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Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
(no call number) In-library use In process
Book
260 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 32 cm
Count Basie, Tchaikovsky, Aretha Franklin, Lou Reed, Diana Ross, John Lennon and the Rolling Stones all had their music promoted by Andy Warhol's record covers. This stunning volume reproduces all of the album covers, front and back, that Warhol designed over four decades. Hundreds of additional contextual illustrations present liner notes and inside covers, related works by Warhol and documentary images that trace the artist's visual sources. Author Paul Marechal explores Warhol's creative process, his relationship with artists and his fascination with all genres of music. The range of music represented through these record covers, from jazz to classical and rock to soul, reveals the breadth of Warhol's musical tastes and his extraordinary ability to combine his artistic vision with that of the musicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Count Basie, Tchaikovsky, Aretha Franklin, Lou Reed, Diana Ross, John Lennon and the Rolling Stones all had their music promoted by Andy Warhol's record covers. This stunning volume reproduces all of the album covers, front and back, that Warhol designed over four decades. Hundreds of additional contextual illustrations present liner notes and inside covers, related works by Warhol and documentary images that trace the artist's visual sources. Author Paul Marechal explores Warhol's creative process, his relationship with artists and his fascination with all genres of music. The range of music represented through these record covers, from jazz to classical and rock to soul, reveals the breadth of Warhol's musical tastes and his extraordinary ability to combine his artistic vision with that of the musicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
NC1883.3 .W37 M37 2015 F In-library use
Book
xii, 240 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
  • Foreword
  • Message from ARSC
  • Acknowledgments
  • About this guide
  • Preserving audio / Curtis Peoples and Marsha Maguire
  • Audio formats : characteristics and deterioration / Harrison Behl
  • Appraisals and priorities / Maya Lerman
  • Care and maintenance / Carla Arton
  • Description of audio recordings / Marsha Maguire
  • Preservation reformatting / William Chase
  • What to do after digitization / Chris Lacinak
  • Audio preservation : the legal context / Brandon Butler
  • Disaster prevention, preparedness, and response / Kara Van Malssen
  • Appendix A. Fair use and sound recordings : lessons from community practice / Brandon Butler and Peter Jaszi
  • Appendix B. Glossary
  • Contributors and editors
  • Index.
  • Foreword
  • Message from ARSC
  • Acknowledgments
  • About this guide
  • Preserving audio / Curtis Peoples and Marsha Maguire
  • Audio formats : characteristics and deterioration / Harrison Behl
  • Appraisals and priorities / Maya Lerman
  • Care and maintenance / Carla Arton
  • Description of audio recordings / Marsha Maguire
  • Preservation reformatting / William Chase
  • What to do after digitization / Chris Lacinak
  • Audio preservation : the legal context / Brandon Butler
  • Disaster prevention, preparedness, and response / Kara Van Malssen
  • Appendix A. Fair use and sound recordings : lessons from community practice / Brandon Butler and Peter Jaszi
  • Appendix B. Glossary
  • Contributors and editors
  • Index.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
Z701.3 .S68 A77 2015 Unknown

4. The big beat [1960]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • The chess players
  • Sakeena's vision
  • Politely
  • Dat dere
  • Lester left town
  • It's only a paper moon.
  • The chess players
  • Sakeena's vision
  • Politely
  • Dat dere
  • Lester left town
  • It's only a paper moon.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84029 In-library use

5. Blue & sentimental [1962]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Blue and sentimental
  • Minor impulse
  • Don't take your love from me
  • Blues for Charlie
  • Like
  • Count every star.
  • Blue and sentimental
  • Minor impulse
  • Don't take your love from me
  • Blues for Charlie
  • Like
  • Count every star.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84098 In-library use

6. Blue hour [1961]

Music recording
1 audio disc ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • I want a little girl
  • Gee baby ain't I good to you
  • Blue riff
  • Since I fell for you
  • Willow weep for me.
  • I want a little girl
  • Gee baby ain't I good to you
  • Blue riff
  • Since I fell for you
  • Willow weep for me.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84057 In-library use
Book
vii, 384 pages ; 26 cm
Calypso, with its richly diverse cultural heritage, was the most significant Caribbean musical form from World War I to Trinidad and Tobago Independence in 1962. Though wildly popular in mid-1950s America, Calypso--along with other music from ""the island of the hummingbird""--has been largely neglected or forgotten. This first-ever discography of the first 50 years of Trinidadian music includes all the major artists, as well as many unknowns. Chronological entries for 78 rpm recordings give bibliographical references, periodicals and websites and the recording location. Rare field recordings are catalogued for the first time, including East Indian and Muslim community performances and Shango and Voodoo rites. Appendices give 10-inch LP (78 rpm), 12-inch LP (33 1?3 rpm), extended play and 7-inch single listings. Non-commercial field recordings, radio broadcasts and initially unissued sessions also are listed. The influence of Trinidadian music on film, and the ""Calypso craze"" are discussed. Audio sources are provided. Indexes list individual artists and groups, titles and labels.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Calypso, with its richly diverse cultural heritage, was the most significant Caribbean musical form from World War I to Trinidad and Tobago Independence in 1962. Though wildly popular in mid-1950s America, Calypso--along with other music from ""the island of the hummingbird""--has been largely neglected or forgotten. This first-ever discography of the first 50 years of Trinidadian music includes all the major artists, as well as many unknowns. Chronological entries for 78 rpm recordings give bibliographical references, periodicals and websites and the recording location. Rare field recordings are catalogued for the first time, including East Indian and Muslim community performances and Shango and Voodoo rites. Appendices give 10-inch LP (78 rpm), 12-inch LP (33 1?3 rpm), extended play and 7-inch single listings. Non-commercial field recordings, radio broadcasts and initially unissued sessions also are listed. The influence of Trinidadian music on film, and the ""Calypso craze"" are discussed. Audio sources are provided. Indexes list individual artists and groups, titles and labels.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML156.4 .C32 G53 2015 In-library use

8. Empyrean isles [1964]

Sound recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • One finger snap
  • Oliloqui valley
  • Cantaloupe island
  • The egg.
  • One finger snap
  • Oliloqui valley
  • Cantaloupe island
  • The egg.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84175 In-library use
Book
214 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 30 cm
Run Wrake's career as an animator and graphic designer was distinguished by an engagement with music, from the videos he produced for the Gang of Four and Howie B. to visuals he created for the live shows of U2 and the Rolling Stones. Between 1988 and 2000, he illustrated album reviews for the NME, turning his talent to documenting one of the most exciting periods in pop music history. Drawing on his influences - early hand-drawn animation, Dada, Pop Art and punk graphics - Run Wrake developed a unique, bold and contemporary style to capture a vibrant musical culture with a perceptiveness and wit that was all his own. The illustrations collected here are a testament to the versatility of Run Wrake's art: End of a Century pictures musicians, good and bad, from the heady days of the nineties, from guitar-driven grunge and Britpop acts to ageing folk musicians and manufactured pop stars.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Run Wrake's career as an animator and graphic designer was distinguished by an engagement with music, from the videos he produced for the Gang of Four and Howie B. to visuals he created for the live shows of U2 and the Rolling Stones. Between 1988 and 2000, he illustrated album reviews for the NME, turning his talent to documenting one of the most exciting periods in pop music history. Drawing on his influences - early hand-drawn animation, Dada, Pop Art and punk graphics - Run Wrake developed a unique, bold and contemporary style to capture a vibrant musical culture with a perceptiveness and wit that was all his own. The illustrations collected here are a testament to the versatility of Run Wrake's art: End of a Century pictures musicians, good and bad, from the heady days of the nineties, from guitar-driven grunge and Britpop acts to ageing folk musicians and manufactured pop stars.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML87 .W84 2015 F In-library use

10. Green street [1961]

Music recording
1 audio disc ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • No. 1 Green Street
  • 'Round about midnight
  • Grant's dimensions
  • Green with envy
  • Alone together.
  • No. 1 Green Street
  • 'Round about midnight
  • Grant's dimensions
  • Green with envy
  • Alone together.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84071 In-library use
Book
xxix, 167 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures and Tables Acknowledgments Preface Part I: Introduction Part II: Transformations in the Recording Industry Chapter 1Recording Industry in Transition Chapter 2The Expansion of Consumption in the Recording Industry Part III: The State in Music Chapter 3Copyright: A Critical Exploration Chapter 4Critical Junctures Part IV: The Recording Industry and Labor Chapter 5Musician Labor Chapter 6Victims, Musicians and Metallica Part V: Digital Distribution and Surveillance Chapter 7Distribution Then and Now Chapter 8Watching Music Consumption Part VI: Conclusion Bibliography Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
iTake-Over: The Recording Industry in the Digital Era sheds light on the way large corporations appropriate new technologies related to recording and distribution of audio material to maintain their market dominance in a capitalist system. All too commonly, scholars have asserted too confidently, how the rise and reign of digital music has diminished the power of major record labels. In iTake-Over, music scholar David Arditi argues otherwise, adopting a broader perspective by examining how the recording industry has strengthened copyright laws for their corporate ends at the expense of the broader public good, which has traditionally depended on the safe harbor of fair use. Arditi also challenges the dominant discourse over digital music distribution, which has largely adopted the position that the recording industry has a legitimate claim to profitability at the detriment of a shared culture. iTake-Over more specifically surveys the actual material effects that digital distribution has had on the industry. Most notable among these is how major record labels find themselves in a stronger financial position today in the music industry than they were before the launch of Napster. Arditi contends that this is largely because of reduced production and distribution costs and the steady gain in digital music sales. Moreover, instead of merely trying to counteract the phenomenon of digital distribution, the RIAA and the major record labels embraced, and then altered, the distribution system. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the RIAA lobbied for legislation, built technologies, and waged war in the courts in order to shape the digital environment for music distribution. From mp3s to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), from the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) to iTunes, the major record labels and the RIAA, instead of trying to torpedo the switch to digital distribution, engineered it to their benefit-often at the expense of the public interest. Throughout, Arditi boldly asserts that the sea change to digital music did not destroy the recording industry. Rather, it stands as a testament to the recording industry's successful management of this migration to digital production and distribution. As such, this work should appeal to musicians and music scholars, political scientists and sociologists, technologists and audio professionals seeking to grasp this remarkable change in music production and consumption.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures and Tables Acknowledgments Preface Part I: Introduction Part II: Transformations in the Recording Industry Chapter 1Recording Industry in Transition Chapter 2The Expansion of Consumption in the Recording Industry Part III: The State in Music Chapter 3Copyright: A Critical Exploration Chapter 4Critical Junctures Part IV: The Recording Industry and Labor Chapter 5Musician Labor Chapter 6Victims, Musicians and Metallica Part V: Digital Distribution and Surveillance Chapter 7Distribution Then and Now Chapter 8Watching Music Consumption Part VI: Conclusion Bibliography Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
iTake-Over: The Recording Industry in the Digital Era sheds light on the way large corporations appropriate new technologies related to recording and distribution of audio material to maintain their market dominance in a capitalist system. All too commonly, scholars have asserted too confidently, how the rise and reign of digital music has diminished the power of major record labels. In iTake-Over, music scholar David Arditi argues otherwise, adopting a broader perspective by examining how the recording industry has strengthened copyright laws for their corporate ends at the expense of the broader public good, which has traditionally depended on the safe harbor of fair use. Arditi also challenges the dominant discourse over digital music distribution, which has largely adopted the position that the recording industry has a legitimate claim to profitability at the detriment of a shared culture. iTake-Over more specifically surveys the actual material effects that digital distribution has had on the industry. Most notable among these is how major record labels find themselves in a stronger financial position today in the music industry than they were before the launch of Napster. Arditi contends that this is largely because of reduced production and distribution costs and the steady gain in digital music sales. Moreover, instead of merely trying to counteract the phenomenon of digital distribution, the RIAA and the major record labels embraced, and then altered, the distribution system. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the RIAA lobbied for legislation, built technologies, and waged war in the courts in order to shape the digital environment for music distribution. From mp3s to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), from the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) to iTunes, the major record labels and the RIAA, instead of trying to torpedo the switch to digital distribution, engineered it to their benefit-often at the expense of the public interest. Throughout, Arditi boldly asserts that the sea change to digital music did not destroy the recording industry. Rather, it stands as a testament to the recording industry's successful management of this migration to digital production and distribution. As such, this work should appeal to musicians and music scholars, political scientists and sociologists, technologists and audio professionals seeking to grasp this remarkable change in music production and consumption.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML3790 .A76 2015 Unknown
Book
vi, 289 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Table of Contents List of Illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Living Stereo (Paul Th berge, Kyle Devine and Tom Everrett) (AUDIO) POSITIONS 1. The "Sweet Spot": The Technology of Stereo and the Field of Auditorship (Tony Grajeda) 2. The Stereophonic Spaces of Soundscape (Jonathan Sterne) 3. Sonar and the Channelization of the Ocean (John Shiga) LISTENING CULTURES 4. Training the Listener: Stereo Demonstration Discs in an Emerging Consumer Market (Tim J. Anderson) 5. Mono in the Stereo Age (Eric Barry) 6. Looking Past the Stereo Loudspeakers: From the Home to the Amplified Concert Hall (Jonathan Tee) 7. Recorded British Folk Song (Allan F. Moore) MULTICHANNEL SOUND and SCREEN MEDIA 8. Television: Now with Two Channels of Audio (David Sedman) 9. The Grandeur(s) of CinemaScope (Matthew Malsky) 10. Atmos Now: Dolby Laboratories, Mixing Ideology and Hollywood Sound Production (Benjamin Wright) 11. A Symphony of Sound: Surround Sound in Formula One Racing Games (Ruth Dockwray and Karen Collins) List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Stereo is everywhere. The whole culture and industry of music and sound became organized around the principle of stereophony during the twentieth century. But nothing about this-not the invention or acceptance or ubiquity of stereo-was inevitable. Nor did the aesthetic conventions, technological objects, and listening practices required to make sense of stereo emerge fully formed, out of the blue. This groundbreaking book uncovers the vast amount of work that has been required to make stereo seem natural, and which has been necessary to maintain stereo's place as a dominant mode of sound reproduction for over half a century. The essays contained within this book are thematically grouped under (Audio) Positions, Listening Cultures, and Multichannel Sound and Screen Media; the cumulative effect is to advance research in music, sound, and media studies and to build new bridges between the fields. With contributions from leading scholars across several disciplines, Living Stereo re-tells the history of twentieth-century aural and musical culture through the lens of stereophonic sound.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Table of Contents List of Illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Living Stereo (Paul Th berge, Kyle Devine and Tom Everrett) (AUDIO) POSITIONS 1. The "Sweet Spot": The Technology of Stereo and the Field of Auditorship (Tony Grajeda) 2. The Stereophonic Spaces of Soundscape (Jonathan Sterne) 3. Sonar and the Channelization of the Ocean (John Shiga) LISTENING CULTURES 4. Training the Listener: Stereo Demonstration Discs in an Emerging Consumer Market (Tim J. Anderson) 5. Mono in the Stereo Age (Eric Barry) 6. Looking Past the Stereo Loudspeakers: From the Home to the Amplified Concert Hall (Jonathan Tee) 7. Recorded British Folk Song (Allan F. Moore) MULTICHANNEL SOUND and SCREEN MEDIA 8. Television: Now with Two Channels of Audio (David Sedman) 9. The Grandeur(s) of CinemaScope (Matthew Malsky) 10. Atmos Now: Dolby Laboratories, Mixing Ideology and Hollywood Sound Production (Benjamin Wright) 11. A Symphony of Sound: Surround Sound in Formula One Racing Games (Ruth Dockwray and Karen Collins) List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Stereo is everywhere. The whole culture and industry of music and sound became organized around the principle of stereophony during the twentieth century. But nothing about this-not the invention or acceptance or ubiquity of stereo-was inevitable. Nor did the aesthetic conventions, technological objects, and listening practices required to make sense of stereo emerge fully formed, out of the blue. This groundbreaking book uncovers the vast amount of work that has been required to make stereo seem natural, and which has been necessary to maintain stereo's place as a dominant mode of sound reproduction for over half a century. The essays contained within this book are thematically grouped under (Audio) Positions, Listening Cultures, and Multichannel Sound and Screen Media; the cumulative effect is to advance research in music, sound, and media studies and to build new bridges between the fields. With contributions from leading scholars across several disciplines, Living Stereo re-tells the history of twentieth-century aural and musical culture through the lens of stereophonic sound.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
TK7881.4 .L57 2015 In-library use

13. Maiden voyage [1965]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Maiden voyage
  • The eye of the hurricane
  • Little one
  • Survival of the fittest
  • Dolphin dance.
  • Maiden voyage
  • The eye of the hurricane
  • Little one
  • Survival of the fittest
  • Dolphin dance.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84195 In-library use

14. Matador [1979]

Music recording
1 audio disc ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Matador
  • My favorite things
  • Green jeans
  • Bedouin.
  • Matador
  • My favorite things
  • Green jeans
  • Bedouin.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84442 In-library use

15. Original Rockers [2015]

Book
252 p. ; 22 cm
Twenty years ago every town had one. From Bangor to Bradford, Bognor Regis to Bournemouth, independent record shops could be found on every high street and many back streets, across the length and breadth of the land. But as the principal format for music switched from vinyl to CD, these places - synonymous with the thrill of discovery experienced by every serious fan and collector - started to disappear. Vinyl has recovered but its natural environment - the record store - is a rare and precious beast. Richard King's book about several years spent working in Bristol's Revolver, is a clear-eyed yet romantic account of life behind the counter in a business run from the heart not the head with a tendency towards dysfunction. In ten chapters of elegiac prose, King brings this lost environment back to life: the smells, the people, and of course the sounds. We see the landscape of a young person's taste come into view with magnificent passages on CAN, Captain Beefheart, Augustus Pablo, Rod Stewart, Sun Ra Arkestra and the free jazz of Cornelius Cardew. And we see the development of Bristol as one of the key musical cities, from its roots sound systems, through the parties run by the Wild Bunch collective, to the emergence of Massive Attack. Original Rockers evokes a golden moment about to turn to dust in the history of British record stores and celebrates the abandon with which we hear music, and it does so magically, without recourse to nostalgia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Twenty years ago every town had one. From Bangor to Bradford, Bognor Regis to Bournemouth, independent record shops could be found on every high street and many back streets, across the length and breadth of the land. But as the principal format for music switched from vinyl to CD, these places - synonymous with the thrill of discovery experienced by every serious fan and collector - started to disappear. Vinyl has recovered but its natural environment - the record store - is a rare and precious beast. Richard King's book about several years spent working in Bristol's Revolver, is a clear-eyed yet romantic account of life behind the counter in a business run from the heart not the head with a tendency towards dysfunction. In ten chapters of elegiac prose, King brings this lost environment back to life: the smells, the people, and of course the sounds. We see the landscape of a young person's taste come into view with magnificent passages on CAN, Captain Beefheart, Augustus Pablo, Rod Stewart, Sun Ra Arkestra and the free jazz of Cornelius Cardew. And we see the development of Bristol as one of the key musical cities, from its roots sound systems, through the parties run by the Wild Bunch collective, to the emergence of Massive Attack. Original Rockers evokes a golden moment about to turn to dust in the history of British record stores and celebrates the abandon with which we hear music, and it does so magically, without recourse to nostalgia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML3790 .K4648 2015 In-library use

16. Our man in Paris [1963]

Sound recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Scapple from the apple
  • Willow weep for me
  • Broadway
  • Stairway to the stars
  • A night in Tunisia.
  • Scapple from the apple
  • Willow weep for me
  • Broadway
  • Stairway to the stars
  • A night in Tunisia.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84146 In-library use

17. Out to lunch [1964]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Hat and beard
  • Something sweet, something tender
  • Gazzelloni
  • Out to lunch
  • Straight up and down.
  • Hat and beard
  • Something sweet, something tender
  • Gazzelloni
  • Out to lunch
  • Straight up and down.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84163 In-library use

18. Point of departure [1964]

Music recording
1 audio disc ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Refuge
  • New monastery
  • Spectrum
  • Flight 19
  • Dedication.
  • Refuge
  • New monastery
  • Spectrum
  • Flight 19
  • Dedication.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84167 In-library use
Book
223 pages : ill. ; 26 x 26 cm
In 2011, Mike Spitz began photographing more than 40 record stores in and around the greater Los Angeles area, rich with old and new record shops, to capture the lively experience of going to the used record store, discovering that rare vinyl record, cassette or 8-track tape, memorabilia, vintage concert posters, turntables, nostalgia and other music-related gems. Colorful imagery shot on film and in-depth interviews with store owners illustrate how each American independent record store has a unique and vibrant culture that cultivates a communal gathering place for human interaction, exploration and discovery. In chronological order from the oldest existing stores, such as Canterbury Records that opened in 1956 in Pasadena or Music Man Murray Records that opened in 1962, to the most recently opened stores, The Record Store Book respectfully marks the "changing of the guard" from the older to the newer generation of stores as each owner shares facts, store history, and distinctive points of view regarding how people search for, find and appreciate music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In 2011, Mike Spitz began photographing more than 40 record stores in and around the greater Los Angeles area, rich with old and new record shops, to capture the lively experience of going to the used record store, discovering that rare vinyl record, cassette or 8-track tape, memorabilia, vintage concert posters, turntables, nostalgia and other music-related gems. Colorful imagery shot on film and in-depth interviews with store owners illustrate how each American independent record store has a unique and vibrant culture that cultivates a communal gathering place for human interaction, exploration and discovery. In chronological order from the oldest existing stores, such as Canterbury Records that opened in 1956 in Pasadena or Music Man Murray Records that opened in 1962, to the most recently opened stores, The Record Store Book respectfully marks the "changing of the guard" from the older to the newer generation of stores as each owner shares facts, store history, and distinctive points of view regarding how people search for, find and appreciate music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML3790 .S725 2015 Unknown

20. Speakin' my piece [1960]

Music recording
1 audio disc ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Wadin'
  • Up in Cynthia's room
  • Borderline
  • Rastus
  • Oh so blue
  • Speakin' my piece.
  • Wadin'
  • Up in Cynthia's room
  • Borderline
  • Rastus
  • Oh so blue
  • Speakin' my piece.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84043 In-library use