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Book
xvi, 586 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction-- 1. Studying fiscal regimes Andrew Monson and Walter Scheidel-- Part I. Diversity and Commonalities in Early Extraction Regimes: 2. The Inka empire Terence N. D'Altroy-- 3. The Aztec empire Michael E. Smith-- 4. The Ancient Near East and Egypt Michael Jursa and Juan Carlos Morena Garcia-- Part II. Determinants of Intensification and Abatement: 5. Hellenistic empires Andrew Monson-- 6. The Roman republic James Tan-- 7. The early Roman monarchy Walter Scheidel-- 8. The later Roman empire Gilles Bransbourg-- 9. Early imperial China, from Qin/Han through Tang Mark E. Lewis-- 10. Imperial China under the Song and late Qing Kent Gang Deng-- Part III. Divergent Trends among Established Regimes: 11. Late Rome, Byzantium and early medieval western Europe John Haldon-- 12. The Middle East in Islamic late antiquity Hugh Kennedy-- 13. The Ottoman empire Metin M. Cosgel-- 14. Early modern Japan Philip C. Brown-- Part IV. Fragmented Political Ecologies and Institutional Innovation: 15. The Greek polis and koinon Emily Mackil-- 16. Classical Athens Josiah Ober-- 17. Why did public debt originate in Europe? David Stasavage-- Part V. Comparative Perspectives and New Frontiers: 18. Tributary empires and the New Fiscal Sociology: some comparative reflections Peter F. Bang-- 19. Interpreting the comparative history of fiscal regimes Edgar Kiser and Margaret Levi.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Inspired by the New Fiscal History, this book represents the first global survey of taxation in the premodern world. What emerges is a rich variety of institutions, including experiments with sophisticated instruments such as sovereign debt and fiduciary money, challenging the notion of a typical premodern stage of fiscal development. The studies also reveal patterns and correlations across widely dispersed societies that shed light on the basic factors driving the intensification, abatement, and innovation of fiscal regimes. Twenty scholars have contributed perspectives from a wide range of fields besides history, including anthropology, economics, political science and sociology. The volume's coverage extends beyond Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East to East Asia and the Americas, thereby transcending the Eurocentric approach of most scholarship on fiscal history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction-- 1. Studying fiscal regimes Andrew Monson and Walter Scheidel-- Part I. Diversity and Commonalities in Early Extraction Regimes: 2. The Inka empire Terence N. D'Altroy-- 3. The Aztec empire Michael E. Smith-- 4. The Ancient Near East and Egypt Michael Jursa and Juan Carlos Morena Garcia-- Part II. Determinants of Intensification and Abatement: 5. Hellenistic empires Andrew Monson-- 6. The Roman republic James Tan-- 7. The early Roman monarchy Walter Scheidel-- 8. The later Roman empire Gilles Bransbourg-- 9. Early imperial China, from Qin/Han through Tang Mark E. Lewis-- 10. Imperial China under the Song and late Qing Kent Gang Deng-- Part III. Divergent Trends among Established Regimes: 11. Late Rome, Byzantium and early medieval western Europe John Haldon-- 12. The Middle East in Islamic late antiquity Hugh Kennedy-- 13. The Ottoman empire Metin M. Cosgel-- 14. Early modern Japan Philip C. Brown-- Part IV. Fragmented Political Ecologies and Institutional Innovation: 15. The Greek polis and koinon Emily Mackil-- 16. Classical Athens Josiah Ober-- 17. Why did public debt originate in Europe? David Stasavage-- Part V. Comparative Perspectives and New Frontiers: 18. Tributary empires and the New Fiscal Sociology: some comparative reflections Peter F. Bang-- 19. Interpreting the comparative history of fiscal regimes Edgar Kiser and Margaret Levi.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Inspired by the New Fiscal History, this book represents the first global survey of taxation in the premodern world. What emerges is a rich variety of institutions, including experiments with sophisticated instruments such as sovereign debt and fiduciary money, challenging the notion of a typical premodern stage of fiscal development. The studies also reveal patterns and correlations across widely dispersed societies that shed light on the basic factors driving the intensification, abatement, and innovation of fiscal regimes. Twenty scholars have contributed perspectives from a wide range of fields besides history, including anthropology, economics, political science and sociology. The volume's coverage extends beyond Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East to East Asia and the Americas, thereby transcending the Eurocentric approach of most scholarship on fiscal history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Classics Library
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Classics Library Status
Stacks
HJ2261 .F57 2015 Unknown
Book
xliv, 611 pages : maps ; 17 cm.
  • Preface
  • General introduction
  • References
  • General bibliography
  • Sigla
  • The Histories
  • Letters to Caesar
  • Divergences from Maurenbrecher's edition
  • Concordances
  • Indexes
  • Maps.
Sallust, Gaius Sallustius Crispus (86 35 BCE), a Sabine from Amiternum, acted as tribune against Cicero and Milo in 52, joined Caesar after being expelled from the Senate in 50, was restored to the Senate by Caesar and took part in his African campaign as praetor in 46, and was then appointed governor of New Africa (Numidia). Upon his return to Rome he narrowly escaped conviction for malfeasance in office, retired from public life, and took up historiography. Sallust s last work, the annalistic "Histories" in five books, is much more expansive than his monographs on Catiline and Jugurtha (LCL 116), treating the whole of Roman history at home and abroad in the post-Sullan age. Although fragmentary, it provides invaluable information and insight about a crucial period of history spanning the period from 78 to around 67 BCE. Although Sallust is decidedly unsubtle and partisan in analyzing people and events, his works are important and significantly influenced later historians, notably Tacitus. Taking Thucydides as his model but building on Roman stylistic and rhetorical traditions, Sallust achieved a distinctive style, concentrated and arresting; lively characterizations, especially in the speeches; and skill at using particular episodes to illustrate large general themes. For this volume, which completes the Loeb Classical Library" "edition of Sallust s works, John T. Ramsey has freshly edited the "Histories" and the two pseudo-Sallustian "Letters to Caesar, " " "supplying ample annotation.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface
  • General introduction
  • References
  • General bibliography
  • Sigla
  • The Histories
  • Letters to Caesar
  • Divergences from Maurenbrecher's edition
  • Concordances
  • Indexes
  • Maps.
Sallust, Gaius Sallustius Crispus (86 35 BCE), a Sabine from Amiternum, acted as tribune against Cicero and Milo in 52, joined Caesar after being expelled from the Senate in 50, was restored to the Senate by Caesar and took part in his African campaign as praetor in 46, and was then appointed governor of New Africa (Numidia). Upon his return to Rome he narrowly escaped conviction for malfeasance in office, retired from public life, and took up historiography. Sallust s last work, the annalistic "Histories" in five books, is much more expansive than his monographs on Catiline and Jugurtha (LCL 116), treating the whole of Roman history at home and abroad in the post-Sullan age. Although fragmentary, it provides invaluable information and insight about a crucial period of history spanning the period from 78 to around 67 BCE. Although Sallust is decidedly unsubtle and partisan in analyzing people and events, his works are important and significantly influenced later historians, notably Tacitus. Taking Thucydides as his model but building on Roman stylistic and rhetorical traditions, Sallust achieved a distinctive style, concentrated and arresting; lively characterizations, especially in the speeches; and skill at using particular episodes to illustrate large general themes. For this volume, which completes the Loeb Classical Library" "edition of Sallust s works, John T. Ramsey has freshly edited the "Histories" and the two pseudo-Sallustian "Letters to Caesar, " " "supplying ample annotation.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Classics Library
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Classics Library Status
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PA6654 .E5 R36 2015 Unknown

3. Silvae [2015]

Book
xxx, 427 pages ; 17 cm.
  • Recent scholarship on the Silvae / Kathleen M. Coleman
  • Statius to his friend Stella
  • The statue of Domitian
  • Wedding ode in honor of Stella and Violentilla
  • The villa of Manilius Vopiscus
  • To Rutilius Gallicus
  • The Baths of Claudius Etruscus
  • The kalends of December
  • Statius to his friend Melior
  • Glaucias
  • The villa of Pollius Felix
  • The tree of Atedius Melior
  • The parrot of the same
  • The tame lion
  • Consolation to Flavius Ursus
  • To Polla on Lucan's birthday
  • Statius to his friend Pollius
  • The Hercules at Surrentum
  • Send-off to Maecius Celer
  • Consolation to Claudius Etruscus
  • The hair of Flavius Earinus
  • To his wife Claudia
  • Statius to his friend Marcellus
  • The seventeenth consulship of Domitian
  • To the Emperor Domitian
  • The Domitian Way
  • To Vitorius Marcellus
  • Ode to Septimius Severus
  • The Hercules statuette
  • Ode to Vibius Maximus
  • Poem of congratulation
  • Jesting hendecasyllabics
  • Statius to his friend Abascantus
  • On the death of Priscilla
  • Praises of Crispinus
  • Lament for his father
  • Sleep
  • A lament for his boy.
Statius "Silvae, " thirty-two occasional poems, were written probably between 89 and 96 CE. Here the poet congratulates friends, consoles mourners, offers thanks, admires a monument or artistic object, and describes a memorable scene. The verse is light in touch, with a distinct pictorial quality. Statius gives us in these impromptu poems clear images of Domitian s Rome. Statius was raised in the Greek cultural milieu of the Bay of Naples, and his Greek literary education lends a sophisticated veneer to his ornamental verse. The role of the emperor and the imperial circle in determining taste is also readily apparent: the figure of the emperor Domitian permeates these poems. D. R. Shackleton Bailey s edition of the "Silvae, " which replaced the earlier Loeb Classical Library edition with translation by J. H. Mozley, is now reissued with corrections by Christopher A. Parrott.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Recent scholarship on the Silvae / Kathleen M. Coleman
  • Statius to his friend Stella
  • The statue of Domitian
  • Wedding ode in honor of Stella and Violentilla
  • The villa of Manilius Vopiscus
  • To Rutilius Gallicus
  • The Baths of Claudius Etruscus
  • The kalends of December
  • Statius to his friend Melior
  • Glaucias
  • The villa of Pollius Felix
  • The tree of Atedius Melior
  • The parrot of the same
  • The tame lion
  • Consolation to Flavius Ursus
  • To Polla on Lucan's birthday
  • Statius to his friend Pollius
  • The Hercules at Surrentum
  • Send-off to Maecius Celer
  • Consolation to Claudius Etruscus
  • The hair of Flavius Earinus
  • To his wife Claudia
  • Statius to his friend Marcellus
  • The seventeenth consulship of Domitian
  • To the Emperor Domitian
  • The Domitian Way
  • To Vitorius Marcellus
  • Ode to Septimius Severus
  • The Hercules statuette
  • Ode to Vibius Maximus
  • Poem of congratulation
  • Jesting hendecasyllabics
  • Statius to his friend Abascantus
  • On the death of Priscilla
  • Praises of Crispinus
  • Lament for his father
  • Sleep
  • A lament for his boy.
Statius "Silvae, " thirty-two occasional poems, were written probably between 89 and 96 CE. Here the poet congratulates friends, consoles mourners, offers thanks, admires a monument or artistic object, and describes a memorable scene. The verse is light in touch, with a distinct pictorial quality. Statius gives us in these impromptu poems clear images of Domitian s Rome. Statius was raised in the Greek cultural milieu of the Bay of Naples, and his Greek literary education lends a sophisticated veneer to his ornamental verse. The role of the emperor and the imperial circle in determining taste is also readily apparent: the figure of the emperor Domitian permeates these poems. D. R. Shackleton Bailey s edition of the "Silvae, " which replaced the earlier Loeb Classical Library edition with translation by J. H. Mozley, is now reissued with corrections by Christopher A. Parrott.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Classics Library
Status of items at Classics Library
Classics Library Status
Stacks
PA6697 .E5 S54 2015 Unknown
Book
xxvi, 590 pages ; 17 cm.
  • Theocritus: Testimonia ; Idylls ; Fragments ; Epigrams
  • Moschus: Testimonia ; Eros the runaway ; Europa ; Lament for Bion ; Megara ; Fragments
  • Bion: Testimonia ; Lament for Adonis ; Wedding song of Achilles and Deidamia ; Fragments
  • Adonis dead
  • Bucolic fragment (P. Rainer 29801)
  • Pattern poems (Technopaegnia).
Theocritus (early third century BCE), born in Syracuse and also active on Cos and at Alexandria, was the inventor of the bucolic genre. Like his contemporary Callimachus, Theocritus was a learned poet who followed the aesthetic, developed a generation earlier by Philitas of Cos (LCL 508), of refashioning traditional literary forms in original ways through tightly organized and highly polished work on a small scale (thus the traditional generic title "Idylls" little forms ). Although Theocritus composed in a variety of genres or generic combinations, including encomium, epigram, hymn, mime, and epyllion, he is best known for the poems set in the countryside, mostly dialogues or song-contests, that combine lyric tone with epic meter and the Doric dialect of his native Sicily to create an idealized and evocatively described pastoral landscape, whose lovelorn inhabitants, presided over by the Nymphs, Pan, and Priapus, use song as a natural mode of expression. The bucolic/pastoral genre was developed by the second and third members of the Greek bucolic canon, Moschus (fl. mid second century BCE, also from Syracuse) and Bion (fl. some fifty years later, from Phlossa near Smyrna), and remained vital through Greco-Roman antiquity and into the modern era. This edition of Theocritus, Moschus, and Bion, together with the so-called pattern poems included in the bucolic tradition, replaces the earlier Loeb Classical Library edition by J. M. Edmonds (1912), using the critical texts of Gow (1952) and Gallavotti (1993) as a base and providing a fresh translation with ample annotation.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Theocritus: Testimonia ; Idylls ; Fragments ; Epigrams
  • Moschus: Testimonia ; Eros the runaway ; Europa ; Lament for Bion ; Megara ; Fragments
  • Bion: Testimonia ; Lament for Adonis ; Wedding song of Achilles and Deidamia ; Fragments
  • Adonis dead
  • Bucolic fragment (P. Rainer 29801)
  • Pattern poems (Technopaegnia).
Theocritus (early third century BCE), born in Syracuse and also active on Cos and at Alexandria, was the inventor of the bucolic genre. Like his contemporary Callimachus, Theocritus was a learned poet who followed the aesthetic, developed a generation earlier by Philitas of Cos (LCL 508), of refashioning traditional literary forms in original ways through tightly organized and highly polished work on a small scale (thus the traditional generic title "Idylls" little forms ). Although Theocritus composed in a variety of genres or generic combinations, including encomium, epigram, hymn, mime, and epyllion, he is best known for the poems set in the countryside, mostly dialogues or song-contests, that combine lyric tone with epic meter and the Doric dialect of his native Sicily to create an idealized and evocatively described pastoral landscape, whose lovelorn inhabitants, presided over by the Nymphs, Pan, and Priapus, use song as a natural mode of expression. The bucolic/pastoral genre was developed by the second and third members of the Greek bucolic canon, Moschus (fl. mid second century BCE, also from Syracuse) and Bion (fl. some fifty years later, from Phlossa near Smyrna), and remained vital through Greco-Roman antiquity and into the modern era. This edition of Theocritus, Moschus, and Bion, together with the so-called pattern poems included in the bucolic tradition, replaces the earlier Loeb Classical Library edition by J. M. Edmonds (1912), using the critical texts of Gow (1952) and Gallavotti (1993) as a base and providing a fresh translation with ample annotation.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Classics Library
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Classics Library Status
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PA4442 .A2 2015 Unknown

5. Confessions [2014 - ]

Book
volumes ; 17 cm.
  • 1. Books 1-8
Aurelius Augustine (354-430 CE), one of the most important figures in the development of western Christianity and philosophy, was the son of a pagan, Patricius of Tagaste, and his Christian wife, Monnica. While studying to become a rhetorician, he plunged into a turmoil of philosophical and psychological doubts, leading him to Manichaeism. In 383 he moved to Rome and then Milan to teach rhetoric. Despite exploring classical philosophical systems, especially skepticism and neoplatonism, his studies of Paul's letters with his friend Alypius, and the preaching of Bishop Ambrose, led in 386 to his momentous conversion from mixed beliefs to Christianity. He soon returned to Tagaste and founded a religious community, and in 395 or 396 became Bishop of Hippo. "Confessions, " ""composed ca. 397, is a spiritual autobiography of Augustine's early life, family, personal and intellectual associations, and explorations of alternative religious and theological viewpoints as he moved toward his conversion. Cast as a prayer addressed to God, though always conscious of its readers, "Confessions "offers a gripping personal story and a philosophical exploration destined to have broad and lasting impact, all delivered with Augustine's characteristic brilliance as a stylist. This edition replaces the earlier Loeb "Confessions" by William Watts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Books 1-8
Aurelius Augustine (354-430 CE), one of the most important figures in the development of western Christianity and philosophy, was the son of a pagan, Patricius of Tagaste, and his Christian wife, Monnica. While studying to become a rhetorician, he plunged into a turmoil of philosophical and psychological doubts, leading him to Manichaeism. In 383 he moved to Rome and then Milan to teach rhetoric. Despite exploring classical philosophical systems, especially skepticism and neoplatonism, his studies of Paul's letters with his friend Alypius, and the preaching of Bishop Ambrose, led in 386 to his momentous conversion from mixed beliefs to Christianity. He soon returned to Tagaste and founded a religious community, and in 395 or 396 became Bishop of Hippo. "Confessions, " ""composed ca. 397, is a spiritual autobiography of Augustine's early life, family, personal and intellectual associations, and explorations of alternative religious and theological viewpoints as he moved toward his conversion. Cast as a prayer addressed to God, though always conscious of its readers, "Confessions "offers a gripping personal story and a philosophical exploration destined to have broad and lasting impact, all delivered with Augustine's characteristic brilliance as a stylist. This edition replaces the earlier Loeb "Confessions" by William Watts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library, Classics Library
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BR65 .A6 2014 V.1 Unknown
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BR65 .A6 2014 V.1 Unknown

6. The Greek anthology [2014 - ]

Book
volumes ; 17 cm.
  • [volume 1]. Books 1-5. Book I, Christian epigrams ; Book II, Description of the statues in the Gymnasium of Zeuxippus ; Book III, Epigrams in the Temple of Apollonis at Cyzicus ; Book IV, Prefaces to the various anthologies ; Book V, Erotic epigrams.
The Greek Anthology contains some 4,500 short Greek poems in the sparkling and diverse genre of epigram, written by more than a hundred poets and collected over many centuries. To the original collection, called The Garland (Stephanus) by its contributing editor, Meleager of Gadara (first century BCE), was added another Garland by Philip of Thessalonica (mid-first century CE) and then a Cycle by Agathias of Myrina (567/568 CE). In about 900 CE these collections (now lost) and perhaps others (also lost, by Rufinus, Diogenianus, Strato, and Palladas) were partly incorporated and arranged into fifteen books according to subject by Constantine Cephalas; most of his collection is preserved in a manuscript called the Palatine Anthology. A second manuscript, the Planudean Anthology made by Maximus Planudes in 1301, contains additional epigrams omitted by Cephalas. Outstanding among the poets are Meleager, Antipater of Sidon, Crinagoras, Palladas, Agathias, and Paulus Silentiarius. This Loeb edition of The Greek Anthology replaces the earlier edition by W. R. Paton, with a Greek text and ample notes reflecting current scholarship.
  • [volume 1]. Books 1-5. Book I, Christian epigrams ; Book II, Description of the statues in the Gymnasium of Zeuxippus ; Book III, Epigrams in the Temple of Apollonis at Cyzicus ; Book IV, Prefaces to the various anthologies ; Book V, Erotic epigrams.
The Greek Anthology contains some 4,500 short Greek poems in the sparkling and diverse genre of epigram, written by more than a hundred poets and collected over many centuries. To the original collection, called The Garland (Stephanus) by its contributing editor, Meleager of Gadara (first century BCE), was added another Garland by Philip of Thessalonica (mid-first century CE) and then a Cycle by Agathias of Myrina (567/568 CE). In about 900 CE these collections (now lost) and perhaps others (also lost, by Rufinus, Diogenianus, Strato, and Palladas) were partly incorporated and arranged into fifteen books according to subject by Constantine Cephalas; most of his collection is preserved in a manuscript called the Palatine Anthology. A second manuscript, the Planudean Anthology made by Maximus Planudes in 1301, contains additional epigrams omitted by Cephalas. Outstanding among the poets are Meleager, Antipater of Sidon, Crinagoras, Palladas, Agathias, and Paulus Silentiarius. This Loeb edition of The Greek Anthology replaces the earlier edition by W. R. Paton, with a Greek text and ample notes reflecting current scholarship.
Green Library, Classics Library
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PA3623 .A5 P38 2014 V.1 Unknown
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PA3623 .A5 P38 2014 V.1 Unknown

7. Kerameikos [2014]

Book
329 pagina's : illustraties ; 35 cm.
Classics Library
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(no call number) Unknown
Book
lxiv, 746 ; 23 cm.
This compendium gives a comprehensive overview of the history of classical studies. Alphabetically arranged, it provides biographies of over 700 scholars from the fourteenth century onwards who have made their mark on the study of Antiquity. These include the lives, careers and works of classical philologists, archaeologists, ancient historians, students of epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, Egyptology and the Ancient Near East, philosophers, anthropologists, social scientists, art historians, collectors and writers. The biographies put the scholars in their social, political and cultural contexts while focusing on their scholarly achievements and their contributions to modern classical scholarship.
This compendium gives a comprehensive overview of the history of classical studies. Alphabetically arranged, it provides biographies of over 700 scholars from the fourteenth century onwards who have made their mark on the study of Antiquity. These include the lives, careers and works of classical philologists, archaeologists, ancient historians, students of epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, Egyptology and the Ancient Near East, philosophers, anthropologists, social scientists, art historians, collectors and writers. The biographies put the scholars in their social, political and cultural contexts while focusing on their scholarly achievements and their contributions to modern classical scholarship.
Green Library, Classics Library
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HASRC (Lane Room) (non-circulating) Find it
DE5 .N3813 2007 SUPPL.V.6 In-library use
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DE5 .N3813 2007 SUPPL.V.6 Unknown

9. Prometheus bound [2014]

Book
xxxvii, 73 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library, Classics Library
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Green Library Status
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PA3827 .P8 A35 2014 Unknown
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PA3827 .P8 A35 2014 Unavailable At bindery Request
Book
x, 173 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgments-- Introduction-- Note on translation-- Sappho-- Notes-- Selected bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Sappho, the earliest and most famous Greek woman poet, sang her songs around 600 BCE on the island of Lesbos. Of the little that survives from the approximately nine papyrus scrolls collected in antiquity, all is translated here: substantial poems, fragments, single words - and, notably, five stanzas of a poem that came to light in 2014. Also included are new additions to five fragments from the latest discovery, and a nearly complete poem published in 2004. The power of Sappho's poetry - her direct style, rich imagery, and passion - is apparent even in these remnants. Diane Rayor's translations of Greek poetry are graceful and poetic, modern in diction yet faithful to the originals. The full range of Sappho's voice is heard in these poems about desire, friendship, rivalry, family, and 'passion for the light of life'. In the introduction and notes, internationally respected Sappho scholar Andre Lardinois presents plausible reconstructions of Sappho's life and work, the importance of the recent discoveries in understanding the performance of her songs, and the story of how these fragments survived.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgments-- Introduction-- Note on translation-- Sappho-- Notes-- Selected bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Sappho, the earliest and most famous Greek woman poet, sang her songs around 600 BCE on the island of Lesbos. Of the little that survives from the approximately nine papyrus scrolls collected in antiquity, all is translated here: substantial poems, fragments, single words - and, notably, five stanzas of a poem that came to light in 2014. Also included are new additions to five fragments from the latest discovery, and a nearly complete poem published in 2004. The power of Sappho's poetry - her direct style, rich imagery, and passion - is apparent even in these remnants. Diane Rayor's translations of Greek poetry are graceful and poetic, modern in diction yet faithful to the originals. The full range of Sappho's voice is heard in these poems about desire, friendship, rivalry, family, and 'passion for the light of life'. In the introduction and notes, internationally respected Sappho scholar Andre Lardinois presents plausible reconstructions of Sappho's life and work, the importance of the recent discoveries in understanding the performance of her songs, and the story of how these fragments survived.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library, Classics Library
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PA4408 .E5 R39 2014 Unknown
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PA4408 .E5 R39 2014 Unknown
Book
xxvi, 582 pages ; 24 cm
Originally published in three volumes in 1973, Robert Funk s classic 'Beginning-Intermediate Grammar of Hellenistic Greek' utilizes the insights of modern linguistics in its presentation of the basic features of ancient Greek grammar. Since modern linguistics aims to be descriptive, rather than prescriptive, Funk s Grammar highlights the breadand-butter features of New Testament Greek, rather than how it deviates from classical Greek.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Originally published in three volumes in 1973, Robert Funk s classic 'Beginning-Intermediate Grammar of Hellenistic Greek' utilizes the insights of modern linguistics in its presentation of the basic features of ancient Greek grammar. Since modern linguistics aims to be descriptive, rather than prescriptive, Funk s Grammar highlights the breadand-butter features of New Testament Greek, rather than how it deviates from classical Greek.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Classics Library
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PA617 .F8 2013 Unknown
Book
3 v.
  • VOLUME 1: INTRODUCTION -- PREFACE -- ABBREVIATIONS -- GREEK AND LATIN TEXTS: ABBREVIATIONS AND EDITIONS -- TABLES -- GENERAL INTRODUCTION -- 1. Earlier editions -- 2. The present edition -- 3. Language and style of the fragmentary Roman historians -- 4. The citing authorities -- 4.1 Overview -- 4.2 Individual sources -- 4.3 Introductions to individual historians -- APPENDIX 1: AUTHORS NOT INCLUDED (IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER) -- APPENDIX 2: OTHERWISE UNKNOWN HISTORIANS AND BIOGRAPHERS CITED IN THE HISTORIA AUGUSTA -- APPENDIX 3: FROM RICCOBONI TO ROTH: EARLY EDITIONS OF THE FRAGMENTS OF THE ROMAN HISTORIANS -- APPENDIX 4: A NOTE ON DATES -- VOLUME 2: TEXT AND TRANSLATION -- General testimonia -- VOLUME 3: COMMENTARY -- Commentaries on fragments of individual historians -- Chronological table of historical events recorded in fragments -- INDEXES -- 1. Index scriptorum -- 2. Indices locorum -- 3. Indices uerborum -- 4. General Index -- CONCORDANCES.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Fragments of the Roman Historians is a definitive and comprehensive edition of the fragmentary texts of all the Roman historians whose works are lost. Historical writing was an important part of the literary culture of ancient Rome, and its best-known exponents, including Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, and Suetonius, provide much of our knowledge of Roman history. However, these authors constitute only a small minority of the Romans who wrote historical works from around 200 BC to AD 250. In this period we know of more than 100 writers of history, biography, and memoirs whose works no longer survive for us to read. They include well-known figures such as Cato the Elder, Sulla, Cicero, and the emperors Augustus, Tiberius, Claudius, Hadrian, and Septimius Severus. Beginning with a detailed introduction explaining the history of scholarly research on the subject, the principles and methods used in editing the fragmentary texts, the literary style of the historians, and a surevy of the secondary texts that cite and preserve the fragments of the lost works, these three volumes bring together everything that is known about these historians and their works. Volume one provides an introduction to each historian, outlining what is known of their life and works. Volume two sets out the critical text with facing English translation, and volume three offers a detailed and up-to-date commentary on each of the historical fragments. The work also lists the full concordances with previous editions and contains detailed indexes. Undertaken as a collaborative research project by a team of ten UK-based scholars, this work will become an important and standard text for anyone working on the Roman historians and ancient history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • VOLUME 1: INTRODUCTION -- PREFACE -- ABBREVIATIONS -- GREEK AND LATIN TEXTS: ABBREVIATIONS AND EDITIONS -- TABLES -- GENERAL INTRODUCTION -- 1. Earlier editions -- 2. The present edition -- 3. Language and style of the fragmentary Roman historians -- 4. The citing authorities -- 4.1 Overview -- 4.2 Individual sources -- 4.3 Introductions to individual historians -- APPENDIX 1: AUTHORS NOT INCLUDED (IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER) -- APPENDIX 2: OTHERWISE UNKNOWN HISTORIANS AND BIOGRAPHERS CITED IN THE HISTORIA AUGUSTA -- APPENDIX 3: FROM RICCOBONI TO ROTH: EARLY EDITIONS OF THE FRAGMENTS OF THE ROMAN HISTORIANS -- APPENDIX 4: A NOTE ON DATES -- VOLUME 2: TEXT AND TRANSLATION -- General testimonia -- VOLUME 3: COMMENTARY -- Commentaries on fragments of individual historians -- Chronological table of historical events recorded in fragments -- INDEXES -- 1. Index scriptorum -- 2. Indices locorum -- 3. Indices uerborum -- 4. General Index -- CONCORDANCES.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Fragments of the Roman Historians is a definitive and comprehensive edition of the fragmentary texts of all the Roman historians whose works are lost. Historical writing was an important part of the literary culture of ancient Rome, and its best-known exponents, including Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, and Suetonius, provide much of our knowledge of Roman history. However, these authors constitute only a small minority of the Romans who wrote historical works from around 200 BC to AD 250. In this period we know of more than 100 writers of history, biography, and memoirs whose works no longer survive for us to read. They include well-known figures such as Cato the Elder, Sulla, Cicero, and the emperors Augustus, Tiberius, Claudius, Hadrian, and Septimius Severus. Beginning with a detailed introduction explaining the history of scholarly research on the subject, the principles and methods used in editing the fragmentary texts, the literary style of the historians, and a surevy of the secondary texts that cite and preserve the fragments of the lost works, these three volumes bring together everything that is known about these historians and their works. Volume one provides an introduction to each historian, outlining what is known of their life and works. Volume two sets out the critical text with facing English translation, and volume three offers a detailed and up-to-date commentary on each of the historical fragments. The work also lists the full concordances with previous editions and contains detailed indexes. Undertaken as a collaborative research project by a team of ten UK-based scholars, this work will become an important and standard text for anyone working on the Roman historians and ancient history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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viii, 321 pages ; 23 cm.
The Iliad defines its poetic goal as preserving the kleos aphthiton, "fame unwithered, " (IX.413) of its hero, Achilles. But how are we to understand the status of the "unwithered" in the Iliad? In Homeric Durability, Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr., investigates the concept of time and temporality in Homeric epic by studying the semantics of "durability" and "decay": namely, the ability of an entity to withstand the effects of time, and its eventual disintegration. Such objects--the ships of the Achaeans, the bodies of the dead, the walls of the Greeks and Trojans, and the tombs of the dead--all exist within time and possess a demonstrable "durability." Even the gods themselves are temporal beings. Through a framework informed by phenomenology, psychology, and psychopathology, Garcia examines the temporal experience of Homer's gods and argues that in moments of pain, sorrow, and shame, Homeric gods come to experience human temporality. If the gods themselves are defined by human temporal experience, Garcia argues, the epic tradition cannot but imagine its own temporal durability as limited: hence, one should understand kleos aphthiton as fame which has not yet decayed, rather than fame which will not decay.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Iliad defines its poetic goal as preserving the kleos aphthiton, "fame unwithered, " (IX.413) of its hero, Achilles. But how are we to understand the status of the "unwithered" in the Iliad? In Homeric Durability, Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr., investigates the concept of time and temporality in Homeric epic by studying the semantics of "durability" and "decay": namely, the ability of an entity to withstand the effects of time, and its eventual disintegration. Such objects--the ships of the Achaeans, the bodies of the dead, the walls of the Greeks and Trojans, and the tombs of the dead--all exist within time and possess a demonstrable "durability." Even the gods themselves are temporal beings. Through a framework informed by phenomenology, psychology, and psychopathology, Garcia examines the temporal experience of Homer's gods and argues that in moments of pain, sorrow, and shame, Homeric gods come to experience human temporality. If the gods themselves are defined by human temporal experience, Garcia argues, the epic tradition cannot but imagine its own temporal durability as limited: hence, one should understand kleos aphthiton as fame which has not yet decayed, rather than fame which will not decay.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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xviii, 702 pages ; 17 cm.
  • Preface
  • General introduction
  • General bibliography
  • Memorabilia
  • Oeconomicus
  • Symposium
  • Apology
  • Index to Memorabilia
  • Index to Oeconomicus
  • Index to Symposium
  • Index to Apology.
Xenophon (ca. 430 to ca. 354 BCE), a member of a wealthy but politically quietist Athenian family and an admirer of Socrates, left Athens in 401 BCE to serve as a mercenary commander for Cyrus the Younger of Persia, then joined the staff of King Agesilaus II of Sparta before settling in Elis and, in the aftermath of the battle of Leuctra in 371 BCE, retiring to Corinth. His historical and biographical works, Socratic dialogues and reminiscences, and short treatises on hunting, horsemanship, economics, and the Spartan constitution are richly informative about his own life and times. This volume collects Xenophon's portrayals of his associate, Socrates. In "Memorabilia" (or "Memoirs of Socrates") and in "Oeconomicus, " a dialogue about household management, we see the philosopher through Xenophon's eyes. Here, as in the accompanying "Symposium, " we also obtain insight on life in Athens. The volume concludes with Xenophon's "Apology, " an interesting complement to Plato's account of Socrates' defense at his trial.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Preface
  • General introduction
  • General bibliography
  • Memorabilia
  • Oeconomicus
  • Symposium
  • Apology
  • Index to Memorabilia
  • Index to Oeconomicus
  • Index to Symposium
  • Index to Apology.
Xenophon (ca. 430 to ca. 354 BCE), a member of a wealthy but politically quietist Athenian family and an admirer of Socrates, left Athens in 401 BCE to serve as a mercenary commander for Cyrus the Younger of Persia, then joined the staff of King Agesilaus II of Sparta before settling in Elis and, in the aftermath of the battle of Leuctra in 371 BCE, retiring to Corinth. His historical and biographical works, Socratic dialogues and reminiscences, and short treatises on hunting, horsemanship, economics, and the Spartan constitution are richly informative about his own life and times. This volume collects Xenophon's portrayals of his associate, Socrates. In "Memorabilia" (or "Memoirs of Socrates") and in "Oeconomicus, " a dialogue about household management, we see the philosopher through Xenophon's eyes. Here, as in the accompanying "Symposium, " we also obtain insight on life in Athens. The volume concludes with Xenophon's "Apology, " an interesting complement to Plato's account of Socrates' defense at his trial.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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538 pages ; 21 cm.
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16. Republic [2013]

Book
2 v. ; 17 cm.
  • [v. 1]. Books 1-5
  • [v. 2]. Books 6-10.
Plato of Athens, who laid the foundations of the Western philosophical tradition and in range and depth ranks among its greatest practitioners, was born to a prosperous and politically active family ca. 427 bce. In early life an admirer of Socrates, Plato later founded the first institution of higher learning in the West, the Academy, among whose many notable alumni was Aristotle. Traditionally ascribed to Plato are thirty-six dialogues developing Socrates' dialectic method and composed with great stylistic virtuosity, together with thirteen letters. Republic, a masterpiece of philosophical and political thought, concerns righteousness both in individuals and in communities, and proposes an ideal state organized and governed on philosophical principles. This edition, which replaces the original Loeb edition by Paul Shorey, offers text, translation, and annotation that are fully current with modern scholarship. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Plato is in twelve volumes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • [v. 1]. Books 1-5
  • [v. 2]. Books 6-10.
Plato of Athens, who laid the foundations of the Western philosophical tradition and in range and depth ranks among its greatest practitioners, was born to a prosperous and politically active family ca. 427 bce. In early life an admirer of Socrates, Plato later founded the first institution of higher learning in the West, the Academy, among whose many notable alumni was Aristotle. Traditionally ascribed to Plato are thirty-six dialogues developing Socrates' dialectic method and composed with great stylistic virtuosity, together with thirteen letters. Republic, a masterpiece of philosophical and political thought, concerns righteousness both in individuals and in communities, and proposes an ideal state organized and governed on philosophical principles. This edition, which replaces the original Loeb edition by Paul Shorey, offers text, translation, and annotation that are fully current with modern scholarship. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Plato is in twelve volumes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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17. Sallust [2013 - ]

Book
2 volumes : maps ; 17 cm.
  • v. 1. The war with Catiline, The war with Jugurtha.
  • Preface
  • General introduction
  • References
  • General bibliography
  • Sigla
  • The war with Cataline
  • The war with Jugurtha
  • Index
  • Maps.
"Sallust, Gaius Sallustius Crispus (86-35 BCE), a Sabine from Amiternum, acted against Cicero and Milo as tribune in 52, joined Caesar after being expelled from the Senate in 50, was restored to the senate by Caesar and took part in his African campaign as praetor in 46, and was then appointed governor of New Africa (Numidia). Upon his return to Rome he narrowly escaped conviction for malfeasance in office, retired from public life, and took up historiography. Sallust's two extant monographs take as their theme the moral and political decline of Rome, one on the conspiracy of Catiline and the other on the war with Jugurtha. Although Sallust is decidedly unsubtle and partisan in analyzing people and events, his works are important and significantly influenced later historians, notably Tacitus. Taking Thucydides as his model but building on Roman stylistic and rhetorical traditions, Sallust achieved a distinctive style, concentrated and arresting; lively characterizations, especially in the speeches; and skill at using particular episodes to illustrate large general themes." -- Publisher website.
  • v. 1. The war with Catiline, The war with Jugurtha.
  • Preface
  • General introduction
  • References
  • General bibliography
  • Sigla
  • The war with Cataline
  • The war with Jugurtha
  • Index
  • Maps.
"Sallust, Gaius Sallustius Crispus (86-35 BCE), a Sabine from Amiternum, acted against Cicero and Milo as tribune in 52, joined Caesar after being expelled from the Senate in 50, was restored to the senate by Caesar and took part in his African campaign as praetor in 46, and was then appointed governor of New Africa (Numidia). Upon his return to Rome he narrowly escaped conviction for malfeasance in office, retired from public life, and took up historiography. Sallust's two extant monographs take as their theme the moral and political decline of Rome, one on the conspiracy of Catiline and the other on the war with Jugurtha. Although Sallust is decidedly unsubtle and partisan in analyzing people and events, his works are important and significantly influenced later historians, notably Tacitus. Taking Thucydides as his model but building on Roman stylistic and rhetorical traditions, Sallust achieved a distinctive style, concentrated and arresting; lively characterizations, especially in the speeches; and skill at using particular episodes to illustrate large general themes." -- Publisher website.
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18. Annals [2012]

Book
lv, 468 p. : maps ; 20 cm.
This is a compelling new translation of Tacitus' "Annals", one of the greatest accounts of ancient Rome, by Cynthia Damon. Tacitus' "Annals" recounts the major historical events from the years shortly before the death of Augustus to the death of Nero in AD 68. With clarity and vivid intensity Tacitus describes the reign of terror under the corrupt Tiberius, the great fire of Rome during the time of Nero and the wars, poisonings, scandals, conspiracies and murders that were part of imperial life. Despite his claim that the "Annals" were written objectively, Tacitus' account is sharply critical of the emperors' excesses and fearful for the future of imperial Rome, while also filled with a longing for its past glories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is a compelling new translation of Tacitus' "Annals", one of the greatest accounts of ancient Rome, by Cynthia Damon. Tacitus' "Annals" recounts the major historical events from the years shortly before the death of Augustus to the death of Nero in AD 68. With clarity and vivid intensity Tacitus describes the reign of terror under the corrupt Tiberius, the great fire of Rome during the time of Nero and the wars, poisonings, scandals, conspiracies and murders that were part of imperial life. Despite his claim that the "Annals" were written objectively, Tacitus' account is sharply critical of the emperors' excesses and fearful for the future of imperial Rome, while also filled with a longing for its past glories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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Book
xviii, 529 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • List of Figures ix Notes on Contributors xv Introduction 1 Robin Osborne and Susan E. Alcock 1 What is Classical Archaeology? 11 Introduction 11 (a) Greek Archaeology 13 Anthony Snodgrass (b) Roman Archaeology 30 Martin Millett 2 Doing Archaeology in the Classical Lands 51 Introduction 51 (a) The Greek World 53 Jack L. Davis (b) The Roman World 71 Henry Hurst 3 Human Ecology and the Classical Landscape 91 Introduction 91 The Greek and Roman Worlds 93 Lin Foxhall, Martin Jones and Hamish Forbes 4 The Essential Countryside 122 Introduction 122 (a) The Greek World 124 Susan E. Alcock (b) The Roman World 144 Nicola Terrenato 5 Urban Spaces and Central Places 168 Introduction 168 (a) The Greek World 170 Tonio Holscher (b) The Roman World 187 Nicholas Purcell 6 Housing and Households 207 Introduction 207 (a) The Greek World 209 Lisa Nevett (b) The Roman World 228 Bettina Bergmann 7 Cult and Ritual 249 Introduction 249 (a) The Greek World 251 Robin Osborne (b) The Roman World 268 Christopher Smith 8 The Personal and the Political 293 Introduction 293 (a) The Greek World 295 John F. Cherry (b) The Roman World 316 Penelope J. E. Davies 9 The Creation and Expression of Identity 348 Introduction 348 (a) The Greek World 350 Jonathan M. Hall (b) The Roman World 368 Andrew Wallace-Hadrill 10 Linking with a Wider World 394 Introduction 394 (a) Greeks and "Barbarians" 396 Sarah P. Morris (b) Romans and "Barbarians" 415 Jane Webster 11 A Place for Art? 439 Introduction 439 (a) Putting the Art into Artifact 442 Caroline Vout (b) Classical Archaeology and the Contexts of Art History 468 Michael Squire Prospective 501 Susan E. Alcock and Robin Osborne Index 506.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The fully revised second edition of this successful volume includes updates on the latest archaeological research in all chapters, and two new essays on Greek and Roman art. It retains its unique, paired essay format, as well as key contributions from leading archaeologists and historians of the classical world. Second edition is updated and revised throughout, showcasing the latest research and fresh theoretical approaches in classical archaeology Includes brand new essays on ancient Greek and Roman art in a modern context Designed to encourage critical thinking about the interpretation of ancient material culture and the role of modern perceptions in shaping the study of art and archaeology Features paired essays -- one covering the Greek world, the other, the Roman -- to stimulate a dialogue not only between the two ancient cultures, but between scholars from different historiographic and methodological traditions Includes maps, chronologies, diagrams, photographs, and short editorial introductions to each chapter.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures ix Notes on Contributors xv Introduction 1 Robin Osborne and Susan E. Alcock 1 What is Classical Archaeology? 11 Introduction 11 (a) Greek Archaeology 13 Anthony Snodgrass (b) Roman Archaeology 30 Martin Millett 2 Doing Archaeology in the Classical Lands 51 Introduction 51 (a) The Greek World 53 Jack L. Davis (b) The Roman World 71 Henry Hurst 3 Human Ecology and the Classical Landscape 91 Introduction 91 The Greek and Roman Worlds 93 Lin Foxhall, Martin Jones and Hamish Forbes 4 The Essential Countryside 122 Introduction 122 (a) The Greek World 124 Susan E. Alcock (b) The Roman World 144 Nicola Terrenato 5 Urban Spaces and Central Places 168 Introduction 168 (a) The Greek World 170 Tonio Holscher (b) The Roman World 187 Nicholas Purcell 6 Housing and Households 207 Introduction 207 (a) The Greek World 209 Lisa Nevett (b) The Roman World 228 Bettina Bergmann 7 Cult and Ritual 249 Introduction 249 (a) The Greek World 251 Robin Osborne (b) The Roman World 268 Christopher Smith 8 The Personal and the Political 293 Introduction 293 (a) The Greek World 295 John F. Cherry (b) The Roman World 316 Penelope J. E. Davies 9 The Creation and Expression of Identity 348 Introduction 348 (a) The Greek World 350 Jonathan M. Hall (b) The Roman World 368 Andrew Wallace-Hadrill 10 Linking with a Wider World 394 Introduction 394 (a) Greeks and "Barbarians" 396 Sarah P. Morris (b) Romans and "Barbarians" 415 Jane Webster 11 A Place for Art? 439 Introduction 439 (a) Putting the Art into Artifact 442 Caroline Vout (b) Classical Archaeology and the Contexts of Art History 468 Michael Squire Prospective 501 Susan E. Alcock and Robin Osborne Index 506.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The fully revised second edition of this successful volume includes updates on the latest archaeological research in all chapters, and two new essays on Greek and Roman art. It retains its unique, paired essay format, as well as key contributions from leading archaeologists and historians of the classical world. Second edition is updated and revised throughout, showcasing the latest research and fresh theoretical approaches in classical archaeology Includes brand new essays on ancient Greek and Roman art in a modern context Designed to encourage critical thinking about the interpretation of ancient material culture and the role of modern perceptions in shaping the study of art and archaeology Features paired essays -- one covering the Greek world, the other, the Roman -- to stimulate a dialogue not only between the two ancient cultures, but between scholars from different historiographic and methodological traditions Includes maps, chronologies, diagrams, photographs, and short editorial introductions to each chapter.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
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400 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. maps ; 28 cm.
  • PREFACE 8 INTRODUCTION 10 The Recovery of Antiquity 13 The Eighteenth Century 17 The Nineteenth Century 19 The Twentieth Century 21 The Twenty-First Century 23 Literary Sources 26 The Development of Classical Archaeology 27 Culture and Society HARRIET BOYD HAWES: AMERICAN PIONEER 20 MAP The Greek World 12 Chapter 1 THE AEGEAN IN THE THIRD MILLENNIUM C. 3000-2000 BC 30 Chronology 32 Crete 34 Architecture 34 Pottery and Stonework 35 The Cyclades 37 Architecture 37 Sculpture 37 Pottery and Stonework 40 Greece 40 Architecture 41 Pottery 43 MAP Minoan Crete and the Bronze Age Aegean 32 Chapter 2 THE MIDDLE BRONZE AGE C. 2000-1550 BC 44 Crete 46 Architecture 46 Sculpture 48 Pottery 52 The Cyclades 52 Architecture 52 Pottery 54 Greece 54 Architecture 54 Pottery 55 Troy 56 Controversies and Issues ART AND THE MARKET: FORGERY 50 Controversies and Issues HEINRICH SCHLIEMANN: SCHOLAR OR RASCAL? 56 Controversies and Issues PRIAM'S TREASURE: DOUBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 59 Chapter 3 THE LATE BRONZE AGE C. 1550-1100 BC 60 The Shipwreck off Uluburun 62 Crete 63 Architecture and Wall Painting 63 Sculpture and Pottery 70 Scripts 77 Minoan Religion 79 The LM III Period 81 The Cyclades 81 Keos 81 Melos: Phylakopi III 81 The Minoan Thalassocracy 81 Pottery 81 Thera 83 The Volcanic Eruption 85 Melos: Phylakopi IV 85 Greece 86 The Grave Circles at Mycenae 86 Architecture and Wall Painting 89 Sculpture and Pottery 95 Troy and the End of the Bronze Age in Greece 99 Culture and Society LINEAR B AND ITS DECIPHERMENT 76 Chapter 4 THE DARK AGE AND GEOMETRIC GREECE C. 1100-700 BC 102 Architecture 105 Sculpture 110 Pottery 112 Colonization 118 Culture and Society BURYING THE DEAD 115 MAP The Greek World to c. 400 BC 104 MAP South Italy and Sicily 119 Chapter 5 THE ORIENTALIZING PERIOD C. 700-600 BC 120 Pottery 121 Corinth 122 Athens 126 East Greece and the Islands 129 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 131 Sculpture 139 Culture and Society DRINKING AND DINING: THE SYMPOSIUM 125 Culture and Society FOOD 135 Chapter 6 ARCHAIC GREECE C. 600-480 BC 146 Athens 147 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 150 The Orders 150 Doric Temples 151 Ionic Temples 154 The Cyclades 156 Temple Functions 156 Sanctuaries 158 Doric and Ionic Treasuries 160 Sicily and South Italy 164 Athens 170 Sculpture 171 Kouroi 172 Korai 176 Reliefs 187 Pottery 189 Athens 192 Corinth 196 Laconia, East Greece, and the West 197 Athenian Red-figure 200 Culture and Society COINS AND COINAGE 149 Controversies and Issues THE GETTY KOUROS: IS IT FOR REAL? 181 Culture and Society CONNOISSEURSHIP 196 MAP Greece and the Aegean 148 Chapter 7 THE PERIOD OF TRANSITION C. 480-450 BC 206 Athens and the Western Greeks 209 The Women's World 210 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 213 Aegina 213 Olympia 214 The Olympic Games 221 Sicily and South Italy 223 Athens 227 Sculpture 229 Pottery and Wall Painting 242 Culture and Society SILVER MINES AND SILVER COINS AT ATHENS 208 Culture and Society HOMOSEXUALITY 243 Chapter 8 THE HIGH CLASSICAL PERIOD C. 450-400 BC 248 The Peloponnesian War 250 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 251 Athens 251 Sicily and South Italy 274 Sculpture 276 Pottery and Wall Painting 281 Controversies and Issues LORD ELGIN AND THE PARTHENON MARBLES 263 MAP Attica 256 Chapter 9 THE FOURTH CENTURY C. 400-300 BC 288 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 293 Bassae 293 Epidauros 294 Athens 297 Olynthos 299 Priene 300 Halikarnassos 302 Sculpture 305 Alexander the Great 312 Pottery 318 Wall Painting and Mosaics 322 Macedon 325 Vergina 325 Pella 334 Lefkadia 336 Controversies and Issues THE THEATER AT ATHENS: WERE WOMEN IN THE AUDIENCE? 326 Controversies and Issues VERGINA: THE TOMB OF PHILIP (BUT WHICH PHILIP?) 333 MAP The Greek World. c. 400-30 BC 290 Chapter 10 THE HELLENISTIC PERIOD C. 323-31 BC 338 Rome and Greece 340 Architecture 341 Pergamon 341 Kos 345 Magnesia and Didyma 345 Athens 348 Miletus 351 Syracuse 354 Sculpture 354 Wall Painting and Mosaics 377 Pottery 382 Culture and Society THE ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM 343 Culture and Society SALVAGE ARCHAEOLOGY 352 Conclusion 386 Chronology 388 Glossary 389 Select Bibliography 392 Photographic Credits 394 Index 395.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Greek Art and Architecture explores the development of Greek art across three centuries. This extensively illustrated and clearly written text is accessible to introductory-level students. The major categories of Greek Art and architecture- including sculpture, vase painting, wall painting, and metal work in a historical, social, and archaeological context, are explored.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • PREFACE 8 INTRODUCTION 10 The Recovery of Antiquity 13 The Eighteenth Century 17 The Nineteenth Century 19 The Twentieth Century 21 The Twenty-First Century 23 Literary Sources 26 The Development of Classical Archaeology 27 Culture and Society HARRIET BOYD HAWES: AMERICAN PIONEER 20 MAP The Greek World 12 Chapter 1 THE AEGEAN IN THE THIRD MILLENNIUM C. 3000-2000 BC 30 Chronology 32 Crete 34 Architecture 34 Pottery and Stonework 35 The Cyclades 37 Architecture 37 Sculpture 37 Pottery and Stonework 40 Greece 40 Architecture 41 Pottery 43 MAP Minoan Crete and the Bronze Age Aegean 32 Chapter 2 THE MIDDLE BRONZE AGE C. 2000-1550 BC 44 Crete 46 Architecture 46 Sculpture 48 Pottery 52 The Cyclades 52 Architecture 52 Pottery 54 Greece 54 Architecture 54 Pottery 55 Troy 56 Controversies and Issues ART AND THE MARKET: FORGERY 50 Controversies and Issues HEINRICH SCHLIEMANN: SCHOLAR OR RASCAL? 56 Controversies and Issues PRIAM'S TREASURE: DOUBTS AND DIFFICULTIES 59 Chapter 3 THE LATE BRONZE AGE C. 1550-1100 BC 60 The Shipwreck off Uluburun 62 Crete 63 Architecture and Wall Painting 63 Sculpture and Pottery 70 Scripts 77 Minoan Religion 79 The LM III Period 81 The Cyclades 81 Keos 81 Melos: Phylakopi III 81 The Minoan Thalassocracy 81 Pottery 81 Thera 83 The Volcanic Eruption 85 Melos: Phylakopi IV 85 Greece 86 The Grave Circles at Mycenae 86 Architecture and Wall Painting 89 Sculpture and Pottery 95 Troy and the End of the Bronze Age in Greece 99 Culture and Society LINEAR B AND ITS DECIPHERMENT 76 Chapter 4 THE DARK AGE AND GEOMETRIC GREECE C. 1100-700 BC 102 Architecture 105 Sculpture 110 Pottery 112 Colonization 118 Culture and Society BURYING THE DEAD 115 MAP The Greek World to c. 400 BC 104 MAP South Italy and Sicily 119 Chapter 5 THE ORIENTALIZING PERIOD C. 700-600 BC 120 Pottery 121 Corinth 122 Athens 126 East Greece and the Islands 129 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 131 Sculpture 139 Culture and Society DRINKING AND DINING: THE SYMPOSIUM 125 Culture and Society FOOD 135 Chapter 6 ARCHAIC GREECE C. 600-480 BC 146 Athens 147 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 150 The Orders 150 Doric Temples 151 Ionic Temples 154 The Cyclades 156 Temple Functions 156 Sanctuaries 158 Doric and Ionic Treasuries 160 Sicily and South Italy 164 Athens 170 Sculpture 171 Kouroi 172 Korai 176 Reliefs 187 Pottery 189 Athens 192 Corinth 196 Laconia, East Greece, and the West 197 Athenian Red-figure 200 Culture and Society COINS AND COINAGE 149 Controversies and Issues THE GETTY KOUROS: IS IT FOR REAL? 181 Culture and Society CONNOISSEURSHIP 196 MAP Greece and the Aegean 148 Chapter 7 THE PERIOD OF TRANSITION C. 480-450 BC 206 Athens and the Western Greeks 209 The Women's World 210 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 213 Aegina 213 Olympia 214 The Olympic Games 221 Sicily and South Italy 223 Athens 227 Sculpture 229 Pottery and Wall Painting 242 Culture and Society SILVER MINES AND SILVER COINS AT ATHENS 208 Culture and Society HOMOSEXUALITY 243 Chapter 8 THE HIGH CLASSICAL PERIOD C. 450-400 BC 248 The Peloponnesian War 250 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 251 Athens 251 Sicily and South Italy 274 Sculpture 276 Pottery and Wall Painting 281 Controversies and Issues LORD ELGIN AND THE PARTHENON MARBLES 263 MAP Attica 256 Chapter 9 THE FOURTH CENTURY C. 400-300 BC 288 Architecture and Architectural Sculpture 293 Bassae 293 Epidauros 294 Athens 297 Olynthos 299 Priene 300 Halikarnassos 302 Sculpture 305 Alexander the Great 312 Pottery 318 Wall Painting and Mosaics 322 Macedon 325 Vergina 325 Pella 334 Lefkadia 336 Controversies and Issues THE THEATER AT ATHENS: WERE WOMEN IN THE AUDIENCE? 326 Controversies and Issues VERGINA: THE TOMB OF PHILIP (BUT WHICH PHILIP?) 333 MAP The Greek World. c. 400-30 BC 290 Chapter 10 THE HELLENISTIC PERIOD C. 323-31 BC 338 Rome and Greece 340 Architecture 341 Pergamon 341 Kos 345 Magnesia and Didyma 345 Athens 348 Miletus 351 Syracuse 354 Sculpture 354 Wall Painting and Mosaics 377 Pottery 382 Culture and Society THE ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM 343 Culture and Society SALVAGE ARCHAEOLOGY 352 Conclusion 386 Chronology 388 Glossary 389 Select Bibliography 392 Photographic Credits 394 Index 395.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Greek Art and Architecture explores the development of Greek art across three centuries. This extensively illustrated and clearly written text is accessible to introductory-level students. The major categories of Greek Art and architecture- including sculpture, vase painting, wall painting, and metal work in a historical, social, and archaeological context, are explored.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Art & Architecture Library, Classics Library
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