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Book
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  • 1. Overview of surface wave methods
  • 2. Linear wave propagation in vertically inhomogeneous continua
  • 3. Measurement of surface waves
  • 4. Dispersion analysis
  • 5. Attenuation analysis
  • 6. Inversion
  • 7. Case histories
  • 8. Advanced surface wave methods.
"Surface wave methods analysis the dispersive nature of surface wave propagation in heterogeneous media to measure shear wave velocity or material damping ratio profiles, and enable earthquake site response to be assessed. This is the only comprehensive reference that provides a unified treatment of surface wave propagation, signal processing, inverse theory and the testing protocols that form the basis of modern surface wave methods. The use of these tests has increased dramatically since the 1980s, but they are too often performed and interpreted in a variety of ways that are confusing. This book answers the pressing need for a guide to the basic principles as well as outlining a set of reliable, dependable and accepted practices. It is written for geotechnical engineers, engineering seismologists and geophysicists as well as academics in these fields"-- Provided by publisher.
  • 1. Overview of surface wave methods
  • 2. Linear wave propagation in vertically inhomogeneous continua
  • 3. Measurement of surface waves
  • 4. Dispersion analysis
  • 5. Attenuation analysis
  • 6. Inversion
  • 7. Case histories
  • 8. Advanced surface wave methods.
"Surface wave methods analysis the dispersive nature of surface wave propagation in heterogeneous media to measure shear wave velocity or material damping ratio profiles, and enable earthquake site response to be assessed. This is the only comprehensive reference that provides a unified treatment of surface wave propagation, signal processing, inverse theory and the testing protocols that form the basis of modern surface wave methods. The use of these tests has increased dramatically since the 1980s, but they are too often performed and interpreted in a variety of ways that are confusing. This book answers the pressing need for a guide to the basic principles as well as outlining a set of reliable, dependable and accepted practices. It is written for geotechnical engineers, engineering seismologists and geophysicists as well as academics in these fields"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
1 online resource.
Engineers use earthquake ground motions for a variety of reasons, including seismic hazard assessment, calibration of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), and input to nonlinear response history analysis. These analyses require a significant number of ground motions and for some scenarios, such as earthquakes with large magnitudes and short distances, it may be difficult to obtain a sufficient number of ground motion recordings. When sufficient recordings do not exist, engineers modify available recordings using scaling or spectrum matching, or they use ground motion simulations. Ground motion simulations have existed for decades, but recent advances in simulation methods due to improved source characterization and wave propagation, coupled with increased computing power, have increased potential benefits for engineers. But before simulations can be used in engineering applications, simulations must be accessible and consistent with natural observations. This dissertation contributes to the latter issue, and it investigates the application of simulations to specific engineering problems. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Broadband Platform (BBP) is an open-source software distribution that enables third-party users to simulate ground motions using research code contributed by model developers. Because the BBP allows users to compute their own simulations with little knowledge of the underlying implementation and it ensures that all calculations are reproducible, it is extremely valuable for simulation validation and engineering applications. In this dissertation, the BBP is evaluated as a simulation generation tool from an engineering perspective. Ground motions are simulated to study parameters of engineering interest, such as high-frequency variability, near-fault ground motions, and local site response. Though some parameters need further development, such as site response (which is currently implemented using simple empirical amplification), the BBP proves to be an effective tool for facilitating these types of engineering studies. This dissertation proposes a simulation validation framework based on simple and robust proxies for the response of more complicated structures. We compile a list of proxies with robust empirical models that are insensitive to changes in earthquake scenario and do not rely on extrapolation for rarely observed events. Because predictions of these proxies are reliable under a variety of earthquake events, we can confidently compare them with simulations. The proposed proxies include correlation of epsilon across periods, ratio of maximum to median response across horizontal orientations, and ratio of inelastic to elastic displacement. The validation framework is applied to example simulations and successfully exposes some parameters that need work, such as variability and correlation of spectral acceleration. Finally, this dissertation investigates the application of simulations to response history analysis and fling-step characterization. A 3D nonlinear structural model is analyzed using recordings and simulations with similar elastic response spectra. The structural performance and resulting design decisions are similar, indicating that simulations are effective for response history analysis subject to certain conditions. To investigate fling-step, we extract fling pulses from a large set of simulations. Extracted fling properties such as amplitude and period are then compared to specially-processed recordings and relevant empirical models for surface displacement and pulse period. Reasonably good agreement is found between simulations, recordings, and empirical models. In general, ground motion simulations are found to be an effective alternative or supplement to recordings in several engineering applications. Because simulation methods are still developing, this work is not intended as an evaluation of existing methods, but rather as a development of procedures that can be used in ongoing work.
Engineers use earthquake ground motions for a variety of reasons, including seismic hazard assessment, calibration of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), and input to nonlinear response history analysis. These analyses require a significant number of ground motions and for some scenarios, such as earthquakes with large magnitudes and short distances, it may be difficult to obtain a sufficient number of ground motion recordings. When sufficient recordings do not exist, engineers modify available recordings using scaling or spectrum matching, or they use ground motion simulations. Ground motion simulations have existed for decades, but recent advances in simulation methods due to improved source characterization and wave propagation, coupled with increased computing power, have increased potential benefits for engineers. But before simulations can be used in engineering applications, simulations must be accessible and consistent with natural observations. This dissertation contributes to the latter issue, and it investigates the application of simulations to specific engineering problems. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Broadband Platform (BBP) is an open-source software distribution that enables third-party users to simulate ground motions using research code contributed by model developers. Because the BBP allows users to compute their own simulations with little knowledge of the underlying implementation and it ensures that all calculations are reproducible, it is extremely valuable for simulation validation and engineering applications. In this dissertation, the BBP is evaluated as a simulation generation tool from an engineering perspective. Ground motions are simulated to study parameters of engineering interest, such as high-frequency variability, near-fault ground motions, and local site response. Though some parameters need further development, such as site response (which is currently implemented using simple empirical amplification), the BBP proves to be an effective tool for facilitating these types of engineering studies. This dissertation proposes a simulation validation framework based on simple and robust proxies for the response of more complicated structures. We compile a list of proxies with robust empirical models that are insensitive to changes in earthquake scenario and do not rely on extrapolation for rarely observed events. Because predictions of these proxies are reliable under a variety of earthquake events, we can confidently compare them with simulations. The proposed proxies include correlation of epsilon across periods, ratio of maximum to median response across horizontal orientations, and ratio of inelastic to elastic displacement. The validation framework is applied to example simulations and successfully exposes some parameters that need work, such as variability and correlation of spectral acceleration. Finally, this dissertation investigates the application of simulations to response history analysis and fling-step characterization. A 3D nonlinear structural model is analyzed using recordings and simulations with similar elastic response spectra. The structural performance and resulting design decisions are similar, indicating that simulations are effective for response history analysis subject to certain conditions. To investigate fling-step, we extract fling pulses from a large set of simulations. Extracted fling properties such as amplitude and period are then compared to specially-processed recordings and relevant empirical models for surface displacement and pulse period. Reasonably good agreement is found between simulations, recordings, and empirical models. In general, ground motion simulations are found to be an effective alternative or supplement to recordings in several engineering applications. Because simulation methods are still developing, this work is not intended as an evaluation of existing methods, but rather as a development of procedures that can be used in ongoing work.
Book
1 online resource.
This thesis integrates geomechanics, microseismic, and laboratory studies to investigate the role of preexisting fractures and faults in development of unconventional reservoirs. This study provides a new method for delineation of reservoir structure using microseismic data with support from geomechanics and laboratory measurement. The interpretation from this study can be applied to address some of the practical questions in highly fractured reservoirs, including, but not limited to, well design and hydraulic fracture design. The implication provides insights for future strategic development of fractured and faulted unconventional reservoirs. The first part of this thesis focuses on the production of shale oil from the Bakken Formation and consists of three approaches (Chapters 2-5). A geomechanical model shows the current stress state to be characterized by a NF/SS regime, with SHmax orientation ~N45°E. The microseismic events were recorded in six vertical observation wells during hydraulic fracturing of parallel wells X and Z, and are independently processed by two contractors. Both sets of event locations show three characteristics: First, rather than occurring in proximity to the stages being pressurized, many of the events occur along the length of well Y, a parallel well located between X and Z that had been in production for ~2.5 years at the time X and Z were stimulated. Second, relatively few fracturing stages are associated with an elongated cloud of events trending in the direction of SHmax as is commonly observed during hydraulic fracturing. Instead, the microseismic events in a number of stages appear to trend ~N75°E, about 30° from the direction of SHmax. Earthquake focal plane mechanisms confirm slip on faults with this orientation. Finally, the microseismic events are clustered at two distinct depths, one near the depth of the well being pressurized in the Middle Bakken Formation and the other ~800 ft above in the Mission Canyon Formation. Approximately 60% of the microseismic events from stage 2 exhibit similar waveforms that are occurring in adjacent multiplet clusters. Two multiplet clusters are relocated using the double-difference technique, and the relocated hypocenters are more clustered, delineating reservoir structures that are consistent with the focal plane mechanisms. We argue that all three of these patterns result from the hydraulic stimulation being dominated by flow channeling along preexisting faults. Combined analysis of hypocenter locations, focal plane mechanisms, fault slip, and 3D seismic data indicate that steeply-dipping N75°E striking faults with a combination of normal and strike-slip movement were being stimulated during hydraulic fracturing. A simple geomechanical analysis was carried out to illustrate how this occurred in the context of the current stress field, pore pressure and depletion in the vicinity of well Y during the 2.5 years of production prior to stimulation of wells X and Z. Laboratory measurements of 6 pairs of core samples from the reservoir suggest that the time dependent deformation of these rocks can be characterized by a power-law constitutive law. The constitutive parameters determined from 3-hour creep measurements follow a range and trend similar to those of samples from other shale gas reservoirs. By applying the viscous relaxation model, the differential horizontal stresses are estimated from geophysical logs. With the NF/SS faulting regime in the Bakken and an assumption of a constant faulting regime in sedimentary lithology, a continuous principal stress profile is estimated. The least horizontal stress magnitude suggests that the Lodgepole and Three Forks Formations adjacent to the Bakken Formation are not acting as frac barriers during hydraulic fracture. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of the microseismicity suggests the out-of-zone microseismic events are associated with preexisting fractures and faults rather than purely hydraulic fracturing growth. Moreover, the pore pressure perturbation required for slip is consistent with the occurrence of microseismicity, where events occur at depths that require less elevated pore pressure. Brittleness determined from elastic properties is considered, but it cannot explain the microseismicity. This is because brittleness is not an intrinsic rock property and cannot be characterized in a consistent way. Therefore, applying brittleness for locating the hydraulic fracturing sweet spot needs to be done cautiously. The second part of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of injecting CO2 to enhance coalbed methane production, as well as the capacity for long term CO2 storage in coalbeds of the Power River Basin, Wyoming. Laboratory measurements are performed to study the adsorption/desorption, mechanical, and transport properties of coal with gas saturation of He, N2, CH4 and CO2, at either increasing pore pressure or increasing effective stress. Results suggest that coal from the PRB has strong adsorption capacity for CO2, and this strong adsorption is stable unless the pore pressure drops below 2 MPa. Also, CO2-induced swelling will cause permeability loss, but the loss is less than one order of magnitude. Laboratory results indicate that the coal seam in the study area might be a good candidate for an ECBM and CO2 sequestration project. However, its feasibility still depends on future numerical modeling predictions, and the results reported in this study can be applied for further modeling work.
This thesis integrates geomechanics, microseismic, and laboratory studies to investigate the role of preexisting fractures and faults in development of unconventional reservoirs. This study provides a new method for delineation of reservoir structure using microseismic data with support from geomechanics and laboratory measurement. The interpretation from this study can be applied to address some of the practical questions in highly fractured reservoirs, including, but not limited to, well design and hydraulic fracture design. The implication provides insights for future strategic development of fractured and faulted unconventional reservoirs. The first part of this thesis focuses on the production of shale oil from the Bakken Formation and consists of three approaches (Chapters 2-5). A geomechanical model shows the current stress state to be characterized by a NF/SS regime, with SHmax orientation ~N45°E. The microseismic events were recorded in six vertical observation wells during hydraulic fracturing of parallel wells X and Z, and are independently processed by two contractors. Both sets of event locations show three characteristics: First, rather than occurring in proximity to the stages being pressurized, many of the events occur along the length of well Y, a parallel well located between X and Z that had been in production for ~2.5 years at the time X and Z were stimulated. Second, relatively few fracturing stages are associated with an elongated cloud of events trending in the direction of SHmax as is commonly observed during hydraulic fracturing. Instead, the microseismic events in a number of stages appear to trend ~N75°E, about 30° from the direction of SHmax. Earthquake focal plane mechanisms confirm slip on faults with this orientation. Finally, the microseismic events are clustered at two distinct depths, one near the depth of the well being pressurized in the Middle Bakken Formation and the other ~800 ft above in the Mission Canyon Formation. Approximately 60% of the microseismic events from stage 2 exhibit similar waveforms that are occurring in adjacent multiplet clusters. Two multiplet clusters are relocated using the double-difference technique, and the relocated hypocenters are more clustered, delineating reservoir structures that are consistent with the focal plane mechanisms. We argue that all three of these patterns result from the hydraulic stimulation being dominated by flow channeling along preexisting faults. Combined analysis of hypocenter locations, focal plane mechanisms, fault slip, and 3D seismic data indicate that steeply-dipping N75°E striking faults with a combination of normal and strike-slip movement were being stimulated during hydraulic fracturing. A simple geomechanical analysis was carried out to illustrate how this occurred in the context of the current stress field, pore pressure and depletion in the vicinity of well Y during the 2.5 years of production prior to stimulation of wells X and Z. Laboratory measurements of 6 pairs of core samples from the reservoir suggest that the time dependent deformation of these rocks can be characterized by a power-law constitutive law. The constitutive parameters determined from 3-hour creep measurements follow a range and trend similar to those of samples from other shale gas reservoirs. By applying the viscous relaxation model, the differential horizontal stresses are estimated from geophysical logs. With the NF/SS faulting regime in the Bakken and an assumption of a constant faulting regime in sedimentary lithology, a continuous principal stress profile is estimated. The least horizontal stress magnitude suggests that the Lodgepole and Three Forks Formations adjacent to the Bakken Formation are not acting as frac barriers during hydraulic fracture. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of the microseismicity suggests the out-of-zone microseismic events are associated with preexisting fractures and faults rather than purely hydraulic fracturing growth. Moreover, the pore pressure perturbation required for slip is consistent with the occurrence of microseismicity, where events occur at depths that require less elevated pore pressure. Brittleness determined from elastic properties is considered, but it cannot explain the microseismicity. This is because brittleness is not an intrinsic rock property and cannot be characterized in a consistent way. Therefore, applying brittleness for locating the hydraulic fracturing sweet spot needs to be done cautiously. The second part of this thesis focuses on the feasibility of injecting CO2 to enhance coalbed methane production, as well as the capacity for long term CO2 storage in coalbeds of the Power River Basin, Wyoming. Laboratory measurements are performed to study the adsorption/desorption, mechanical, and transport properties of coal with gas saturation of He, N2, CH4 and CO2, at either increasing pore pressure or increasing effective stress. Results suggest that coal from the PRB has strong adsorption capacity for CO2, and this strong adsorption is stable unless the pore pressure drops below 2 MPa. Also, CO2-induced swelling will cause permeability loss, but the loss is less than one order of magnitude. Laboratory results indicate that the coal seam in the study area might be a good candidate for an ECBM and CO2 sequestration project. However, its feasibility still depends on future numerical modeling predictions, and the results reported in this study can be applied for further modeling work.
Collection
John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center Technical Report Series
As part of an investigation to enhance the seismic performance of light-frame residential structures by reducing damage to partition walls and other deformation-sensitive components, this report describes the testing and experimental results of twenty full-scale gypsum-sheathed walls. The experiments investigated the effects of enhanced, inexpensive construction procedures with the objective to increase the racking strength and stiffness of partition-type shear walls, lessening seismic deformations. A majority of the specimens utilized wood framing members, while four specimens featured cold-formed steel framing. The specimens were subjected to cyclic earthquake-type loading through established loading histories for light-frame components. The stiffness, strength, and damage progression of specimens with varying wall length, openings, orthogonal wall returns, tie-down and anchoring configurations, and interior and exterior sheathings are discussed. Iterative tests of specific interior wall geometries determined the optimal construction techniques required to reduce deformations and improve life-cycle performance. The main improvement to these specimens over typical construction was the use of construction adhesive and mechanical fasteners to attach the sheathing to the framing. Additional enhancements included mid-height blocking, improved corner stud assemblies, properly sized tie downs at the ends of wall segments, exterior stucco engagement, and bent straps on the exterior of planar wood-framed walls. The stiffness, strength, and residual capacity of specimens with orthogonal walls increased as compared to specimens with in-plane-only shear walls.
As part of an investigation to enhance the seismic performance of light-frame residential structures by reducing damage to partition walls and other deformation-sensitive components, this report describes the testing and experimental results of twenty full-scale gypsum-sheathed walls. The experiments investigated the effects of enhanced, inexpensive construction procedures with the objective to increase the racking strength and stiffness of partition-type shear walls, lessening seismic deformations. A majority of the specimens utilized wood framing members, while four specimens featured cold-formed steel framing. The specimens were subjected to cyclic earthquake-type loading through established loading histories for light-frame components. The stiffness, strength, and damage progression of specimens with varying wall length, openings, orthogonal wall returns, tie-down and anchoring configurations, and interior and exterior sheathings are discussed. Iterative tests of specific interior wall geometries determined the optimal construction techniques required to reduce deformations and improve life-cycle performance. The main improvement to these specimens over typical construction was the use of construction adhesive and mechanical fasteners to attach the sheathing to the framing. Additional enhancements included mid-height blocking, improved corner stud assemblies, properly sized tie downs at the ends of wall segments, exterior stucco engagement, and bent straps on the exterior of planar wood-framed walls. The stiffness, strength, and residual capacity of specimens with orthogonal walls increased as compared to specimens with in-plane-only shear walls.
Book
1 online resource.
Deterioration of built infrastructure is growing into a major cause of concern for countries with a large population of aging structures. Although seismic design standards continue to advance as lessons learned from past events get incorporated, structures designed to older standards are likely to be more vulnerable to damage during earthquakes. The poor seismic performance of older structures is likely to be further exacerbated by advanced levels of structural deterioration, which may be caused due to a variety of processes such as chloride-induced corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack, freeze-thaw cycles, carbonation, and fatigue. However, the effects of long-term structural deterioration have been traditionally neglected in seismic risk assessment. This dissertation focuses on the development of a comprehensive methodology for the time-dependent seismic risk assessment of structures located in a multi-hazard environment, that can explicitly account for the effects of (1) the time-varying nature of the different hazards, (2) long-term structural deterioration, and (3) cost escalation and the time-value of economic resources on seismic loss and impact estimates. The methodology for time-dependent seismic risk analysis proposed in this dissertation begins with the PEER framework as a starting point and extends it through the addition of a separate module for time-dependent probabilistic deterioration analysis. Explicitly accounting for deterioration within the proposed framework requires probabilistic models for predicting the time-dependent level of deterioration of structural elements. The steps involved in estimation of the time-dependent degree of deterioration for the case of deterioration in reinforced concrete bridge columns due to chloride-induced corrosion are illustrated in this dissertation, using available empirical models to describe the multi-stage corrosion process. In order to account for the effects of structural deterioration within the proposed framework, the seismic fragility of structural components is modeled as a joint function of the ground motion intensity measure, and the degree of deterioration. Calculation of these deterioration-dependent component fragility functions requires predicting the change in both damage state capacities and seismic demands due to deterioration. The use of a simple, single parameter exponential decay function is proposed to model the decrease in median damage state fragilities with increase in the degree of deterioration. The deterioration-dependent component fragility functions can be integrated with the results from probabilistic time-dependent deterioration analysis, or with actual measurements of the level of deterioration obtained during inspection, at a later stage within the proposed framework to obtain a time-dependent description of the seismic risk. Finally, the proposed methodology for time-dependent seismic risk assessment is used to conduct a comprehensive study of the life cycle costs and environmental impacts of three deteriorating California highway bridge columns. Such a comprehensive evaluation of time-dependent environmental impacts associated with repairs following an earthquake for deteriorating structures located in an evolving multi-hazard environment is the first of its kind.
Deterioration of built infrastructure is growing into a major cause of concern for countries with a large population of aging structures. Although seismic design standards continue to advance as lessons learned from past events get incorporated, structures designed to older standards are likely to be more vulnerable to damage during earthquakes. The poor seismic performance of older structures is likely to be further exacerbated by advanced levels of structural deterioration, which may be caused due to a variety of processes such as chloride-induced corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack, freeze-thaw cycles, carbonation, and fatigue. However, the effects of long-term structural deterioration have been traditionally neglected in seismic risk assessment. This dissertation focuses on the development of a comprehensive methodology for the time-dependent seismic risk assessment of structures located in a multi-hazard environment, that can explicitly account for the effects of (1) the time-varying nature of the different hazards, (2) long-term structural deterioration, and (3) cost escalation and the time-value of economic resources on seismic loss and impact estimates. The methodology for time-dependent seismic risk analysis proposed in this dissertation begins with the PEER framework as a starting point and extends it through the addition of a separate module for time-dependent probabilistic deterioration analysis. Explicitly accounting for deterioration within the proposed framework requires probabilistic models for predicting the time-dependent level of deterioration of structural elements. The steps involved in estimation of the time-dependent degree of deterioration for the case of deterioration in reinforced concrete bridge columns due to chloride-induced corrosion are illustrated in this dissertation, using available empirical models to describe the multi-stage corrosion process. In order to account for the effects of structural deterioration within the proposed framework, the seismic fragility of structural components is modeled as a joint function of the ground motion intensity measure, and the degree of deterioration. Calculation of these deterioration-dependent component fragility functions requires predicting the change in both damage state capacities and seismic demands due to deterioration. The use of a simple, single parameter exponential decay function is proposed to model the decrease in median damage state fragilities with increase in the degree of deterioration. The deterioration-dependent component fragility functions can be integrated with the results from probabilistic time-dependent deterioration analysis, or with actual measurements of the level of deterioration obtained during inspection, at a later stage within the proposed framework to obtain a time-dependent description of the seismic risk. Finally, the proposed methodology for time-dependent seismic risk assessment is used to conduct a comprehensive study of the life cycle costs and environmental impacts of three deteriorating California highway bridge columns. Such a comprehensive evaluation of time-dependent environmental impacts associated with repairs following an earthquake for deteriorating structures located in an evolving multi-hazard environment is the first of its kind.
Collection
John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center Technical Report Series
Growth of major population centers near seismically active faults has significantly increased the probability of a large earthquake striking close to a big city in the near future. This, coupled with the fact that near-fault ground motions are known to impose larger demands on structures than ground motions far from the fault, makes the quantitative study of near-fault seismic hazard and risk important. Directivity effects cause pulse-like ground motions that are known to increase the seismic hazard and risk in near-fault region. These effects depend on the source-to- site geometry parameters, which are not included in most ground-motion models used for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment computation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive framework to study near-fault ground motions, and account for their effects in seismic hazard assessment. The proposed framework is designed to be modular, with separate models to predict the probability of observing a pulse at a site, the probability distribution of the period of the observed pulse, and a narrow band amplification of the spectral ordinate conditioned on the period of the pulse. The framework also allows deaggregation of hazard with respect to probability of observing the pulse at the site and the period of the pulse. This deaggregation information can be used to aid in ground-motion selection at near fault sites. A database of recorded ground motions with each record classified as pulse-like or non-pulse-like is needed for an empirical study of directivity effects. Early studies of directivity effects used manually classified pulses. Manual classification of ground motions as pulse-like is labor intensive, slow, and has the possibility to introduce subjectivity into the classifications. To address these problems we propose an efficient algorithm to classify multi-component ground motions as pulse-like and non-pulse- like. The proposed algorithm uses the continuous wavelet transform of two orthogonal components of the ground motion to identify pulses in arbitrary orientations. The proposed algorithm was used to classify each record in the NGA-West2 database, which created the largest set of pulse-like motions ever used to study directivity effects. The framework to include directivity effects in seismic hazard assessment, as pro- posed in this study, requires a ground-motion model that accounts for directivity effects in its prediction. Most of the current directivity models were developed as a correction for already existing ground-motion models, and were fitted using ground- motion model residuals. Directivity effects are dependent on magnitude, distance, and the spectral acceleration period. This interaction of directivity effects with magnitude and distance makes separation of distance and magnitude scaling from directivity ef- fects challenging. To properly account for directivity effects in a ground-motion model they need to be fitted as a part of the original model and not as a correction. We propose a method to include the effects of directivity in a ground-motion model and also develop models to make unbiased prediction of ground-motion intensity, even when the directivity parameters are not available. Finally, following the approach used to model directivity effects, we developed a modular framework to characterize ground-motion directionality, which causes the ground-motion intensity to vary with orientation. Using the expanded NGA-West2 database we developed new models to predict the ratio between maximum and median ground-motion intensity over all orientations. Other models to predict distribution of orientations of the maximum intensity relative to the fault and the relationship between this orientation at different periods are also presented. The models developed in this dissertation allow us to compute response spectra that are expected to be observed in a single orientation (e.g., fault normal, orientation of maximum intensity at a period). It is expected that the proposed spectra can be a more realistic representation of single orientation ground motion compared to the median or maximum spectra over all orientations that is currently used.
Growth of major population centers near seismically active faults has significantly increased the probability of a large earthquake striking close to a big city in the near future. This, coupled with the fact that near-fault ground motions are known to impose larger demands on structures than ground motions far from the fault, makes the quantitative study of near-fault seismic hazard and risk important. Directivity effects cause pulse-like ground motions that are known to increase the seismic hazard and risk in near-fault region. These effects depend on the source-to- site geometry parameters, which are not included in most ground-motion models used for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment computation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive framework to study near-fault ground motions, and account for their effects in seismic hazard assessment. The proposed framework is designed to be modular, with separate models to predict the probability of observing a pulse at a site, the probability distribution of the period of the observed pulse, and a narrow band amplification of the spectral ordinate conditioned on the period of the pulse. The framework also allows deaggregation of hazard with respect to probability of observing the pulse at the site and the period of the pulse. This deaggregation information can be used to aid in ground-motion selection at near fault sites. A database of recorded ground motions with each record classified as pulse-like or non-pulse-like is needed for an empirical study of directivity effects. Early studies of directivity effects used manually classified pulses. Manual classification of ground motions as pulse-like is labor intensive, slow, and has the possibility to introduce subjectivity into the classifications. To address these problems we propose an efficient algorithm to classify multi-component ground motions as pulse-like and non-pulse- like. The proposed algorithm uses the continuous wavelet transform of two orthogonal components of the ground motion to identify pulses in arbitrary orientations. The proposed algorithm was used to classify each record in the NGA-West2 database, which created the largest set of pulse-like motions ever used to study directivity effects. The framework to include directivity effects in seismic hazard assessment, as pro- posed in this study, requires a ground-motion model that accounts for directivity effects in its prediction. Most of the current directivity models were developed as a correction for already existing ground-motion models, and were fitted using ground- motion model residuals. Directivity effects are dependent on magnitude, distance, and the spectral acceleration period. This interaction of directivity effects with magnitude and distance makes separation of distance and magnitude scaling from directivity ef- fects challenging. To properly account for directivity effects in a ground-motion model they need to be fitted as a part of the original model and not as a correction. We propose a method to include the effects of directivity in a ground-motion model and also develop models to make unbiased prediction of ground-motion intensity, even when the directivity parameters are not available. Finally, following the approach used to model directivity effects, we developed a modular framework to characterize ground-motion directionality, which causes the ground-motion intensity to vary with orientation. Using the expanded NGA-West2 database we developed new models to predict the ratio between maximum and median ground-motion intensity over all orientations. Other models to predict distribution of orientations of the maximum intensity relative to the fault and the relationship between this orientation at different periods are also presented. The models developed in this dissertation allow us to compute response spectra that are expected to be observed in a single orientation (e.g., fault normal, orientation of maximum intensity at a period). It is expected that the proposed spectra can be a more realistic representation of single orientation ground motion compared to the median or maximum spectra over all orientations that is currently used.
Collection
John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center Technical Report Series
Performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) quantifies the seismic hazard, predicts the structural response, and estimates the damage to building elements, in order to assess the resulting losses in terms of dollars, downtime, and deaths. This dissertation focuses on the ground motion selection that connects seismic hazard and structural response, the first two elements of PBEE, to ensure that the ground motion selection method to obtain structural response results is consistent with probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Structure- and site-specific ground motion selection typically requires information re-garding the system characteristics of the structure (often through a structural model) and the seismic hazard of the site (often through characterization of seismic sources, their oc-currence frequencies, and their proximity to the site). As the ground motion intensity level changes, the target distribution of important ground motion parameters (e.g., magnitude and distance) also changes. With the quantification of contributing ground motion parameters at a specific spectral acceleration (Sa) level, a target response spectrum can be computed using a single or multiple ground motion prediction models (GMPMs, previously known as attenuation relations). Ground motions are selected from a ground motion database, and their response spectra are scaled to match the target response spectrum. These ground mo-tions are then used as seismic inputs to structural models for nonlinear dynamic analysis, to obtain structural response under such seismic excitations. This procedure to estimate structural response results at a specific intensity level is termed an intensity-based assessment. When this procedure is repeated at different intensity levels to cover the frequent to rare levels of ground motion (expressed in terms of Sa), a risk-based assessment can be performed by integrating the structural response results at each intensity level with their corresponding seismic hazard occurrence (through the seismic hazard curve).
Performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) quantifies the seismic hazard, predicts the structural response, and estimates the damage to building elements, in order to assess the resulting losses in terms of dollars, downtime, and deaths. This dissertation focuses on the ground motion selection that connects seismic hazard and structural response, the first two elements of PBEE, to ensure that the ground motion selection method to obtain structural response results is consistent with probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Structure- and site-specific ground motion selection typically requires information re-garding the system characteristics of the structure (often through a structural model) and the seismic hazard of the site (often through characterization of seismic sources, their oc-currence frequencies, and their proximity to the site). As the ground motion intensity level changes, the target distribution of important ground motion parameters (e.g., magnitude and distance) also changes. With the quantification of contributing ground motion parameters at a specific spectral acceleration (Sa) level, a target response spectrum can be computed using a single or multiple ground motion prediction models (GMPMs, previously known as attenuation relations). Ground motions are selected from a ground motion database, and their response spectra are scaled to match the target response spectrum. These ground mo-tions are then used as seismic inputs to structural models for nonlinear dynamic analysis, to obtain structural response under such seismic excitations. This procedure to estimate structural response results at a specific intensity level is termed an intensity-based assessment. When this procedure is repeated at different intensity levels to cover the frequent to rare levels of ground motion (expressed in terms of Sa), a risk-based assessment can be performed by integrating the structural response results at each intensity level with their corresponding seismic hazard occurrence (through the seismic hazard curve).
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 221 pages) : illustrations.
  • Reappraisal of concepts underlying reinforced concrete design
  • The concept of the compressive-force path
  • Modelling of simply-supported beams
  • Design of simply supported beams
  • Design for punching of flat slabs
  • Design of skeletal structures with beam-like elements
  • Earthquake-resistant design
  • Design examples.
This book presents a method which simplifies and unifies the design of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and is applicable to any structural element under both normal and seismic loading conditions. The proposed method has a sound theoretical basis and is expressed in a unified form applicable to all structural members, as well as their connections. It is applied in practice through the use of simple failure criteria derived from first principles without the need for calibration through the use of experimental data. The method is capable of predicting not only load-carrying capacity but also the locations and modes of failure, as well as safeguarding the structural performance code requirements. In this book, the concepts underlying the method are first presented for the case of simply supported RC beams. The application of the method is progressively extended so as to cover all common structural elements. For each structural element considered, evidence of the validity of the proposed method is presented together with design examples and comparisons with current code specifications. The method has been found to produce design solutions which satisfy the seismic performance requirements of current codes in all cases investigated to date, including structural members such as beams, columns, and walls, beam-to-beam or column-to-column connections, and beam-to-column joints.
  • Reappraisal of concepts underlying reinforced concrete design
  • The concept of the compressive-force path
  • Modelling of simply-supported beams
  • Design of simply supported beams
  • Design for punching of flat slabs
  • Design of skeletal structures with beam-like elements
  • Earthquake-resistant design
  • Design examples.
This book presents a method which simplifies and unifies the design of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and is applicable to any structural element under both normal and seismic loading conditions. The proposed method has a sound theoretical basis and is expressed in a unified form applicable to all structural members, as well as their connections. It is applied in practice through the use of simple failure criteria derived from first principles without the need for calibration through the use of experimental data. The method is capable of predicting not only load-carrying capacity but also the locations and modes of failure, as well as safeguarding the structural performance code requirements. In this book, the concepts underlying the method are first presented for the case of simply supported RC beams. The application of the method is progressively extended so as to cover all common structural elements. For each structural element considered, evidence of the validity of the proposed method is presented together with design examples and comparisons with current code specifications. The method has been found to produce design solutions which satisfy the seismic performance requirements of current codes in all cases investigated to date, including structural members such as beams, columns, and walls, beam-to-beam or column-to-column connections, and beam-to-column joints.
Book
1 online resource : ill.
  • Earthquakes, seismology and the VAN earthquake prediction method
  • The development of the VAN research on earthquake prediction
  • The procedure for the measurements: The telemetric VAN network and how the epicenter and magnitude are predicted
  • First international evaluation of VAN, 1984
  • Two powerful earthquakes, 1986
  • Disastrous earthquakes in Killini-Vartholomio, 1988
  • The FRENCH interest in VAN (1986-1989)
  • Second international evaluation of VAN, 1990
  • Disastrous earthquakes in PIRGOS, 1993: The public warning
  • Third evaluation of VAN, 1992, 1995
  • The United Nations recommendation on VAN, 1994
  • VAN evaluations, 1995, 1996
  • Earthquake at Chalkidiki, 1995: The success of the prediction
  • Earthquake in Grevena-Kozani, 1995
  • Disastrous earthquake at Eratini-Egion, June 1995
  • The International Prize of the Onassis Foundation, 1995
  • Disastrous Athens earthquake, 1999
  • A new concept of time and its applications: Natural time
  • Earthquake in the northern Aegean Sea, 2001
  • Publicising predictions: Changes from 2006
  • Earthquake in southwestern Greece, 2008
  • Earthquake between Patras and Pirgos, 2008
  • The VAN earthquake prediction method in other countries: Current views.
As evidenced dramatically and tragically in 2011 alone, earthquakes cause devastation and their consequences in terms of human suffering and economic disaster can last for years or even decades. The VAN method of earthquake prediction, based on the detection and measurement of low frequency electric signals called Seismic Electric Signals (SES), has been researched and evaluated over 30 years, and now constitutes the only earthquake prediction effort that has led to concrete successful results. This book recounts the history of the VAN method, detailing how it has developed and been tested und
  • Earthquakes, seismology and the VAN earthquake prediction method
  • The development of the VAN research on earthquake prediction
  • The procedure for the measurements: The telemetric VAN network and how the epicenter and magnitude are predicted
  • First international evaluation of VAN, 1984
  • Two powerful earthquakes, 1986
  • Disastrous earthquakes in Killini-Vartholomio, 1988
  • The FRENCH interest in VAN (1986-1989)
  • Second international evaluation of VAN, 1990
  • Disastrous earthquakes in PIRGOS, 1993: The public warning
  • Third evaluation of VAN, 1992, 1995
  • The United Nations recommendation on VAN, 1994
  • VAN evaluations, 1995, 1996
  • Earthquake at Chalkidiki, 1995: The success of the prediction
  • Earthquake in Grevena-Kozani, 1995
  • Disastrous earthquake at Eratini-Egion, June 1995
  • The International Prize of the Onassis Foundation, 1995
  • Disastrous Athens earthquake, 1999
  • A new concept of time and its applications: Natural time
  • Earthquake in the northern Aegean Sea, 2001
  • Publicising predictions: Changes from 2006
  • Earthquake in southwestern Greece, 2008
  • Earthquake between Patras and Pirgos, 2008
  • The VAN earthquake prediction method in other countries: Current views.
As evidenced dramatically and tragically in 2011 alone, earthquakes cause devastation and their consequences in terms of human suffering and economic disaster can last for years or even decades. The VAN method of earthquake prediction, based on the detection and measurement of low frequency electric signals called Seismic Electric Signals (SES), has been researched and evaluated over 30 years, and now constitutes the only earthquake prediction effort that has led to concrete successful results. This book recounts the history of the VAN method, detailing how it has developed and been tested und
Book
1 online resource (lii, 731 pages) : illustrations.
  • Screening Geotechnical Risks
  • Accounting For Certainty
  • Engineering Geology : Fundamental Input or Random Variable?
  • Ground Uncertainty Implications in the Application of the Observational Method to Underground Works : Comparitive Examples
  • Geotechnical Uncertainties and Reliability-Based Design
  • Hydrologic Properties of Final Cover Soils
  • Variability of Soil Properties and Reliability of Empirical Equations on Soil Settlement Predictions
  • Second-Moment Characterization of Undrained Shear Strengths from Different Test Procedures
  • Soil Modulus Correlations
  • Multivariate Model for Soil Parameters Based on Johnson Distributions
  • Wetting Effect on CBR Properties of Compacted Fine-Grained Residual Soils
  • Bayesian Characterization of Transformation Uncertainty for Strength and Stiffness of Sands
  • A Simple Method to Assess the Effects of Soil Spatial Variability on the Performance of a Shallow Foundation
  • Assessing Soil Correlation Distances and Fractal Behavior
  • Evaluation of Common Interpolation Algorithms for Site Characterization
  • Scale of Fluctuation of Geotechnical Parameters Estimated from CPTu and Laboratory Test Data
  • Distinguishing Between Data Uncertainty and Natural Variability in Virtual Geotechnical Databases
  • Reliability of Suction Caissons for Deep Water Floating Facilities
  • Reliability-Based Design of Laterally Loaded Piles Considering Soil Spatial Variability
  • Reliability Assessment of Diaphragm Wall Deflections in Soft Clays
  • On Capacity of Pile Foundations
  • Model Errors in Bearing Capacity of Vertically Loaded Foundations
  • Reliability Analysis of Long Multi-Segment Earth Slopes
  • Updating Uncertain Soil Parameters by Maximum Likelihood Method for Predicting Maximum Ground and Wall Movements in Braced Excavations
  • Stochastic Analysis of Hydraulic Hysteresis in Multi-Layer Unsaturated Soil Covers Under Random Flux Boundary Conditions
  • Estimation of Resistance Factors for Reliability-Based Design of Shallow Foundations in Cohesionless Soils Under Earthquake Loading
  • System Reliability-Based Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) for External Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Walls
  • LRFD Calibration of Metallic Reinforced Soil Walls
  • Effects of Spatial Variability on Reliability-Based Design of Drilled Shafts
  • An Approach to Assess LRFD-Φ from Load Test and Borehole Data In and Outside the Footprint of a Drilled Shaft
  • Calibration of LRFD-Based Resistance Factors for Soil Nail Pullout
  • Composite Tolerable Settlement and Horizontal Displacement Criteria for Reliability-Based Design of Foundations
  • Integration of Design and Risk Management in Large Soft-Ground NATM Tunnels
  • Instrumented Pile Load Testing Program for a Coal-Fired Power Plant
  • Foundation Geometry and Load Testing Reduces Uncertainty for a Sports Stadium
  • Capacity and Load Movement of a CFA Pile : A Prediction Event
  • Foundation Design for High-Rise Tower in Karstic Ground.
  • Screening Geotechnical Risks
  • Accounting For Certainty
  • Engineering Geology : Fundamental Input or Random Variable?
  • Ground Uncertainty Implications in the Application of the Observational Method to Underground Works : Comparitive Examples
  • Geotechnical Uncertainties and Reliability-Based Design
  • Hydrologic Properties of Final Cover Soils
  • Variability of Soil Properties and Reliability of Empirical Equations on Soil Settlement Predictions
  • Second-Moment Characterization of Undrained Shear Strengths from Different Test Procedures
  • Soil Modulus Correlations
  • Multivariate Model for Soil Parameters Based on Johnson Distributions
  • Wetting Effect on CBR Properties of Compacted Fine-Grained Residual Soils
  • Bayesian Characterization of Transformation Uncertainty for Strength and Stiffness of Sands
  • A Simple Method to Assess the Effects of Soil Spatial Variability on the Performance of a Shallow Foundation
  • Assessing Soil Correlation Distances and Fractal Behavior
  • Evaluation of Common Interpolation Algorithms for Site Characterization
  • Scale of Fluctuation of Geotechnical Parameters Estimated from CPTu and Laboratory Test Data
  • Distinguishing Between Data Uncertainty and Natural Variability in Virtual Geotechnical Databases
  • Reliability of Suction Caissons for Deep Water Floating Facilities
  • Reliability-Based Design of Laterally Loaded Piles Considering Soil Spatial Variability
  • Reliability Assessment of Diaphragm Wall Deflections in Soft Clays
  • On Capacity of Pile Foundations
  • Model Errors in Bearing Capacity of Vertically Loaded Foundations
  • Reliability Analysis of Long Multi-Segment Earth Slopes
  • Updating Uncertain Soil Parameters by Maximum Likelihood Method for Predicting Maximum Ground and Wall Movements in Braced Excavations
  • Stochastic Analysis of Hydraulic Hysteresis in Multi-Layer Unsaturated Soil Covers Under Random Flux Boundary Conditions
  • Estimation of Resistance Factors for Reliability-Based Design of Shallow Foundations in Cohesionless Soils Under Earthquake Loading
  • System Reliability-Based Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) for External Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Walls
  • LRFD Calibration of Metallic Reinforced Soil Walls
  • Effects of Spatial Variability on Reliability-Based Design of Drilled Shafts
  • An Approach to Assess LRFD-Φ from Load Test and Borehole Data In and Outside the Footprint of a Drilled Shaft
  • Calibration of LRFD-Based Resistance Factors for Soil Nail Pullout
  • Composite Tolerable Settlement and Horizontal Displacement Criteria for Reliability-Based Design of Foundations
  • Integration of Design and Risk Management in Large Soft-Ground NATM Tunnels
  • Instrumented Pile Load Testing Program for a Coal-Fired Power Plant
  • Foundation Geometry and Load Testing Reduces Uncertainty for a Sports Stadium
  • Capacity and Load Movement of a CFA Pile : A Prediction Event
  • Foundation Design for High-Rise Tower in Karstic Ground.
Stanford University Libraries
Status of items at Stanford University Libraries
Stanford University Libraries Status
(no call number) Unavailable
Book
1 online resource (2418 pages) : illustrations, maps.
  • Numerical Modeling of Three Dimensional Geosynthetic Soil Reinforcement by Using Alternative Parameters
  • Numerical Modeling of the Pull-out Test of Steel Grid Soil Reinforcement Using FLAC2D
  • Performance Monitoring of Rail Tracks Stabilized by Geosynthetics and Shock Mats : Case Studies at Bulli and Singleton in Australia
  • Deformation of Slurry Filled Permeable Geosynthetic Tubes
  • Pullout Resistance Factors for Steel Reinforcements Used in TxDOT MSE Walls
  • A Constitutive Equation for Compression Behaviors of Artificially Cemented Composite Geo-Materials
  • Interface Shear Testing of GCL Liner Systems for Very High Normal Stress Conditions
  • Effect of Reinforcement Coverage Ratio on Cellular Reinforced Fly Ash Walls
  • Triaxial Testing on Saturated Mixtures of Sand and Granulated Rubber
  • Evaluation of Shear Creep Response of Recycled Asphalt Shingle Mixtures
  • Numerical Modeling of Cellular Reinforced Fly Ash Walls Effect of Reinforcement Coverage Ratio
  • Estimating Undrained Strength of Clays from Direct Shear Testing at Fast Displacement Rates
  • Quantifying Surface Roughness of Weathered Rock Examples from Granite and Limestone
  • The Hydro-Mechanical Behavior of Infilled Rock Joints with Fill Materials in Unsaturated Conditions
  • Laboratory Investigation of the Pre- and Post-Cyclic Volume Change Properties of Sherman Island Peat
  • Potential Value of Outcrop Confidence for Characterizing Geologic Variability
  • Back-analysis & in-situ shear testing studies to estimate shear strength parameters on an actual slope
  • Shear Strength Characterization and Stability Assessment of Urban Open-Pit Mine Slopes
  • Integrated Geophysical Exploration for Safety Assessment of Levee Systems
  • Soil Migration and Piping Susceptibility by the VisCPT
  • Refraction Microtremor Characterization of a Landslide SR 14, Cedar Canyon, Utah
  • Characterizing Low Plastic Fine-Grained Foundation Soils under Strong Earthquake Shaking
  • Fully Softened Strength of Natural and Compacted Clays for Slope Stability
  • Measurement of Fully Softened Shear Strength
  • Effect of Fast Shearing on the Residual Shear Strengths Measured Along Pre-Existing Shear Surfaces in Kaolinite.
  • Post-Peak Fully-Softened Strength and Curved Strength Envelope in Shallow Slope Failure Analysis
  • Deformations of a Rapidly Moving Landslide from High-Resolution Optical Satellite Imagery-- Joint Pixels InSAR for Health Assessment of Levees in New Orleans
  • Characterization of Landslides Using Advanced Remote Sensing Techniques, Standard Monitoring Techniques, and Laboratory Testing
  • Slope Stability and Rock-Fall Monitoring with a Remote Interferometric Radar System
  • GPS and Remote Sensing Study of Slope Movement in the Berkeley Hills, Ca.
  • Ground-based Interferometric Radar for Monitoring Slopes and Embankments
  • Numerical Modeling of Wetting-Induced Settlement of Embankments
  • Impact of Heat Exchange on the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Response of Reinforced Embankments
  • Comparisons of Data from a Complex-Impedance Measuring Instrument and Conventional Compaction Control Tests
  • Integrated Slope Stability Analyses of Wastewater Storage Structure extending the Capillary Barrier Technique
  • Field Monitoring of Embankment Constructed by Volcanic Soil and Its Evaluation
  • Slope Stability Assessment Using Field Moisture Data for North Texas Clay Soil
  • Slope Stability Characteristic of Unsaturated Weathered Granite Soil in Korea considering Antecedent Rainfall
  • Modelling Suctions in a Cutting with a Bimodal Soil Water Characteristic Curve and Hydraulic Conductivity Function
  • An Evaluation of Specification Methodologies for Use with Continuous Compaction Control Equipment
  • Effect of Rainfall on Stability of Unsaturated Earth Slopes Constructed on Expansive Clay
  • Model Testing of Precipitation-Induced Landslides
  • Increase of Resilient Modulus of Unsaturated Granular Materials During Drying After Compaction
  • Effects of Surface Explosions on top of Earth Embankment Dams
  • Experimental Simulation of Rainfall and Seismic Effects to Trigger Slope Failures
  • Mechanism of rainfall triggering landslides in Kulonprogo, Indonesia
  • Slope Instability of High Terrace Deposits under Extreme Weather Conditions.
  • Stability Analysis of Soil Slope Subjected to Blast Induced Vibrations Using FLAC3D
  • Centrifugal and Numerical Modeling of High and Steep Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slopes
  • Large Model Footing Load Test on Multi-Layer Reinforced Coal Ash Slope
  • Impacts of Time on the Performance of Reinforced Slopes
  • Back-to-Back Mechanically Stabilized Earth Wall "To Grout or Not to Grout?"
  • Performance of High Geosynthetic-reinforced Embankments
  • An Analytical Method for Reinforcement Load of Wrapped-Face Mse Walls before Full Mobilization of Soil Strength
  • Aspects of Design and Construction of a 30m high MSE wall : A Case Study
  • Geosynthetic-Strip Reinforced MSE Wall for Dam Expansion
  • Stability of Back-to-Back Mechanically Stabilized Earth Walls
  • Effect of Rainfall on Performance of Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil Wall Using Stress-Pore Pressure Coupled Analysis
  • Jointed Rock Slopes Stability Analysis Using PFC2D
  • Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Approach for Reliability Based Seismic Design of Rock Slopes against Wedge Failures
  • CRSP-3D Application for Remediating a Rockfall at Yosemite National Park
  • Fracture Behavior Analysis on the Effect of Joint and Hydrostatic Pressure to Rock Slope by Displacement Discontinuity Method
  • A Case History Study on the Failure Mechanism of A Reactivated Landslide in Northern California
  • Long-Term Performance of Engineered Fills
  • Lateral Extension of Slopes in Expansive Soils
  • Mitigation Measures for Stability Enhancement of Tailing Dams during Construction.
  • Finite Element Modeling of Displacement Behavior of a Slow-Moving Landslide
  • Spheroidal Shaped Rupture Surfaces for Undrained Soils Planar Slope Stability
  • Geotechnical Aspects of a 16 m High Steep Embankment in Eastern Pennsylvania
  • Remedial Design of An Earth Dam 20 Years later
  • Characterization and Stabilization of Reactivated Ancient Landslide, Soledad Mountain Road, La Jolla, California
  • Physical Model Tests of Expansive Soil Slope
  • Predicting Time-to-Failure in Slopes from Precursory Displacements : A Centrifuge Experiment
  • Slope Stability under Cyclic Foundation Loading Effect of Loading Frequency
  • Quantification and Characterization of Temperature Effect on Desiccation Crack Network in Soil
  • Fragmentation due to Desiccation and Shallow Failures in Clay Slopes
  • Evidences of Hierarchy in Cracking of Drying Soils
  • Origin and Mechanism of Cracks Seen at the Bottom of a Desiccating Soil Specimen
  • Effect of Depth of Desiccation Cracks on Earth Embankments
  • Study of Desiccation Cracks in Soils Using A 2D Laser Scanner
  • Micro-Scale Study of Rupture in Desiccating Granular Media
  • Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Characterizing Cracking of Soils
  • Full Scale Test of Periodic Irrigation Infiltration in a Cracked and Intact Clay Slope
  • Multi-Scale Approach to Cracking Criteria for Drying Silty Soils
  • An Alternative Performance-Based Liquefaction Initiation Procedure for the Standard Penetration Test
  • On Correction Factors for Liquefaction Analysis of Embankments and Slopes
  • Analyzing Liquefaction Induced Instability and Deformation of Slopes using Static Shear Stress and Residual Strength
  • Stone Columns and Earthquake Drain Liquefaction Mitigation for Federal Center South in Seattle, Washington
  • Remediation of Liquefaction Potential of Sand Using the Biogas Method
  • Effect of Uncertainty in Site Characterization on the Prediction of Liquefaction Potential for Bridge Embankments in the Mississippi Embayment.
  • A Methodology for Evaluating Liquefaction Susceptibility in Shallow Sandy Slopes
  • Effectiveness of PV Drains for Mitigating Earthquake-Induced Deformations in Sandy Slopes
  • Comparison of Liquefaction Triggering Methods for Sloping Ground Using Two Flow Failures from the 2010 Haiti Earthquake
  • Downslope Ground Movements during Liquefaction-Induced Lateral Spreading in Centrifuge Testing
  • Testing Bias and Parametric Uncertainty in Analyses of A Slope Failure in San Francisco Bay Mud
  • Probability of Failure for Slopes with Sensitivity Analysis
  • A Benchmark Slope For System Reliability Analysis
  • Effect of Slope Height and Gradient on Failure Probability
  • A Cell-based Reliability Analysis Model for Predicting Regional Rainfall-induced Slope Failures
  • Travel Distances of Earthquake-induced Landslides
  • Stability Analysis of the L-575 Levee Failure on the Missouri River
  • Probabilistic Back Analysis of Failed Slopes using Bayesian Techniques
  • A contribution for the assessment of sliding susceptibility in Sarno area, Southern Italy
  • Reliability Based Design of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfills using Translational Failure Mechanism
  • Laboratory Modeling of Critical Hydraulic Conditions for the Initiation of Piping
  • Effect of Geomechanical and Geometrical Factors on Soil Arching in Zoned Embankment Dams
  • Performance of Missouri River Levee System and Flood Fighting Efforts at Eppley Airfield during 2011 Flood Event
  • Effects of Initial Conditions on the Results of Transient Seepage Analyses
  • Simulation of Piping in Earth Dams Due to Concentrated Leak Erosion
  • Characterization of Soil-Foundation Interaction for a T-Wall Flood Protection System in New Orleans
  • Slurry Wall and Embankment Deformation Observations and Modeling of Levees over Loose Sacramento River Silts.
  • Stability Analyses for a 200-foot-high Dam Requiring Staged Construction
  • Analytical Solutions for Levee Underseepage Analysis : Straight and Curved Levee Sections with an Infinite Blanket
  • Probability-Based Design for Levee Underseepage : Heaving vs. Piping Phenomena
  • Seismic Design, Construction and Performance of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Soil Retaining Walls and Bridge Abutments for Railways in Japan
  • Application of a New Analytical-Numerical Framework for Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Earth Structures
  • Shake Table Test of MSE Wall with Tire Derived Aggregates (TDA) Backfill
  • Acceleration-Amplified Responses of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Soil Structures with a Wide Range of Input Ground Accelerations
  • Seismic Testing Program for Large-Scale MSE Retaining Walls at UCSD
  • Optimum Load and Resistance Factors for External Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Walls : A Reliability Based Approach
  • Seismically Induced Displacements in a 3D Mechanism of Slope Collapse
  • Parametric Study on Earthquake-Induced Slope Deformations
  • Stability Analysis of Landfills in Seismic Area
  • Comparison of Nonlinear One- and Two-Dimensional Site Response Analysis Tools for Charleston, SC
  • Evaluation of Empirical Predictive Models Used to Predict Earthquake-Induced Slope Deformations
  • The Effect of Input Frequency on Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction of Levees with Cutoff Walls
  • A New Stability Number for Vertical Cuts in Stiff Clays
  • Comparison of Limit Equilibrium and Limit Analysis for Complex Slopes
  • Particulate Study of Drained Diffuse Instability in Granular Material
  • A Simplified Approach for Evaluating 3D Slot-Cut Slope Stability
  • Stability Analysis of Seismically Loaded Slopes Using Finite Element Techniques
  • Erosion of Coastal Slopes and Landslides
  • Impacts of Freeze-Thaw on Cliff Recession at the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland
  • Contribution of Grass Roots on Enhancement of Slope and Embankment Stability.
  • Stability and Deformation of Sheet Pile Walls for Protecting Riverside Structures in the Mekong River Delta
  • Impacts of Growth Faults on Slope Stability
  • Stabilization of the Coastal Cliff in Netanya, Israel
  • Bridge Approach Embankment Slope Distress : Analysis, Monitoring, Design & Remediation A Case Study
  • Settlement of a Structure Adjacent to Large Embankment Construction A Case History
  • Modeling the Effect of Polyurethane Stabilization on Rail Track Response
  • Performance of Mechanically Stabilized Rail Track
  • Design and Construction of Freestanding Expanded Polystyrene Roadway Embankment in Downtown St. Louis, Missouri
  • Near-Real-Time Embankment Settlement Monitoring for Construction Control
  • Mine Wastes in Western Australia and Their Suitability for Embankment Construction
  • Landform/Geomorphic Grading for Sustainable Hillside Developments
  • Stabilizer Selection for Arresting Surficial Slope Failures : A Sustainability Perspective
  • Converting Waste Disposal Sites to Renewable Energy Sites Using MSE Berms
  • Environmental Life Cycle Performance of Recycled Materials for Sustainable Slope Engineering
  • Soil Pressure Measurement, Forgotten Facts about Compliance
  • Analysis of a simple displacement sensor based on BOTDR optical fiber
  • Atomic-Scale Simulation of Sensor-Enabled Geosynthetics for Health-Monitoring of Reinforced Soil Slopes and Embankments
  • Decision Criteria of Slope Hazards by Multi-step Monitoring using a WSN
  • Remote Monitoring of a Model Levee Constructed on Soft Peaty Organic Soil
  • Comprehensive Real-Time Field Monitoring at Active Embankment subjected to Tidal Loading
  • Failure of the Fujinuma Dams during the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake.
  • Surface Fault Rupture through a Ridge in an Aftershock of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
  • Reconnaissance Documentation of Geologic Structure Using Close-Range Terrestrial Photogrammetry
  • Slope Stability Issues After Mw 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake
  • Geospatial Characterization of Causative Factors for Recent Landslides in the Oregon Coast Range
  • Development of a Multiscale Monitoring and Health Assessment Framework for Effective Management of Levee Infrastructure
  • Geotechnical Asset Management with Performance Data from MSE Steel Reinforcements
  • Risk Based Methods for Management of Geotechnical Features in Transportation Infrastructure
  • Capturing The Impacts of Geotechnical Features on Transportation System Performance
  • Management of Unstable Slopes along Washington State Highways Past, Present, and Future
  • Geotechnical Asset Management of Slopes : Condition Indices and Performance Measures
  • Stabilization of the Bender's Park Landslide, Lead, South Dakota
  • Landslide Stabilization Using High Strength Aggregate-Cement Slurry
  • Performance of Slope Stabilization Works with Drainage and Buttress
  • High Capacity Reinforced Flexible Systems for Slope Stabilization : An Outstanding Technology, Not Well Known
  • Cost and Schedule Savings from Directly-Driven Soil Nail and Innovative Fascia Systems
  • Full-Scale Shallow Anchor Testing in High Moisture Content Fine-Grained Levee Soils
  • Seismic Stability Analysis of Slopes Stabilized with EPS-Block Geofoam
  • Performance Evaluation of a Slope Reinforced with Recycled Plastic Pin
  • Stream Bank Remediation : Not Just a Geotechnical Problem
  • Horizontal Drains State of Practice The Past Seven Decades in the US
  • Influence of Grout Rheology and Placement Technique on Integrity of Soil Nails.
  • Performance of Soil Nail Wall in High Plasticity Expansive Soil
  • Uplift Behavior of Anchor Plates in Slope
  • Advances in Design Methodology for Landslide Repair Using Launched Soil Nails
  • Stability Failure Modes of Rigid Column-Supported Embankments
  • Consolidation of Column-reinforced Soft Foundations under Embankments
  • Load Distribution on Geosynthetic Reinforcement in Column-Supported Embankments
  • Dutch Research on Basal Reinforced Piled Embankments
  • Reducing Erosion Along the Surface of Sloping Clay-sand Liners
  • Computer Simulation of Levee Erosion and Overtopping
  • Concave Slopes for Improved Stability and Erosion Resistance
  • Modeling the Internal Erosion Behavior of Lignosulfonate Treated Soil
  • Slope Stability Analysis of Three Earthen Levee Strengthening Systems under Hurricane Overtopping Flow Conditions
  • Erosion Resistance of Earthen Levee Strengthened by HPTRM System under Combined Wave and Surge Overtopping Conditions
  • Influence of Slope Morphology on the Stability of Earthen Slopes
  • Comparison of Erosion Susceptibility and Slope Stability of Repaired Highway Embankment
  • Case Study of Rapid Levee Armoring During 2011 Mississippi River Flood and Potential Future Applications
  • Fundamental Study on Surface Erosion in Levee Systems
  • Long-Term Performance of Landslide Shear Piles
  • Application of the Strain Wedge Model in Soil-pile Interaction Analysis of Pile-stabilized Slopes
  • Analysis of Alternative Landslides Remediation Measures Using Sliding Force Concept
  • Design Method for Slide-Stabilizing Micropile Walls
  • A Study of Effects of Pile Depth and Stiffness on a Homogeneous Soil Slope Stabilized with Pile.
  • Yield Acceleration of a Slope Reinforced with a Row of Drilled Shafts
  • Reliability Based Design for Drilled Shafts for Slope Stabilization
  • Numerical Analysis of Pile-Reinforced Slopes
  • Design Method for Drilled Shaft Stabilization of Unstable Slopes
  • A Procedure for Predicting Micropile Resistance for Earth Slope Stabilization
  • Modeling Mechanical Response of Cemented EPS-Backfill
  • Mechanical Behavior of Cement- and Cement-Fiber-Improved Soft Soils
  • Pervious Concrete Pile : An Innovation Ground Improvement Alternative
  • Mixtures of Clay / EPS Particulates and Undrained Shear Strength
  • Soil Improvement for Seismic Retrofit of Tuttle Creek Dam
  • Monitoring the Embankment Stabilization of Cantagalo Park, Brazil
  • Physicochemical Characterization of Cement Stabilized Highly Expansive Soil
  • Centrifuge Model Tests on Influence of Slope Height on Stability of Soft Clay Slope
  • Stiffness Nonlinearities of SCP-inserted Clay Specimens with Various Replacement Ratios in Triaxial Compression Tests.
  • Analytical and Numerical Model of Electro-osmotic Consolidation for Soft Soil Improvement
  • Long-term Viscoplastic Behaviour of Embankments Built on Improved Soft Soil Using Vertical Drains
  • Investigation and Liquefaction Mitigation of Landfill Perimeter Levee
  • Quality Control and Quality Assurance Methods for Cutoff Walls in Dams and Levees
  • Design and Construction of Deep Mixing at Orleans Avenue Canal, New Orleans
  • Partial Stabilization of an Active Slide Area Utilizing Soil Mixed Shear Keys installed Using Cutter Soil Mixing Results of a Test Section
  • Slope Stability Then and Now
  • Remote Sensing Applications for Landslides, Slopes and Embankments
  • Instrumentation and Monitoring of Slope Stability
  • Issues of Reliability in Stability of Slopes
  • Seismic Slope Stability
  • Lessons Learned from Troubleshooting Dams
  • Advances in Shear Strength Measurement, Assessment, and Use for Slope Stability Analysis
  • Toppling A Fundamental Failure Mode in Discontinuous Materials Description and Analysis
  • Case Studies of Offshore Slope Stability.
  • Numerical Modeling of Three Dimensional Geosynthetic Soil Reinforcement by Using Alternative Parameters
  • Numerical Modeling of the Pull-out Test of Steel Grid Soil Reinforcement Using FLAC2D
  • Performance Monitoring of Rail Tracks Stabilized by Geosynthetics and Shock Mats : Case Studies at Bulli and Singleton in Australia
  • Deformation of Slurry Filled Permeable Geosynthetic Tubes
  • Pullout Resistance Factors for Steel Reinforcements Used in TxDOT MSE Walls
  • A Constitutive Equation for Compression Behaviors of Artificially Cemented Composite Geo-Materials
  • Interface Shear Testing of GCL Liner Systems for Very High Normal Stress Conditions
  • Effect of Reinforcement Coverage Ratio on Cellular Reinforced Fly Ash Walls
  • Triaxial Testing on Saturated Mixtures of Sand and Granulated Rubber
  • Evaluation of Shear Creep Response of Recycled Asphalt Shingle Mixtures
  • Numerical Modeling of Cellular Reinforced Fly Ash Walls Effect of Reinforcement Coverage Ratio
  • Estimating Undrained Strength of Clays from Direct Shear Testing at Fast Displacement Rates
  • Quantifying Surface Roughness of Weathered Rock Examples from Granite and Limestone
  • The Hydro-Mechanical Behavior of Infilled Rock Joints with Fill Materials in Unsaturated Conditions
  • Laboratory Investigation of the Pre- and Post-Cyclic Volume Change Properties of Sherman Island Peat
  • Potential Value of Outcrop Confidence for Characterizing Geologic Variability
  • Back-analysis & in-situ shear testing studies to estimate shear strength parameters on an actual slope
  • Shear Strength Characterization and Stability Assessment of Urban Open-Pit Mine Slopes
  • Integrated Geophysical Exploration for Safety Assessment of Levee Systems
  • Soil Migration and Piping Susceptibility by the VisCPT
  • Refraction Microtremor Characterization of a Landslide SR 14, Cedar Canyon, Utah
  • Characterizing Low Plastic Fine-Grained Foundation Soils under Strong Earthquake Shaking
  • Fully Softened Strength of Natural and Compacted Clays for Slope Stability
  • Measurement of Fully Softened Shear Strength
  • Effect of Fast Shearing on the Residual Shear Strengths Measured Along Pre-Existing Shear Surfaces in Kaolinite.
  • Post-Peak Fully-Softened Strength and Curved Strength Envelope in Shallow Slope Failure Analysis
  • Deformations of a Rapidly Moving Landslide from High-Resolution Optical Satellite Imagery-- Joint Pixels InSAR for Health Assessment of Levees in New Orleans
  • Characterization of Landslides Using Advanced Remote Sensing Techniques, Standard Monitoring Techniques, and Laboratory Testing
  • Slope Stability and Rock-Fall Monitoring with a Remote Interferometric Radar System
  • GPS and Remote Sensing Study of Slope Movement in the Berkeley Hills, Ca.
  • Ground-based Interferometric Radar for Monitoring Slopes and Embankments
  • Numerical Modeling of Wetting-Induced Settlement of Embankments
  • Impact of Heat Exchange on the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Response of Reinforced Embankments
  • Comparisons of Data from a Complex-Impedance Measuring Instrument and Conventional Compaction Control Tests
  • Integrated Slope Stability Analyses of Wastewater Storage Structure extending the Capillary Barrier Technique
  • Field Monitoring of Embankment Constructed by Volcanic Soil and Its Evaluation
  • Slope Stability Assessment Using Field Moisture Data for North Texas Clay Soil
  • Slope Stability Characteristic of Unsaturated Weathered Granite Soil in Korea considering Antecedent Rainfall
  • Modelling Suctions in a Cutting with a Bimodal Soil Water Characteristic Curve and Hydraulic Conductivity Function
  • An Evaluation of Specification Methodologies for Use with Continuous Compaction Control Equipment
  • Effect of Rainfall on Stability of Unsaturated Earth Slopes Constructed on Expansive Clay
  • Model Testing of Precipitation-Induced Landslides
  • Increase of Resilient Modulus of Unsaturated Granular Materials During Drying After Compaction
  • Effects of Surface Explosions on top of Earth Embankment Dams
  • Experimental Simulation of Rainfall and Seismic Effects to Trigger Slope Failures
  • Mechanism of rainfall triggering landslides in Kulonprogo, Indonesia
  • Slope Instability of High Terrace Deposits under Extreme Weather Conditions.
  • Stability Analysis of Soil Slope Subjected to Blast Induced Vibrations Using FLAC3D
  • Centrifugal and Numerical Modeling of High and Steep Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slopes
  • Large Model Footing Load Test on Multi-Layer Reinforced Coal Ash Slope
  • Impacts of Time on the Performance of Reinforced Slopes
  • Back-to-Back Mechanically Stabilized Earth Wall "To Grout or Not to Grout?"
  • Performance of High Geosynthetic-reinforced Embankments
  • An Analytical Method for Reinforcement Load of Wrapped-Face Mse Walls before Full Mobilization of Soil Strength
  • Aspects of Design and Construction of a 30m high MSE wall : A Case Study
  • Geosynthetic-Strip Reinforced MSE Wall for Dam Expansion
  • Stability of Back-to-Back Mechanically Stabilized Earth Walls
  • Effect of Rainfall on Performance of Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil Wall Using Stress-Pore Pressure Coupled Analysis
  • Jointed Rock Slopes Stability Analysis Using PFC2D
  • Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Approach for Reliability Based Seismic Design of Rock Slopes against Wedge Failures
  • CRSP-3D Application for Remediating a Rockfall at Yosemite National Park
  • Fracture Behavior Analysis on the Effect of Joint and Hydrostatic Pressure to Rock Slope by Displacement Discontinuity Method
  • A Case History Study on the Failure Mechanism of A Reactivated Landslide in Northern California
  • Long-Term Performance of Engineered Fills
  • Lateral Extension of Slopes in Expansive Soils
  • Mitigation Measures for Stability Enhancement of Tailing Dams during Construction.
  • Finite Element Modeling of Displacement Behavior of a Slow-Moving Landslide
  • Spheroidal Shaped Rupture Surfaces for Undrained Soils Planar Slope Stability
  • Geotechnical Aspects of a 16 m High Steep Embankment in Eastern Pennsylvania
  • Remedial Design of An Earth Dam 20 Years later
  • Characterization and Stabilization of Reactivated Ancient Landslide, Soledad Mountain Road, La Jolla, California
  • Physical Model Tests of Expansive Soil Slope
  • Predicting Time-to-Failure in Slopes from Precursory Displacements : A Centrifuge Experiment
  • Slope Stability under Cyclic Foundation Loading Effect of Loading Frequency
  • Quantification and Characterization of Temperature Effect on Desiccation Crack Network in Soil
  • Fragmentation due to Desiccation and Shallow Failures in Clay Slopes
  • Evidences of Hierarchy in Cracking of Drying Soils
  • Origin and Mechanism of Cracks Seen at the Bottom of a Desiccating Soil Specimen
  • Effect of Depth of Desiccation Cracks on Earth Embankments
  • Study of Desiccation Cracks in Soils Using A 2D Laser Scanner
  • Micro-Scale Study of Rupture in Desiccating Granular Media
  • Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Characterizing Cracking of Soils
  • Full Scale Test of Periodic Irrigation Infiltration in a Cracked and Intact Clay Slope
  • Multi-Scale Approach to Cracking Criteria for Drying Silty Soils
  • An Alternative Performance-Based Liquefaction Initiation Procedure for the Standard Penetration Test
  • On Correction Factors for Liquefaction Analysis of Embankments and Slopes
  • Analyzing Liquefaction Induced Instability and Deformation of Slopes using Static Shear Stress and Residual Strength
  • Stone Columns and Earthquake Drain Liquefaction Mitigation for Federal Center South in Seattle, Washington
  • Remediation of Liquefaction Potential of Sand Using the Biogas Method
  • Effect of Uncertainty in Site Characterization on the Prediction of Liquefaction Potential for Bridge Embankments in the Mississippi Embayment.
  • A Methodology for Evaluating Liquefaction Susceptibility in Shallow Sandy Slopes
  • Effectiveness of PV Drains for Mitigating Earthquake-Induced Deformations in Sandy Slopes
  • Comparison of Liquefaction Triggering Methods for Sloping Ground Using Two Flow Failures from the 2010 Haiti Earthquake
  • Downslope Ground Movements during Liquefaction-Induced Lateral Spreading in Centrifuge Testing
  • Testing Bias and Parametric Uncertainty in Analyses of A Slope Failure in San Francisco Bay Mud
  • Probability of Failure for Slopes with Sensitivity Analysis
  • A Benchmark Slope For System Reliability Analysis
  • Effect of Slope Height and Gradient on Failure Probability
  • A Cell-based Reliability Analysis Model for Predicting Regional Rainfall-induced Slope Failures
  • Travel Distances of Earthquake-induced Landslides
  • Stability Analysis of the L-575 Levee Failure on the Missouri River
  • Probabilistic Back Analysis of Failed Slopes using Bayesian Techniques
  • A contribution for the assessment of sliding susceptibility in Sarno area, Southern Italy
  • Reliability Based Design of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfills using Translational Failure Mechanism
  • Laboratory Modeling of Critical Hydraulic Conditions for the Initiation of Piping
  • Effect of Geomechanical and Geometrical Factors on Soil Arching in Zoned Embankment Dams
  • Performance of Missouri River Levee System and Flood Fighting Efforts at Eppley Airfield during 2011 Flood Event
  • Effects of Initial Conditions on the Results of Transient Seepage Analyses
  • Simulation of Piping in Earth Dams Due to Concentrated Leak Erosion
  • Characterization of Soil-Foundation Interaction for a T-Wall Flood Protection System in New Orleans
  • Slurry Wall and Embankment Deformation Observations and Modeling of Levees over Loose Sacramento River Silts.
  • Stability Analyses for a 200-foot-high Dam Requiring Staged Construction
  • Analytical Solutions for Levee Underseepage Analysis : Straight and Curved Levee Sections with an Infinite Blanket
  • Probability-Based Design for Levee Underseepage : Heaving vs. Piping Phenomena
  • Seismic Design, Construction and Performance of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Soil Retaining Walls and Bridge Abutments for Railways in Japan
  • Application of a New Analytical-Numerical Framework for Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Earth Structures
  • Shake Table Test of MSE Wall with Tire Derived Aggregates (TDA) Backfill
  • Acceleration-Amplified Responses of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Soil Structures with a Wide Range of Input Ground Accelerations
  • Seismic Testing Program for Large-Scale MSE Retaining Walls at UCSD
  • Optimum Load and Resistance Factors for External Seismic Stability of Reinforced Soil Walls : A Reliability Based Approach
  • Seismically Induced Displacements in a 3D Mechanism of Slope Collapse
  • Parametric Study on Earthquake-Induced Slope Deformations
  • Stability Analysis of Landfills in Seismic Area
  • Comparison of Nonlinear One- and Two-Dimensional Site Response Analysis Tools for Charleston, SC
  • Evaluation of Empirical Predictive Models Used to Predict Earthquake-Induced Slope Deformations
  • The Effect of Input Frequency on Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction of Levees with Cutoff Walls
  • A New Stability Number for Vertical Cuts in Stiff Clays
  • Comparison of Limit Equilibrium and Limit Analysis for Complex Slopes
  • Particulate Study of Drained Diffuse Instability in Granular Material
  • A Simplified Approach for Evaluating 3D Slot-Cut Slope Stability
  • Stability Analysis of Seismically Loaded Slopes Using Finite Element Techniques
  • Erosion of Coastal Slopes and Landslides
  • Impacts of Freeze-Thaw on Cliff Recession at the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland
  • Contribution of Grass Roots on Enhancement of Slope and Embankment Stability.
  • Stability and Deformation of Sheet Pile Walls for Protecting Riverside Structures in the Mekong River Delta
  • Impacts of Growth Faults on Slope Stability
  • Stabilization of the Coastal Cliff in Netanya, Israel
  • Bridge Approach Embankment Slope Distress : Analysis, Monitoring, Design & Remediation A Case Study
  • Settlement of a Structure Adjacent to Large Embankment Construction A Case History
  • Modeling the Effect of Polyurethane Stabilization on Rail Track Response
  • Performance of Mechanically Stabilized Rail Track
  • Design and Construction of Freestanding Expanded Polystyrene Roadway Embankment in Downtown St. Louis, Missouri
  • Near-Real-Time Embankment Settlement Monitoring for Construction Control
  • Mine Wastes in Western Australia and Their Suitability for Embankment Construction
  • Landform/Geomorphic Grading for Sustainable Hillside Developments
  • Stabilizer Selection for Arresting Surficial Slope Failures : A Sustainability Perspective
  • Converting Waste Disposal Sites to Renewable Energy Sites Using MSE Berms
  • Environmental Life Cycle Performance of Recycled Materials for Sustainable Slope Engineering
  • Soil Pressure Measurement, Forgotten Facts about Compliance
  • Analysis of a simple displacement sensor based on BOTDR optical fiber
  • Atomic-Scale Simulation of Sensor-Enabled Geosynthetics for Health-Monitoring of Reinforced Soil Slopes and Embankments
  • Decision Criteria of Slope Hazards by Multi-step Monitoring using a WSN
  • Remote Monitoring of a Model Levee Constructed on Soft Peaty Organic Soil
  • Comprehensive Real-Time Field Monitoring at Active Embankment subjected to Tidal Loading
  • Failure of the Fujinuma Dams during the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake.
  • Surface Fault Rupture through a Ridge in an Aftershock of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake
  • Reconnaissance Documentation of Geologic Structure Using Close-Range Terrestrial Photogrammetry
  • Slope Stability Issues After Mw 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake
  • Geospatial Characterization of Causative Factors for Recent Landslides in the Oregon Coast Range
  • Development of a Multiscale Monitoring and Health Assessment Framework for Effective Management of Levee Infrastructure
  • Geotechnical Asset Management with Performance Data from MSE Steel Reinforcements
  • Risk Based Methods for Management of Geotechnical Features in Transportation Infrastructure
  • Capturing The Impacts of Geotechnical Features on Transportation System Performance
  • Management of Unstable Slopes along Washington State Highways Past, Present, and Future
  • Geotechnical Asset Management of Slopes : Condition Indices and Performance Measures
  • Stabilization of the Bender's Park Landslide, Lead, South Dakota
  • Landslide Stabilization Using High Strength Aggregate-Cement Slurry
  • Performance of Slope Stabilization Works with Drainage and Buttress
  • High Capacity Reinforced Flexible Systems for Slope Stabilization : An Outstanding Technology, Not Well Known
  • Cost and Schedule Savings from Directly-Driven Soil Nail and Innovative Fascia Systems
  • Full-Scale Shallow Anchor Testing in High Moisture Content Fine-Grained Levee Soils
  • Seismic Stability Analysis of Slopes Stabilized with EPS-Block Geofoam
  • Performance Evaluation of a Slope Reinforced with Recycled Plastic Pin
  • Stream Bank Remediation : Not Just a Geotechnical Problem
  • Horizontal Drains State of Practice The Past Seven Decades in the US
  • Influence of Grout Rheology and Placement Technique on Integrity of Soil Nails.
  • Performance of Soil Nail Wall in High Plasticity Expansive Soil
  • Uplift Behavior of Anchor Plates in Slope
  • Advances in Design Methodology for Landslide Repair Using Launched Soil Nails
  • Stability Failure Modes of Rigid Column-Supported Embankments
  • Consolidation of Column-reinforced Soft Foundations under Embankments
  • Load Distribution on Geosynthetic Reinforcement in Column-Supported Embankments
  • Dutch Research on Basal Reinforced Piled Embankments
  • Reducing Erosion Along the Surface of Sloping Clay-sand Liners
  • Computer Simulation of Levee Erosion and Overtopping
  • Concave Slopes for Improved Stability and Erosion Resistance
  • Modeling the Internal Erosion Behavior of Lignosulfonate Treated Soil
  • Slope Stability Analysis of Three Earthen Levee Strengthening Systems under Hurricane Overtopping Flow Conditions
  • Erosion Resistance of Earthen Levee Strengthened by HPTRM System under Combined Wave and Surge Overtopping Conditions
  • Influence of Slope Morphology on the Stability of Earthen Slopes
  • Comparison of Erosion Susceptibility and Slope Stability of Repaired Highway Embankment
  • Case Study of Rapid Levee Armoring During 2011 Mississippi River Flood and Potential Future Applications
  • Fundamental Study on Surface Erosion in Levee Systems
  • Long-Term Performance of Landslide Shear Piles
  • Application of the Strain Wedge Model in Soil-pile Interaction Analysis of Pile-stabilized Slopes
  • Analysis of Alternative Landslides Remediation Measures Using Sliding Force Concept
  • Design Method for Slide-Stabilizing Micropile Walls
  • A Study of Effects of Pile Depth and Stiffness on a Homogeneous Soil Slope Stabilized with Pile.
  • Yield Acceleration of a Slope Reinforced with a Row of Drilled Shafts
  • Reliability Based Design for Drilled Shafts for Slope Stabilization
  • Numerical Analysis of Pile-Reinforced Slopes
  • Design Method for Drilled Shaft Stabilization of Unstable Slopes
  • A Procedure for Predicting Micropile Resistance for Earth Slope Stabilization
  • Modeling Mechanical Response of Cemented EPS-Backfill
  • Mechanical Behavior of Cement- and Cement-Fiber-Improved Soft Soils
  • Pervious Concrete Pile : An Innovation Ground Improvement Alternative
  • Mixtures of Clay / EPS Particulates and Undrained Shear Strength
  • Soil Improvement for Seismic Retrofit of Tuttle Creek Dam
  • Monitoring the Embankment Stabilization of Cantagalo Park, Brazil
  • Physicochemical Characterization of Cement Stabilized Highly Expansive Soil
  • Centrifuge Model Tests on Influence of Slope Height on Stability of Soft Clay Slope
  • Stiffness Nonlinearities of SCP-inserted Clay Specimens with Various Replacement Ratios in Triaxial Compression Tests.
  • Analytical and Numerical Model of Electro-osmotic Consolidation for Soft Soil Improvement
  • Long-term Viscoplastic Behaviour of Embankments Built on Improved Soft Soil Using Vertical Drains
  • Investigation and Liquefaction Mitigation of Landfill Perimeter Levee
  • Quality Control and Quality Assurance Methods for Cutoff Walls in Dams and Levees
  • Design and Construction of Deep Mixing at Orleans Avenue Canal, New Orleans
  • Partial Stabilization of an Active Slide Area Utilizing Soil Mixed Shear Keys installed Using Cutter Soil Mixing Results of a Test Section
  • Slope Stability Then and Now
  • Remote Sensing Applications for Landslides, Slopes and Embankments
  • Instrumentation and Monitoring of Slope Stability
  • Issues of Reliability in Stability of Slopes
  • Seismic Slope Stability
  • Lessons Learned from Troubleshooting Dams
  • Advances in Shear Strength Measurement, Assessment, and Use for Slope Stability Analysis
  • Toppling A Fundamental Failure Mode in Discontinuous Materials Description and Analysis
  • Case Studies of Offshore Slope Stability.
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Book
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Slow slip events, sometimes also called slow earthquakes, have been the subject of intense study since they were discovered in the late 1990's. Slow slip events (SSEs) occur when a fault within the earth slips, as in an earthquake, but more slowly than in an earthquake. SSEs take anywhere from days to years to release the same energy as a Mw 5 - 7.5 earthquake would release in seconds. Because of their slow nature, SSEs do not excite seismic waves in the earth like regular earthquakes do, and thus do not cause the dangerous ground shaking or other hazards (i.e. liquifaction, tsunamis) associated with earthquakes. However SSEs still perturb the static stress state within the earth in the same way that earthquakes do, and can trigger regular earthquakes which may be damaging. SSEs are found in areas that are transitional between largely locked fault regions and freely creeping regions. Typically these SSE regions occur on the deeper extent of faults, below the depth of most earthquakes, however some SSEs occur on shallow transitional regions shallower than most earthquakes. SSEs present a unique window into the physics of these transitional fault regions, and thus present an opportunity to re ne our understanding of fault mechanics. SSEs are sometimes accompanied by an emergent seismic signal called tectonic tremor. Tectonic tremor is thought to be composed of individual very small, lowfrequency earthquakes which represent faster slip on small patches either within or adjacent to the active SSE region. The precise relationship between slip and tremor is not well understood, but has implications for the physics of deep fault regions, the hazards associated with SSE triggered earthquakes, and monitoring of SSEs. Tectonic tremor is studied by multiple researchers from a seismological point of view, using seismic instruments. When present, the total energy released in as tectonic tremor is always orders of magnitude below the total energy released by slip as measured by geodetic instruments, indicating that most of the slip is occurring aseismically. Additionally, some SSEs have no tremor associated with them. Therefore, SSEs are most suited to study using geodesy, as well as laboratory and modeling studies. In this thesis, I present a number of studies of GPS data from SSEs in the Cascadia subduction zone in the United States, the Hikurangi subduction zone on North Island of New Zealand, and the Boso peninsula area of Japan. I use a time-depenent inversion method to study the time-dependent properties of the SSEs, such as acceleration and migration of slip. I then use these models to study in detail the relationships between SSEs, seismicity, and tremor in these regions. I also present one laboratory study in which I create stress conditions similar to those thought to exist in SSE regions in subduction zones, including pressurized pore fluid. I extrapolate the results of this study to explain why SSE associated tremor is often modulated by solid earth tides, while regular earthquakes are not.
Slow slip events, sometimes also called slow earthquakes, have been the subject of intense study since they were discovered in the late 1990's. Slow slip events (SSEs) occur when a fault within the earth slips, as in an earthquake, but more slowly than in an earthquake. SSEs take anywhere from days to years to release the same energy as a Mw 5 - 7.5 earthquake would release in seconds. Because of their slow nature, SSEs do not excite seismic waves in the earth like regular earthquakes do, and thus do not cause the dangerous ground shaking or other hazards (i.e. liquifaction, tsunamis) associated with earthquakes. However SSEs still perturb the static stress state within the earth in the same way that earthquakes do, and can trigger regular earthquakes which may be damaging. SSEs are found in areas that are transitional between largely locked fault regions and freely creeping regions. Typically these SSE regions occur on the deeper extent of faults, below the depth of most earthquakes, however some SSEs occur on shallow transitional regions shallower than most earthquakes. SSEs present a unique window into the physics of these transitional fault regions, and thus present an opportunity to re ne our understanding of fault mechanics. SSEs are sometimes accompanied by an emergent seismic signal called tectonic tremor. Tectonic tremor is thought to be composed of individual very small, lowfrequency earthquakes which represent faster slip on small patches either within or adjacent to the active SSE region. The precise relationship between slip and tremor is not well understood, but has implications for the physics of deep fault regions, the hazards associated with SSE triggered earthquakes, and monitoring of SSEs. Tectonic tremor is studied by multiple researchers from a seismological point of view, using seismic instruments. When present, the total energy released in as tectonic tremor is always orders of magnitude below the total energy released by slip as measured by geodetic instruments, indicating that most of the slip is occurring aseismically. Additionally, some SSEs have no tremor associated with them. Therefore, SSEs are most suited to study using geodesy, as well as laboratory and modeling studies. In this thesis, I present a number of studies of GPS data from SSEs in the Cascadia subduction zone in the United States, the Hikurangi subduction zone on North Island of New Zealand, and the Boso peninsula area of Japan. I use a time-depenent inversion method to study the time-dependent properties of the SSEs, such as acceleration and migration of slip. I then use these models to study in detail the relationships between SSEs, seismicity, and tremor in these regions. I also present one laboratory study in which I create stress conditions similar to those thought to exist in SSE regions in subduction zones, including pressurized pore fluid. I extrapolate the results of this study to explain why SSE associated tremor is often modulated by solid earth tides, while regular earthquakes are not.
Book
1 online resource (xxxviii, 2565 pages) : ill.
  • Use of the Biot-Gassmann Equation in Modeling of the Seismic Velocity Changes During Supercritical CO2 Injection in Sandstone
  • Complex Function Approach to Biot Consolidation Equations for Wave Scattering by a Cylindrical Cavity in Cross-Anisotropic Porous Media
  • A Semi-Analytical Solution to the Dynamic Response of Saturated Multi-Layer Porous Media under Progressive Waves
  • Modeling Seismic Attenuation Due to Wave-Induced Fluid Flow in the Mesoscopic Scale to Interpret Laboratory Measurements
  • Fracture Connectivity Effects on Seismic Attenuation
  • Wave Attenuation and Dispersion in Patchy Saturated Gas Reservoirs : Influence of Frequency and Saturation on AVO Attributes
  • Generalization of the Biot's Equations for Account of Fluid Shear Relaxation : The Second Shear Wave
  • Rock Physics Templates in Heterogeneous Gas Reservoir : An Application of the Biot-Rayleigh Theory
  • Rock Physics Model for Tight Sandstone with Complex Pore Geometry
  • Propagation of Sound Waves in Poroelastic Media with Anisotropic Permeability
  • Krauklis Wave Initiation in Fluid-Filled Fractures by a Passing Body Wave
  • P-wave Propagation in Double-Porosity Materials Saturated with Dual-Fluid
  • Linear and Nonlinear Waves in Porous Media Filled with Electrolyte
  • Full-Waveform Simulation of Multipole Seismoelectric Logging While Drilling in a Fluid-Saturated Porous Formation
  • Acoustic Reverberation of a Borehole Located in a Poroelastic Formation
  • An Experimental Study of Low-Frequency Wave Dispersion and Attenuation in Water Saturated Sandstones
  • Effects of Squirt-Flow in Cracks on Drained Bulk Modulus of Porous Media
  • Simulation of Poro-Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation in Complex Borehole Environments Using a Pseudo-Spectral Approach
  • Acoustoelasticity for a Dissipative Fluid-Saturated Porous Rock
  • Novel Technique to Measure the Biot-Gassmann Modulus
  • Stoneley Wave Properties in a Fracture Filled with Viscous Fluid
  • Acoustic Characterization of Porous Materials with a Rigid Structure in the Low Frequency Regime
  • Digital Rock Physics : Poroelastic Signature of Permeability and Tortuosity
  • Use of CO2 as a Fluid in Fundamental Studies of Wave Propagation through Porous Media
  • Biot's Slow Wave and Effective Hydraulic Conductivity in Random Media
  • Effect of Fluid on Wave Propagation in Weakly Anisotropic Porous Media
  • Experimental Results on the Combined Effects of Frequency, Pressure and Pore Fluid on the Dispersion of Elastic Waves in Porous Rock
  • A Comparison of Seismic Attenuation Models for Unconsolidated Surficial Sediments : Evidence from Multi-Frequency Sonic Logs
  • Quantifying the Effect of Squirt Flow Dispersion from Compliant Clay Porosity in Clay-Bearing Sandstones
  • Transient Acoustic Wave Propagation in Non-Integer-Dimensional Rigid Porous Media
  • Interaction Between Fracture Zones and Shock-Induced Borehole Waves
  • Wave Propagation in Residual Saturated Porous Rocks A Multiscale Approach
  • Observation of the Diffuse Biot Slow Wave via its Electrokinetic Coupling : A Numerical Perspective
  • Biot-Pride Electrokinetic Wave Propagation in Porous Rocks
  • Some Theoretical and Practical Questions in Transient Electrokinetic Coupling in Fluid-Saturated Porous Media
  • Effect of the Fracture Fill on the Dispersion and Attenuation of Elastic Waves in a Porous Rock with Aligned Fractures
  • Slow Shear Waves in Poroelasticity and the Concept of Dynamic Permeability
  • The Wave Field of a Point Source that Acts on the Permeable Free Boundary of a Biot Half-Plane
  • Numerical Models of Converted Slow P-wave Modes in Porous Media
  • On the Field Variables of the Biot Theory and Modeling of Seismic Wave Propagation
  • A Poro-Elastic Model for Underwater Sand and Silt
  • On Poro-Elasticity in Finite-Element Geomechanical Simulations : Theory and Implementation
  • Triggering a Shear Band in Variably Saturated Porous Materials
  • A Theoretical Framework for Modeling Chemo-Mechanical Behavior of Porous Media with Multiphases and Multispecies
  • Examination and Implications of Preconsolidation Pressure Changes in Overconsolidated Clay Underlying a Large Embankment
  • Study on 1-D Nonlinear Consolidation Behavior for Ningbo Soft Clay with Threshold Gradient
  • Chemical Degradation and Compaction Instabilities in Geomaterials
  • Mechanics of Time-Dependent Deformation in Crustal Rocks
  • A General Criterion for Liquefaction in Granular Layers with Heterogeneous Pore Pressure
  • Poroelastic Center of Dilation Revisited.
  • Propagation of a Semi-Infinite Hydraulic Fracture in a Poroelastic Medium
  • Mechanical Compaction of Porous Rock : Comparison between the Behavior of a Porous Sandstone and a Porous Basalt
  • On Foundations of the Biot's Theory : New Interpretation on the Basis of the Generalized Variational Principle
  • Pore Pressure and Stress around Dipping Structures
  • Finite Element Modeling of Fluid-Driven Fracture in Permeable Medium
  • Localization of Shear in Saturated Granular Media : Insights from a Multi-Scaled Granular-Fluid Model
  • Unjacketed Bulk Compressibility of Sandstone in Laboratory Experiments
  • Derivation of the McNamee-Gibson Displacement Functions for Plane Strain and Axisymmetric Consolidation Problems
  • Thermal Consolidation with Chemical Dehydration Reactions : Pore Pressure Generation in the Slow Slip Region of Subduction Zones
  • On Nature of Earthquakes with Cause of Compressed Methane Gas Expansion and Migration in Crustal Rocks
  • One-Way versus Two-Way Coupling in Reservoir-Geomechanical Models
  • Micromechanical Origin of Static and Dynamic Liquefaction in Granular Soils
  • On Solitary Shock Waves for Solute and Fluid Pressure in Geologic Porous Media
  • An Analytical Solution of Flow-Deformation Coupling due to a Point Sink within a Finite Poroelastic Layer
  • An Analytical Solution to Plane Strain Consolidation due to Surface Loading within a Finite Poroelastic Media
  • On Modelling of Collective Behaviour of Hydro-Fractures in Rockmasses
  • Strength Homogenization for Partially Frozen Soil using Linear Comparison Composite Approach
  • An Improved Cap Model for Partially Saturated Soils
  • Simulation of Early-Age Cracking due to Drying Shrinkage Based on a Multi-Scale Constitutive Model
  • Visualization of Finite Element Data of a Multi-Phase Concrete Model
  • Ultrasonic Measurement of Evolving Microstructure in Hydrating Mortar
  • Finite Element Modeling and Computer Design of Porous Composites
  • Porosity Development in a Numerical Model for Concrete Shrinkage
  • Adsorption-Induced Breathing Transitions in Metal-Organic Frameworks
  • Pressure Effects in Phases Confined in Pores : Application to In-Pore Freezing and Mechanical Enhancement of Porous Materials
  • Characterisation of MOF Materials by Thermomechanical Methods
  • THM Modeling of the CO2 Injection in Coal : Influence of Biot's Coefficient and Langmuir'S Adsorption Parameters
  • Enhanced Continuum Poromechanics to Account for Adsorption Induced Swelling of Saturated Isotropic Nanoporous Materials
  • Role of Adsorption in the Creep Behavior of Coal and Shale
  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Sound Velocity Measurements of Chalk Saturated with Magnesium Rich Brine
  • Swelling/Shrinkage Induced by Shear in Narrow Pores
  • Freezing of Water in Cylindrical Nanopores
  • Sorption-Induced Deformation of Microporous Solids Studied by In-Situ Dilatometry
  • Effect of Water Content on the Mechanical Behavior of Thin Clay Films
  • Found in Translation : from Adsorption Thermodynamics to Poromechanics of Nanostructured Solids
  • Measurement of Adsorptive-Mechanical Properties of Fractured Coal Cores
  • Poromechanics of Swelling in Nanoporous Materials : Motivations and Introduction of Strain Effects on Adsorption
  • A Poromechanics Approach to Predict the Effective Swelling Behavior of Cellular Materials
  • Adsorption Process in MesoPorous Materials : New Investigations on the Role of Elastic Strain
  • Water Melting Induced Deformation of Ordered Nanoporous Silica
  • Adsorption and Defect-Sensitive Structure of Single Wall Nanocarbons
  • Pressure from Crystallization in Pore Channels
  • Poromechanics of Salt Nucleation within an Unsaturated Reservoir Rock
  • The Thermodynamic and Poromechanic Crystallization Pressure of Sodium Sulfate Heptahydrate : an NMR Study
  • Episodic Slip and Waves of Fluid-Filled Porosity
  • Anisotropy of Alkali-Silica Reaction under Loading
  • Confinement During In-Pore Crystallization
  • Potential Gradients Produced by Pore-Space Heterogeneities : Application to Isothermal Frost Damage and Submarine Hydrate Anomalies
  • Reaction-Driven Cracking During Mineral Hydration, Carbonation and Oxidation.
  • Fast Numerical Computation of Effective Elastic Moduli of Porous Materials
  • Boundary Element Formulation for Partially Saturated Poroelastic Media
  • Materials under Shock Loading : from Biot's Theory to Nano-Poromechanics
  • A Boundary Element Formulation for the Wave Propagation in the Unsaturated Soils
  • Modeling Effects of Clay Structure on Consolidation Behavior
  • An Isogeometric Analysis Approach to Fluid Flow in a Fractured Porous Medium
  • Modeling of Flow-Induced Sound in Poroelastic Materials
  • Poromechanical Cohesive Surface Element with Elastoplasticity for Modeling Cracks and Interfaces in Saturated Geomaterials
  • A Trefftz Based Prediction Technique for the Dynamic Response of Poroelastic Media in Vibro-Acoustic Applications
  • Fully Coupled Computational Simulations of Pile Foundations in Improved and Unimproved Soft Clays
  • A Stability Condition for the Numerical Simulation of Poroelastic Systems
  • A Comparison of Fully Implicit and Semi-Implicit Methods for Integration of an Elastoplastic Model for Clays
  • Preliminary Assessment of Higher-Order u-p Elements for Poromechanics Applications
  • Blast Response of Cellular Cement Foams : An Experimental Evaluation
  • Advanced Structural Materials to Mitigate Explosive and Impact Threats
  • Dynamic Fracture of Cellular Cementitious Plates under Blast/Shock Loading
  • Mitigation of Blast Effects on Underground Structure Using Compressible Porous Foam Barriers
  • Poro-Elasto-Plastic Modeling of Saturated Granular Soils Subjected to Blast Loading
  • Simulation of Excavation in Soft Cohesive Soils Using Enhanced Anisotropic Elastoplastic Bounding Surface Models
  • An Anisotropic Elastoplastic Bounding Surface Model for New York Bay Clay A Parametric Study
  • Two-Phase Dynamic Finite Element Method with One-Dimensional Examples
  • Towards a Generalized Bounding Surface Model for Cohesive Soils
  • Finite Element Modeling of the Elastic Modulus of Ti6Al4V Scaffold Fabricated by SLM
  • Stress Fluctuations in a Soil Element Testing
  • Porosity and Permeability Change under Stress and Correlation to Rock Texture
  • Prediction of Flow Behavior of Liquid and Particles in Liquid-Solid Risers with Modified Cluster Structure-Dependent Drag Method
  • A Constitutive Model for Sand Incorporating the Effects of Rotation of Principal Stress and State-Parameter-Dependant Dilatancy
  • Micromechanics of Dilatancy, Critical State and Shear Bands in Dense Granular Matter
  • Modelling Stress-Strain Behaviour of Granular Soils
  • Macro and Micro Analysis for Grading-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of Granular Materials
  • Investigation of the Flow in the Microscopic Level and its Contribution to the Poroelastic Properties in Cortical Bone
  • Homogenizing the Ultrasonic Response of Wet Cortical Bone
  • Estimation of the Poroelastic Properties of Trabecular Bone at the Microscopic Scale Using CT Based FE Models
  • The Sensitivity of Fabric Tensor in Bovine Cancellous Bone
  • Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Water Uptake and Swelling Kinetics of Trabecular Tissue from Human Femur Head : Some Preliminary Results
  • Assessment of the Lacunar-Canalicular Permeability Using Harmonic Loading
  • Modelling Rest-Inserted Loading in Bone Mechanotransduction Using Poroelastic Finite Element Models : The Impact of Permeability
  • Multi-Scale Permeability of Murine Bone Measured by Nanoindentation
  • Models of Poroelastic Double Porous Structures Based on Hierarchical Homogenization Application to Compact Bone
  • Ultrasonic Response of Functionally-Graded Anisotropic Porous Bones
  • On the Reconstruction of Dynamic Permeability of Cancellous Bones
  • Fabric Dependence in Dynamic Poroelasticity
  • Assessment of Cancellous Bone Microarchitecture from Poroelastic Ultrasound (PEUS) Theory
  • The Role of Microarchitecture on Absorption and Scattering of Ultrasound Waves in Trabecular Bone
  • Interstitial Flow in the Hierarchical Pore Space Architecture of Bone Tissue
  • Prediction of Anisotropic Trabecular Orientation and Spatial Distribution of Anabolic Remodeling by Acoustic Wave Propagation
  • The Fabric Anisotropy Effect on Elastic and Yield behavior of the Human Calcaneus Trabecular Bone.
  • Application of Numerical Methods for Estimating Settlements Due to Consolidation and Creep Two Case Histories
  • Deep Excavations with Special Ground Shape
  • Influence of Confining Stress on the Effective Stress Parameter
  • Poro-Mechanical Coupling Versus Chemical Effects of Different Fluids in a Porous Rock During Brittle Creep : Acoustic and Mechanical Evidences
  • Modelling Particle Breakage in Unsaturated Granular Assemblies
  • A Multiscale Anisotropic Poroplasticity Damage Model for Cracked Solids
  • Direct and Simultaneous Measurements of Sandstone Porosity, Permeability, and Electrical Conductivity at Elevated Pressures
  • A Modified form of Terzaghi's Effective Stress Principle of Unsaturated Expansive Clays Derived from Micromechanical Analysis
  • The Effect of Crack Closure on Permeability and Dynamic Elastic Moduli of Sandstone
  • Preliminary Study on Modeling Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling Behavior of Unsaturated Soils Based on Hybrid Mixture Theory
  • Microstructural Evaluation of the Water Sensitivity of Clayey Rocks
  • Effects of Pore Fluid Salinity on the Shear Strength of a Soft Clay
  • A Chemo-Poromechanical Model for Well/Caprock Interface in Presence of CO2
  • Investigating the Susceptibility of Iron Ore to Liquefaction
  • Terzaghi's and Biot's Poromechanics in Terms of Quaternions
  • Inception of Strain Localization in Unsaturated Porous Media
  • Poroelastic Contribution to Freezing in Cement Paste
  • Experimental Study on the Use of Electroosmosis for Accelerating the Consolidation of Clays under Increasing Vertical Stress
  • Characterization of Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Media : Two-Phase Flow Analysis of an In-Situ Experiment
  • Modelling the Coupled Chemo-Hydro-Mechanical Behavior of Structured Active Clays on Basis of Quantitative Microstructural Information
  • Coupled Processes During Rainfall : An Experimental Investigation on a Silty Sand
  • Modelling Hydro-Mechanical Interactive Behaviour of Unsaturated Soils
  • On the Impact of Cracking on Unsaturated Hydrous Properties of Porous Materials
  • SWRC Modeling in Unsaturated Soils : A Pore Network Approach
  • Self-Sealing Capacity of Macro-Cracked Argillite under Confinement
  • U-Tube Method of Identification of Drag Parameters for High Permeability Materials
  • Long-Term Creep Properties of Cementitious Materials Comparing Compression Tests on Concrete with Microindentation Tests on Cement
  • Thermal Pressurisation Coefficient During Heating and Rapid Hydrostatic Loading of Porous Media
  • Gas Migration through COx Claystone and Implications for Self-Healing
  • Nanomechanical Investigation of Internal Curing Effects on Sustainable Concretes with Absorbent Aggregates
  • Micro-Scale Experimental Investigation of Deformation and Damage of Argillaceous Rocks under Hydric and Mechanical Loads
  • Experimental Characterization of Chemical Alteration Effects on Carbonate Rock Dynamic Poroelastic Properties
  • Water Content Monitoring for Nuclear Concrete Buildings : Needs, Feedback and Perspectives
  • Singular Solutions in the Mechanics of Soils
  • Origin of Cohesion and Its Dependence on Saturation for Granular Media
  • Molecular Modeling of Early Stage of Swelling in Na-Montmorillonite Clay
  • FTIR Investigation of Molecular Interactions in Swelling Clays and their Role on Swelling and Other Macroscopic Properties
  • Expansive Clay Minerals and Hurricane Katrina
  • A Simple Modeling Approach for Estimation of Soil Deformation Behaviour of Natural Expansive Soils Using the Modulus of Elasticity as a Tool.
  • -- Poroelastic Properties of Hardwood at Different Length Scales
  • Strength Evolution of Hydrating Cement Pastes : the Counteracting Effects of Capillary Porosity and Unhydrated Clinker Reinforcements
  • How do Porous Interfacial Transition Zones (ITZ) Trigger Elastic Limits of Concrete? Micromechanics of ITZ Failure and ITZ-Aggregate Separation
  • Effect of Porosity on the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Porous Materials
  • Poromechanical Stimulation of Bone Remodeling : A Continuum Micromechanics-Based Mathematical Model and Experimental Validation
  • Liquid Crystal Interface Micromechanics of Creeping (Geo- and Bio-) Materials
  • Elaboration of a Straw Fiber-Based Insulated Material : Numerical Prediction of Thermohydromechanical Properties
  • Overall Properties of a Soft Porous Material : Surface Tension Effects
  • Effective Strength of Saturated Double Porous Media with a Drucker-Prager Solid Phase
  • Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Modelling of Deep Geothermal Heat Production
  • Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using Extended Finite Element Method
  • A Hybrid LSSVM-ABC Model for the Determination of the Magnitude of Horizontal in Situ Stresses
  • Coupled THMC Analysis of the Stress and Pressure Change around the Injection Well in CO2 Sequestration
  • A Dual Porosity Model for Ionic Solute Transport in Swelling Clays Incorporating Ion-Ion Correlation Effects
  • Hydro-Mechanical Coupling in Damaged Porous Media Containing Isolated Cracks or/and Vugs : Model and Computations
  • Multiscale Adaptive Simulations of Concrete Carbonation Taking into Account the Evolution of the Microstructure
  • Effect of Inner Resonators on Acoustics of Rigid Porous Media
  • Biphasic Acoustic Behavior of a Non-periodic Porous Medium
  • Multiscale Modeling of High Contrast Brinkman Equations with Applications to Deformable Porous Media
  • A Morphologically Informed Formulation of Poroelasticity Under Compression
  • Hygrothermal-Chemical Couplings in Degradation of Cementitious Materials
  • Thermo-Elasto-Plastic Consolidation Analysis with Water Phase Change
  • Modeling the Impact of Internal Erosion on the Behavior of Silty Sand
  • Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Time-Domain Computation of the Seismoelectric Field Generated by a Slipping Fault
  • A Hydromechanic-Electrokinetic Model for CO2 Sequestration in Geological Formations
  • Mechanics of Unsaturated Soils : from Equilibrium to Transient Conditions
  • Reactive Transport of scCO2 within Cement Paste
  • Poromechanics of an Externally Heated Sphere
  • Numerical Model of Elasto-Plastic Electro-Osmosis Consolidation of Clays
  • Interfacial Water : Unexplained Phenomena
  • 2D and 3D Numerical Analysis of Fluid Pressure Induced Fracture
  • Multiphase Coupled Numerical Simulation of the Rainfall Infiltration into Unsaturated Embankments.
  • -- Towards Stability Criteria for Deep Oil Drilling and Fracking in Shales
  • Hydraulic Fracturing Modeling : A Microporomechanics Approach
  • The Pressure Dependence of Permeability as a Function of Stiff and Compliant Porosities
  • An Insight into Molecular Scale Interactions and In-situ Nanomechanical Properties of Kerogen in Green River Oil Shale
  • Autogenous Shrinkage of Hardening Cement Paste in Oil Wells
  • Modeling the Influence of Thermo-Mechanical Crack Opening and Closure on Rock Stiffness
  • Heat Damaged Cement Paste Characterization Using the Nonlinear Acoustic Waves
  • Modeling Damage Induced by Deviatoric Stress in Rock : Theoretical Framework
  • Simulation of the Unsaturated Excavation Damage Zone around a Tunnel Using a Fully Coupled Damage-Plasticity Model.
  • Use of the Biot-Gassmann Equation in Modeling of the Seismic Velocity Changes During Supercritical CO2 Injection in Sandstone
  • Complex Function Approach to Biot Consolidation Equations for Wave Scattering by a Cylindrical Cavity in Cross-Anisotropic Porous Media
  • A Semi-Analytical Solution to the Dynamic Response of Saturated Multi-Layer Porous Media under Progressive Waves
  • Modeling Seismic Attenuation Due to Wave-Induced Fluid Flow in the Mesoscopic Scale to Interpret Laboratory Measurements
  • Fracture Connectivity Effects on Seismic Attenuation
  • Wave Attenuation and Dispersion in Patchy Saturated Gas Reservoirs : Influence of Frequency and Saturation on AVO Attributes
  • Generalization of the Biot's Equations for Account of Fluid Shear Relaxation : The Second Shear Wave
  • Rock Physics Templates in Heterogeneous Gas Reservoir : An Application of the Biot-Rayleigh Theory
  • Rock Physics Model for Tight Sandstone with Complex Pore Geometry
  • Propagation of Sound Waves in Poroelastic Media with Anisotropic Permeability
  • Krauklis Wave Initiation in Fluid-Filled Fractures by a Passing Body Wave
  • P-wave Propagation in Double-Porosity Materials Saturated with Dual-Fluid
  • Linear and Nonlinear Waves in Porous Media Filled with Electrolyte
  • Full-Waveform Simulation of Multipole Seismoelectric Logging While Drilling in a Fluid-Saturated Porous Formation
  • Acoustic Reverberation of a Borehole Located in a Poroelastic Formation
  • An Experimental Study of Low-Frequency Wave Dispersion and Attenuation in Water Saturated Sandstones
  • Effects of Squirt-Flow in Cracks on Drained Bulk Modulus of Porous Media
  • Simulation of Poro-Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation in Complex Borehole Environments Using a Pseudo-Spectral Approach
  • Acoustoelasticity for a Dissipative Fluid-Saturated Porous Rock
  • Novel Technique to Measure the Biot-Gassmann Modulus
  • Stoneley Wave Properties in a Fracture Filled with Viscous Fluid
  • Acoustic Characterization of Porous Materials with a Rigid Structure in the Low Frequency Regime
  • Digital Rock Physics : Poroelastic Signature of Permeability and Tortuosity
  • Use of CO2 as a Fluid in Fundamental Studies of Wave Propagation through Porous Media
  • Biot's Slow Wave and Effective Hydraulic Conductivity in Random Media
  • Effect of Fluid on Wave Propagation in Weakly Anisotropic Porous Media
  • Experimental Results on the Combined Effects of Frequency, Pressure and Pore Fluid on the Dispersion of Elastic Waves in Porous Rock
  • A Comparison of Seismic Attenuation Models for Unconsolidated Surficial Sediments : Evidence from Multi-Frequency Sonic Logs
  • Quantifying the Effect of Squirt Flow Dispersion from Compliant Clay Porosity in Clay-Bearing Sandstones
  • Transient Acoustic Wave Propagation in Non-Integer-Dimensional Rigid Porous Media
  • Interaction Between Fracture Zones and Shock-Induced Borehole Waves
  • Wave Propagation in Residual Saturated Porous Rocks A Multiscale Approach
  • Observation of the Diffuse Biot Slow Wave via its Electrokinetic Coupling : A Numerical Perspective
  • Biot-Pride Electrokinetic Wave Propagation in Porous Rocks
  • Some Theoretical and Practical Questions in Transient Electrokinetic Coupling in Fluid-Saturated Porous Media
  • Effect of the Fracture Fill on the Dispersion and Attenuation of Elastic Waves in a Porous Rock with Aligned Fractures
  • Slow Shear Waves in Poroelasticity and the Concept of Dynamic Permeability
  • The Wave Field of a Point Source that Acts on the Permeable Free Boundary of a Biot Half-Plane
  • Numerical Models of Converted Slow P-wave Modes in Porous Media
  • On the Field Variables of the Biot Theory and Modeling of Seismic Wave Propagation
  • A Poro-Elastic Model for Underwater Sand and Silt
  • On Poro-Elasticity in Finite-Element Geomechanical Simulations : Theory and Implementation
  • Triggering a Shear Band in Variably Saturated Porous Materials
  • A Theoretical Framework for Modeling Chemo-Mechanical Behavior of Porous Media with Multiphases and Multispecies
  • Examination and Implications of Preconsolidation Pressure Changes in Overconsolidated Clay Underlying a Large Embankment
  • Study on 1-D Nonlinear Consolidation Behavior for Ningbo Soft Clay with Threshold Gradient
  • Chemical Degradation and Compaction Instabilities in Geomaterials
  • Mechanics of Time-Dependent Deformation in Crustal Rocks
  • A General Criterion for Liquefaction in Granular Layers with Heterogeneous Pore Pressure
  • Poroelastic Center of Dilation Revisited.
  • Propagation of a Semi-Infinite Hydraulic Fracture in a Poroelastic Medium
  • Mechanical Compaction of Porous Rock : Comparison between the Behavior of a Porous Sandstone and a Porous Basalt
  • On Foundations of the Biot's Theory : New Interpretation on the Basis of the Generalized Variational Principle
  • Pore Pressure and Stress around Dipping Structures
  • Finite Element Modeling of Fluid-Driven Fracture in Permeable Medium
  • Localization of Shear in Saturated Granular Media : Insights from a Multi-Scaled Granular-Fluid Model
  • Unjacketed Bulk Compressibility of Sandstone in Laboratory Experiments
  • Derivation of the McNamee-Gibson Displacement Functions for Plane Strain and Axisymmetric Consolidation Problems
  • Thermal Consolidation with Chemical Dehydration Reactions : Pore Pressure Generation in the Slow Slip Region of Subduction Zones
  • On Nature of Earthquakes with Cause of Compressed Methane Gas Expansion and Migration in Crustal Rocks
  • One-Way versus Two-Way Coupling in Reservoir-Geomechanical Models
  • Micromechanical Origin of Static and Dynamic Liquefaction in Granular Soils
  • On Solitary Shock Waves for Solute and Fluid Pressure in Geologic Porous Media
  • An Analytical Solution of Flow-Deformation Coupling due to a Point Sink within a Finite Poroelastic Layer
  • An Analytical Solution to Plane Strain Consolidation due to Surface Loading within a Finite Poroelastic Media
  • On Modelling of Collective Behaviour of Hydro-Fractures in Rockmasses
  • Strength Homogenization for Partially Frozen Soil using Linear Comparison Composite Approach
  • An Improved Cap Model for Partially Saturated Soils
  • Simulation of Early-Age Cracking due to Drying Shrinkage Based on a Multi-Scale Constitutive Model
  • Visualization of Finite Element Data of a Multi-Phase Concrete Model
  • Ultrasonic Measurement of Evolving Microstructure in Hydrating Mortar
  • Finite Element Modeling and Computer Design of Porous Composites
  • Porosity Development in a Numerical Model for Concrete Shrinkage
  • Adsorption-Induced Breathing Transitions in Metal-Organic Frameworks
  • Pressure Effects in Phases Confined in Pores : Application to In-Pore Freezing and Mechanical Enhancement of Porous Materials
  • Characterisation of MOF Materials by Thermomechanical Methods
  • THM Modeling of the CO2 Injection in Coal : Influence of Biot's Coefficient and Langmuir'S Adsorption Parameters
  • Enhanced Continuum Poromechanics to Account for Adsorption Induced Swelling of Saturated Isotropic Nanoporous Materials
  • Role of Adsorption in the Creep Behavior of Coal and Shale
  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Sound Velocity Measurements of Chalk Saturated with Magnesium Rich Brine
  • Swelling/Shrinkage Induced by Shear in Narrow Pores
  • Freezing of Water in Cylindrical Nanopores
  • Sorption-Induced Deformation of Microporous Solids Studied by In-Situ Dilatometry
  • Effect of Water Content on the Mechanical Behavior of Thin Clay Films
  • Found in Translation : from Adsorption Thermodynamics to Poromechanics of Nanostructured Solids
  • Measurement of Adsorptive-Mechanical Properties of Fractured Coal Cores
  • Poromechanics of Swelling in Nanoporous Materials : Motivations and Introduction of Strain Effects on Adsorption
  • A Poromechanics Approach to Predict the Effective Swelling Behavior of Cellular Materials
  • Adsorption Process in MesoPorous Materials : New Investigations on the Role of Elastic Strain
  • Water Melting Induced Deformation of Ordered Nanoporous Silica
  • Adsorption and Defect-Sensitive Structure of Single Wall Nanocarbons
  • Pressure from Crystallization in Pore Channels
  • Poromechanics of Salt Nucleation within an Unsaturated Reservoir Rock
  • The Thermodynamic and Poromechanic Crystallization Pressure of Sodium Sulfate Heptahydrate : an NMR Study
  • Episodic Slip and Waves of Fluid-Filled Porosity
  • Anisotropy of Alkali-Silica Reaction under Loading
  • Confinement During In-Pore Crystallization
  • Potential Gradients Produced by Pore-Space Heterogeneities : Application to Isothermal Frost Damage and Submarine Hydrate Anomalies
  • Reaction-Driven Cracking During Mineral Hydration, Carbonation and Oxidation.
  • Fast Numerical Computation of Effective Elastic Moduli of Porous Materials
  • Boundary Element Formulation for Partially Saturated Poroelastic Media
  • Materials under Shock Loading : from Biot's Theory to Nano-Poromechanics
  • A Boundary Element Formulation for the Wave Propagation in the Unsaturated Soils
  • Modeling Effects of Clay Structure on Consolidation Behavior
  • An Isogeometric Analysis Approach to Fluid Flow in a Fractured Porous Medium
  • Modeling of Flow-Induced Sound in Poroelastic Materials
  • Poromechanical Cohesive Surface Element with Elastoplasticity for Modeling Cracks and Interfaces in Saturated Geomaterials
  • A Trefftz Based Prediction Technique for the Dynamic Response of Poroelastic Media in Vibro-Acoustic Applications
  • Fully Coupled Computational Simulations of Pile Foundations in Improved and Unimproved Soft Clays
  • A Stability Condition for the Numerical Simulation of Poroelastic Systems
  • A Comparison of Fully Implicit and Semi-Implicit Methods for Integration of an Elastoplastic Model for Clays
  • Preliminary Assessment of Higher-Order u-p Elements for Poromechanics Applications
  • Blast Response of Cellular Cement Foams : An Experimental Evaluation
  • Advanced Structural Materials to Mitigate Explosive and Impact Threats
  • Dynamic Fracture of Cellular Cementitious Plates under Blast/Shock Loading
  • Mitigation of Blast Effects on Underground Structure Using Compressible Porous Foam Barriers
  • Poro-Elasto-Plastic Modeling of Saturated Granular Soils Subjected to Blast Loading
  • Simulation of Excavation in Soft Cohesive Soils Using Enhanced Anisotropic Elastoplastic Bounding Surface Models
  • An Anisotropic Elastoplastic Bounding Surface Model for New York Bay Clay A Parametric Study
  • Two-Phase Dynamic Finite Element Method with One-Dimensional Examples
  • Towards a Generalized Bounding Surface Model for Cohesive Soils
  • Finite Element Modeling of the Elastic Modulus of Ti6Al4V Scaffold Fabricated by SLM
  • Stress Fluctuations in a Soil Element Testing
  • Porosity and Permeability Change under Stress and Correlation to Rock Texture
  • Prediction of Flow Behavior of Liquid and Particles in Liquid-Solid Risers with Modified Cluster Structure-Dependent Drag Method
  • A Constitutive Model for Sand Incorporating the Effects of Rotation of Principal Stress and State-Parameter-Dependant Dilatancy
  • Micromechanics of Dilatancy, Critical State and Shear Bands in Dense Granular Matter
  • Modelling Stress-Strain Behaviour of Granular Soils
  • Macro and Micro Analysis for Grading-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of Granular Materials
  • Investigation of the Flow in the Microscopic Level and its Contribution to the Poroelastic Properties in Cortical Bone
  • Homogenizing the Ultrasonic Response of Wet Cortical Bone
  • Estimation of the Poroelastic Properties of Trabecular Bone at the Microscopic Scale Using CT Based FE Models
  • The Sensitivity of Fabric Tensor in Bovine Cancellous Bone
  • Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Water Uptake and Swelling Kinetics of Trabecular Tissue from Human Femur Head : Some Preliminary Results
  • Assessment of the Lacunar-Canalicular Permeability Using Harmonic Loading
  • Modelling Rest-Inserted Loading in Bone Mechanotransduction Using Poroelastic Finite Element Models : The Impact of Permeability
  • Multi-Scale Permeability of Murine Bone Measured by Nanoindentation
  • Models of Poroelastic Double Porous Structures Based on Hierarchical Homogenization Application to Compact Bone
  • Ultrasonic Response of Functionally-Graded Anisotropic Porous Bones
  • On the Reconstruction of Dynamic Permeability of Cancellous Bones
  • Fabric Dependence in Dynamic Poroelasticity
  • Assessment of Cancellous Bone Microarchitecture from Poroelastic Ultrasound (PEUS) Theory
  • The Role of Microarchitecture on Absorption and Scattering of Ultrasound Waves in Trabecular Bone
  • Interstitial Flow in the Hierarchical Pore Space Architecture of Bone Tissue
  • Prediction of Anisotropic Trabecular Orientation and Spatial Distribution of Anabolic Remodeling by Acoustic Wave Propagation
  • The Fabric Anisotropy Effect on Elastic and Yield behavior of the Human Calcaneus Trabecular Bone.
  • Application of Numerical Methods for Estimating Settlements Due to Consolidation and Creep Two Case Histories
  • Deep Excavations with Special Ground Shape
  • Influence of Confining Stress on the Effective Stress Parameter
  • Poro-Mechanical Coupling Versus Chemical Effects of Different Fluids in a Porous Rock During Brittle Creep : Acoustic and Mechanical Evidences
  • Modelling Particle Breakage in Unsaturated Granular Assemblies
  • A Multiscale Anisotropic Poroplasticity Damage Model for Cracked Solids
  • Direct and Simultaneous Measurements of Sandstone Porosity, Permeability, and Electrical Conductivity at Elevated Pressures
  • A Modified form of Terzaghi's Effective Stress Principle of Unsaturated Expansive Clays Derived from Micromechanical Analysis
  • The Effect of Crack Closure on Permeability and Dynamic Elastic Moduli of Sandstone
  • Preliminary Study on Modeling Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling Behavior of Unsaturated Soils Based on Hybrid Mixture Theory
  • Microstructural Evaluation of the Water Sensitivity of Clayey Rocks
  • Effects of Pore Fluid Salinity on the Shear Strength of a Soft Clay
  • A Chemo-Poromechanical Model for Well/Caprock Interface in Presence of CO2
  • Investigating the Susceptibility of Iron Ore to Liquefaction
  • Terzaghi's and Biot's Poromechanics in Terms of Quaternions
  • Inception of Strain Localization in Unsaturated Porous Media
  • Poroelastic Contribution to Freezing in Cement Paste
  • Experimental Study on the Use of Electroosmosis for Accelerating the Consolidation of Clays under Increasing Vertical Stress
  • Characterization of Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Media : Two-Phase Flow Analysis of an In-Situ Experiment
  • Modelling the Coupled Chemo-Hydro-Mechanical Behavior of Structured Active Clays on Basis of Quantitative Microstructural Information
  • Coupled Processes During Rainfall : An Experimental Investigation on a Silty Sand
  • Modelling Hydro-Mechanical Interactive Behaviour of Unsaturated Soils
  • On the Impact of Cracking on Unsaturated Hydrous Properties of Porous Materials
  • SWRC Modeling in Unsaturated Soils : A Pore Network Approach
  • Self-Sealing Capacity of Macro-Cracked Argillite under Confinement
  • U-Tube Method of Identification of Drag Parameters for High Permeability Materials
  • Long-Term Creep Properties of Cementitious Materials Comparing Compression Tests on Concrete with Microindentation Tests on Cement
  • Thermal Pressurisation Coefficient During Heating and Rapid Hydrostatic Loading of Porous Media
  • Gas Migration through COx Claystone and Implications for Self-Healing
  • Nanomechanical Investigation of Internal Curing Effects on Sustainable Concretes with Absorbent Aggregates
  • Micro-Scale Experimental Investigation of Deformation and Damage of Argillaceous Rocks under Hydric and Mechanical Loads
  • Experimental Characterization of Chemical Alteration Effects on Carbonate Rock Dynamic Poroelastic Properties
  • Water Content Monitoring for Nuclear Concrete Buildings : Needs, Feedback and Perspectives
  • Singular Solutions in the Mechanics of Soils
  • Origin of Cohesion and Its Dependence on Saturation for Granular Media
  • Molecular Modeling of Early Stage of Swelling in Na-Montmorillonite Clay
  • FTIR Investigation of Molecular Interactions in Swelling Clays and their Role on Swelling and Other Macroscopic Properties
  • Expansive Clay Minerals and Hurricane Katrina
  • A Simple Modeling Approach for Estimation of Soil Deformation Behaviour of Natural Expansive Soils Using the Modulus of Elasticity as a Tool.
  • -- Poroelastic Properties of Hardwood at Different Length Scales
  • Strength Evolution of Hydrating Cement Pastes : the Counteracting Effects of Capillary Porosity and Unhydrated Clinker Reinforcements
  • How do Porous Interfacial Transition Zones (ITZ) Trigger Elastic Limits of Concrete? Micromechanics of ITZ Failure and ITZ-Aggregate Separation
  • Effect of Porosity on the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Porous Materials
  • Poromechanical Stimulation of Bone Remodeling : A Continuum Micromechanics-Based Mathematical Model and Experimental Validation
  • Liquid Crystal Interface Micromechanics of Creeping (Geo- and Bio-) Materials
  • Elaboration of a Straw Fiber-Based Insulated Material : Numerical Prediction of Thermohydromechanical Properties
  • Overall Properties of a Soft Porous Material : Surface Tension Effects
  • Effective Strength of Saturated Double Porous Media with a Drucker-Prager Solid Phase
  • Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Modelling of Deep Geothermal Heat Production
  • Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using Extended Finite Element Method
  • A Hybrid LSSVM-ABC Model for the Determination of the Magnitude of Horizontal in Situ Stresses
  • Coupled THMC Analysis of the Stress and Pressure Change around the Injection Well in CO2 Sequestration
  • A Dual Porosity Model for Ionic Solute Transport in Swelling Clays Incorporating Ion-Ion Correlation Effects
  • Hydro-Mechanical Coupling in Damaged Porous Media Containing Isolated Cracks or/and Vugs : Model and Computations
  • Multiscale Adaptive Simulations of Concrete Carbonation Taking into Account the Evolution of the Microstructure
  • Effect of Inner Resonators on Acoustics of Rigid Porous Media
  • Biphasic Acoustic Behavior of a Non-periodic Porous Medium
  • Multiscale Modeling of High Contrast Brinkman Equations with Applications to Deformable Porous Media
  • A Morphologically Informed Formulation of Poroelasticity Under Compression
  • Hygrothermal-Chemical Couplings in Degradation of Cementitious Materials
  • Thermo-Elasto-Plastic Consolidation Analysis with Water Phase Change
  • Modeling the Impact of Internal Erosion on the Behavior of Silty Sand
  • Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Time-Domain Computation of the Seismoelectric Field Generated by a Slipping Fault
  • A Hydromechanic-Electrokinetic Model for CO2 Sequestration in Geological Formations
  • Mechanics of Unsaturated Soils : from Equilibrium to Transient Conditions
  • Reactive Transport of scCO2 within Cement Paste
  • Poromechanics of an Externally Heated Sphere
  • Numerical Model of Elasto-Plastic Electro-Osmosis Consolidation of Clays
  • Interfacial Water : Unexplained Phenomena
  • 2D and 3D Numerical Analysis of Fluid Pressure Induced Fracture
  • Multiphase Coupled Numerical Simulation of the Rainfall Infiltration into Unsaturated Embankments.
  • -- Towards Stability Criteria for Deep Oil Drilling and Fracking in Shales
  • Hydraulic Fracturing Modeling : A Microporomechanics Approach
  • The Pressure Dependence of Permeability as a Function of Stiff and Compliant Porosities
  • An Insight into Molecular Scale Interactions and In-situ Nanomechanical Properties of Kerogen in Green River Oil Shale
  • Autogenous Shrinkage of Hardening Cement Paste in Oil Wells
  • Modeling the Influence of Thermo-Mechanical Crack Opening and Closure on Rock Stiffness
  • Heat Damaged Cement Paste Characterization Using the Nonlinear Acoustic Waves
  • Modeling Damage Induced by Deviatoric Stress in Rock : Theoretical Framework
  • Simulation of the Unsaturated Excavation Damage Zone around a Tunnel Using a Fully Coupled Damage-Plasticity Model.
Book
1 online resource.
Growth of major population centers near seismically active faults has significantly increased the probability of a large earthquake striking close to a big city in the near future. This, coupled with the fact that near-fault ground motions are known to impose larger demands on structures than ground motions far from the fault, makes the quantitative study of near-fault seismic hazard and risk important. Directivity effects cause pulse-like ground motions that are known to increase the seismic hazard and risk in near-fault region. These effects depend on the source-to-site geometry parameters, which are not included in most ground-motion models used for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment computation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive framework to study near-fault ground motions, and account for their effects in seismic hazard assessment. The proposed framework is designed to be modular, with separate models to predict the probability of observing a pulse at a site, the probability distribution of the period of the observed pulse, and a narrow band amplification of the spectral ordinate conditioned on the period of the pulse. The framework also allows deaggregation of hazard with respect to probability of observing the pulse at the site and the period of the pulse. This deaggregation information can be used to aid in ground-motion selection at near fault sites. A database of recorded ground motions with each record classified as pulse-like or non-pulse-like is needed for an empirical study of directivity effects. Early studies of directivity effects used manually classified pulses. Manual classification of ground motions as pulse-like is labor intensive, slow, and has the possibility to introduce subjectivity into the classifications. To address these problems we propose an efficient algorithm to classify multi-component ground motions as pulse-like and non-pulse-like. The proposed algorithm uses the continuous wavelet transform of two orthogonal components of the ground motion to identify pulses in arbitrary orientations. The proposed algorithm was used to classify each record in the NGA-West2 database, which created the largest set of pulse-like motions ever used to study directivity effects. The framework to include directivity effects in seismic hazard assessment, as proposed in this study, requires a ground-motion model that accounts for directivity effects in its prediction. Most of the current directivity models were developed as a correction for already existing ground-motion models, and were fitted using ground-motion model residuals. Directivity effects are dependent on magnitude, distance, and the spectral acceleration period. This interaction of directivity effects with magnitude and distance makes separation of distance and magnitude scaling from directivity effects challenging. To properly account for directivity effects in a ground-motion model they need to be fitted as a part of the original model and not as a correction. We propose a method to include the effects of directivity in a ground-motion model and also develop models to make unbiased prediction of ground-motion intensity, even when the directivity parameters are not available. Finally, following the approach used to model directivity effects, we developed a modular framework to characterize ground-motion directionality, which causes the ground-motion intensity to vary with orientation. Using the expanded NGA-West2 database we developed new models to predict the ratio between maximum and median ground-motion intensity over all orientations. Other models to predict distribution of orientations of the maximum intensity relative to the fault and the relationship between this orientation at different periods are also presented. The models developed in this dissertation allow us to compute response spectra that are expected to be observed in a single orientation (e.g., fault normal, orientation of maximum intensity at a period). It is expected that the proposed spectra can be a more realistic representation of single orientation ground motion compared to the median or maximum spectra over all orientations that is currently used.
Growth of major population centers near seismically active faults has significantly increased the probability of a large earthquake striking close to a big city in the near future. This, coupled with the fact that near-fault ground motions are known to impose larger demands on structures than ground motions far from the fault, makes the quantitative study of near-fault seismic hazard and risk important. Directivity effects cause pulse-like ground motions that are known to increase the seismic hazard and risk in near-fault region. These effects depend on the source-to-site geometry parameters, which are not included in most ground-motion models used for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment computation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive framework to study near-fault ground motions, and account for their effects in seismic hazard assessment. The proposed framework is designed to be modular, with separate models to predict the probability of observing a pulse at a site, the probability distribution of the period of the observed pulse, and a narrow band amplification of the spectral ordinate conditioned on the period of the pulse. The framework also allows deaggregation of hazard with respect to probability of observing the pulse at the site and the period of the pulse. This deaggregation information can be used to aid in ground-motion selection at near fault sites. A database of recorded ground motions with each record classified as pulse-like or non-pulse-like is needed for an empirical study of directivity effects. Early studies of directivity effects used manually classified pulses. Manual classification of ground motions as pulse-like is labor intensive, slow, and has the possibility to introduce subjectivity into the classifications. To address these problems we propose an efficient algorithm to classify multi-component ground motions as pulse-like and non-pulse-like. The proposed algorithm uses the continuous wavelet transform of two orthogonal components of the ground motion to identify pulses in arbitrary orientations. The proposed algorithm was used to classify each record in the NGA-West2 database, which created the largest set of pulse-like motions ever used to study directivity effects. The framework to include directivity effects in seismic hazard assessment, as proposed in this study, requires a ground-motion model that accounts for directivity effects in its prediction. Most of the current directivity models were developed as a correction for already existing ground-motion models, and were fitted using ground-motion model residuals. Directivity effects are dependent on magnitude, distance, and the spectral acceleration period. This interaction of directivity effects with magnitude and distance makes separation of distance and magnitude scaling from directivity effects challenging. To properly account for directivity effects in a ground-motion model they need to be fitted as a part of the original model and not as a correction. We propose a method to include the effects of directivity in a ground-motion model and also develop models to make unbiased prediction of ground-motion intensity, even when the directivity parameters are not available. Finally, following the approach used to model directivity effects, we developed a modular framework to characterize ground-motion directionality, which causes the ground-motion intensity to vary with orientation. Using the expanded NGA-West2 database we developed new models to predict the ratio between maximum and median ground-motion intensity over all orientations. Other models to predict distribution of orientations of the maximum intensity relative to the fault and the relationship between this orientation at different periods are also presented. The models developed in this dissertation allow us to compute response spectra that are expected to be observed in a single orientation (e.g., fault normal, orientation of maximum intensity at a period). It is expected that the proposed spectra can be a more realistic representation of single orientation ground motion compared to the median or maximum spectra over all orientations that is currently used.
Special Collections
Status of items at Special Collections
Special Collections Status
University Archives Request
3781 2013 S In-library use
Book
1 online resource.
Quantification of the seismic performance of structures is a critical step in the design and analysis of our built environment. This is sometimes accomplished using response history analysis, which requires ground motions resulting from (or attempting to simulate) real earthquakes. This thesis describes statistical studies of structural analysis results obtained from ground motions developed using response spectrum compatibilization (a.k.a. ``spectrum matching''), in order to evaluate whether the compatibilization approach produces ground motions that induce lower levels of demand on structures relative to those developed using other methods. Ground motions strong enough to cause significant damage are rare yet inevitable, motivating research on how to select, modify, or synthesize appropriate records for analysis. The spectrum matching process is a modification procedure used to provide such ground motions through nonlinear modification of spectral shape, and may be useful either to reduce spectral variability among a suite of records, or to change unsuitable spectral shapes to make them suitable. Response history analysis can be quite time-consuming, and a reduction in spectral variability generally leads to a reduction in nonlinear structural response variability, implying fewer ground motions (and fewer hours) are required to obtain an estimate of mean response. A drawback of using matched ground motions is that there is not yet consensus as to whether they will produce biased structural response results relative to results obtained from ground motions that were not matched. This thesis demonstrates the existence of a statistically significant and unconservative response bias for a variety of structural models and response parameters when ground motions are matched to reduce spectral dispersion. The cause for this bias is fully attributed to the impact of spectral shape variability, as characterized within a suite of ground motions by conditional spectral dispersion. A modified variable-target matching methodology is then proposed to provide rare, intense ground motions that produce unbiased response estimates by maintaining appropriate spectral shape variability. Finally, general recommendations are provided on the use of spectrum matching for design and analysis, and both the limitations of this study and future opportunities are discussed.
Quantification of the seismic performance of structures is a critical step in the design and analysis of our built environment. This is sometimes accomplished using response history analysis, which requires ground motions resulting from (or attempting to simulate) real earthquakes. This thesis describes statistical studies of structural analysis results obtained from ground motions developed using response spectrum compatibilization (a.k.a. ``spectrum matching''), in order to evaluate whether the compatibilization approach produces ground motions that induce lower levels of demand on structures relative to those developed using other methods. Ground motions strong enough to cause significant damage are rare yet inevitable, motivating research on how to select, modify, or synthesize appropriate records for analysis. The spectrum matching process is a modification procedure used to provide such ground motions through nonlinear modification of spectral shape, and may be useful either to reduce spectral variability among a suite of records, or to change unsuitable spectral shapes to make them suitable. Response history analysis can be quite time-consuming, and a reduction in spectral variability generally leads to a reduction in nonlinear structural response variability, implying fewer ground motions (and fewer hours) are required to obtain an estimate of mean response. A drawback of using matched ground motions is that there is not yet consensus as to whether they will produce biased structural response results relative to results obtained from ground motions that were not matched. This thesis demonstrates the existence of a statistically significant and unconservative response bias for a variety of structural models and response parameters when ground motions are matched to reduce spectral dispersion. The cause for this bias is fully attributed to the impact of spectral shape variability, as characterized within a suite of ground motions by conditional spectral dispersion. A modified variable-target matching methodology is then proposed to provide rare, intense ground motions that produce unbiased response estimates by maintaining appropriate spectral shape variability. Finally, general recommendations are provided on the use of spectrum matching for design and analysis, and both the limitations of this study and future opportunities are discussed.
Special Collections
Status of items at Special Collections
Special Collections Status
University Archives Request
3781 2013 S In-library use
Book
1 online resource (xix, 497 pages) : ill. (some color).
  • 1. Surrealism in Facing the Earthquake Risk / Mete A. Sözen
  • 2. Rapid Seismic Assessment Procedures for the Turkish Building Stock / Ahmet Yakut [and others]
  • 3. Post-Earthquake Risk-Based Decision Making Methodology for Turkish School Buildings / Ufuk Yazgan and Reşat Atalay Oyguç
  • 4. Proposed Vulnerability Functions to Estimate the Real Damage State of RC Buildings after Major Turkish Earthquakes / Ulgen Mert Tugsal and Beyza Taskin
  • 5. Probabilistic Path Finding Method for Post-Disaster Risk Estimation / Florin Leon and Gabriela M. Atanasiu
  • 6. Seismic Behaviour of Thin-Bed Layered Unreinforced Clay Masonry Shear Walls Including Soundproofing Elements / Christophe Mordant [and others]
  • 7. Assessing Seismic Vulnerability of Unreinforced Masonry Walls Using Elasto-Plastic Damage Model / Basheer H. Al-Gohi [and others]
  • 8. Implementation of Experimentally Developed Methodology for Seismic Strengthening and Repair of Historic Monuments / Veronika Shendova [and others]
  • 9. Shaking Table Tests of a Full-scale Two-Storey Predamaged Natural Stone Building Retrofitted with the Multi-Axial Hybrid Textile System Eq-grid / Lothar Stempniewski and Moritz Urban
  • 10. Application of Mesh Reinforced Mortar for Performance Enhancement of Hollow Clay Tile Infill Walls / Pourang Ezzatfar [and others]
  • 11. Shake Table Tests on Deficient RC Buildings Strengthened Using Post-Tensioned Metal Straps / Reyes Garcia [and others]
  • 12. Bond Strength of Lap Splices in FRP and TRM Confined Concrete: Behaviour and Design / Dionysios Bournas and Thanasis Triantafillou
  • 13. Finite Element Modeling of Seismic Performance of Low Strength Concrete Exterior Beam-Column Joints / Danish Ahmed [and others]
  • 14. Experimental Behavior of Non-Conforming Full Scale RC Beam-Column Joints Retrofitted with FRP / Andrea Prota [and others]
  • 15. Seismic Rehabilitation of Concrete Buildings by Converting Frame Bays into RC Walls / Michael N. Fardis, Antonis Schetakis, and Elias Strepelias
  • 16. Pseudo-Dynamic Tests of 4-Storey Non-Ductile Frames with RC Infilling of the Bay / Elias Strepelias [and others]
  • 17. RC Infilling of Existing RC Structures for Seismic Retrofitting / Christis Z. Chrysostomou [and others]
  • 18. Hybrid Control of a 3-D Structure by using Semi-Active Dampers / Gürsoy Turan
  • 19. Substructured Pseudo-Dynamic Tests on Seismic Response Control of Soft-First-Story Buildings / Hideto Kanno, Tetsuya Nishida, and Jun Kobayashi
  • 20. Towards Robust Behavioral Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Members / Kutay Orakcal
  • 21. Earthquake Engineering Experimental Facility for Research and Public Outreach / Ece Eseller-Bayat, Seda Gokyer, and Mishac K. Yegian
  • 22. Physical Modeling for the Evaluation of the Seismic Behavior of Square Tunnels / Grigorios Tsinidis [and others]
  • 23. Susceptibility of Shallow Foundation to Rocking and Sliding Movements during Seismic Loading / Charles Heron, Stuart Haigh, and Gopal Madabhushi
  • 24. Centrifuge Modeling of Liquefaction Effects on Shallow Foundations / Andreia Sofia Pedroso da Silva Marques [and others]
  • 25. Stability Control of Rafted Pile Foundation against Soil Liquefaction / Ahmed Mohammed Youssef Mohammed and Koichi Maekawa
  • 26. Experimental Assessment of Seismic Pile-Soil-Interaction / Armando L. Simonelli [and others]
  • 27. Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Behaviour of Cantilever Retaining Walls / Panos Kloukinos [and others]
  • Index.
In the past, facilities considered to be at the end of their useful life were demolished and replaced with new ones that better met the functional requirements of In the past, facilities considered to be at the end of their useful life were demolished and replaced with new ones that better met the functional requirements of modern society, including new safety standards. Humankind has recently recognised the threats to the environment and to our limited natural resources due to our relentless determination to destroy the old and build anew. With the awareness of these constraints and the emphasis on sustainability, in future the majority of old structures will be retrofitted to extend their service life as long as feasible. In keeping with this new approach, the EU's Construction Products Regulation 305/2011, which is the basis of the Eurocodes, included the sustainable use of resources as an "Essential Requirement" for construction. So, the forthcoming second generation of EN-Eurocodes will cover not only the design of new structures, but the rehabilitation of existing ones as well. Most of the existing building stock and civil infrastructures are seismically deficient. When the time comes for a decision to prolong their service life with the help of structural and architectural upgrading, seismic retrofitting may be needed. Further, it is often decided to enhance the earthquake resistance of facilities that still meet their functional requirements and fulfil their purpose, if they are not earthquake-safe. In order to decide how badly a structure needs seismic upgrading or to prioritise it in a population of structures, a seismic evaluation is needed, which also serves as a guide for the extent and type of strengthening. Seismic codes do not sufficiently cover the delicate phase of seismic evaluation nor the many potential technical options for seismic upgrading; therefore research is on-going and the state-of-the-art is constantly evolving. All the more so as seismic evaluation and rehabilitation demand considerable expertise, to make best use of the available safety margins in the existing structure, to adapt the engineering capabilities and techniques at hand to the particularities of a project, to minimise disruption of use, etc. Further, as old structures are very diverse in terms of their materials and layout, seismic retrofitting does not lend itself to straightforward codified procedures or cook-book approaches. As such, seismic evaluation and rehabilitation need the best that the current state-of-the-art can offer on all aspects of earthquake engineering. This volume serves this need, as it gathers the most recent research of top seismic experts from around the world on seismic evaluation, retrofitting and closely related subjects.
  • 1. Surrealism in Facing the Earthquake Risk / Mete A. Sözen
  • 2. Rapid Seismic Assessment Procedures for the Turkish Building Stock / Ahmet Yakut [and others]
  • 3. Post-Earthquake Risk-Based Decision Making Methodology for Turkish School Buildings / Ufuk Yazgan and Reşat Atalay Oyguç
  • 4. Proposed Vulnerability Functions to Estimate the Real Damage State of RC Buildings after Major Turkish Earthquakes / Ulgen Mert Tugsal and Beyza Taskin
  • 5. Probabilistic Path Finding Method for Post-Disaster Risk Estimation / Florin Leon and Gabriela M. Atanasiu
  • 6. Seismic Behaviour of Thin-Bed Layered Unreinforced Clay Masonry Shear Walls Including Soundproofing Elements / Christophe Mordant [and others]
  • 7. Assessing Seismic Vulnerability of Unreinforced Masonry Walls Using Elasto-Plastic Damage Model / Basheer H. Al-Gohi [and others]
  • 8. Implementation of Experimentally Developed Methodology for Seismic Strengthening and Repair of Historic Monuments / Veronika Shendova [and others]
  • 9. Shaking Table Tests of a Full-scale Two-Storey Predamaged Natural Stone Building Retrofitted with the Multi-Axial Hybrid Textile System Eq-grid / Lothar Stempniewski and Moritz Urban
  • 10. Application of Mesh Reinforced Mortar for Performance Enhancement of Hollow Clay Tile Infill Walls / Pourang Ezzatfar [and others]
  • 11. Shake Table Tests on Deficient RC Buildings Strengthened Using Post-Tensioned Metal Straps / Reyes Garcia [and others]
  • 12. Bond Strength of Lap Splices in FRP and TRM Confined Concrete: Behaviour and Design / Dionysios Bournas and Thanasis Triantafillou
  • 13. Finite Element Modeling of Seismic Performance of Low Strength Concrete Exterior Beam-Column Joints / Danish Ahmed [and others]
  • 14. Experimental Behavior of Non-Conforming Full Scale RC Beam-Column Joints Retrofitted with FRP / Andrea Prota [and others]
  • 15. Seismic Rehabilitation of Concrete Buildings by Converting Frame Bays into RC Walls / Michael N. Fardis, Antonis Schetakis, and Elias Strepelias
  • 16. Pseudo-Dynamic Tests of 4-Storey Non-Ductile Frames with RC Infilling of the Bay / Elias Strepelias [and others]
  • 17. RC Infilling of Existing RC Structures for Seismic Retrofitting / Christis Z. Chrysostomou [and others]
  • 18. Hybrid Control of a 3-D Structure by using Semi-Active Dampers / Gürsoy Turan
  • 19. Substructured Pseudo-Dynamic Tests on Seismic Response Control of Soft-First-Story Buildings / Hideto Kanno, Tetsuya Nishida, and Jun Kobayashi
  • 20. Towards Robust Behavioral Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Members / Kutay Orakcal
  • 21. Earthquake Engineering Experimental Facility for Research and Public Outreach / Ece Eseller-Bayat, Seda Gokyer, and Mishac K. Yegian
  • 22. Physical Modeling for the Evaluation of the Seismic Behavior of Square Tunnels / Grigorios Tsinidis [and others]
  • 23. Susceptibility of Shallow Foundation to Rocking and Sliding Movements during Seismic Loading / Charles Heron, Stuart Haigh, and Gopal Madabhushi
  • 24. Centrifuge Modeling of Liquefaction Effects on Shallow Foundations / Andreia Sofia Pedroso da Silva Marques [and others]
  • 25. Stability Control of Rafted Pile Foundation against Soil Liquefaction / Ahmed Mohammed Youssef Mohammed and Koichi Maekawa
  • 26. Experimental Assessment of Seismic Pile-Soil-Interaction / Armando L. Simonelli [and others]
  • 27. Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Behaviour of Cantilever Retaining Walls / Panos Kloukinos [and others]
  • Index.
In the past, facilities considered to be at the end of their useful life were demolished and replaced with new ones that better met the functional requirements of In the past, facilities considered to be at the end of their useful life were demolished and replaced with new ones that better met the functional requirements of modern society, including new safety standards. Humankind has recently recognised the threats to the environment and to our limited natural resources due to our relentless determination to destroy the old and build anew. With the awareness of these constraints and the emphasis on sustainability, in future the majority of old structures will be retrofitted to extend their service life as long as feasible. In keeping with this new approach, the EU's Construction Products Regulation 305/2011, which is the basis of the Eurocodes, included the sustainable use of resources as an "Essential Requirement" for construction. So, the forthcoming second generation of EN-Eurocodes will cover not only the design of new structures, but the rehabilitation of existing ones as well. Most of the existing building stock and civil infrastructures are seismically deficient. When the time comes for a decision to prolong their service life with the help of structural and architectural upgrading, seismic retrofitting may be needed. Further, it is often decided to enhance the earthquake resistance of facilities that still meet their functional requirements and fulfil their purpose, if they are not earthquake-safe. In order to decide how badly a structure needs seismic upgrading or to prioritise it in a population of structures, a seismic evaluation is needed, which also serves as a guide for the extent and type of strengthening. Seismic codes do not sufficiently cover the delicate phase of seismic evaluation nor the many potential technical options for seismic upgrading; therefore research is on-going and the state-of-the-art is constantly evolving. All the more so as seismic evaluation and rehabilitation demand considerable expertise, to make best use of the available safety margins in the existing structure, to adapt the engineering capabilities and techniques at hand to the particularities of a project, to minimise disruption of use, etc. Further, as old structures are very diverse in terms of their materials and layout, seismic retrofitting does not lend itself to straightforward codified procedures or cook-book approaches. As such, seismic evaluation and rehabilitation need the best that the current state-of-the-art can offer on all aspects of earthquake engineering. This volume serves this need, as it gathers the most recent research of top seismic experts from around the world on seismic evaluation, retrofitting and closely related subjects.
Book
xii, 621 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Methods and background; 2. Introduction to North America: the Pacific-North America plate boundary; 3. San Andreas System and basin and range; 4. Caribbean Plate and Middle America subduction zone; 5. South America; 6. Africa, Arabia, and Western Europe; 7. Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus, and the Middle East; 8. India, the Himalaya, Mainland China, and Central Asia; 9. Japan and the Western Pacific; 10. Southeast Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and Pacific Islands; References; Index.
"Providing the first worldwide survey of active earthquake faults, this book focuses on those described as 'seismic time bombs' - with the potential to destroy large cities in the developing world such as Port au Prince, Kabul, Tehran and Caracas. Leading international earthquake expert, Robert Yeats, explores both the regional and plate-tectonic context of active faults, providing the background for seismic hazard evaluation in planning large-scale projects such as nuclear power plants or hydroelectric dams. He also highlights work done in more advanced seismogenic countries like Japan, the United States, New Zealand and China, providing an important basis for upgrading building standards and other laws in developing nations. The book also explores the impact of major quakes on social development through history. It will form an accessible reference for analysts and consulting firms, and a convenient overview for academics and students of geoscience, geotechnical engineering and civil engineering, and land-use planning"-- Provided by publisher.
"Active Faults of the World There is an ever increasing need for a better understanding of regional seismic hazards, particularly in developing parts of the world where major building projects are planned and there is a huge migration of people to large cities that are at risk from earthquakes. Disasters in recent times, such as the earthquakes in Japan and Haiti, are chilling proof of the dangers of building in active fault zones"-- Provided by publisher.
  • Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Methods and background; 2. Introduction to North America: the Pacific-North America plate boundary; 3. San Andreas System and basin and range; 4. Caribbean Plate and Middle America subduction zone; 5. South America; 6. Africa, Arabia, and Western Europe; 7. Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus, and the Middle East; 8. India, the Himalaya, Mainland China, and Central Asia; 9. Japan and the Western Pacific; 10. Southeast Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and Pacific Islands; References; Index.
"Providing the first worldwide survey of active earthquake faults, this book focuses on those described as 'seismic time bombs' - with the potential to destroy large cities in the developing world such as Port au Prince, Kabul, Tehran and Caracas. Leading international earthquake expert, Robert Yeats, explores both the regional and plate-tectonic context of active faults, providing the background for seismic hazard evaluation in planning large-scale projects such as nuclear power plants or hydroelectric dams. He also highlights work done in more advanced seismogenic countries like Japan, the United States, New Zealand and China, providing an important basis for upgrading building standards and other laws in developing nations. The book also explores the impact of major quakes on social development through history. It will form an accessible reference for analysts and consulting firms, and a convenient overview for academics and students of geoscience, geotechnical engineering and civil engineering, and land-use planning"-- Provided by publisher.
"Active Faults of the World There is an ever increasing need for a better understanding of regional seismic hazards, particularly in developing parts of the world where major building projects are planned and there is a huge migration of people to large cities that are at risk from earthquakes. Disasters in recent times, such as the earthquakes in Japan and Haiti, are chilling proof of the dangers of building in active fault zones"-- Provided by publisher.
dx.doi.org Cambridge Books Online
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Status of items at Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner) Status
Stacks
QE606 .Y43 2012 Unknown
Book
1 online resource.
Performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) quantifies the seismic hazard, predicts the structural response, and estimates the damage to building elements, in order to assess the resulting losses in terms of dollars, downtime, and deaths. This dissertation focuses on the ground motion selection that connects seismic hazard and structural response, the first two elements of PBEE, to ensure that the ground motion selection method to obtain structural response results is consistent with probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Structure- and site-specific ground motion selection typically requires information regarding the system characteristics of the structure (often through a structural model) and the seismic hazard of the site (often through characterization of seismic sources, their occurrence frequencies, and their proximity to the site). As the ground motion intensity level changes, the target distribution of important ground motion parameters (e.g., magnitude and distance) also changes. With the quantification of contributing ground motion parameters at a specific spectral acceleration (Sa) level, a target response spectrum can be computed using a single or multiple ground motion prediction models (GMPMs, previously known as attenuation relations). Ground motions are selected from a ground motion database, and their response spectra are scaled to match the target response spectrum. These ground motions are then used as seismic inputs to structural models for nonlinear dynamic analysis, to obtain structural response under such seismic excitations. This procedure to estimate structural response results at a specific intensity level is termed an intensity-based assessment. When this procedure is repeated at different intensity levels to cover the frequent to rare levels of ground motion (expressed in terms of Sa), a risk-based assessment can be performed by integrating the structural response results at each intensity level with their corresponding seismic hazard occurrence (through the seismic hazard curve). This dissertation proposes a more rigorous ground motion selection methodology which will carefully examine the aleatory uncertainties from ground motion parameters, incorporate the epistemic uncertainties from multiple GMPMs, make adaptive changes to ground motions at various intensity levels, and use the Conditional Spectrum (CS) as the new target spectrum. The CS estimates the distribution (with mean and standard deviation) of the response spectrum, conditioned on the occurrence of a target Sa value at the period of interest. By utilizing the correlation of Sa values across periods, the CS removes the conservatism from the Uniform Hazard Spectrum (which assumes equal probabilities of exceedance of Sa at all periods) when used as a target for ground motion selection, and more realistically captures the Sa distributions away from the conditioning period. The variability of the CS can be important in structural response estimation and collapse prediction. To account for the spectral variability, aleatory and epistemic uncertainties can be incorporated to compute a CS that is fully consistent with the PSHA calculations upon which it is based. Furthermore, the CS is computed based on a specified conditioning period, whereas structures under consideration may be sensitive to multiple periods of excitation. Questions remain regarding the appropriate choice of conditioning period when utilizing the CS as the target spectrum. To advance the computation and the use of the CS in ground motion selection, contributions have been made in the following areas: The computation of the CS has been refined by incorporating multiple causal earthquakes and GMPMs. Probabilistic seismic hazard deaggregation of GMPMs provides the essential input for such refined CS computation that maintains the rigor of PSHA. It is shown that when utilizing the CS as the target spectrum, risk-based assessments are relatively insensitive to the choice of conditioning period when ground motions are carefully selected to ensure hazard consistency. Depending on the conditioning period, the structural analysis objective, and the target response spectrum, conclusions regarding appropriate procedures for selecting ground motions may differ.
Performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) quantifies the seismic hazard, predicts the structural response, and estimates the damage to building elements, in order to assess the resulting losses in terms of dollars, downtime, and deaths. This dissertation focuses on the ground motion selection that connects seismic hazard and structural response, the first two elements of PBEE, to ensure that the ground motion selection method to obtain structural response results is consistent with probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Structure- and site-specific ground motion selection typically requires information regarding the system characteristics of the structure (often through a structural model) and the seismic hazard of the site (often through characterization of seismic sources, their occurrence frequencies, and their proximity to the site). As the ground motion intensity level changes, the target distribution of important ground motion parameters (e.g., magnitude and distance) also changes. With the quantification of contributing ground motion parameters at a specific spectral acceleration (Sa) level, a target response spectrum can be computed using a single or multiple ground motion prediction models (GMPMs, previously known as attenuation relations). Ground motions are selected from a ground motion database, and their response spectra are scaled to match the target response spectrum. These ground motions are then used as seismic inputs to structural models for nonlinear dynamic analysis, to obtain structural response under such seismic excitations. This procedure to estimate structural response results at a specific intensity level is termed an intensity-based assessment. When this procedure is repeated at different intensity levels to cover the frequent to rare levels of ground motion (expressed in terms of Sa), a risk-based assessment can be performed by integrating the structural response results at each intensity level with their corresponding seismic hazard occurrence (through the seismic hazard curve). This dissertation proposes a more rigorous ground motion selection methodology which will carefully examine the aleatory uncertainties from ground motion parameters, incorporate the epistemic uncertainties from multiple GMPMs, make adaptive changes to ground motions at various intensity levels, and use the Conditional Spectrum (CS) as the new target spectrum. The CS estimates the distribution (with mean and standard deviation) of the response spectrum, conditioned on the occurrence of a target Sa value at the period of interest. By utilizing the correlation of Sa values across periods, the CS removes the conservatism from the Uniform Hazard Spectrum (which assumes equal probabilities of exceedance of Sa at all periods) when used as a target for ground motion selection, and more realistically captures the Sa distributions away from the conditioning period. The variability of the CS can be important in structural response estimation and collapse prediction. To account for the spectral variability, aleatory and epistemic uncertainties can be incorporated to compute a CS that is fully consistent with the PSHA calculations upon which it is based. Furthermore, the CS is computed based on a specified conditioning period, whereas structures under consideration may be sensitive to multiple periods of excitation. Questions remain regarding the appropriate choice of conditioning period when utilizing the CS as the target spectrum. To advance the computation and the use of the CS in ground motion selection, contributions have been made in the following areas: The computation of the CS has been refined by incorporating multiple causal earthquakes and GMPMs. Probabilistic seismic hazard deaggregation of GMPMs provides the essential input for such refined CS computation that maintains the rigor of PSHA. It is shown that when utilizing the CS as the target spectrum, risk-based assessments are relatively insensitive to the choice of conditioning period when ground motions are carefully selected to ensure hazard consistency. Depending on the conditioning period, the structural analysis objective, and the target response spectrum, conclusions regarding appropriate procedures for selecting ground motions may differ.
Special Collections
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University Archives Request
3781 2012 L In-library use
Book
1 online resource (viii, 258 p.) : ill. (some col.).
This guide focuses specifically on EN 1998-2 (Eurocode 8. Part 2 Bridges), the design standard for use in the seismic design of bridges in which horizontal seismic actions are mainly resisted through bending of the piers or at the abutments; however it can also be applied to the seismic design of cable-stayed and arched bridges.
This guide focuses specifically on EN 1998-2 (Eurocode 8. Part 2 Bridges), the design standard for use in the seismic design of bridges in which horizontal seismic actions are mainly resisted through bending of the piers or at the abutments; however it can also be applied to the seismic design of cable-stayed and arched bridges.
Book
253 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 26 cm.
  • Stress, faulting, fracturing and seismicity: the legacy of Ernest Masson Anderson
  • Andersonian wrench faulting in a regional stress field during the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand, earthquake sequence
  • Andersonian and Coulomb stresses in Central Costa Rica and its fault slip tendency potential: new insights into their associated seismic hazard
  • Reverse fault rupturing: competition between non-optimal and optimal fault orientations
  • The complexity of 3D stress-state changes during compressional tectonic inversion at the onset of orogeny
  • Geomechanical modelling of fault reactivation in the Ceduna Sub-basin, Bight Basin, Australia
  • Quantifying Neogene plate-boundary controlled uplift and deformation of the southern Australian margin
  • Pressure conditions for shear and tensile failure around a circular magma chamber; insight from elasto-plastic modeling
  • Stress fluctuation during thrust-related folding: Boltana anticline (Pyrenees, Spain)
  • Stress deflections around salt diapirs in the Gulf of Mexico
  • Evidence for non-Andersonian faulting above evaporites in the Nile Delta
  • Modelling of sediment wedge movement along low-angle detachments using ABAQUS
  • On the nucleation of non-Andersonian faults along phyllosilicate-rich mylonite belts
  • Anisotropic poroelasticity and the response of faulted rock to changes in pore-fluid pressure
  • The dilatancy-diffusion hypothesis and earthquake predictability
  • Facsimile reproduction of The Dynamics of Faulting by E. M. Anderson.
Geologists have long grappled with understanding the mechanical origins of rock deformation. Stress regimes control the nucleation, growth and reactivation of faults and fractures; induce seismic activity; affect the transport of magma; and modulate structural permeability, thereby influencing the redistribution of hydrothermal and hydrocarbon fluids. Experimentalists endeavour to recreate deformation structures observed in nature under controlled stress conditions. Earth scientists studying earthquakes will attempt to monitor or deduce stress changes in the Earth as it actively deforms. All are building upon the pioneering research and concepts of Ernest Masson Anderson, dating back to the start of the twentieth century. This volume celebrates Anderson's legacy, with 14 original research papers that examine faulting and seismic hazard; structural inheritance; the role of local and regional stress fields; low angle faults and the role of pore fluids; supplemented by reviews of Andersonian approaches and a reprint of his classic paper of 1905.
  • Stress, faulting, fracturing and seismicity: the legacy of Ernest Masson Anderson
  • Andersonian wrench faulting in a regional stress field during the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand, earthquake sequence
  • Andersonian and Coulomb stresses in Central Costa Rica and its fault slip tendency potential: new insights into their associated seismic hazard
  • Reverse fault rupturing: competition between non-optimal and optimal fault orientations
  • The complexity of 3D stress-state changes during compressional tectonic inversion at the onset of orogeny
  • Geomechanical modelling of fault reactivation in the Ceduna Sub-basin, Bight Basin, Australia
  • Quantifying Neogene plate-boundary controlled uplift and deformation of the southern Australian margin
  • Pressure conditions for shear and tensile failure around a circular magma chamber; insight from elasto-plastic modeling
  • Stress fluctuation during thrust-related folding: Boltana anticline (Pyrenees, Spain)
  • Stress deflections around salt diapirs in the Gulf of Mexico
  • Evidence for non-Andersonian faulting above evaporites in the Nile Delta
  • Modelling of sediment wedge movement along low-angle detachments using ABAQUS
  • On the nucleation of non-Andersonian faults along phyllosilicate-rich mylonite belts
  • Anisotropic poroelasticity and the response of faulted rock to changes in pore-fluid pressure
  • The dilatancy-diffusion hypothesis and earthquake predictability
  • Facsimile reproduction of The Dynamics of Faulting by E. M. Anderson.
Geologists have long grappled with understanding the mechanical origins of rock deformation. Stress regimes control the nucleation, growth and reactivation of faults and fractures; induce seismic activity; affect the transport of magma; and modulate structural permeability, thereby influencing the redistribution of hydrothermal and hydrocarbon fluids. Experimentalists endeavour to recreate deformation structures observed in nature under controlled stress conditions. Earth scientists studying earthquakes will attempt to monitor or deduce stress changes in the Earth as it actively deforms. All are building upon the pioneering research and concepts of Ernest Masson Anderson, dating back to the start of the twentieth century. This volume celebrates Anderson's legacy, with 14 original research papers that examine faulting and seismic hazard; structural inheritance; the role of local and regional stress fields; low angle faults and the role of pore fluids; supplemented by reviews of Andersonian approaches and a reprint of his classic paper of 1905.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
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QE1 .G4745 NO.367 Unknown