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1. The big beat [1960]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • The chess players
  • Sakeena's vision
  • Politely
  • Dat dere
  • Lester left town
  • It's only a paper moon.
  • The chess players
  • Sakeena's vision
  • Politely
  • Dat dere
  • Lester left town
  • It's only a paper moon.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84029 In-library use

2. Blue & sentimental [1962]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Blue and sentimental
  • Minor impulse
  • Don't take your love from me
  • Blues for Charlie
  • Like
  • Count every star.
  • Blue and sentimental
  • Minor impulse
  • Don't take your love from me
  • Blues for Charlie
  • Like
  • Count every star.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84098 In-library use

3. Blue hour [1961]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
(no call number) In-library use In process

4. Empyrean isles [1964]

Sound recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • One finger snap
  • Oliloqui valley
  • Cantaloupe island
  • The egg.
  • One finger snap
  • Oliloqui valley
  • Cantaloupe island
  • The egg.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84175 In-library use
Book
xxix, 167 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures and Tables Acknowledgments Preface Part I: Introduction Part II: Transformations in the Recording Industry Chapter 1Recording Industry in Transition Chapter 2The Expansion of Consumption in the Recording Industry Part III: The State in Music Chapter 3Copyright: A Critical Exploration Chapter 4Critical Junctures Part IV: The Recording Industry and Labor Chapter 5Musician Labor Chapter 6Victims, Musicians and Metallica Part V: Digital Distribution and Surveillance Chapter 7Distribution Then and Now Chapter 8Watching Music Consumption Part VI: Conclusion Bibliography Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
iTake-Over: The Recording Industry in the Digital Era sheds light on the way large corporations appropriate new technologies related to recording and distribution of audio material to maintain their market dominance in a capitalist system. All too commonly, scholars have asserted too confidently, how the rise and reign of digital music has diminished the power of major record labels. In iTake-Over, music scholar David Arditi argues otherwise, adopting a broader perspective by examining how the recording industry has strengthened copyright laws for their corporate ends at the expense of the broader public good, which has traditionally depended on the safe harbor of fair use. Arditi also challenges the dominant discourse over digital music distribution, which has largely adopted the position that the recording industry has a legitimate claim to profitability at the detriment of a shared culture. iTake-Over more specifically surveys the actual material effects that digital distribution has had on the industry. Most notable among these is how major record labels find themselves in a stronger financial position today in the music industry than they were before the launch of Napster. Arditi contends that this is largely because of reduced production and distribution costs and the steady gain in digital music sales. Moreover, instead of merely trying to counteract the phenomenon of digital distribution, the RIAA and the major record labels embraced, and then altered, the distribution system. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the RIAA lobbied for legislation, built technologies, and waged war in the courts in order to shape the digital environment for music distribution. From mp3s to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), from the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) to iTunes, the major record labels and the RIAA, instead of trying to torpedo the switch to digital distribution, engineered it to their benefit-often at the expense of the public interest. Throughout, Arditi boldly asserts that the sea change to digital music did not destroy the recording industry. Rather, it stands as a testament to the recording industry's successful management of this migration to digital production and distribution. As such, this work should appeal to musicians and music scholars, political scientists and sociologists, technologists and audio professionals seeking to grasp this remarkable change in music production and consumption.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures and Tables Acknowledgments Preface Part I: Introduction Part II: Transformations in the Recording Industry Chapter 1Recording Industry in Transition Chapter 2The Expansion of Consumption in the Recording Industry Part III: The State in Music Chapter 3Copyright: A Critical Exploration Chapter 4Critical Junctures Part IV: The Recording Industry and Labor Chapter 5Musician Labor Chapter 6Victims, Musicians and Metallica Part V: Digital Distribution and Surveillance Chapter 7Distribution Then and Now Chapter 8Watching Music Consumption Part VI: Conclusion Bibliography Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
iTake-Over: The Recording Industry in the Digital Era sheds light on the way large corporations appropriate new technologies related to recording and distribution of audio material to maintain their market dominance in a capitalist system. All too commonly, scholars have asserted too confidently, how the rise and reign of digital music has diminished the power of major record labels. In iTake-Over, music scholar David Arditi argues otherwise, adopting a broader perspective by examining how the recording industry has strengthened copyright laws for their corporate ends at the expense of the broader public good, which has traditionally depended on the safe harbor of fair use. Arditi also challenges the dominant discourse over digital music distribution, which has largely adopted the position that the recording industry has a legitimate claim to profitability at the detriment of a shared culture. iTake-Over more specifically surveys the actual material effects that digital distribution has had on the industry. Most notable among these is how major record labels find themselves in a stronger financial position today in the music industry than they were before the launch of Napster. Arditi contends that this is largely because of reduced production and distribution costs and the steady gain in digital music sales. Moreover, instead of merely trying to counteract the phenomenon of digital distribution, the RIAA and the major record labels embraced, and then altered, the distribution system. Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, the RIAA lobbied for legislation, built technologies, and waged war in the courts in order to shape the digital environment for music distribution. From mp3s to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), from the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) to iTunes, the major record labels and the RIAA, instead of trying to torpedo the switch to digital distribution, engineered it to their benefit-often at the expense of the public interest. Throughout, Arditi boldly asserts that the sea change to digital music did not destroy the recording industry. Rather, it stands as a testament to the recording industry's successful management of this migration to digital production and distribution. As such, this work should appeal to musicians and music scholars, political scientists and sociologists, technologists and audio professionals seeking to grasp this remarkable change in music production and consumption.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML3790 .A76 2015 Unknown
Music recording
1 audio disc : CD audio ; 4 3/4 in.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
(no call number) In-library use In process

7. Maiden voyage [1965]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Maiden voyage
  • The eye of the hurricane
  • Little one
  • Survival of the fittest
  • Dolphin dance.
  • Maiden voyage
  • The eye of the hurricane
  • Little one
  • Survival of the fittest
  • Dolphin dance.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84195 In-library use

8. Our man in Paris [1963]

Sound recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Scapple from the apple
  • Willow weep for me
  • Broadway
  • Stairway to the stars
  • A night in Tunisia.
  • Scapple from the apple
  • Willow weep for me
  • Broadway
  • Stairway to the stars
  • A night in Tunisia.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84146 In-library use

9. Out to lunch [1964]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Hat and beard
  • Something sweet, something tender
  • Gazzelloni
  • Out to lunch
  • Straight up and down.
  • Hat and beard
  • Something sweet, something tender
  • Gazzelloni
  • Out to lunch
  • Straight up and down.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84163 In-library use

10. Speakin' my piece [1960]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
(no call number) In-library use In process
Book
xxiii, 203 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgements Preface 1. Vinyl as Record: Several Lives of the 'King Format' 2. Medium: Handling and Hearing 3. Thing: Qualities and Entanglements 4. Commodity: Value and Markets 5. Totem: Scene-Making in Urban Spaces Epilogue: Modern Icon Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Recent years have seen not just a revival, but a rebirth of the analogue record. More than merely a nostalgic craze, vinyl has become a cultural icon. As music consumption migrated to digital and online, this seemingly obsolete medium became the fastest-growing format in music sales. Whilst vinyl never ceased to be the favorite amongst many music lovers and DJs, from the late 1980s the recording industry regarded it as an outdated relic, consigned to dusty domestic corners and obscure record shops. So why is vinyl now experiencing a 'rebirth of its cool'? Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward explore this question by combining a cultural sociological approach with insights from material culture studies. Presenting vinyl as a multifaceted cultural object, they investigate the reasons behind its persistence within our technologically accelerated culture. Informed by media analysis, urban ethnography and the authors' interviews with musicians, DJs, sound engineers, record store owners, collectors and cutting-edge label chiefs from a range of metropolitan centres renowned for thriving music scenes including London, New York, Tokyo, Melbourne, and especially Berlin, what emerges is a story of a modern icon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgements Preface 1. Vinyl as Record: Several Lives of the 'King Format' 2. Medium: Handling and Hearing 3. Thing: Qualities and Entanglements 4. Commodity: Value and Markets 5. Totem: Scene-Making in Urban Spaces Epilogue: Modern Icon Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Recent years have seen not just a revival, but a rebirth of the analogue record. More than merely a nostalgic craze, vinyl has become a cultural icon. As music consumption migrated to digital and online, this seemingly obsolete medium became the fastest-growing format in music sales. Whilst vinyl never ceased to be the favorite amongst many music lovers and DJs, from the late 1980s the recording industry regarded it as an outdated relic, consigned to dusty domestic corners and obscure record shops. So why is vinyl now experiencing a 'rebirth of its cool'? Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward explore this question by combining a cultural sociological approach with insights from material culture studies. Presenting vinyl as a multifaceted cultural object, they investigate the reasons behind its persistence within our technologically accelerated culture. Informed by media analysis, urban ethnography and the authors' interviews with musicians, DJs, sound engineers, record store owners, collectors and cutting-edge label chiefs from a range of metropolitan centres renowned for thriving music scenes including London, New York, Tokyo, Melbourne, and especially Berlin, what emerges is a story of a modern icon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
ML1055 .B19 2015 Unknown

12. 1000 record covers [2014]

Book
574 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Jacket madness: A splendid collection of album art from the 1960s to the 90s Record covers are a sign of our life and times. Like the music on the discs, they address such issues as love, life, death, fashion, and rebellion. For music fans the covers are the expression of a period, of a particular time in their lives. Many are works of art and have become as famous as the music they stand for--Andy Warhol's covers, for example, including the banana he designed for The Velvet Underground. This edition of Record Covers presents a selection of the best rock album covers of the 60s to 90s from music archivist, disc jockey, journalist, and former record-publicity executive Michael Ochs's enormous private collection. Both a trip down memory lane and a study in the evolution of cover art, this is a sweeping look at an underappreciated art form. Text in English, French, and German.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Jacket madness: A splendid collection of album art from the 1960s to the 90s Record covers are a sign of our life and times. Like the music on the discs, they address such issues as love, life, death, fashion, and rebellion. For music fans the covers are the expression of a period, of a particular time in their lives. Many are works of art and have become as famous as the music they stand for--Andy Warhol's covers, for example, including the banana he designed for The Velvet Underground. This edition of Record Covers presents a selection of the best rock album covers of the 60s to 90s from music archivist, disc jockey, journalist, and former record-publicity executive Michael Ochs's enormous private collection. Both a trip down memory lane and a study in the evolution of cover art, this is a sweeping look at an underappreciated art form. Text in English, French, and German.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Stacks
NC1882 .O35 2014 Unknown
Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Moanin'
  • Are you real
  • Along came Betty
  • The drum thunder (miniature) suite
  • Blues march
  • Come rain or come shine.
  • Moanin'
  • Are you real
  • Along came Betty
  • The drum thunder (miniature) suite
  • Blues march
  • Come rain or come shine.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-84003 In-library use
Book
93 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm + 1 sound disc (digital ; 4 3/4 in.)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML3531 .P385 2014 In-library use
Book
xxxii, 210 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
"The Arto-Bell group of labels is one of the most daunting to research. The frequent absence of any matrix markings, and the use of alternate takes or specially commissioned recordings, have caused problems for more than a few researches over the years"--Back cover.
"The Arto-Bell group of labels is one of the most daunting to research. The frequent absence of any matrix markings, and the use of alternate takes or specially commissioned recordings, have caused problems for more than a few researches over the years"--Back cover.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML156.2 .B734 2014 In-library use
Book
399 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm
Released to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the coolest and best- known label in jazz, this book celebrates over seven decades of extraordinary music from a company that has stayed true to its founders commitment to Uncompromising Expression. Tracing the evolution of jazz from the boogie- woogie and swing of the 1930s, through bebop, funk and fusion, to the eclectic mix Blue Note releases today, the book also narrates a complex social history from the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany to the developments in music and technology in the late 20th century. Blue Note is not only known as the purveyor of extraordinary jazz but is also famous as an arbiter of cool. The photography of co-founder Francis Wolff and the cover designs of Reid Miles were integral to the labels success and this highly illustrated, landmark publication featuring the very best photographs, covers, and ephemera from the archives, including never-before-published material commemorates Blue Notes momentous contribution to jazz, to art and design as well as to revolutionizing the music business.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Released to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the coolest and best- known label in jazz, this book celebrates over seven decades of extraordinary music from a company that has stayed true to its founders commitment to Uncompromising Expression. Tracing the evolution of jazz from the boogie- woogie and swing of the 1930s, through bebop, funk and fusion, to the eclectic mix Blue Note releases today, the book also narrates a complex social history from the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany to the developments in music and technology in the late 20th century. Blue Note is not only known as the purveyor of extraordinary jazz but is also famous as an arbiter of cool. The photography of co-founder Francis Wolff and the cover designs of Reid Miles were integral to the labels success and this highly illustrated, landmark publication featuring the very best photographs, covers, and ephemera from the archives, including never-before-published material commemorates Blue Notes momentous contribution to jazz, to art and design as well as to revolutionizing the music business.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML3506 .H38 2014 In-library use In process

17. Blue train [1957]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, mono, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; mono.
  • Blue train
  • Moment's notice
  • Locomotion
  • I'm old fashioned
  • Lazy bird.
  • Blue train
  • Moment's notice
  • Locomotion
  • I'm old fashioned
  • Lazy bird.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBLP-1577 In-library use

18. Call it art. [2014]

Music recording
5 audio discs : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. + programme notes in English (156 pages)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
(no call number) In-library use In process
Book
703 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference (non-circulating)
ML156.7 .B4 V35 2014 In-library use

20. Cool struttin'. [1958]

Music recording
1 audio disc : vinyl, analog, stereo, 33 1/3 rpm ; 12 in. Sound: analog; vinyl; 33 1/3 rpm; microgroove; stereo.
  • Cool struttin'
  • Blue minor
  • Sippin' at bells
  • Deep night.
  • Cool struttin'
  • Blue minor
  • Sippin' at bells
  • Deep night.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Recordings
MUSIC MATTERS MMBST-81588 In-library use