networks and collaborations that enable the music to maintain and sustain its cultural status are surprisingly under-investigated. This collection explores the history of musician-led collectives and the ways in which they offer a powerful counter-model for rethinking jazz practices in the post-war period. It includes studies of groups including the New York Musicians Organization, Sweden's Ett minne for livet, Wonderbrass from South Wales, the contemporary Dutch jazz-hip hop scene, and Austria's JazzWerkstatt. With an international list of contributors and examples from Europe and the United States, these twelve essays and case studies examine issues of shared aesthetic vision, socioeconomic and political factors, local education, and cultural values among improvising musicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3506 .C85 2015 Unknown
Book
xvi, 194 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1 Dress Theory, Fashion and a Jazz Aesthetic 2 A Stylish History of Jazz: 1900-1960 3 A Narrative of Jazz Modernity 4 Assessing Elitism and Branding in Jazz 5 Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference 6 Subversive Representation: Vernacular, Dress and Morality 7 Narcotics and Jazz: A Fashionable Addiction 8 Beyond the Gardenia: Billie Holiday 9 Aesthetics of the Jazz Dandy 10 Philadelphia Nightlife, Nostalgia and Popular Culture Coda Appendix I: Recommended Listening Appendix II: Recommended Viewing Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Born in the late 19th century, jazz gained mainstream popularity during a volatile period of racial segregation and gender inequality. It was in these adverse conditions that jazz performers discovered the power of dress as a visual tool used to defy mainstream societal constructs, shaping a new fashion and style aesthetic. Fashion and Jazz is the first study to identify the behaviours, signs and meanings that defined this newly evolving subculture. Drawing on fashion studies and cultural theory, the book provides an in-depth analysis of the social and political entanglements of jazz and dress, with individual chapters exploring key themes such as race, class and gender. Including a wide variety of case studies, ranging from Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald to Louis Armstrong and Chet Baker, it presents a critical and cultural analysis of jazz performers as modern icons of fashion and popular style. Addressing a number of previously underexplored areas of jazz culture, such as modern dandyism and the link between drug use and glamorous dress, Fashion and Jazz provides a fascinating history of fashion's dialogue with African-American art and style. It is essential reading for students of fashion, cultural studies, African-American studies and history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction 1 Dress Theory, Fashion and a Jazz Aesthetic 2 A Stylish History of Jazz: 1900-1960 3 A Narrative of Jazz Modernity 4 Assessing Elitism and Branding in Jazz 5 Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference 6 Subversive Representation: Vernacular, Dress and Morality 7 Narcotics and Jazz: A Fashionable Addiction 8 Beyond the Gardenia: Billie Holiday 9 Aesthetics of the Jazz Dandy 10 Philadelphia Nightlife, Nostalgia and Popular Culture Coda Appendix I: Recommended Listening Appendix II: Recommended Viewing Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Born in the late 19th century, jazz gained mainstream popularity during a volatile period of racial segregation and gender inequality. It was in these adverse conditions that jazz performers discovered the power of dress as a visual tool used to defy mainstream societal constructs, shaping a new fashion and style aesthetic. Fashion and Jazz is the first study to identify the behaviours, signs and meanings that defined this newly evolving subculture. Drawing on fashion studies and cultural theory, the book provides an in-depth analysis of the social and political entanglements of jazz and dress, with individual chapters exploring key themes such as race, class and gender. Including a wide variety of case studies, ranging from Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald to Louis Armstrong and Chet Baker, it presents a critical and cultural analysis of jazz performers as modern icons of fashion and popular style. Addressing a number of previously underexplored areas of jazz culture, such as modern dandyism and the link between drug use and glamorous dress, Fashion and Jazz provides a fascinating history of fashion's dialogue with African-American art and style. It is essential reading for students of fashion, cultural studies, African-American studies and history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
GT596 .M378 2015 Unknown
Book
xix, 256 pages ; 24 cm.
For the first time in English, this is the classic treatise that developed a radical new understanding of free jazz and African American culture. In 1971, French jazz critics Philippe Carles and Jean-Louis Comolli co-wrote Free Jazz/Black Power, a treatise on the racial and political implications of jazz and jazz criticism. It remains a testimony to the long ignored encounter of radical African American music and French left-wing criticism. Carles and Comolli set out to defend a genre vilified by jazz critics on both sides of the Atlantic by exposing the new sound's ties to African American culture, history, and the political struggle that was raging in the early 1970s. This analysis of jazz criticism and its production is astutely self-aware. It critiques the critics, building a work of cultural studies in a time and place where the practice was virtually unknown. The authors reached radical conclusions - free jazz was a revolutionary reaction against white domination, was the musical counterpart to the Black Power movement, and was a music that demanded a similar political commitment. The impact of this book is difficult to overstate, as it made readers reconsider their response to African American music. In some cases it changed the way musicians thought about and played jazz. It remains indispensable to the study of the relation of American free jazz to European audiences, critics, and artists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
For the first time in English, this is the classic treatise that developed a radical new understanding of free jazz and African American culture. In 1971, French jazz critics Philippe Carles and Jean-Louis Comolli co-wrote Free Jazz/Black Power, a treatise on the racial and political implications of jazz and jazz criticism. It remains a testimony to the long ignored encounter of radical African American music and French left-wing criticism. Carles and Comolli set out to defend a genre vilified by jazz critics on both sides of the Atlantic by exposing the new sound's ties to African American culture, history, and the political struggle that was raging in the early 1970s. This analysis of jazz criticism and its production is astutely self-aware. It critiques the critics, building a work of cultural studies in a time and place where the practice was virtually unknown. The authors reached radical conclusions - free jazz was a revolutionary reaction against white domination, was the musical counterpart to the Black Power movement, and was a music that demanded a similar political commitment. The impact of this book is difficult to overstate, as it made readers reconsider their response to African American music. In some cases it changed the way musicians thought about and played jazz. It remains indispensable to the study of the relation of American free jazz to European audiences, critics, and artists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3561 .J3 C3213 2015 Unknown
Book
329 pages ; 22 cm
Antony and Cleopatra. Helen of Troy and Paris. Romeo and Juliet. And now... Henry and Flora. For centuries Love and Death have chosen their players. They have set the rules, rolled the dice, and kept close, ready to influence, angling for supremacy. And Death has always won. Always. Could there ever be one time, one place, one pair whose love would truly tip the balance? Meet Flora Saudade, an African-American girl who dreams of becoming the next Amelia Earhart by day and sings in the smoky jazz clubs of Seattle by night. Meet Henry Bishop, born a few blocks and a million worlds away, a white boy with his future assured -- a wealthy adoptive family in the midst of the Great Depression, a college scholarship, and all the opportunities in the world seemingly available to him. The players have been chosen. The dice have been rolled. But when human beings make moves of their own, what happens next is anyone's guess.
Antony and Cleopatra. Helen of Troy and Paris. Romeo and Juliet. And now... Henry and Flora. For centuries Love and Death have chosen their players. They have set the rules, rolled the dice, and kept close, ready to influence, angling for supremacy. And Death has always won. Always. Could there ever be one time, one place, one pair whose love would truly tip the balance? Meet Flora Saudade, an African-American girl who dreams of becoming the next Amelia Earhart by day and sings in the smoky jazz clubs of Seattle by night. Meet Henry Bishop, born a few blocks and a million worlds away, a white boy with his future assured -- a wealthy adoptive family in the midst of the Great Depression, a college scholarship, and all the opportunities in the world seemingly available to him. The players have been chosen. The dice have been rolled. But when human beings make moves of their own, what happens next is anyone's guess.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Book
xvi, 537 pages ; 24 cm
Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature is a multidisciplinary exploration of the ways that African American ohoto musicuminstrelsy, ragtime, jazz, and especially bluesuemerged into the American cultural mainstream in the nineteenth century and ultii??mately dominated American music and literature from 1920 to 1929. Exploring the deep and enduring relationship between music and literature, Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature examines the diverse ways in which African American ohoto music ini??fluenced American cultureuparticularly literatureuin early twentieth century America. Steven C. Tracy provides a history of the fusion of Afrii??can and European elements that formed African American ohoto music, and considers how terms like ragtime, jazz, and blues developed their own particular meanings for American music and society. He draws from the fields of literature, literary criticism, cultural anthropology, American studies, and folklore to demonstrate how blues as a musical and poetic form has been a critical influence on American literature. Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature begins by highlighting instances in which American writers, including Herman Melville, Stephen Crane, and Gertrude Stein, use African American culi??ture and music in their work, and then characterizes the social context of the Jazz Age, discussing how African American music reflected the wild abandon of the time. Tracy focuses on how a variety of schools of early twentieth century writers, from modernists to members of the Harlem Renaissance to dramatists and more, used their connections with ohoto music to give their own work meaning. TracyAEs extensive and detailed understanding of how African American ohoto music operates has produced a fresh and original perspective on its influence on mainstream American literature and culture. An experienced blues musician himself, Tracy draws on his performance background to offer an added dimension to his analysis. Where ani??other blues scholar might only analyse blues language, Tracy shows how the language is actually performed. Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature is the first book to offer such a refreshingly broad interdisciplinary vision of the influence of African American ohoto music on American literature. It is an essential addition to the library of serious scholars of American and African American literature and culture and blues aficionados alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature is a multidisciplinary exploration of the ways that African American ohoto musicuminstrelsy, ragtime, jazz, and especially bluesuemerged into the American cultural mainstream in the nineteenth century and ultii??mately dominated American music and literature from 1920 to 1929. Exploring the deep and enduring relationship between music and literature, Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature examines the diverse ways in which African American ohoto music ini??fluenced American cultureuparticularly literatureuin early twentieth century America. Steven C. Tracy provides a history of the fusion of Afrii??can and European elements that formed African American ohoto music, and considers how terms like ragtime, jazz, and blues developed their own particular meanings for American music and society. He draws from the fields of literature, literary criticism, cultural anthropology, American studies, and folklore to demonstrate how blues as a musical and poetic form has been a critical influence on American literature. Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature begins by highlighting instances in which American writers, including Herman Melville, Stephen Crane, and Gertrude Stein, use African American culi??ture and music in their work, and then characterizes the social context of the Jazz Age, discussing how African American music reflected the wild abandon of the time. Tracy focuses on how a variety of schools of early twentieth century writers, from modernists to members of the Harlem Renaissance to dramatists and more, used their connections with ohoto music to give their own work meaning. TracyAEs extensive and detailed understanding of how African American ohoto music operates has produced a fresh and original perspective on its influence on mainstream American literature and culture. An experienced blues musician himself, Tracy draws on his performance background to offer an added dimension to his analysis. Where ani??other blues scholar might only analyse blues language, Tracy shows how the language is actually performed. Hot Music, Ragmentation, and the Bluing of American Literature is the first book to offer such a refreshingly broad interdisciplinary vision of the influence of African American ohoto music on American literature. It is an essential addition to the library of serious scholars of American and African American literature and culture and blues aficionados alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
PS153 .N5 T67 2015 Unknown

11. Jazz [2015]

Book
xix, 473, a66 p. : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3508 .D47 2015 Unknown
Book
245 pages ; 25 cm
"In the midst of boomtown Chicago, two Jewish families have suffered terrible blows. The Lehrmans, who run a small hat factory, lost their beloved son Harold in a blizzard. The Chimbrovas, who run a saloon, lost three of their boys on the SS Eastland when it sank in 1915. Each family holds out hope that one of their remaining children will rise to carry on the family business. But Benny Lehrman has no interest in making hats. His true passion is piano--especially jazz. At night he sneaks down to the South Side, slipping into predominantly black clubs to hear jazz groups play. One night he is called out and asked to sit in on a group. His playing is first-rate, and the other musicians are impressed"--Amazon.com.
"In the midst of boomtown Chicago, two Jewish families have suffered terrible blows. The Lehrmans, who run a small hat factory, lost their beloved son Harold in a blizzard. The Chimbrovas, who run a saloon, lost three of their boys on the SS Eastland when it sank in 1915. Each family holds out hope that one of their remaining children will rise to carry on the family business. But Benny Lehrman has no interest in making hats. His true passion is piano--especially jazz. At night he sneaks down to the South Side, slipping into predominantly black clubs to hear jazz groups play. One night he is called out and asked to sit in on a group. His playing is first-rate, and the other musicians are impressed"--Amazon.com.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
HAS Fiction (Lane Room) Find it
PS3563 .O87445 J39 2015 Unknown
Book
239 p. ; 23 cm.
  • En allant vers Oklahoma -- La formation d'un intellectuel noir -- Uptown New York -- Le moderniste noir et l'héritage vernaculaire -- Le jazz moderne : Ellison face à ses contradicteurs -- Le pur, l'impur, le masque -- De quelques manifestations du fore noir -- Au-delà de la race : circulation du Tore -- Double conscience et Aufklarung.
"La vie de Ralph Ellison (1913-1994) est exceptionnelle. Né en Oklahoma, six ans seulement après le rattachement de ce territoire indien à l'Union, il est l'enfant de multiples migrations : noire avec ses parents pionniers attirés par le rêve américain dans ce nouvel État ; indienne avec sa mère ; juive, avec des employeurs qui lui apprennent le yiddish. Une telle identité lui a permis de prétendre choisir ses ancêtres et de ne pas souscrire aux diverses mystiques de la négritude, position qui le mettra en porte-à-faux vis-à-vis de la génération radicale des années 1960, celle qui faisait rimer free jazz et black power. C'est en écrivant sur la musique, le jazz en particulier, que Ralph Ellison exprimera le mieux ses idées. Le jazz, loin de consister en un repli frileux sur une identité se suffisant à elle-même, a eu le pouvoir de recycler tant d'influences diverses qu'il appartient à part entière à la culture occidentale. C'est même cette dernière qui a pris, depuis, un peu de la couleur du blues. C'est à une nouvelle façon d'envisager les rapports des Noirs à la modernité que nous invite Ellison et qu'explore pour nous ce livre où se répondent musique, littérature et anthropologie."--P. [4] of cover.
  • En allant vers Oklahoma -- La formation d'un intellectuel noir -- Uptown New York -- Le moderniste noir et l'héritage vernaculaire -- Le jazz moderne : Ellison face à ses contradicteurs -- Le pur, l'impur, le masque -- De quelques manifestations du fore noir -- Au-delà de la race : circulation du Tore -- Double conscience et Aufklarung.
"La vie de Ralph Ellison (1913-1994) est exceptionnelle. Né en Oklahoma, six ans seulement après le rattachement de ce territoire indien à l'Union, il est l'enfant de multiples migrations : noire avec ses parents pionniers attirés par le rêve américain dans ce nouvel État ; indienne avec sa mère ; juive, avec des employeurs qui lui apprennent le yiddish. Une telle identité lui a permis de prétendre choisir ses ancêtres et de ne pas souscrire aux diverses mystiques de la négritude, position qui le mettra en porte-à-faux vis-à-vis de la génération radicale des années 1960, celle qui faisait rimer free jazz et black power. C'est en écrivant sur la musique, le jazz en particulier, que Ralph Ellison exprimera le mieux ses idées. Le jazz, loin de consister en un repli frileux sur une identité se suffisant à elle-même, a eu le pouvoir de recycler tant d'influences diverses qu'il appartient à part entière à la culture occidentale. C'est même cette dernière qui a pris, depuis, un peu de la couleur du blues. C'est à une nouvelle façon d'envisager les rapports des Noirs à la modernité que nous invite Ellison et qu'explore pour nous ce livre où se répondent musique, littérature et anthropologie."--P. [4] of cover.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
On order
(no call number) Unavailable On order Request
Book
xv, 246 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction 2. Pimps, Rebels, and Volkswagens 3. Autoeroticism: Sex, Cars, and Jazz 4. The New Sound of Cola 5. "The Bank of Music" 6. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Jazz Sells: Music, Marketing, and Meaning examines the issues of jazz, consumption, and capitalism through advertising. On television, on the Internet, in radio, and in print, advertising is a critically important medium for the mass dissemination of music and musical meaning. This book is a study of the use of the jazz genre as a musical signifier in promotional efforts, exploring how the relationship between brand, jazz music, and jazz discourses come together to create meaning for the product and the consumer. At the same time, it examines how jazz offers an invaluable lens through which to examine the complex and often contradictory culture of consumption upon which capitalism is predicated.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction 2. Pimps, Rebels, and Volkswagens 3. Autoeroticism: Sex, Cars, and Jazz 4. The New Sound of Cola 5. "The Bank of Music" 6. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Jazz Sells: Music, Marketing, and Meaning examines the issues of jazz, consumption, and capitalism through advertising. On television, on the Internet, in radio, and in print, advertising is a critically important medium for the mass dissemination of music and musical meaning. This book is a study of the use of the jazz genre as a musical signifier in promotional efforts, exploring how the relationship between brand, jazz music, and jazz discourses come together to create meaning for the product and the consumer. At the same time, it examines how jazz offers an invaluable lens through which to examine the complex and often contradictory culture of consumption upon which capitalism is predicated.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3506 .L38 2015 Unknown
Book
xiv, 202 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Climate
  • Development
  • Preparation
  • Music
  • Post-production
  • Aftermath
  • Beyond brew
  • Miles in 3-D : image of Bitches Brew.
This is the first close critical treatment of the album that shook jazz with its electric sound and rock-influenced style. Listen to This stands is the first book exclusively dedicated to Miles Davis' watershed 1969 album, Bitches Brew. It traces its incarnations and inspirations for ten-plus years before its release. The album arrived as the jazz scene waned beneath the rise of rock and roll and as Davis (1926-1991) faced large changes in social conditions affecting the African-American consciousness. This new climate served as a catalyst for an experiment that many considered a major departure. Davis' new music projected rock and roll sensibilities, the experimental essence of 1960s' counterculture, yet also harsh dissonances of African-American reality. Many listeners embraced it, while others misunderstood and rejected it. Listen to This is not just the story of Bitches Brew. It reveals much of the legend of Miles Davis - his attitude and will, his grace under pressure, his bands, his relationship to the masses, his business and personal etiquette, and his response to extraordinary social conditions seemingly aligned to bring him down. Svorinich revisits the mystery and scepticism surrounding the album, and places it into both a historical and musical context using new interviews, original analysis, recently found recordings, unearthed session data sheets, memoranda, letters, musical transcriptions, scores, and a wealth of other material.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Climate
  • Development
  • Preparation
  • Music
  • Post-production
  • Aftermath
  • Beyond brew
  • Miles in 3-D : image of Bitches Brew.
This is the first close critical treatment of the album that shook jazz with its electric sound and rock-influenced style. Listen to This stands is the first book exclusively dedicated to Miles Davis' watershed 1969 album, Bitches Brew. It traces its incarnations and inspirations for ten-plus years before its release. The album arrived as the jazz scene waned beneath the rise of rock and roll and as Davis (1926-1991) faced large changes in social conditions affecting the African-American consciousness. This new climate served as a catalyst for an experiment that many considered a major departure. Davis' new music projected rock and roll sensibilities, the experimental essence of 1960s' counterculture, yet also harsh dissonances of African-American reality. Many listeners embraced it, while others misunderstood and rejected it. Listen to This is not just the story of Bitches Brew. It reveals much of the legend of Miles Davis - his attitude and will, his grace under pressure, his bands, his relationship to the masses, his business and personal etiquette, and his response to extraordinary social conditions seemingly aligned to bring him down. Svorinich revisits the mystery and scepticism surrounding the album, and places it into both a historical and musical context using new interviews, original analysis, recently found recordings, unearthed session data sheets, memoranda, letters, musical transcriptions, scores, and a wealth of other material.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML419 .D39 S86 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 377 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword Preface 1. A Face not Built for Gloom (1935-1951) 2. Boy Wonder Terrorist (1951-1955) 3. '56 not '45 (1956-1958) 4. The End of the Old Order (1958-1959) 5. Now its Who have they Got? (1959-1961) 6. Down in the Village (1961-1962) 7. Tubby Hayes Loves you Madly (1963-1964) 8. The Best of Both Worlds (1964-1965) 9. Addictive Tendencies (1966-1967) 10. The Other Scene (1967-1968) 11. The Beginning of the End 91969-1972) 12. It'll be me Next (1972-1973) Afterword: The Lost Leader - The Legacy of Tubby Hayes Discography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Forty years have elapsed since the death of the British jazz legend Tubby Hayes and yet his story still continues to captivate. Beginning as a precociously talented teenage saxophonist, he took first the local and then the international jazz scene by storm, displaying gifts equal to the finest American jazzmen. He appeared with none other than Duke Ellington and proved almost single-handedly that British jazz need not labour under an inferiority complex. Hayes' triumphs during the 1950's and 60's enabled still later generations of English musicians to take their music onto the world stage. However his story, distorted by the folklore surrounding his tragically early death, aged only 38, has rarely been accurately recorded. Much of what has been written, broadcast and recounted about Hayes has added only confusion to our understanding of his short but brilliant life.In this book, award-winning saxophonist and writer Simon Spillett, widely regarded as the world's leading authority on Hayes and his work, painstakingly outlines a career which alternated professional success and personal downfall.Using credible eye-witness recollection, drawn from conversations with Hayes' family, partners, friends and musical colleagues, unique access to Hayes own tape, photographicand personal archives, and extensive contemporary research material, Spillett has reconstructed the trajectory of his subject's life both candidly and respectfully. Hayes' meteoric musical rise from boy wonder to youthfully mature virtuoso, from saxophonist to multi-instrumentalist and composer is faithfully documented, as is his struggle for relevance as rock, pop and the avant-garde took over the musicallandscape in the 1960s. For the first time, the opaque world of his inconsistent and troubled personal life is recounted in full. His unsettled childhood, his battles with addiction and ill-health and his difficult personal relationships are all exposed, and the confused accounts of his final days are unravelled and made clear as never before.The Long Shadow of The Little Giant also traces Hayes' path through one of the most vibrant periods of history, beginning in the austerity of post-World War Two London, through the "never had it so good" 1950's, the "Swinging Sixties" and into the privations of the "State of Emergency" early Seventies, and outlines the cultural and musical developments of the times which underpinned the life of arguably theUK's finest ever jazz musician.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Foreword Preface 1. A Face not Built for Gloom (1935-1951) 2. Boy Wonder Terrorist (1951-1955) 3. '56 not '45 (1956-1958) 4. The End of the Old Order (1958-1959) 5. Now its Who have they Got? (1959-1961) 6. Down in the Village (1961-1962) 7. Tubby Hayes Loves you Madly (1963-1964) 8. The Best of Both Worlds (1964-1965) 9. Addictive Tendencies (1966-1967) 10. The Other Scene (1967-1968) 11. The Beginning of the End 91969-1972) 12. It'll be me Next (1972-1973) Afterword: The Lost Leader - The Legacy of Tubby Hayes Discography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Forty years have elapsed since the death of the British jazz legend Tubby Hayes and yet his story still continues to captivate. Beginning as a precociously talented teenage saxophonist, he took first the local and then the international jazz scene by storm, displaying gifts equal to the finest American jazzmen. He appeared with none other than Duke Ellington and proved almost single-handedly that British jazz need not labour under an inferiority complex. Hayes' triumphs during the 1950's and 60's enabled still later generations of English musicians to take their music onto the world stage. However his story, distorted by the folklore surrounding his tragically early death, aged only 38, has rarely been accurately recorded. Much of what has been written, broadcast and recounted about Hayes has added only confusion to our understanding of his short but brilliant life.In this book, award-winning saxophonist and writer Simon Spillett, widely regarded as the world's leading authority on Hayes and his work, painstakingly outlines a career which alternated professional success and personal downfall.Using credible eye-witness recollection, drawn from conversations with Hayes' family, partners, friends and musical colleagues, unique access to Hayes own tape, photographicand personal archives, and extensive contemporary research material, Spillett has reconstructed the trajectory of his subject's life both candidly and respectfully. Hayes' meteoric musical rise from boy wonder to youthfully mature virtuoso, from saxophonist to multi-instrumentalist and composer is faithfully documented, as is his struggle for relevance as rock, pop and the avant-garde took over the musicallandscape in the 1960s. For the first time, the opaque world of his inconsistent and troubled personal life is recounted in full. His unsettled childhood, his battles with addiction and ill-health and his difficult personal relationships are all exposed, and the confused accounts of his final days are unravelled and made clear as never before.The Long Shadow of The Little Giant also traces Hayes' path through one of the most vibrant periods of history, beginning in the austerity of post-World War Two London, through the "never had it so good" 1950's, the "Swinging Sixties" and into the privations of the "State of Emergency" early Seventies, and outlines the cultural and musical developments of the times which underpinned the life of arguably theUK's finest ever jazz musician.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML419 .H3525 S65 2015 Unknown
Book
xx, 195 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Foreword Acknowledgments Introduction Part I: Prelude Chapter 1: Stuart Davis and the Art of Jazz Chapter 2: Arthur Dove and George Gershwin: A Brush with Rhapsody in Blue Chapter 3: Romare Bearden and Visual Jazz Chapter 4: European Artists and American Jazz Chapter 5: Kandinsky and Schoenberg: On the Verge Part II: Interlude 1 Chapter 6: Dave Brubeck and His Reflections on Miro: Music and Art across Time Chapter 7: Paul Klee: The Music in the Art Chapter 8: Mark Rothko and Morton Feldman: Somewhere between Presence and Absence, Sound and Silence Chapter 9: Earle Brown and Alexander Calder: Who's in Control? Chapter 10: John Cage and Robert Rauschenberg: Life in Art - Art in Life Part III: Interlude 2 Chapter 11: Claude Debussy and Fin de Siecle Chapter 12: Cubism in Art and Music Chapter 13: Georgia O'Keeffe and American Modernist Composers: The Spirit of a New Century Chapter 14: Diego Rivera and Carlos Chavez: Voices of Mexico in Art and Music Chapter 15: Minimalism in Art and Music Postlude Glossary Works Cited About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Looking and Listening: Conversations between Modern Art and Music invites the art and music lover to place these two realms of creative endeavor into an open dialog. Although the worlds of music and visual art often seem to take separate paths, they are usually parallel. Conductor and art connoisseur Brenda Leach takes unique pairings of well-known visual art works and musical compositions from the twentieth century to identify the shared sources of inspiration, as well as similarities in theme, style, and technique, to explore the historical and cultural influences on the great artists and composers in the twentieth century. Looking and Listening asks and answers: *What does jazz have in common with paintings by Stuart Davis and Piet Mondrian? *How did Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue affect the work of artist Arthur Dove? *How did painter Georgia O'Keeffe and composer Aaron Copland capture the spirit of a youthful America entering the twentieth century? *What did Kandinsky and Schoenberg share in their artistic visions? Leach takes readers on a whirlwind tour of the lives of these artists, surveying many of the key movements in the twentieth century by comparing representative works from the modern masters of the visual arts and music. Leach's refreshing and innovation approach will interest those passionate about twentieth-century art and music and is ideal for any student or instructor, museum docent, or music programmer seeking to draw the lines of connection between these two art forms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Foreword Acknowledgments Introduction Part I: Prelude Chapter 1: Stuart Davis and the Art of Jazz Chapter 2: Arthur Dove and George Gershwin: A Brush with Rhapsody in Blue Chapter 3: Romare Bearden and Visual Jazz Chapter 4: European Artists and American Jazz Chapter 5: Kandinsky and Schoenberg: On the Verge Part II: Interlude 1 Chapter 6: Dave Brubeck and His Reflections on Miro: Music and Art across Time Chapter 7: Paul Klee: The Music in the Art Chapter 8: Mark Rothko and Morton Feldman: Somewhere between Presence and Absence, Sound and Silence Chapter 9: Earle Brown and Alexander Calder: Who's in Control? Chapter 10: John Cage and Robert Rauschenberg: Life in Art - Art in Life Part III: Interlude 2 Chapter 11: Claude Debussy and Fin de Siecle Chapter 12: Cubism in Art and Music Chapter 13: Georgia O'Keeffe and American Modernist Composers: The Spirit of a New Century Chapter 14: Diego Rivera and Carlos Chavez: Voices of Mexico in Art and Music Chapter 15: Minimalism in Art and Music Postlude Glossary Works Cited About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Looking and Listening: Conversations between Modern Art and Music invites the art and music lover to place these two realms of creative endeavor into an open dialog. Although the worlds of music and visual art often seem to take separate paths, they are usually parallel. Conductor and art connoisseur Brenda Leach takes unique pairings of well-known visual art works and musical compositions from the twentieth century to identify the shared sources of inspiration, as well as similarities in theme, style, and technique, to explore the historical and cultural influences on the great artists and composers in the twentieth century. Looking and Listening asks and answers: *What does jazz have in common with paintings by Stuart Davis and Piet Mondrian? *How did Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue affect the work of artist Arthur Dove? *How did painter Georgia O'Keeffe and composer Aaron Copland capture the spirit of a youthful America entering the twentieth century? *What did Kandinsky and Schoenberg share in their artistic visions? Leach takes readers on a whirlwind tour of the lives of these artists, surveying many of the key movements in the twentieth century by comparing representative works from the modern masters of the visual arts and music. Leach's refreshing and innovation approach will interest those passionate about twentieth-century art and music and is ideal for any student or instructor, museum docent, or music programmer seeking to draw the lines of connection between these two art forms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3849 .L42 2015 Unknown
Book
455 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Einleitung
  • "In mir habt Ihr einen, auf den könnt Ihr nicht bauen" : Konstanten und Konstruktionen
  • Eva
  • Was ist wahr? Leben in unsicheren Zeiten
  • "The face on the cutting-room floor"
  • Vorbild Brecht
  • "In diesem Sinne bin ich ein Jude" : Lob der Diaspora
  • Hören Die Ethnologie des Jazz
  • Das schwarze London : eine transkulturelle Erfahrung
  • "A History of American Negro Music"
  • "The anthropologist looks at Jazz"
  • Im Krieg der Kritiker : Blues gegen Swing und Bebop
  • Jazz in Paris
  • Jazz im Film
  • Der Beat ist zurück : das Blues-Revival in Großbritannien
  • Jazz in Deutschland
  • Die spanische Färbung : Kreolischer Jazz
  • Sound and vision : Beat im Fernsehen
  • Schwarzes Licht, weißer Schatten : Free Jazz und Black Nationalism
  • "Ich möchte wohl ein Neger sein"
  • Sehen
  • Das Leben auf der Leinwand
  • National Film Board of Canada
  • Laokoon im Schaffenskampf
  • Borneman und Grierson
  • Inhalt und Form
  • Arbeit und Vergnügen
  • Verfolgung der Familien
  • UNESCO
  • Back to Berlin
  • "Dear Ernest, live simply" : Zusammenarbeit mit Orson Wel-les
  • Freiberuflich für Fernsehen und Radio
  • In den Chefetagen des britischen Privatfernsehens
  • Zurück nach Deutschland?
  • Freies Fernsehen
  • Geschmackswellen erfinden : Bornemans Konzept
  • Das Programm
  • Unterhaltung oder Information?
  • Programm und Ästhetik des Fernsehens
  • Familien- oder Zielgruppenprogramm?
  • "Deutsches" oder "englisches" Fernsehen?
  • Berühren Sex und Gesellschaft
  • Freiheit von Angst : die "sexuelle revolution"
  • Die Sexuallexika
  • Kindliche Sexualität
  • Das veröffentlichte Private : Bornemans Sexleben
  • "Marx der Frauenbewegung" : "Das Patriarchat" und der Feminismus der 70er Jahre
  • Die Entstehung des "Hauptwerks"
  • Bornemans Psychologie und die Verwissenschaftlichung des Sozialen
  • Die öffentliche Debatte um "Das Patriarchat"
  • Die Rezeption in der Frauenbewegung
  • Bornemans Wunschautobiografie : die "Ur-Szene"
  • "Sex-Onkel" in den Medien
  • Neue Revue
  • Die Auseinandersetzung mit Volkmar Sigusch
  • Sexualität konkret
  • Trieb und Strafe
  • Dauergast in den Talkshows
  • Pädophilie und Kindesmiss-brauch
  • Aus!
  • Leichen am Wegrand Schluss
  • Anmerkungen
  • Abkürzungen
  • Bildnachweis
  • Quellen und Literatur
  • Personenregister.
  • Einleitung
  • "In mir habt Ihr einen, auf den könnt Ihr nicht bauen" : Konstanten und Konstruktionen
  • Eva
  • Was ist wahr? Leben in unsicheren Zeiten
  • "The face on the cutting-room floor"
  • Vorbild Brecht
  • "In diesem Sinne bin ich ein Jude" : Lob der Diaspora
  • Hören Die Ethnologie des Jazz
  • Das schwarze London : eine transkulturelle Erfahrung
  • "A History of American Negro Music"
  • "The anthropologist looks at Jazz"
  • Im Krieg der Kritiker : Blues gegen Swing und Bebop
  • Jazz in Paris
  • Jazz im Film
  • Der Beat ist zurück : das Blues-Revival in Großbritannien
  • Jazz in Deutschland
  • Die spanische Färbung : Kreolischer Jazz
  • Sound and vision : Beat im Fernsehen
  • Schwarzes Licht, weißer Schatten : Free Jazz und Black Nationalism
  • "Ich möchte wohl ein Neger sein"
  • Sehen
  • Das Leben auf der Leinwand
  • National Film Board of Canada
  • Laokoon im Schaffenskampf
  • Borneman und Grierson
  • Inhalt und Form
  • Arbeit und Vergnügen
  • Verfolgung der Familien
  • UNESCO
  • Back to Berlin
  • "Dear Ernest, live simply" : Zusammenarbeit mit Orson Wel-les
  • Freiberuflich für Fernsehen und Radio
  • In den Chefetagen des britischen Privatfernsehens
  • Zurück nach Deutschland?
  • Freies Fernsehen
  • Geschmackswellen erfinden : Bornemans Konzept
  • Das Programm
  • Unterhaltung oder Information?
  • Programm und Ästhetik des Fernsehens
  • Familien- oder Zielgruppenprogramm?
  • "Deutsches" oder "englisches" Fernsehen?
  • Berühren Sex und Gesellschaft
  • Freiheit von Angst : die "sexuelle revolution"
  • Die Sexuallexika
  • Kindliche Sexualität
  • Das veröffentlichte Private : Bornemans Sexleben
  • "Marx der Frauenbewegung" : "Das Patriarchat" und der Feminismus der 70er Jahre
  • Die Entstehung des "Hauptwerks"
  • Bornemans Psychologie und die Verwissenschaftlichung des Sozialen
  • Die öffentliche Debatte um "Das Patriarchat"
  • Die Rezeption in der Frauenbewegung
  • Bornemans Wunschautobiografie : die "Ur-Szene"
  • "Sex-Onkel" in den Medien
  • Neue Revue
  • Die Auseinandersetzung mit Volkmar Sigusch
  • Sexualität konkret
  • Trieb und Strafe
  • Dauergast in den Talkshows
  • Pädophilie und Kindesmiss-brauch
  • Aus!
  • Leichen am Wegrand Schluss
  • Anmerkungen
  • Abkürzungen
  • Bildnachweis
  • Quellen und Literatur
  • Personenregister.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
ML423 .B67 S54 2015 Available
Book
xvi, 369 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Chapter One: First Meditations -- Chapter Two: Procession of the Great Ancestry: Traditions Jazz and Religious -- Chapter Three: Shadows on a Wall: Jazz Narrates American Religions -- Chapter Four: Urban Magic: Jazz Communitarianism -- Chapter Five: The Magic of Juju: Improvising Ritual -- Chapter Six: The Tao of Mad Phat: Jazz Meditation and Mysticism -- Chapter Seven: Other Planes of There: Jazz Cosmologies and Harmonialism -- Chapter Eight: Spirits Rejoice! Beyond "Religion" -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Spirits Rejoice! takes its name from a record by jazz saxophonist of the mid-1960s, Albert Ayler-later used, with an exclamation point added, by Louis Moholo-Moholo-and is appropriated in Jason Bivins's book to express the overlap of religion and jazz music through history. Bivins explore themes that have resounded throughout the musical genre that are also integral to the practice of religions in the United States. Much writing about jazz falls into one of three categories: glorified record reviews or discographies; impressionistic descriptions of the actual sounds and dense musicological analyses; or contextualizing it within institutions or extant narratives that are easier to analyze. Using religious studies as a point of comparison Bivins seeks to go beyond these approaches. Instead, he takes to heart a commonly invoked characteristic of jazz, and improvises on the standard questions and stories that might be told. Rather than producing a history or a series of biographical entries, Spirits Rejoice! will generate a collection of themes, pursuits, reoccurring foci, and interpretations. When ranging across the cultural history of American jazz, these themes emerge not just in the musicians' own words (in interviews, liner notes, or journals) but also from the bandstand, audience reception, and critical interrogation. Bivins looks at themes such as musical creativity as related to specific religious traditions, jazz as a form of ritual and healing, and jazz cosmologies and metaphysics, drawing conclusions that explore how "the sound of spirits rejoicing" challenges not only prevailing understandings of race and music, but also the way we think about "religion.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Chapter One: First Meditations -- Chapter Two: Procession of the Great Ancestry: Traditions Jazz and Religious -- Chapter Three: Shadows on a Wall: Jazz Narrates American Religions -- Chapter Four: Urban Magic: Jazz Communitarianism -- Chapter Five: The Magic of Juju: Improvising Ritual -- Chapter Six: The Tao of Mad Phat: Jazz Meditation and Mysticism -- Chapter Seven: Other Planes of There: Jazz Cosmologies and Harmonialism -- Chapter Eight: Spirits Rejoice! Beyond "Religion" -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Spirits Rejoice! takes its name from a record by jazz saxophonist of the mid-1960s, Albert Ayler-later used, with an exclamation point added, by Louis Moholo-Moholo-and is appropriated in Jason Bivins's book to express the overlap of religion and jazz music through history. Bivins explore themes that have resounded throughout the musical genre that are also integral to the practice of religions in the United States. Much writing about jazz falls into one of three categories: glorified record reviews or discographies; impressionistic descriptions of the actual sounds and dense musicological analyses; or contextualizing it within institutions or extant narratives that are easier to analyze. Using religious studies as a point of comparison Bivins seeks to go beyond these approaches. Instead, he takes to heart a commonly invoked characteristic of jazz, and improvises on the standard questions and stories that might be told. Rather than producing a history or a series of biographical entries, Spirits Rejoice! will generate a collection of themes, pursuits, reoccurring foci, and interpretations. When ranging across the cultural history of American jazz, these themes emerge not just in the musicians' own words (in interviews, liner notes, or journals) but also from the bandstand, audience reception, and critical interrogation. Bivins looks at themes such as musical creativity as related to specific religious traditions, jazz as a form of ritual and healing, and jazz cosmologies and metaphysics, drawing conclusions that explore how "the sound of spirits rejoicing" challenges not only prevailing understandings of race and music, but also the way we think about "religion.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ML3921.8 .J39 B58 2015 Unknown
Book
xvi, 269 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm.
  • Troubling jazz/abínibí/black theatre for the twenty-first century
  • The ensemble/ẹgbẹ̀/community
  • The marrow : Laurie Carlos
  • The blue note : Daniel Alexander Jones
  • The roots : Sharon Bridgforth
  • The break/awo/process
  • The bridge/àṣẹ/transformation.
  • Troubling jazz/abínibí/black theatre for the twenty-first century
  • The ensemble/ẹgbẹ̀/community
  • The marrow : Laurie Carlos
  • The blue note : Daniel Alexander Jones
  • The roots : Sharon Bridgforth
  • The break/awo/process
  • The bridge/àṣẹ/transformation.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
PN1584 .J66 2015 Unavailable In process Request

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