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Book
xxii, 328 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
50 years ago, the friendly rivalry between musicians and turned 1965 into the most ground-breaking year in music history ever. It was the year rock and roll evolved into the premier art form of its time and accelerated the drive for personal freedom throughout the Western world. The feedback loop between the artists and their times ignited an unprecedented explosion of creativity. The Beatles made their first artistic statement with Rubber Soul and performed at Shea Stadium, the first rock concert to be held in a major American stadium. Bob Dylan released "Like a Rolling Stone" - the quintessential anthem of the year - and went electric at the Newport Folk Festival. The Rolling Stones' hit song "Satisfaction" catapulted the band to world-wide success. Fashion designer Mary Qaunt raised the hemlines of her skirts to above the knee, introducing the iconic miniskirt. This was not only the year of rock as new genres such as funk and psychedelia were born. Soul music became a prime force of desegregation as Motown crossed out of the R&B charts on to the top of the Billboard Top 100. Country music reached new heights with Nashville and the Bakersfield sound and competition between musicians coincided with seismic cultural shifts wrought by the Civil Rights Movement, psychedelics, and Vietnam. In 1965, Andrew Grant Jackson combines fascinating and often surprising personal stories with a panoramic historical narrative.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
50 years ago, the friendly rivalry between musicians and turned 1965 into the most ground-breaking year in music history ever. It was the year rock and roll evolved into the premier art form of its time and accelerated the drive for personal freedom throughout the Western world. The feedback loop between the artists and their times ignited an unprecedented explosion of creativity. The Beatles made their first artistic statement with Rubber Soul and performed at Shea Stadium, the first rock concert to be held in a major American stadium. Bob Dylan released "Like a Rolling Stone" - the quintessential anthem of the year - and went electric at the Newport Folk Festival. The Rolling Stones' hit song "Satisfaction" catapulted the band to world-wide success. Fashion designer Mary Qaunt raised the hemlines of her skirts to above the knee, introducing the iconic miniskirt. This was not only the year of rock as new genres such as funk and psychedelia were born. Soul music became a prime force of desegregation as Motown crossed out of the R&B charts on to the top of the Billboard Top 100. Country music reached new heights with Nashville and the Bakersfield sound and competition between musicians coincided with seismic cultural shifts wrought by the Civil Rights Movement, psychedelics, and Vietnam. In 1965, Andrew Grant Jackson combines fascinating and often surprising personal stories with a panoramic historical narrative.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3470 .J327 2015 Unknown
Music score
1 score (173 pages) ; 28 cm
  • A White Rose (John Boyle O'Reilly)
  • An April Day (Joseph Cotter)
  • Because (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • Beside the Sea (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • Bewilderment (Langston Hughes)
  • Dawn's Awakening (James Joseph Burke)
  • Death's Gwineter Lay His Cold Icy Hand on Me (Spiritual)
  • Feet o' Jesus (Langston Hughes)
  • Four Encore Songs: Tobacco (Graham Lee Hemminger); A Flea and a Fly (Anonymous); "Come, come, " said Tom's Father (Thomas Moore); Song of the Open Road (Ogden Nash)
  • Go Down, Moses (Spiritual)
  • God Gives Me You (Nora Connelly)
  • Hold Fast to Dreams (Langston Hughes)
  • I Grew a Rose (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • I'm Goin' to Lay Down My Heavy Load (Spiritual)
  • Love-in-a-mist (Mary Rolofson Gamble)
  • My Little Soul's Goin' to Shine (Spiritual)
  • My Neighbor (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • My Soul's Been Anchored in de Lord (Spiritual)
  • Night (Louise C. Wallace)
  • Out of the South Blew a Wind (Fannie Carter Woods)
  • Resignation (Florence B. Price)
  • Rise Mourner (Spiritual)
  • Save Me Lord, Save Me (Spiritual)
  • Some o' These Days (Spiritual)
  • Song to the Dark Virgin (Langston Hughes)
  • Sunset (Odessa P. Elder)
  • Sympathy (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • The Glory of the Day Was in Her Face (James Weldon Johnso)
  • The Moon Bridge (Mary Rolofson Gamble)
  • The Poet and His Song (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • The Washerwoman (Otto Leland Bohanan)
  • To My Little Son (Julia Johnson Davis)
  • Travel's End (Mary Folwell Hoisington)
  • Trouble Done Come My Way (Florence B. Price)
  • Two Traditional Negro Spirituals: I am Bound for the Kingdom; I'm Workin' on My Buildin'
  • We Have Tomorrow (Langston Hughes)
  • Weary Traveler (Spiritual)
  • What's the Use (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • Words for a Spiritual ("Capricorn")
  • You Won't Find a Man Like Jesus (Spiritual).
  • A White Rose (John Boyle O'Reilly)
  • An April Day (Joseph Cotter)
  • Because (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • Beside the Sea (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • Bewilderment (Langston Hughes)
  • Dawn's Awakening (James Joseph Burke)
  • Death's Gwineter Lay His Cold Icy Hand on Me (Spiritual)
  • Feet o' Jesus (Langston Hughes)
  • Four Encore Songs: Tobacco (Graham Lee Hemminger); A Flea and a Fly (Anonymous); "Come, come, " said Tom's Father (Thomas Moore); Song of the Open Road (Ogden Nash)
  • Go Down, Moses (Spiritual)
  • God Gives Me You (Nora Connelly)
  • Hold Fast to Dreams (Langston Hughes)
  • I Grew a Rose (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • I'm Goin' to Lay Down My Heavy Load (Spiritual)
  • Love-in-a-mist (Mary Rolofson Gamble)
  • My Little Soul's Goin' to Shine (Spiritual)
  • My Neighbor (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • My Soul's Been Anchored in de Lord (Spiritual)
  • Night (Louise C. Wallace)
  • Out of the South Blew a Wind (Fannie Carter Woods)
  • Resignation (Florence B. Price)
  • Rise Mourner (Spiritual)
  • Save Me Lord, Save Me (Spiritual)
  • Some o' These Days (Spiritual)
  • Song to the Dark Virgin (Langston Hughes)
  • Sunset (Odessa P. Elder)
  • Sympathy (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • The Glory of the Day Was in Her Face (James Weldon Johnso)
  • The Moon Bridge (Mary Rolofson Gamble)
  • The Poet and His Song (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • The Washerwoman (Otto Leland Bohanan)
  • To My Little Son (Julia Johnson Davis)
  • Travel's End (Mary Folwell Hoisington)
  • Trouble Done Come My Way (Florence B. Price)
  • Two Traditional Negro Spirituals: I am Bound for the Kingdom; I'm Workin' on My Buildin'
  • We Have Tomorrow (Langston Hughes)
  • Weary Traveler (Spiritual)
  • What's the Use (Paul Laurence Dunbar)
  • Words for a Spiritual ("Capricorn")
  • You Won't Find a Man Like Jesus (Spiritual).
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Scores
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
Book
xxii, 289 pages : illustrations, music ; 25 cm
  • List of Figures List of Tables Acknowledgements Preface, Pamela Burnard (University of Cambridge, UK) and Elizabeth Haddon (University of York, UK) Part 1 1. Introduction: The Imperative of Diverse Musical Creativities in Academia and Industry, Pamela Burnard (University of Cambridge, UK) and Elizabeth Haddon (University of York, UK) Part 2: Experiments in Learning 2. On the Other Side of the Divide: Making Sense of Student Stories of Creativities in Music, Dawn Bennett (University of Curtin, Australia), Anna Reid (Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Australia) and Peter Petocz (Macquarie University, Australia) 3. Creativities in Popular Songwriting Curricula: Teaching or Learning? Joe Bennett (Bath Spa University, UK) 4. Killing the Muse: Listening Creativities and the Journey to Creative Mastery, Donna Weston (Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University, Australia) and Tim Bryon (Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University, Australia) 5. Permission to Play: Fostering Enterprise Creativities in Music Technology through Extracurricular Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Elizabeth Dobson (University of Huddersfield, UK) Part 3: Experiments in Teaching 6. Activating Improvisational Creativity in the Performance of 'World' and 'Popular' Music, Sue Miller (Anglia Ruskin University, UK/Cuba) 7. The Inner Voice: Activating Intuitive and Improvisational Creativities, Esmee Olthuis (Conservatory of Utrecht, The Netherlands) 8. Activating Empathic Creativity in Musicking through University-Community Partnerships, Susan Helfter (University of Southern California, US) and Beatriz Ilari (University of Southern California, US) 9. Activating Communal Creativities for Redesigning Higher Education Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment: Drawing on Intercultural Experience, Lindy Joubert (University of Melbourne, Australia) and Violeta Schubert (University of Melbourne, Australia) 10. Being a Composer in an Age of Uncertainties, Risks and Diffuse Creativity: Learning, Career and Creativities, Antonio Angelo Vasconcelos (Institute of Setubal, Portugal) Part 4: Engaging Technologies 11. Technology as a Vehicle (Tool and Practice) for Developing Diverse Creativities, Andrew King (University of Hull, UK) 12. Activating Digital Creativities in Higher Music Education, Leah Kardos (Kingston University, UK) 13. Creative Teaching with Performing Arts Students: Developing Career Creativities through the Use of ePortfolios for Career Awareness and Resilience, Jennifer Rowley (University of Sydney, Australia), Dawn Bennett (University of Curtin, Australia), Peter Dunbar-Hall (University of Sydney, Australia) 14. Conclusion: Musical Creativities and Entrepreneurship in Higher Music Education: Activating New Possibilities, Elizabeth Haddon (University of York, UK) and Pam Burnard (University of Cambridge, UK) Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Activating Diverse Musical Creativities analyses the ways in which music programmes in higher education can activate and foster diverse musical creativities. It also demonstrates the relationship between musical creativities and entrepreneurship in higher education teaching and learning. These issues are of vital significance to contemporary educational practice and training in both university and conservatoire contexts, particularly when considered alongside the growing importance of entrepreneurship, defined here as a type of creativity, for successful musicians working in the 21st century creative and cultural industries. International contributors address a broad spectrum of musical creativities in higher education, such as improvisational creativity, empathic creativity and leadership creativity, demonstrating the transformative possibilities of embedding these within higher music education teaching and learning. The chapters explore the active practice of musical creativities in teaching and learning and recognize their mutual dependency. The contributors consider philosophical and practical concerns in their work on teaching for creativity in higher music education and focus on practices using imaginative approaches in order to make learning more interesting, effective and relevant.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures List of Tables Acknowledgements Preface, Pamela Burnard (University of Cambridge, UK) and Elizabeth Haddon (University of York, UK) Part 1 1. Introduction: The Imperative of Diverse Musical Creativities in Academia and Industry, Pamela Burnard (University of Cambridge, UK) and Elizabeth Haddon (University of York, UK) Part 2: Experiments in Learning 2. On the Other Side of the Divide: Making Sense of Student Stories of Creativities in Music, Dawn Bennett (University of Curtin, Australia), Anna Reid (Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Australia) and Peter Petocz (Macquarie University, Australia) 3. Creativities in Popular Songwriting Curricula: Teaching or Learning? Joe Bennett (Bath Spa University, UK) 4. Killing the Muse: Listening Creativities and the Journey to Creative Mastery, Donna Weston (Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University, Australia) and Tim Bryon (Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University, Australia) 5. Permission to Play: Fostering Enterprise Creativities in Music Technology through Extracurricular Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Elizabeth Dobson (University of Huddersfield, UK) Part 3: Experiments in Teaching 6. Activating Improvisational Creativity in the Performance of 'World' and 'Popular' Music, Sue Miller (Anglia Ruskin University, UK/Cuba) 7. The Inner Voice: Activating Intuitive and Improvisational Creativities, Esmee Olthuis (Conservatory of Utrecht, The Netherlands) 8. Activating Empathic Creativity in Musicking through University-Community Partnerships, Susan Helfter (University of Southern California, US) and Beatriz Ilari (University of Southern California, US) 9. Activating Communal Creativities for Redesigning Higher Education Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment: Drawing on Intercultural Experience, Lindy Joubert (University of Melbourne, Australia) and Violeta Schubert (University of Melbourne, Australia) 10. Being a Composer in an Age of Uncertainties, Risks and Diffuse Creativity: Learning, Career and Creativities, Antonio Angelo Vasconcelos (Institute of Setubal, Portugal) Part 4: Engaging Technologies 11. Technology as a Vehicle (Tool and Practice) for Developing Diverse Creativities, Andrew King (University of Hull, UK) 12. Activating Digital Creativities in Higher Music Education, Leah Kardos (Kingston University, UK) 13. Creative Teaching with Performing Arts Students: Developing Career Creativities through the Use of ePortfolios for Career Awareness and Resilience, Jennifer Rowley (University of Sydney, Australia), Dawn Bennett (University of Curtin, Australia), Peter Dunbar-Hall (University of Sydney, Australia) 14. Conclusion: Musical Creativities and Entrepreneurship in Higher Music Education: Activating New Possibilities, Elizabeth Haddon (University of York, UK) and Pam Burnard (University of Cambridge, UK) Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Activating Diverse Musical Creativities analyses the ways in which music programmes in higher education can activate and foster diverse musical creativities. It also demonstrates the relationship between musical creativities and entrepreneurship in higher education teaching and learning. These issues are of vital significance to contemporary educational practice and training in both university and conservatoire contexts, particularly when considered alongside the growing importance of entrepreneurship, defined here as a type of creativity, for successful musicians working in the 21st century creative and cultural industries. International contributors address a broad spectrum of musical creativities in higher education, such as improvisational creativity, empathic creativity and leadership creativity, demonstrating the transformative possibilities of embedding these within higher music education teaching and learning. The chapters explore the active practice of musical creativities in teaching and learning and recognize their mutual dependency. The contributors consider philosophical and practical concerns in their work on teaching for creativity in higher music education and focus on practices using imaginative approaches in order to make learning more interesting, effective and relevant.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
MT18 .A35 2015 Unknown
Music recording
3 sound discs : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Recordings
(no call number) Unavailable In process
Book
viii, 297 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Histories of jazz in France
  • Hugues Panassié's supernatural swing : criticism, politics and the iconic jazz recording
  • Jazz between art and entertainment : André Hodeir and Thelonious Monk
  • Cool going cold : Miles Davis and Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
  • Barney Wilen : phantoms and freedom
  • Looking for something we don't yet know : towards a French jazz
  • A good jazzman is a dead jazzman.
  • Histories of jazz in France
  • Hugues Panassié's supernatural swing : criticism, politics and the iconic jazz recording
  • Jazz between art and entertainment : André Hodeir and Thelonious Monk
  • Cool going cold : Miles Davis and Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
  • Barney Wilen : phantoms and freedom
  • Looking for something we don't yet know : towards a French jazz
  • A good jazzman is a dead jazzman.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3509 .F7 P47 2015 Unknown
Video
1 videodisc : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Recordings
(no call number) Unavailable In process
Book
190 p. ; 19 cm.
  • Prélude à l'ivresse -- Vers le rêve (1872-1892 Des premières oeuvres à la Sonate n° 1) De l'art comme religion (Danses) -- Vers le charme (1892-1896 Sonates n° 1 et n° 2) De Chopin à lui-même (Études) -- Vers le souffle (1896-1902 Sonates n° 2 à 4) De l'aphorisme musical (Préludes) -- Vers l'extase (1902-1905 Sonates n° 4 à 5) De la surabondance (Poèmes) -- Vers la plénitude (1905-1909 Sonates n° 5 à 6) De l'ivresse théorique (Symphonies) -- Vers l'infini (1909-1913 Sonates n° 6à 10) Du mysticisme musical (Sonates) -- Vers railleurs (1913-1915 De la Sonate n° 10 aux oeuvres ultimes) De l'art total -- Au-delà de la flamme.
"L'oeuvre de Scriabine est l'une des plus originales de toute la musique ; totalement révolutionnaire, au même titre que celles de Schônberg, Bart6k, Prokofiev ou Stravinski, bousculant de manière irréversible la tonalité, inventant comme Chopin ses propres formes, développant une esthétique de la miniature en droite ligne des tentatives du dernier Liszt, exploitant des horizons harmoniques et des espaces sonores inédits dont Messiaen se souviendra, pour ne rien dire de Berg, Szymanowski ou de compositeurs plus proches de nous, tels Stockhausen ou Cage, Scriabine fait poser à la musique des questions qu'elle ne se posait pas avant lui. Créateur à la charnière du bousculement des mondes entre xix' et xx' siècles, partagé entre romantisme total et modernisme radical, mystique absolu et prophète d'un nouveau monde, Scriabine a fait de l'art une sorte de religion et d'initiation magique appelées à transformer la vie. Cent ans après sa mort, il est plus que jamais notre contemporain. Comme tous les volumes de la collection "Classica", ce Scriabine est enrichi d'un index, de repères bibliographiques et d'une discographie."--P. [4] of cover.
  • Prélude à l'ivresse -- Vers le rêve (1872-1892 Des premières oeuvres à la Sonate n° 1) De l'art comme religion (Danses) -- Vers le charme (1892-1896 Sonates n° 1 et n° 2) De Chopin à lui-même (Études) -- Vers le souffle (1896-1902 Sonates n° 2 à 4) De l'aphorisme musical (Préludes) -- Vers l'extase (1902-1905 Sonates n° 4 à 5) De la surabondance (Poèmes) -- Vers la plénitude (1905-1909 Sonates n° 5 à 6) De l'ivresse théorique (Symphonies) -- Vers l'infini (1909-1913 Sonates n° 6à 10) Du mysticisme musical (Sonates) -- Vers railleurs (1913-1915 De la Sonate n° 10 aux oeuvres ultimes) De l'art total -- Au-delà de la flamme.
"L'oeuvre de Scriabine est l'une des plus originales de toute la musique ; totalement révolutionnaire, au même titre que celles de Schônberg, Bart6k, Prokofiev ou Stravinski, bousculant de manière irréversible la tonalité, inventant comme Chopin ses propres formes, développant une esthétique de la miniature en droite ligne des tentatives du dernier Liszt, exploitant des horizons harmoniques et des espaces sonores inédits dont Messiaen se souviendra, pour ne rien dire de Berg, Szymanowski ou de compositeurs plus proches de nous, tels Stockhausen ou Cage, Scriabine fait poser à la musique des questions qu'elle ne se posait pas avant lui. Créateur à la charnière du bousculement des mondes entre xix' et xx' siècles, partagé entre romantisme total et modernisme radical, mystique absolu et prophète d'un nouveau monde, Scriabine a fait de l'art une sorte de religion et d'initiation magique appelées à transformer la vie. Cent ans après sa mort, il est plus que jamais notre contemporain. Comme tous les volumes de la collection "Classica", ce Scriabine est enrichi d'un index, de repères bibliographiques et d'une discographie."--P. [4] of cover.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Miniature
ML410 .S5988 C59 2015 M Unknown
Music score
1 score (76 p.) ; 30 cm.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Scores
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
Book
172 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction Part I: Contextual Perspectives 2. Transtextuality: Preexisting and Original Music 3. Marketing: Music and Products 4. Settings: Television, Web, and Stores Part II: Cotextual Perspectives 5. Musical Signification 6. Musical Structures 7. Musical Functions 8. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The study of music in commercials is well-suited for exploring the persuasive impact that music has beyond the ability to entertain, edify, and purify its audience. This book focuses on music in commercials from an interpretive text analytical perspective, answering hitherto neglected questions: What characterizes music in commercials compared to other commercial music and other music on TV? How does music in commercials relate to music 'outside' the universe of commercials? How and what can music in commercials signify? Author Nicolai Graakjaer sets a new benchmark for the international scholarly study of music on television and its pervading influence on consumer choice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction Part I: Contextual Perspectives 2. Transtextuality: Preexisting and Original Music 3. Marketing: Music and Products 4. Settings: Television, Web, and Stores Part II: Cotextual Perspectives 5. Musical Signification 6. Musical Structures 7. Musical Functions 8. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The study of music in commercials is well-suited for exploring the persuasive impact that music has beyond the ability to entertain, edify, and purify its audience. This book focuses on music in commercials from an interpretive text analytical perspective, answering hitherto neglected questions: What characterizes music in commercials compared to other commercial music and other music on TV? How does music in commercials relate to music 'outside' the universe of commercials? How and what can music in commercials signify? Author Nicolai Graakjaer sets a new benchmark for the international scholarly study of music on television and its pervading influence on consumer choice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .G676 2015 Unknown
Music score
1 score (78 pages) ; 31 cm
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Scores
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
Music score
1 playing score (7 leaves in cover) ; 31 cm.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Scores
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
Book
vi, 234 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML410 .B88 F613 2015 Unavailable On order Request
Book
xiii, 249 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Acknowledgments xi Introduction xiii 1. Basic Theory 1 Sound Level 2 Sound Level 2 Source Path Receiver 4 Measuring Sound Level 5 Measuring Sound Level 8 Multiple Sound Sources 9 Decibel Addition 10 Sound Propagation 11 Sound Propagation 11 Directivity 12 Sound Frequency 13 Frequency 13 Octave Bands 17 Sound Level Perception and Frequency 19 A?]Weighted Decibels 20 The Special Case of Low?]Frequency Sound 22 2. Sound Absorption 25 Principles of Absorptive and Reflective Surfaces 26 Absorption Coefficient 27 Types of Sound Absorbers 29 Room Constant 33 Room Average Absorption 33 Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) 36 Sound Absorption Data 38 3. Room Acoustics 57 Room Acoustics Qualities 58 Impulse Response 58 Reverberance 60 Optimal Reverberation Time 65 Clarity 66 Variable Acoustics 70 Reverberation Time Calculation Checklist 74 Room Shaping for Speech and Music 75 Loudness 76 Balconies 80 Sightlines 82 Warmth 83 Concert Hall Types 85 Spatial Impression 87 Intimacy 94 Diffusion 95 Theater Planning 97 Stage Acoustics 97 Orchestra Pits 101 What Makes a Good Room for Music? 102 Performance Venue Seats 106 Acoustic Defects 109 Acoustic Defects 109 Performance Venues 114 Room Acoustics History 114 Performance Venues to Visit 117 Design Checklists 118 Rooms for Unamplified Music Performance Checklist 118 Other Types of Rooms Checklist 119 Sound System Design 123 Electronic Sound Reinforcement 123 4. Noise Control 131 Sound Isolation Principles 132 Apartment Layout Graphic Quiz 132 Flanking 133 Flanking Graphic Checklist 134 Flanking Noise Checklist 134 Measures of Airborne Sound Isolation 140 Transmission Loss (TL) 140 Sound Transmission Class (STC) 142 How to Measure Sound Transmission Class (STC) 144 Target STC Ratings 146 Noise Reduction (NR) 147 Achieving Higher Acoustical Privacy 148 Background Noise 152 Background Noise 152 Noise Criteria (NC) 153 Speech Intelligibility and Noise 155 Open?]Plan Office Acoustics 157 Sound Transmission Loss Data 162 Noise Reduction Example Problem 175 Air?]Structure?]Air Flanking 178 Acoustic Privacy Checklist 179 Apartment Layout Quiz Answer 180 Door and Window Sound Isolation 182 Doors 182 Noise Isolation and Windows 184 Impact Noise 185 Impact Noise Isolation 185 How to Measure IIC 190 Impact Noise Checklist 192 Recommended Floor?]Ceiling Assemblies 195 Resiliently Mounted Room Surfaces 197 Community Noise 202 Principles of Community Noise 202 Building?]in?]Building Design 202 Noise Sources 204 Community Noise Research 207 Community Noise Example Problem 208 Outdoor Barriers 209 Outdoor Barriers Checklist 210 Outdoor Barrier Example Problem 212 Wind Turbine Noise 214 Community Noise Checklist 215 Mechanical System Noise 217 Principles of Mechanical System Noise 217 Ducted Fan Noise 220 Mechanical Room Graphic Checklist 224 Ducted Air Turbulence Noise 225 Vibration Isolation 229 Mechanical Noise Checklist 232 Plumbing Noise 237 Isolating Pipes from Structure 238 Plumbing Noise Checklist 239 index 243.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Unite the science of sound and the principles of design to enhance any space Architectural Acoustics Illustrated translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. This highly-visual guide includes over 350 illustrations that outline the physics of sound and the best design practices for limiting or mitigating noise in buildings by using the latest in materials and techniques. Each chapter includes a summary checklist of design guidelines to help prevent mistakes and oversights, and the Instructor's website offers video animations demonstrating acoustical concepts. Designed as a "first look" at the interaction of sound and space, the book explains the principles of architectural acoustics and their practical applications, providing a comprehensive guide for designing with acoustics in mind. Architectural acoustics is more than just concert halls it may determine building placement, division of interior space, exterior construction, and even siting. When addressed early in the design process, the resulting space can be free of unwanted sound and promote good hearing; if left unaddressed, the problems with the space can lead to lawsuits and costly post-construction remediation. Architectural Acoustics Illustrated helps designers solve most acoustical problems in advance, by enabling readers to: * Understand the physical science underlying the behavior of sound * Consider the interactions of sound and space in the initial design approach * Mitigate building sounds such as those produced by HVAC and plumbing with early design planning * Design spaces for listening, and incorporate acoustics best practices into every plan The highly visual format of the book helps readers grasp complex concepts quickly, and thorough discussion of each concept's real-world application ties the science directly into the design process. All design professionals need to have a fundamental understanding of acoustics, and Architectural Acoustics Illustrated is a comprehensive, practical guide in an easy-to-read format.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgments xi Introduction xiii 1. Basic Theory 1 Sound Level 2 Sound Level 2 Source Path Receiver 4 Measuring Sound Level 5 Measuring Sound Level 8 Multiple Sound Sources 9 Decibel Addition 10 Sound Propagation 11 Sound Propagation 11 Directivity 12 Sound Frequency 13 Frequency 13 Octave Bands 17 Sound Level Perception and Frequency 19 A?]Weighted Decibels 20 The Special Case of Low?]Frequency Sound 22 2. Sound Absorption 25 Principles of Absorptive and Reflective Surfaces 26 Absorption Coefficient 27 Types of Sound Absorbers 29 Room Constant 33 Room Average Absorption 33 Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) 36 Sound Absorption Data 38 3. Room Acoustics 57 Room Acoustics Qualities 58 Impulse Response 58 Reverberance 60 Optimal Reverberation Time 65 Clarity 66 Variable Acoustics 70 Reverberation Time Calculation Checklist 74 Room Shaping for Speech and Music 75 Loudness 76 Balconies 80 Sightlines 82 Warmth 83 Concert Hall Types 85 Spatial Impression 87 Intimacy 94 Diffusion 95 Theater Planning 97 Stage Acoustics 97 Orchestra Pits 101 What Makes a Good Room for Music? 102 Performance Venue Seats 106 Acoustic Defects 109 Acoustic Defects 109 Performance Venues 114 Room Acoustics History 114 Performance Venues to Visit 117 Design Checklists 118 Rooms for Unamplified Music Performance Checklist 118 Other Types of Rooms Checklist 119 Sound System Design 123 Electronic Sound Reinforcement 123 4. Noise Control 131 Sound Isolation Principles 132 Apartment Layout Graphic Quiz 132 Flanking 133 Flanking Graphic Checklist 134 Flanking Noise Checklist 134 Measures of Airborne Sound Isolation 140 Transmission Loss (TL) 140 Sound Transmission Class (STC) 142 How to Measure Sound Transmission Class (STC) 144 Target STC Ratings 146 Noise Reduction (NR) 147 Achieving Higher Acoustical Privacy 148 Background Noise 152 Background Noise 152 Noise Criteria (NC) 153 Speech Intelligibility and Noise 155 Open?]Plan Office Acoustics 157 Sound Transmission Loss Data 162 Noise Reduction Example Problem 175 Air?]Structure?]Air Flanking 178 Acoustic Privacy Checklist 179 Apartment Layout Quiz Answer 180 Door and Window Sound Isolation 182 Doors 182 Noise Isolation and Windows 184 Impact Noise 185 Impact Noise Isolation 185 How to Measure IIC 190 Impact Noise Checklist 192 Recommended Floor?]Ceiling Assemblies 195 Resiliently Mounted Room Surfaces 197 Community Noise 202 Principles of Community Noise 202 Building?]in?]Building Design 202 Noise Sources 204 Community Noise Research 207 Community Noise Example Problem 208 Outdoor Barriers 209 Outdoor Barriers Checklist 210 Outdoor Barrier Example Problem 212 Wind Turbine Noise 214 Community Noise Checklist 215 Mechanical System Noise 217 Principles of Mechanical System Noise 217 Ducted Fan Noise 220 Mechanical Room Graphic Checklist 224 Ducted Air Turbulence Noise 225 Vibration Isolation 229 Mechanical Noise Checklist 232 Plumbing Noise 237 Isolating Pipes from Structure 238 Plumbing Noise Checklist 239 index 243.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Unite the science of sound and the principles of design to enhance any space Architectural Acoustics Illustrated translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. This highly-visual guide includes over 350 illustrations that outline the physics of sound and the best design practices for limiting or mitigating noise in buildings by using the latest in materials and techniques. Each chapter includes a summary checklist of design guidelines to help prevent mistakes and oversights, and the Instructor's website offers video animations demonstrating acoustical concepts. Designed as a "first look" at the interaction of sound and space, the book explains the principles of architectural acoustics and their practical applications, providing a comprehensive guide for designing with acoustics in mind. Architectural acoustics is more than just concert halls it may determine building placement, division of interior space, exterior construction, and even siting. When addressed early in the design process, the resulting space can be free of unwanted sound and promote good hearing; if left unaddressed, the problems with the space can lead to lawsuits and costly post-construction remediation. Architectural Acoustics Illustrated helps designers solve most acoustical problems in advance, by enabling readers to: * Understand the physical science underlying the behavior of sound * Consider the interactions of sound and space in the initial design approach * Mitigate building sounds such as those produced by HVAC and plumbing with early design planning * Design spaces for listening, and incorporate acoustics best practices into every plan The highly visual format of the book helps readers grasp complex concepts quickly, and thorough discussion of each concept's real-world application ties the science directly into the design process. All design professionals need to have a fundamental understanding of acoustics, and Architectural Acoustics Illustrated is a comprehensive, practical guide in an easy-to-read format.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
NA2800 .E76 2015 Unknown
Book
375 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction, par Étienne Jardin & Patrick Taïeb -- Une affiche du Concert spirituel retrouvée, et quelques observations sur la relation entre les affiches et la presse, par Beverly Wilcox -- Les Paroles du concert au XVIIIe siècle : premiers exemples de programmes de salle imprimés, par Florence Doé de Maindreville -- Le concert et le droit des pauvres en l'an V, par Patrick Taïeb -- Les concerts parisiens de 1822 à 1848 d'après les archives du droit des pauvres. Introduction au répertoire, par Étienne Jardin -- Les concerts de Paris. Feuilleton paru dans Le Ménestrel (31 mai, 7, 14 et 21 juin et 5 juillet 1840), par Edmond Viel -- Répertoire des concerts parisiens de 1822 à 1848 d'après les archives du droit des pauvres, par Étienne Jardin -- Index des noms du répertoire -- Index des lieux du répertoire -- Annexe 1 Bilan par année des sommes perçues -- Annexe 2 Bilan par salle des sommes perçues.
"Une affiche du Concert spirituel retrouvée (pour l'année 1754) ; un corpus de "Paroles du concert" (ancêtres des programmes de salle) issu des académies de musique de six villes françaises et datant de la deuxième partie du XVIIIe siècle ; les archives du droit des pauvres (taxe sur les spectacles fixée sous la Révolution française) concernant les événements parisiens de la Restauration et de la monarchie de Juillet : en analysant ces documents méconnus, Beverly Wilcox, Florence Doé de Maindreville, Patrick Taieb et Étienne Jardin apportent, dans cet ouvrage, de nouveaux éclairages sur l'histoire du concert en France entre 1750 et 1850. Leurs études y sont complétées par le répertoire indexé des concerts publics ayant eu lieu à Paris entre 1822 et 1848 : plus de 3 000 fiches établies à partir des archives du droit des pauvres qui permettent de retracer le parcours de musiciens prestigieux (Berlioz, Liszt, Paganini, Chopin ou Offenbach) et de découvrir une vie musicale d'une richesse encore insoupçonnée."--P. [4] of cover.
  • Introduction, par Étienne Jardin & Patrick Taïeb -- Une affiche du Concert spirituel retrouvée, et quelques observations sur la relation entre les affiches et la presse, par Beverly Wilcox -- Les Paroles du concert au XVIIIe siècle : premiers exemples de programmes de salle imprimés, par Florence Doé de Maindreville -- Le concert et le droit des pauvres en l'an V, par Patrick Taïeb -- Les concerts parisiens de 1822 à 1848 d'après les archives du droit des pauvres. Introduction au répertoire, par Étienne Jardin -- Les concerts de Paris. Feuilleton paru dans Le Ménestrel (31 mai, 7, 14 et 21 juin et 5 juillet 1840), par Edmond Viel -- Répertoire des concerts parisiens de 1822 à 1848 d'après les archives du droit des pauvres, par Étienne Jardin -- Index des noms du répertoire -- Index des lieux du répertoire -- Annexe 1 Bilan par année des sommes perçues -- Annexe 2 Bilan par salle des sommes perçues.
"Une affiche du Concert spirituel retrouvée (pour l'année 1754) ; un corpus de "Paroles du concert" (ancêtres des programmes de salle) issu des académies de musique de six villes françaises et datant de la deuxième partie du XVIIIe siècle ; les archives du droit des pauvres (taxe sur les spectacles fixée sous la Révolution française) concernant les événements parisiens de la Restauration et de la monarchie de Juillet : en analysant ces documents méconnus, Beverly Wilcox, Florence Doé de Maindreville, Patrick Taieb et Étienne Jardin apportent, dans cet ouvrage, de nouveaux éclairages sur l'histoire du concert en France entre 1750 et 1850. Leurs études y sont complétées par le répertoire indexé des concerts publics ayant eu lieu à Paris entre 1822 et 1848 : plus de 3 000 fiches établies à partir des archives du droit des pauvres qui permettent de retracer le parcours de musiciens prestigieux (Berlioz, Liszt, Paganini, Chopin ou Offenbach) et de découvrir une vie musicale d'une richesse encore insoupçonnée."--P. [4] of cover.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML270.3 .A73 2015 Unknown
Music recording
1 audio disc (74:14 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
  • Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit: Sonatina (arr. Kurtag) (2:30)
  • Concerto in C major for 2 pianos (18:03)
  • St Matthew Passion-Suite for 2 pianos (arr. Anderson & Roe) (19:50)
  • The art of fugue: contrapunctus Ix, XIIIA, XIIIB (7:02)
  • 5 Canons on the Goldberg ground (3:07)
  • Die seele ruht in Jesu Handen (arr. Anderson & Roe) *:58)
  • Sheep may safely graze (arr. Howe) (4:48)
  • Brandenburg concerto no. 3 (arr. Reger) (10:55).
  • Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit: Sonatina (arr. Kurtag) (2:30)
  • Concerto in C major for 2 pianos (18:03)
  • St Matthew Passion-Suite for 2 pianos (arr. Anderson & Roe) (19:50)
  • The art of fugue: contrapunctus Ix, XIIIA, XIIIB (7:02)
  • 5 Canons on the Goldberg ground (3:07)
  • Die seele ruht in Jesu Handen (arr. Anderson & Roe) *:58)
  • Sheep may safely graze (arr. Howe) (4:48)
  • Brandenburg concerto no. 3 (arr. Reger) (10:55).
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Recordings
MCD 27319 Unknown
Book
xiii, 353 pages : ill. ; 24 cm
  • Preface About the Authors Aim and Scope of Book Introduction and Fundamentals Understanding Sound and Digital Audio Working with Decibels Level Measurements Representing and Understanding Digital Signals Representing Complex Numbers Frequency and Time-Frequency Representations Aliasing Modifying and Processing Digital Signals The Z Transform and Filter Representation Digital Filter Example Nonlinear and Time-Varying Effects Delay Line Effects Delay Theory Basic Delay Delay with Feedback Other Delay Types Slapback Delay Multitap Delay Ping-Pong Delay Implementation Basic Delay Variations Delay Line Interpolation Code Example Applications Vibrato Simulation Theory Interpolation Implementation Low-Frequency Oscillator Parameters Code Example Applications Flanging Theory Principle of Operation Basic Flanger Low-Frequency Oscillator Flanger with Feedback Stereo Flanging Properties Common Parameters Depth (or Mix) Delay and Sweep Width Speed and Waveform Feedback (or Regeneration) Inverted Mode (or Phase) Implementation Buffer Allocation Interpolation Code Example Applications Resonant Pitches Avoiding Disappearing Instruments Flanging versus Chorus Chorus Theory Basic Chorus Low-Frequency Oscillator Pitch-Shifting in the Chorus Multivoice Chorus Stereo Chorus Properties Common Parameters Depth (or Mix) Delay and Sweep Width Speed and Waveform Number of Voices Other Variations Summary: Flanger and Chorus Compared Filter Design Filter Construction and Transformation Simple, Prototype Low-Pass Filter High-Order Prototype Low-Pass Filter Changing the Gain at the Cutoff Frequency Shifting the Cutoff Frequency Creating a Shelving Filter Inverting the Magnitude Response Simple Low-Pass to Band Pass Transformation Popular IIR Filter Design Low Pass High Pass Low Shelf High Shelf Gain at Bandwidth Band Pass Filters Band Stop Filters Peaking and Notch Filters The Allpass Filter Applications of Filter Fundamentals Exponential Moving Average Filter Loudspeaker Crossovers Filter Effects Equalization Theory Two-Knob Tone Controls Three-Knob Tone Controls Presence Control Loudness Control Graphic Equalizers Bands in a Graphic Equalizer Parametric Equalizers Summary Implementation General Notes Tone Control Architecture Calculating Filter Coefficients Presence and Loudness Architecture Graphic Equalizer Architecture Parametric Equalizer Architecture Code Example Applications Graphic Equalizer Application Parametric Equalizer Application Wah-Wah Theory Basis in Speech Basic Wah-Wah Auto-Wah Tremolo-Wah Other Variations Implementation Filter Design Low-Frequency Oscillator Envelope Follower Analog Emulation Phaser Theory Basic Phaser Low-Frequency Oscillator Phaser with Feedback Stereo Phaser Implementation Allpass Filter Calculation Alternate Implementation LFO Waveform Analog and Digital Implementations Common Parameters Code Example Amplitude Modulation Tremolo Theory Low-Frequency Oscillator Properties Implementation Audio Rate and Control Rate Code Example Ring Modulation Theory Modulation in the Frequency Domain Perception w-Frequency Oscillator Variations Implementation Code Example Applications Dynamics Processing Dynamic Range Compression Theory Compressor Controls Signal Paths The Gain Stage The Gain Computer Level Detection RMS Detector Peak Detector Level-Corrected Peak Detectors Implementation Feedback and Feedforward Design An Alternate Digital Feedback Compressor Detector Placement Code Example Application Artifacts Summary Noise Gates and Expanders Theory and Implementation Applications Overdrive, Distortion, and Fuzz Theory Characteristic Curve Hard and Soft Clipping Input Gain Symmetry and Rectification Harmonic Distortion Intermodulation Distortion Analog Emulation Implementation Basic Implementation Aliasing and Oversampling Filtering Common Parameters Tube Sound Distortion Code Example Applications Expressivity and Spectral Content Sustain Comparison with Compression The Phase Vocoder Phase Vocoder Theory Overview Windowing Analysis: Fast Fourier Transform Interpreting Frequency Domain Data Target Phase, Phase Deviation, and Instantaneous Frequency Synthesis: Inverse Fast Fourier Transform Overlap-Add Filterbank Analysis Variant Oscillator Bank Reconstruction Variant Phase Vocoder Effects Robotization Robotization Code Example Whisperization Whisperization Code Example Time Scaling Time-Scaling Resynthesis Pitch Shifting Code Example Phase Vocoder Artifacts Spatial Audio Theory Panorama Precedence Vector Base Amplitude Panning Ambisonics Wave Field Synthesis The Head-Related Transfer Function ITD Model ILD Model Implementation Joint Panorama and Precedence Ambisonics and Its Relationship to VBAP Implementation of WFS HRTF Calculation Applications Transparent Amplification Surround Sound Sound Reproduction Using HRTFs The Doppler Effect A Familiar Example Derivation of the Doppler Effect Simple Derivation of the Basic Doppler Effect General Derivation of the Doppler Effect Simplifications and Approximations Implementation Time-Varying Delay Line Reads Multiple Write Pointers Code Example Applications Reverberation Theory Sabine and Norris-Eyring Equations Direct and Reverberant Sound Fields Implementation Algorithmic Reverb Schroeder's Reverberator Moorer's Reverberator Generating Reverberation with the Image Source Method Background The Image Source Model Modeling Reflections as Virtual Sources Locating the Virtual Sources The Impulse Response for a Virtual Source Convolutional Reverb Convolution and Fast Convolution Block-Based Convolution Physical Meaning Other Approaches Applications Why Use Reverb? Stereo Reverb Gated Reverb Reverse Reverb Common Parameters Audio Production The Mixing Console The Channel Section The Master Section Metering and Monitoring Basic Mixing Console Signal Flow and Routing Inserts for Processors, Auxiliary Sends for Effects Subgroup and Grouping Digital versus Analog Latency Digital User Interface Design Sound Quality Do You Need to Decide? Software Mixers Digital Audio Workstations Common Functionality of Computer-Based DAWs MIDI and Sequencers Audio Effect Ordering Noise Gates Compressors and Noise Gates Compression and EQ Reverb and Flanger Reverb and Vibrato Delay Line Effects Distortion Order Summary Combinations of Audio Effects Parallel Effects and Parallel Compression Sidechaining Ducking De-Esser Sidechain Compression for Mastering Multiband Compression Dynamic Equalization Combining LFOs with Other Effects Discussion Building Audio Effect Plug-Ins Plug-In Basics Programming Language Plug-In Properties The JUCE Framework Theory of Operation Callback Function Managing Parameters Initialization and Cleanup Preserving State Example: Building a Delay Effect in JUCE Required Software Creating a New Plug-In in JUCE Opening Example Plug-Ins File Overview PluginProcessor.h Declaration and Methods Variables PluginProcessor.cpp Audio Callback Initialization Managing Parameters Cleanup PluginEditor.h PluginEditor.cpp Initialization Managing Parameters Resizing Cleanup Summary Advanced Topics Efficiency Considerations Thread Safety Conclusion References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Audio Effects: Theory, Implementation and Application explores digital audio effects relevant to audio signal processing and music informatics. It supplies fundamental background information on digital signal processing, focusing on audio-specific aspects that constitute the building block on which audio effects are developed. The text integrates theory and practice, relating technical implementation to musical implications. It can be used to gain an understanding of the operation of existing audio effects or to create new ones. In addition to delivering detailed coverage of common (and unusual) audio effects, the book discusses current digital audio standards, most notably VST and AudioUnit. Source code is provided in C/C++ and implemented as audio effect plug-ins with accompanying sound samples. Each section of the book includes study questions, anecdotes from the history of music technology, and examples that offer valuable real-world insight, making this an ideal resource for researchers and for students moving directly into industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface About the Authors Aim and Scope of Book Introduction and Fundamentals Understanding Sound and Digital Audio Working with Decibels Level Measurements Representing and Understanding Digital Signals Representing Complex Numbers Frequency and Time-Frequency Representations Aliasing Modifying and Processing Digital Signals The Z Transform and Filter Representation Digital Filter Example Nonlinear and Time-Varying Effects Delay Line Effects Delay Theory Basic Delay Delay with Feedback Other Delay Types Slapback Delay Multitap Delay Ping-Pong Delay Implementation Basic Delay Variations Delay Line Interpolation Code Example Applications Vibrato Simulation Theory Interpolation Implementation Low-Frequency Oscillator Parameters Code Example Applications Flanging Theory Principle of Operation Basic Flanger Low-Frequency Oscillator Flanger with Feedback Stereo Flanging Properties Common Parameters Depth (or Mix) Delay and Sweep Width Speed and Waveform Feedback (or Regeneration) Inverted Mode (or Phase) Implementation Buffer Allocation Interpolation Code Example Applications Resonant Pitches Avoiding Disappearing Instruments Flanging versus Chorus Chorus Theory Basic Chorus Low-Frequency Oscillator Pitch-Shifting in the Chorus Multivoice Chorus Stereo Chorus Properties Common Parameters Depth (or Mix) Delay and Sweep Width Speed and Waveform Number of Voices Other Variations Summary: Flanger and Chorus Compared Filter Design Filter Construction and Transformation Simple, Prototype Low-Pass Filter High-Order Prototype Low-Pass Filter Changing the Gain at the Cutoff Frequency Shifting the Cutoff Frequency Creating a Shelving Filter Inverting the Magnitude Response Simple Low-Pass to Band Pass Transformation Popular IIR Filter Design Low Pass High Pass Low Shelf High Shelf Gain at Bandwidth Band Pass Filters Band Stop Filters Peaking and Notch Filters The Allpass Filter Applications of Filter Fundamentals Exponential Moving Average Filter Loudspeaker Crossovers Filter Effects Equalization Theory Two-Knob Tone Controls Three-Knob Tone Controls Presence Control Loudness Control Graphic Equalizers Bands in a Graphic Equalizer Parametric Equalizers Summary Implementation General Notes Tone Control Architecture Calculating Filter Coefficients Presence and Loudness Architecture Graphic Equalizer Architecture Parametric Equalizer Architecture Code Example Applications Graphic Equalizer Application Parametric Equalizer Application Wah-Wah Theory Basis in Speech Basic Wah-Wah Auto-Wah Tremolo-Wah Other Variations Implementation Filter Design Low-Frequency Oscillator Envelope Follower Analog Emulation Phaser Theory Basic Phaser Low-Frequency Oscillator Phaser with Feedback Stereo Phaser Implementation Allpass Filter Calculation Alternate Implementation LFO Waveform Analog and Digital Implementations Common Parameters Code Example Amplitude Modulation Tremolo Theory Low-Frequency Oscillator Properties Implementation Audio Rate and Control Rate Code Example Ring Modulation Theory Modulation in the Frequency Domain Perception w-Frequency Oscillator Variations Implementation Code Example Applications Dynamics Processing Dynamic Range Compression Theory Compressor Controls Signal Paths The Gain Stage The Gain Computer Level Detection RMS Detector Peak Detector Level-Corrected Peak Detectors Implementation Feedback and Feedforward Design An Alternate Digital Feedback Compressor Detector Placement Code Example Application Artifacts Summary Noise Gates and Expanders Theory and Implementation Applications Overdrive, Distortion, and Fuzz Theory Characteristic Curve Hard and Soft Clipping Input Gain Symmetry and Rectification Harmonic Distortion Intermodulation Distortion Analog Emulation Implementation Basic Implementation Aliasing and Oversampling Filtering Common Parameters Tube Sound Distortion Code Example Applications Expressivity and Spectral Content Sustain Comparison with Compression The Phase Vocoder Phase Vocoder Theory Overview Windowing Analysis: Fast Fourier Transform Interpreting Frequency Domain Data Target Phase, Phase Deviation, and Instantaneous Frequency Synthesis: Inverse Fast Fourier Transform Overlap-Add Filterbank Analysis Variant Oscillator Bank Reconstruction Variant Phase Vocoder Effects Robotization Robotization Code Example Whisperization Whisperization Code Example Time Scaling Time-Scaling Resynthesis Pitch Shifting Code Example Phase Vocoder Artifacts Spatial Audio Theory Panorama Precedence Vector Base Amplitude Panning Ambisonics Wave Field Synthesis The Head-Related Transfer Function ITD Model ILD Model Implementation Joint Panorama and Precedence Ambisonics and Its Relationship to VBAP Implementation of WFS HRTF Calculation Applications Transparent Amplification Surround Sound Sound Reproduction Using HRTFs The Doppler Effect A Familiar Example Derivation of the Doppler Effect Simple Derivation of the Basic Doppler Effect General Derivation of the Doppler Effect Simplifications and Approximations Implementation Time-Varying Delay Line Reads Multiple Write Pointers Code Example Applications Reverberation Theory Sabine and Norris-Eyring Equations Direct and Reverberant Sound Fields Implementation Algorithmic Reverb Schroeder's Reverberator Moorer's Reverberator Generating Reverberation with the Image Source Method Background The Image Source Model Modeling Reflections as Virtual Sources Locating the Virtual Sources The Impulse Response for a Virtual Source Convolutional Reverb Convolution and Fast Convolution Block-Based Convolution Physical Meaning Other Approaches Applications Why Use Reverb? Stereo Reverb Gated Reverb Reverse Reverb Common Parameters Audio Production The Mixing Console The Channel Section The Master Section Metering and Monitoring Basic Mixing Console Signal Flow and Routing Inserts for Processors, Auxiliary Sends for Effects Subgroup and Grouping Digital versus Analog Latency Digital User Interface Design Sound Quality Do You Need to Decide? Software Mixers Digital Audio Workstations Common Functionality of Computer-Based DAWs MIDI and Sequencers Audio Effect Ordering Noise Gates Compressors and Noise Gates Compression and EQ Reverb and Flanger Reverb and Vibrato Delay Line Effects Distortion Order Summary Combinations of Audio Effects Parallel Effects and Parallel Compression Sidechaining Ducking De-Esser Sidechain Compression for Mastering Multiband Compression Dynamic Equalization Combining LFOs with Other Effects Discussion Building Audio Effect Plug-Ins Plug-In Basics Programming Language Plug-In Properties The JUCE Framework Theory of Operation Callback Function Managing Parameters Initialization and Cleanup Preserving State Example: Building a Delay Effect in JUCE Required Software Creating a New Plug-In in JUCE Opening Example Plug-Ins File Overview PluginProcessor.h Declaration and Methods Variables PluginProcessor.cpp Audio Callback Initialization Managing Parameters Cleanup PluginEditor.h PluginEditor.cpp Initialization Managing Parameters Resizing Cleanup Summary Advanced Topics Efficiency Considerations Thread Safety Conclusion References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Audio Effects: Theory, Implementation and Application explores digital audio effects relevant to audio signal processing and music informatics. It supplies fundamental background information on digital signal processing, focusing on audio-specific aspects that constitute the building block on which audio effects are developed. The text integrates theory and practice, relating technical implementation to musical implications. It can be used to gain an understanding of the operation of existing audio effects or to create new ones. In addition to delivering detailed coverage of common (and unusual) audio effects, the book discusses current digital audio standards, most notably VST and AudioUnit. Source code is provided in C/C++ and implemented as audio effect plug-ins with accompanying sound samples. Each section of the book includes study questions, anecdotes from the history of music technology, and examples that offer valuable real-world insight, making this an ideal resource for researchers and for students moving directly into industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
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Stacks
TK7881.4 .R45 2015 Unknown
Music score
1 score (18 p.) ; 30 cm.
Music Library
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Scores
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
Music score
1 score (91 p.) ; 30 cm.
Music Library
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Scores
(no call number) Unavailable In process Request
Music score
1 score (liii, 209 pages) ; 31 cm.
Music Library
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Stacks (Limited loan)
(no call number) Unavailable In process
Book
310 pages, [16] pages of plates : ill. ; 24 cm
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3477 .Y34 2015 Unknown