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Video
1 streaming video file (93 min.) : digital, sound, color
Alan Lomax (1915-2002) was a song collector who travelled around the world with his recording equipment, hunting for folk songs. Rogier Kappers went on a journey through Europe in search of the people Lomax recorded; this is a record of his journey, combined with conversations with colleagues and friends of Lomax.
Alan Lomax (1915-2002) was a song collector who travelled around the world with his recording equipment, hunting for folk songs. Rogier Kappers went on a journey through Europe in search of the people Lomax recorded; this is a record of his journey, combined with conversations with colleagues and friends of Lomax.
Book
xiii, 560 pages ; 25 cm
  • Contemplating the musics of the world. A harmless drudge : reaching for the dictionary ; Combining tones : on the concept of music ; Is music the universal language of mankind? : commonalities and the origins of music
  • As sounds and structures. Inspiration and perspiration : creative processes ; A nonuniversal language : on the musics of the world ; The fundamental skill : notation and transcription ; Contemplating musical repertories : a sampling of descriptive and analytical approaches ; The most indefatigable tourists of the world : units of musical thought ; Apples, oranges, and a Model T : comparison and comparative study
  • In the field. Come back and see me next Tuesday : essentials of the fieldwork tradition ; You will never understand this music : insiders and outsiders ; Citadels of the profession : archives, preservation, and the study of recordings ; No one plays it like me : ordinary and exceptional musicians ; You call that fieldwork? : redefining the "field" ; Who owns this music? : the host's perspective
  • In human culture. Music and "that complex whole" : studying music in or as culture ; Writing the meat-and-potatoes book : musical ethnography ; "If music be the food of love ..." : uses and functions ; The river of Heraclitus : on people changing their music ; Traditions : recorded, printed, written, oral, virtual ; The basic unit of all culture and civilization : signs, symbols, and meaning ; The whys of world music : determinants of musical style
  • In all of its varieties. The "where" of world music : interpreting geographic distribution ; Never heard a horse sing : taxonomies and boundaries ; The creatures of Jubal : instruments ; How do you get to Carnegie Hall? : teaching and learning ; I'm a stranger here myself : women's music, women in music ; Diversity and difference : a variety of minorities
  • From a broad perspective. Are you doing anyone any good? : thoughts on applied ethnomusicology ; Musing about an interdiscipline : musicology, anthropology, and the study of dance ; Second thoughts : some personal disclosures ; On the shape of the story : persepctives on the history of ideas and practices ; A snapshot of the new century : notes on ethnomusicology today.
  • Contemplating the musics of the world. A harmless drudge : reaching for the dictionary ; Combining tones : on the concept of music ; Is music the universal language of mankind? : commonalities and the origins of music
  • As sounds and structures. Inspiration and perspiration : creative processes ; A nonuniversal language : on the musics of the world ; The fundamental skill : notation and transcription ; Contemplating musical repertories : a sampling of descriptive and analytical approaches ; The most indefatigable tourists of the world : units of musical thought ; Apples, oranges, and a Model T : comparison and comparative study
  • In the field. Come back and see me next Tuesday : essentials of the fieldwork tradition ; You will never understand this music : insiders and outsiders ; Citadels of the profession : archives, preservation, and the study of recordings ; No one plays it like me : ordinary and exceptional musicians ; You call that fieldwork? : redefining the "field" ; Who owns this music? : the host's perspective
  • In human culture. Music and "that complex whole" : studying music in or as culture ; Writing the meat-and-potatoes book : musical ethnography ; "If music be the food of love ..." : uses and functions ; The river of Heraclitus : on people changing their music ; Traditions : recorded, printed, written, oral, virtual ; The basic unit of all culture and civilization : signs, symbols, and meaning ; The whys of world music : determinants of musical style
  • In all of its varieties. The "where" of world music : interpreting geographic distribution ; Never heard a horse sing : taxonomies and boundaries ; The creatures of Jubal : instruments ; How do you get to Carnegie Hall? : teaching and learning ; I'm a stranger here myself : women's music, women in music ; Diversity and difference : a variety of minorities
  • From a broad perspective. Are you doing anyone any good? : thoughts on applied ethnomusicology ; Musing about an interdiscipline : musicology, anthropology, and the study of dance ; Second thoughts : some personal disclosures ; On the shape of the story : persepctives on the history of ideas and practices ; A snapshot of the new century : notes on ethnomusicology today.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3798 .N47 2015 Unavailable On order Request
Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 53 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
This film portrays aspects of an Afghan refugee's life - his living conditions in Peshawar and his longing to return to Herat. It is also about Amir's life as a professional musician and his relationships with other musicians in Peshawar.
This film portrays aspects of an Afghan refugee's life - his living conditions in Peshawar and his longing to return to Herat. It is also about Amir's life as a professional musician and his relationships with other musicians in Peshawar.

4. Are'are music [1979]

Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 141 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
A fascinating documentation of the traditional musical culture of the 'Are'are people of the Solomon Islands, in the South-Western Pacific. The three LP records published after a first one-year field-research in 1969-70 were a "phenomenal surprise" (Garfias) as they revealed a completely unknown music (outside of the Solomon Islands) of an exceptional beauty and complexity in its instrumental and vocal polyphonies. It seemed to the researcher an absolute necessity to document visually what had been published on sound recordings, showing in detail all the playing techniques, body movements of performers, and spatial coordination of music ensembles and dancers. The documentary consists of a comprehensive inventory of all the twenty musical genres of the 'Are'are people and is structured according to native classification, along with explanations by master musician 'Irisipau. Filmmaker: Hugo Zemp.
A fascinating documentation of the traditional musical culture of the 'Are'are people of the Solomon Islands, in the South-Western Pacific. The three LP records published after a first one-year field-research in 1969-70 were a "phenomenal surprise" (Garfias) as they revealed a completely unknown music (outside of the Solomon Islands) of an exceptional beauty and complexity in its instrumental and vocal polyphonies. It seemed to the researcher an absolute necessity to document visually what had been published on sound recordings, showing in detail all the playing techniques, body movements of performers, and spatial coordination of music ensembles and dancers. The documentary consists of a comprehensive inventory of all the twenty musical genres of the 'Are'are people and is structured according to native classification, along with explanations by master musician 'Irisipau. Filmmaker: Hugo Zemp.
Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 37 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
Shot in a variety of locations all over Turkey, Those Who Are In Love successfully conveys the emotion and beauty of traditional Anatolian village culture as it struggles with the process of modernization and change.
Shot in a variety of locations all over Turkey, Those Who Are In Love successfully conveys the emotion and beauty of traditional Anatolian village culture as it struggles with the process of modernization and change.

6. Bitter Melons [1971]

Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 32 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
This film, shot in 1955, focuses on a small band of /Gwi San living in the arid landscape of the central Kalahari Desert in present-day Botswana. The hardships of their everyday survival are woven into the songs of a blind musician, Ukxone, who composes music on a hunting bow.
This film, shot in 1955, focuses on a small band of /Gwi San living in the arid landscape of the central Kalahari Desert in present-day Botswana. The hardships of their everyday survival are woven into the songs of a blind musician, Ukxone, who composes music on a hunting bow.

7. Carnaval de Pueblo [1987]

Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 57 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
Carnival time is big in this small Spanish town in Andalusia. Appropriately described by a local as a 'newspaper', the carnival is a time of dressing up and coming together. The men compose 'spicy' songs about local affairs and sing their social criticisms of national events.
Carnival time is big in this small Spanish town in Andalusia. Appropriately described by a local as a 'newspaper', the carnival is a time of dressing up and coming together. The men compose 'spicy' songs about local affairs and sing their social criticisms of national events.
Book
351 p. : ill., music ; 21 cm.
  • Passages et tensions -- Le chant des mots -- Mélodies verbales -- Le jeu des mots: ubiquité de la parole dans la tradition carnatique (Inde du Sud) -- Paul Valéry, le chant impassible -- Représentations de la parole et enjeux dramaturgiques -- Aspects du mélodrame dans les opéras de Massenet après Manou : sources, formes et fonctions dramaturgiques -- Du murmure au cri: dramaturgies et scénographies vocales dans Lulu d'Alban Berg -- Pelléas et Mélisande. La lettre de Golaud à Geneviève : un enjeu dramaturgique -- Entre dire et chanter : les expressions de la vocalité dans El Retablo de Maese Pedro de Manuel de Falla -- Le Gendarme incompris et Les Mariés de la Tour Eiffel : premières expériences de Jean Cocteau vers une théâtralisation musicale de la poésie -- La Voix humaine de Francis Poulenc : des représentations de la parole -- Du souffle au cri -- De l'extra-vocalité dans la musique contemporaine : pour une philosophie du cri -- Les cris du rock -- Le cri et "les forces qui le suscitent" : Accanto de Lachenmann et Hiérophonie V de Taïra -- La voix-geste dans Le Grand dépaysement d'Alexandre Le Grand de Jean-Christophe Marti -- Voix plurielles et identité -- Offrir la messe : voix et terminologies des chantres de l'Église apostolique arménienne d'Istanbul -- Dire ou chanter les chants coptes en Égypte contemporaine -- Mélopée, logopée, et phanopée dans le Requiem pour un jeune poète de Bernd Alois Zimmermann -- Les cent bouches d'Ezra Pound : hétérogénéité de la vocalité dans O Moon My Pin-up de Franz Koglmann.
"Ce livre interroge tes passages entre dire et chanter, leurs usages, leurs contraintes, les multiples façons dont ils sont nommés et mis en oeuvre, leurs enjeux esthétiques, poétiques, dramaturgiques ou anthropologiques. Il rassemble dix-sept essais comme autant d'études de cas, autour de quatre axes: "Le chant des mots"; "Représentations de la parole et enjeux dramaturgiques"; "Du souffle au cri"; "Voix plurielles et identité". De multiples états du dit/chanté sont abordés : des manifestations du parlé sur la scène de l'opéra au XIXe siècle au retour actuel de la mélodie parlante orchestrale, des formes vocales exploratoires des années soixante aux modes du chant en poésie, de l'extra-vocalité provocatrice des XXe et XXIe siècles aux musiques rituelles où il n'est plus seulement question de chanter mais aussi de servir avec sa voix. L'ouvrage tient ensemble musicologie, ethnomusicologie et poétique. Il rend compte de structures, de pratiques et de typologies."--P. [4] of cover.
  • Passages et tensions -- Le chant des mots -- Mélodies verbales -- Le jeu des mots: ubiquité de la parole dans la tradition carnatique (Inde du Sud) -- Paul Valéry, le chant impassible -- Représentations de la parole et enjeux dramaturgiques -- Aspects du mélodrame dans les opéras de Massenet après Manou : sources, formes et fonctions dramaturgiques -- Du murmure au cri: dramaturgies et scénographies vocales dans Lulu d'Alban Berg -- Pelléas et Mélisande. La lettre de Golaud à Geneviève : un enjeu dramaturgique -- Entre dire et chanter : les expressions de la vocalité dans El Retablo de Maese Pedro de Manuel de Falla -- Le Gendarme incompris et Les Mariés de la Tour Eiffel : premières expériences de Jean Cocteau vers une théâtralisation musicale de la poésie -- La Voix humaine de Francis Poulenc : des représentations de la parole -- Du souffle au cri -- De l'extra-vocalité dans la musique contemporaine : pour une philosophie du cri -- Les cris du rock -- Le cri et "les forces qui le suscitent" : Accanto de Lachenmann et Hiérophonie V de Taïra -- La voix-geste dans Le Grand dépaysement d'Alexandre Le Grand de Jean-Christophe Marti -- Voix plurielles et identité -- Offrir la messe : voix et terminologies des chantres de l'Église apostolique arménienne d'Istanbul -- Dire ou chanter les chants coptes en Égypte contemporaine -- Mélopée, logopée, et phanopée dans le Requiem pour un jeune poète de Bernd Alois Zimmermann -- Les cent bouches d'Ezra Pound : hétérogénéité de la vocalité dans O Moon My Pin-up de Franz Koglmann.
"Ce livre interroge tes passages entre dire et chanter, leurs usages, leurs contraintes, les multiples façons dont ils sont nommés et mis en oeuvre, leurs enjeux esthétiques, poétiques, dramaturgiques ou anthropologiques. Il rassemble dix-sept essais comme autant d'études de cas, autour de quatre axes: "Le chant des mots"; "Représentations de la parole et enjeux dramaturgiques"; "Du souffle au cri"; "Voix plurielles et identité". De multiples états du dit/chanté sont abordés : des manifestations du parlé sur la scène de l'opéra au XIXe siècle au retour actuel de la mélodie parlante orchestrale, des formes vocales exploratoires des années soixante aux modes du chant en poésie, de l'extra-vocalité provocatrice des XXe et XXIe siècles aux musiques rituelles où il n'est plus seulement question de chanter mais aussi de servir avec sa voix. L'ouvrage tient ensemble musicologie, ethnomusicologie et poétique. Il rend compte de structures, de pratiques et de typologies."--P. [4] of cover.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3849 .D57 2014 Unknown
Book
xvi, 151 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
  • List of illustrations -- Chapter 1: Defining ethnomusicology -- Chapter 2: A bit of history -- Chapter 3: Conducting research -- Chapter 4: The nature of music -- Chapter 5: Music and culture -- Chapter 6: Individual musicians -- Chapter 7: Writing music history -- Chapter 8: Ethnomusicology in the modern world -- Chapter 9: Ethnomusicologists at work -- References -- Further reading -- Suggestions for listening.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Ethnomusicologists believe that all humans, not just those we call musicians, are musical, and that musicality is one of the essential touchstones of the human experience. This insight raises big questions about the nature of music and the nature of humankind, and ethnomusicologists argue that to properly address these questions, we must study music in all its geographical and historical diversity. In this Very Short Introduction, one of the foremost ethnomusicologists, Timothy Rice, offers a compact and illuminating account of this growing discipline, showing how modern researchers go about studying music from around the world, looking for insights into both music and humanity. The reader discovers that ethnomusicologists today not only examine traditional forms of music-such as Japanese gagaku, Bulgarian folk music, Javanese gamelan, or Native American drumming and singing-but also explore more contemporary musical forms, from rap and reggae to Tex-Mex, Serbian turbofolk, and even the piped-in music at the Mall of America. To investigate these diverse musical forms, Rice shows, ethnomusicologists typically live in a community, participate in and observe and record musical events, interview the musicians, their patrons, and the audience, and learn to sing, play, and dance. It's important to establish rapport with musicians and community members, and obtain the permission of those they will work with closely over the course of many months and years. We see how the researcher analyzes the data to understand how a particular musical tradition works, what is distinctive about it, and how it bears the personal, social, and cultural meanings attributed to it. Rice also discusses how researchers may apply theories from anthropology and other social sciences, to shed further light on the nature of music as a human behavior and cultural practice. About the Series: Oxford's Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects-from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative-yet always balanced and complete-discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of illustrations -- Chapter 1: Defining ethnomusicology -- Chapter 2: A bit of history -- Chapter 3: Conducting research -- Chapter 4: The nature of music -- Chapter 5: Music and culture -- Chapter 6: Individual musicians -- Chapter 7: Writing music history -- Chapter 8: Ethnomusicology in the modern world -- Chapter 9: Ethnomusicologists at work -- References -- Further reading -- Suggestions for listening.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Ethnomusicologists believe that all humans, not just those we call musicians, are musical, and that musicality is one of the essential touchstones of the human experience. This insight raises big questions about the nature of music and the nature of humankind, and ethnomusicologists argue that to properly address these questions, we must study music in all its geographical and historical diversity. In this Very Short Introduction, one of the foremost ethnomusicologists, Timothy Rice, offers a compact and illuminating account of this growing discipline, showing how modern researchers go about studying music from around the world, looking for insights into both music and humanity. The reader discovers that ethnomusicologists today not only examine traditional forms of music-such as Japanese gagaku, Bulgarian folk music, Javanese gamelan, or Native American drumming and singing-but also explore more contemporary musical forms, from rap and reggae to Tex-Mex, Serbian turbofolk, and even the piped-in music at the Mall of America. To investigate these diverse musical forms, Rice shows, ethnomusicologists typically live in a community, participate in and observe and record musical events, interview the musicians, their patrons, and the audience, and learn to sing, play, and dance. It's important to establish rapport with musicians and community members, and obtain the permission of those they will work with closely over the course of many months and years. We see how the researcher analyzes the data to understand how a particular musical tradition works, what is distinctive about it, and how it bears the personal, social, and cultural meanings attributed to it. Rice also discusses how researchers may apply theories from anthropology and other social sciences, to shed further light on the nature of music as a human behavior and cultural practice. About the Series: Oxford's Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects-from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative-yet always balanced and complete-discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Miniature
ML3798 .R53 2014 M Unknown
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white)
  • Acknowledgements -- List of contributors -- About the companion web site -- Chapter 1. Introduction (Martin Clayton, Byron Dueck and Laura Leante) -- Chapter 2. Entrainment, ethnography and musical interaction (Martin Clayton) -- Chapter 3. Social co-regulation and communication in North Indian duo performances (Nikki Moran) -- Chapter 4. Groove: temporality, awareness and the feeling of entrainment in jazz performance (Mark Doffman) -- Chapter 5. Performing the Rosary: meanings of time in Afro-Brazilian Congado music (Glaura Lucas) -- Chapter 6. Performance and shame (Andy McGuiness) -- Chapter 7. Rhythm and role recruitment in Manitoban aboriginal vocal and instrumental music (Byron Dueck) -- Chapter 8. Imagery, gesture and listeners' construction of meaning in North Indian classical music (Laura Leante) -- Chapter 9. Embodiment and movement in musical performance (Martin Clayton and Laura Leante) -- References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
How does the immediate experience of musical sound relate to processes of meaning construction and discursive mediation? This question lies at the heart of the studies presented in Experience and Meaning in Music Performance, a unique multi-authored work that both draws on and contributes to current debates in a wide range of disciplines, including ethnomusicology, musicology, psychology, and cognitive science. Addressing a wide range of musical practices from Indian raga and Afro-Brazilian Congado rituals to jazz, rock, and Canadian aboriginal fiddling, the coherence of this study is underpinned by its three main themes: experience, meaning, and performance. Central to all of the studies are moments of performance: those junctures when sound and meaning are actually produced. Experience-what people do, and what they feel, while engaging in music-is equally important. And considered alongside these is meaning: what people put into a performance, what they (and others) get out of it, and, more broadly, how discourses shape performances and experiences of music. In tracing trajectories from moments of musical execution, this volume a novel and productive view of how cultural practice relates to the experience and meaning of musical performance. A model of interdisciplinary study, and including access to an array of audio-visual materials available on an extensive companion website, Experience and Meaning in Music Performance is essential reading for scholars and students of ethnomusicology and music psychology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Acknowledgements -- List of contributors -- About the companion web site -- Chapter 1. Introduction (Martin Clayton, Byron Dueck and Laura Leante) -- Chapter 2. Entrainment, ethnography and musical interaction (Martin Clayton) -- Chapter 3. Social co-regulation and communication in North Indian duo performances (Nikki Moran) -- Chapter 4. Groove: temporality, awareness and the feeling of entrainment in jazz performance (Mark Doffman) -- Chapter 5. Performing the Rosary: meanings of time in Afro-Brazilian Congado music (Glaura Lucas) -- Chapter 6. Performance and shame (Andy McGuiness) -- Chapter 7. Rhythm and role recruitment in Manitoban aboriginal vocal and instrumental music (Byron Dueck) -- Chapter 8. Imagery, gesture and listeners' construction of meaning in North Indian classical music (Laura Leante) -- Chapter 9. Embodiment and movement in musical performance (Martin Clayton and Laura Leante) -- References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
How does the immediate experience of musical sound relate to processes of meaning construction and discursive mediation? This question lies at the heart of the studies presented in Experience and Meaning in Music Performance, a unique multi-authored work that both draws on and contributes to current debates in a wide range of disciplines, including ethnomusicology, musicology, psychology, and cognitive science. Addressing a wide range of musical practices from Indian raga and Afro-Brazilian Congado rituals to jazz, rock, and Canadian aboriginal fiddling, the coherence of this study is underpinned by its three main themes: experience, meaning, and performance. Central to all of the studies are moments of performance: those junctures when sound and meaning are actually produced. Experience-what people do, and what they feel, while engaging in music-is equally important. And considered alongside these is meaning: what people put into a performance, what they (and others) get out of it, and, more broadly, how discourses shape performances and experiences of music. In tracing trajectories from moments of musical execution, this volume a novel and productive view of how cultural practice relates to the experience and meaning of musical performance. A model of interdisciplinary study, and including access to an array of audio-visual materials available on an extensive companion website, Experience and Meaning in Music Performance is essential reading for scholars and students of ethnomusicology and music psychology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xvi, 237 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
One of the pioneers of gender studies in music, Ellen Koskoff edited the foundational text Women and Music in Cross Cultural Perspective, and her career evolved in tandem with the emergence and development of the field. In this intellectual memoir, Koskoff describes her journey through the maze of social history and scholarship related to her work examining the intersection of music and gender. Koskoff collects new, revised, and hard-to-find published material from mid-1970s through 2010 to trace the evolution of ethnomusicological thinking about women, gender, and music, offering a perspective of how questions emerged and changed in those years, as well as Koskoff's reassessment of the early years and development of the field. Her goal: a personal map of the different paths to understanding she took over the decades, and how each inspired, informed, and clarified her scholarship. For example, Koskoff shows how a preference for face-to-face interactions with living people served her best in her research, and how her now-classic work within Brooklyn's Hasidic community inflamed her feminist consciousness while leading her into ethnomusicological studies. An uncommon merging of retrospective and rumination, A Feminist Ethnomusicology: Writings on Music and Gender offers a witty and disarmingly frank tour through the formative decades of the field and will be of interest to ethnomusicologists, anthropologists, scholars of the history and development of feminist thought, and those engaged in fieldwork. It includes a foreword by Suzanne Cusick framing Koskoff's career and an extensive bibliography provided by the author.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
One of the pioneers of gender studies in music, Ellen Koskoff edited the foundational text Women and Music in Cross Cultural Perspective, and her career evolved in tandem with the emergence and development of the field. In this intellectual memoir, Koskoff describes her journey through the maze of social history and scholarship related to her work examining the intersection of music and gender. Koskoff collects new, revised, and hard-to-find published material from mid-1970s through 2010 to trace the evolution of ethnomusicological thinking about women, gender, and music, offering a perspective of how questions emerged and changed in those years, as well as Koskoff's reassessment of the early years and development of the field. Her goal: a personal map of the different paths to understanding she took over the decades, and how each inspired, informed, and clarified her scholarship. For example, Koskoff shows how a preference for face-to-face interactions with living people served her best in her research, and how her now-classic work within Brooklyn's Hasidic community inflamed her feminist consciousness while leading her into ethnomusicological studies. An uncommon merging of retrospective and rumination, A Feminist Ethnomusicology: Writings on Music and Gender offers a witty and disarmingly frank tour through the formative decades of the field and will be of interest to ethnomusicologists, anthropologists, scholars of the history and development of feminist thought, and those engaged in fieldwork. It includes a foreword by Suzanne Cusick framing Koskoff's career and an extensive bibliography provided by the author.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3798 .K67 2014 Unknown
Book
x, 338 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Touristic and Migrating Musics in Transit Simone Kruger and Ruxandra Trandafoiu Part I: Music and Tourism 1.Heritage Rocks! Mapping Spaces of Popular Music Tourism Sara Cohen and Les Roberts 2.Negotiating Musical Boundaries and Frontiers: Tourism, Child Performers, and the Tourist-Ethnographer in Bali, Indonesia Jonathan McIntosh 3.The Staged Desert: Tourist and Nomad Encounters at the Festival au Desert Marta Amico 4.The Golden Fleece: Music and Cruise Ship Tourism David Cashman and Philip Hayward 5.Mobilizing Music Festivals for Rural Transformation: Opportunities and Ambiguities John Connell and Chris Gibson 6.Branding the City: Music Tourism and the European Capital of Culture Event Simone Kruger 7. Goatrance Travellers: Psychedelic Trance and its Seasoned Progeny Graham St John Part II: Music and Migration 8.Global Balkan Gypsy Music: Issues of Migration, Appropriation, and Representation Carol Silverman 9.From the Shtetl to the Gardens and Beyond: Identity and Symbolic Geography in Cape Town's Synagogue Choirs Stephen Muir 10. Reimagining the Caucasus: Music and Community in the Azerbaijani Asiq Tradition Anna Oldfield 11. From Burger Highlife to Gospel Highlife: Music, Migration, and the Ghanaian Diaspora Florian Carl 12. Transnational Samba and the Construction of Diasporic Musicscapes Natasha Pravaz 13. Music in Cyberspace. Transitions, Translations, and Adaptations on Romanian Diasporic Websites Ruxandra Trandafoiu Afterword Timothy D. Taylor.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book traces the particularities of music migration and tourism in different global settings, and provides current, even new perspectives for ethnomusicological research on globalizing musics in transit. The dual focus on tourism and migration is central to debates on globalization, and their examination-separately or combined-offers a useful lens on many key questions about where globalization is taking us: questions about identity and heritage, commoditization, historical and cultural representation, hybridity, authenticity and ownership, neoliberalism, inequality, diasporization, the relocation of allegiances, and more. Moreover, for the first time, these two key phenomena-tourism and migration-are studied conjointly, as well as interdisciplinary, in order to derive both parallels and contrasts. While taking diverse perspectives in embracing the contemporary musical landscape, the collection offers a range of research methods and theoretical approaches from ethnomusicology, anthropology, cultural geography, sociology, popular music studies, and media and communication. In so doing, Musics in Transit provides a rich exemplification of the ways that all forms of musical culture are becoming transnational under post-global conditions, sustained by both global markets and musics in transit, and to which both tourists and diasporic cosmopolitans make an important contribution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction: Touristic and Migrating Musics in Transit Simone Kruger and Ruxandra Trandafoiu Part I: Music and Tourism 1.Heritage Rocks! Mapping Spaces of Popular Music Tourism Sara Cohen and Les Roberts 2.Negotiating Musical Boundaries and Frontiers: Tourism, Child Performers, and the Tourist-Ethnographer in Bali, Indonesia Jonathan McIntosh 3.The Staged Desert: Tourist and Nomad Encounters at the Festival au Desert Marta Amico 4.The Golden Fleece: Music and Cruise Ship Tourism David Cashman and Philip Hayward 5.Mobilizing Music Festivals for Rural Transformation: Opportunities and Ambiguities John Connell and Chris Gibson 6.Branding the City: Music Tourism and the European Capital of Culture Event Simone Kruger 7. Goatrance Travellers: Psychedelic Trance and its Seasoned Progeny Graham St John Part II: Music and Migration 8.Global Balkan Gypsy Music: Issues of Migration, Appropriation, and Representation Carol Silverman 9.From the Shtetl to the Gardens and Beyond: Identity and Symbolic Geography in Cape Town's Synagogue Choirs Stephen Muir 10. Reimagining the Caucasus: Music and Community in the Azerbaijani Asiq Tradition Anna Oldfield 11. From Burger Highlife to Gospel Highlife: Music, Migration, and the Ghanaian Diaspora Florian Carl 12. Transnational Samba and the Construction of Diasporic Musicscapes Natasha Pravaz 13. Music in Cyberspace. Transitions, Translations, and Adaptations on Romanian Diasporic Websites Ruxandra Trandafoiu Afterword Timothy D. Taylor.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book traces the particularities of music migration and tourism in different global settings, and provides current, even new perspectives for ethnomusicological research on globalizing musics in transit. The dual focus on tourism and migration is central to debates on globalization, and their examination-separately or combined-offers a useful lens on many key questions about where globalization is taking us: questions about identity and heritage, commoditization, historical and cultural representation, hybridity, authenticity and ownership, neoliberalism, inequality, diasporization, the relocation of allegiances, and more. Moreover, for the first time, these two key phenomena-tourism and migration-are studied conjointly, as well as interdisciplinary, in order to derive both parallels and contrasts. While taking diverse perspectives in embracing the contemporary musical landscape, the collection offers a range of research methods and theoretical approaches from ethnomusicology, anthropology, cultural geography, sociology, popular music studies, and media and communication. In so doing, Musics in Transit provides a rich exemplification of the ways that all forms of musical culture are becoming transnational under post-global conditions, sustained by both global markets and musics in transit, and to which both tourists and diasporic cosmopolitans make an important contribution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3916 .G56 2014 Unknown
Book
363 p. : ill., facsims. ; 24 cm.
  • L'ethnologie musicale (1929-1939) -- Instruments de musique, objets de musée -- Naissance et diversification du Service d'organologie -- Collections d'objets et d'instruments -- Instrument de musique, objet de spécialité -- Séries ethniques et séries comparatives -- Observations du proche et du lointain -- Représentations et photographies -- Performances proches -- Ethnographies du lointain -- Enregistrements et auditions -- Contraintes et progrès techniques -- Politiques de l'enregistrement -- Échanges internationaux -- La "portée" du disque -- Informateurs et indigènes -- Indigènes en France -- Dialogue et colonisation -- Lectures et écritures -- Pratiques bibliographiques -- Raisons graphiques -- La tentation philosophique -- L'ethnologie musicale (1940-1949) -- Les trois visages de l'ethnographie -- Missions françaises -- Observer pour décrire -- Observer pour entendre -- Informateurs et premières décolonisations -- Écouter les informateurs -- Un couple chez les Kissi -- Statuts de l'enregistrement -- Disques souples -- Circulations et premières collaborations internationales -- Enregistrer des paysans -- Enregistrements exotiques -- Pratiques diversifiées de l'écriture -- Écrire sous l'Occupation -- Écriture et ethnographie -- L'ethnomusicologie (1950-1961) -- Instruments et expositions -- Héritages organologiques -- La Salle des Arts et Techniques -- Prolongements ethnographiques -- Vertus de l'observation directe -- Missions ATP -- Usages et partages de l'enregistrement -- Généralisation et diversification -- Un collectif international -- L'avenir des archives sonores -- Informateurs et changement -- Colonisation et anthropologies dynamiques -- Les silences de la tradition -- Écriture et discipline -- Structures et structuralisme -- Réflexivités disciplinaires -- "Ethnologie musicale" ou "ethnomusicologie" -- L'ethnomusicologie au début des années 1960 -- Une histoire de l'ethnomusicologie -- Comment accéder aux connaissances ? -- Altérité et historicité.
"L'ethnomusicologie est souvent définie comme la discipline qui étudie les pratiques musicales considérées comme exotiques ou populaires. En France, ce domaine de savoir fut institutionnalisé en 1929, quand André Schaeffner intégra le Musée d'ethnographie du Trocadéro pour y fonder un Service d'organologie et devenir ainsi le responsable des instruments de musique présents dans les collections. En 1961, un séminaire consacré à l'ethnomusicologie était fondé au sein de l'École pratique des hautes études et illustrait particulièrement la dimension collective de ce savoir. Entre ces deux dates, l'histoire du domaine révèle des différenciations successives. Sur le plan institutionnel, la double fondation du Musée de l'Homme et du Musée des arts et traditions populaires en 1937 fut ainsi l'origine d'un partage durable entre l'étude des musiques "traditionnelles" de tous les continents et celle des musiques populaires françaises. Sur le plan méthodologique, la nature des relations avec les informateurs ou par ailleurs l'importance respective accordée à l'observation ethnographique ou à l'enregistrement sonore devaient déterminer les contours de différents projets scientifiques. Plus globalement, l'évocation des travaux d'André Schaeffner, de Gilbert Rouget, de Claudie Marcel-Dubois ou de savants en marge des institutions parisiennes est donc l'occasion de comprendre les façons diverses dont les pratiques musicales furent étudiées. En distinguant plusieurs modes d'accès à la connaissance des musiques découvertes à travers le monde, cet ouvrage analyse et contextualise l'évolution de l'ethnomusicologie, à partir d'une documentation le plus souvent inédite et en renvoyant régulièrement à des archives sonores."--P. [4] of cover.
  • L'ethnologie musicale (1929-1939) -- Instruments de musique, objets de musée -- Naissance et diversification du Service d'organologie -- Collections d'objets et d'instruments -- Instrument de musique, objet de spécialité -- Séries ethniques et séries comparatives -- Observations du proche et du lointain -- Représentations et photographies -- Performances proches -- Ethnographies du lointain -- Enregistrements et auditions -- Contraintes et progrès techniques -- Politiques de l'enregistrement -- Échanges internationaux -- La "portée" du disque -- Informateurs et indigènes -- Indigènes en France -- Dialogue et colonisation -- Lectures et écritures -- Pratiques bibliographiques -- Raisons graphiques -- La tentation philosophique -- L'ethnologie musicale (1940-1949) -- Les trois visages de l'ethnographie -- Missions françaises -- Observer pour décrire -- Observer pour entendre -- Informateurs et premières décolonisations -- Écouter les informateurs -- Un couple chez les Kissi -- Statuts de l'enregistrement -- Disques souples -- Circulations et premières collaborations internationales -- Enregistrer des paysans -- Enregistrements exotiques -- Pratiques diversifiées de l'écriture -- Écrire sous l'Occupation -- Écriture et ethnographie -- L'ethnomusicologie (1950-1961) -- Instruments et expositions -- Héritages organologiques -- La Salle des Arts et Techniques -- Prolongements ethnographiques -- Vertus de l'observation directe -- Missions ATP -- Usages et partages de l'enregistrement -- Généralisation et diversification -- Un collectif international -- L'avenir des archives sonores -- Informateurs et changement -- Colonisation et anthropologies dynamiques -- Les silences de la tradition -- Écriture et discipline -- Structures et structuralisme -- Réflexivités disciplinaires -- "Ethnologie musicale" ou "ethnomusicologie" -- L'ethnomusicologie au début des années 1960 -- Une histoire de l'ethnomusicologie -- Comment accéder aux connaissances ? -- Altérité et historicité.
"L'ethnomusicologie est souvent définie comme la discipline qui étudie les pratiques musicales considérées comme exotiques ou populaires. En France, ce domaine de savoir fut institutionnalisé en 1929, quand André Schaeffner intégra le Musée d'ethnographie du Trocadéro pour y fonder un Service d'organologie et devenir ainsi le responsable des instruments de musique présents dans les collections. En 1961, un séminaire consacré à l'ethnomusicologie était fondé au sein de l'École pratique des hautes études et illustrait particulièrement la dimension collective de ce savoir. Entre ces deux dates, l'histoire du domaine révèle des différenciations successives. Sur le plan institutionnel, la double fondation du Musée de l'Homme et du Musée des arts et traditions populaires en 1937 fut ainsi l'origine d'un partage durable entre l'étude des musiques "traditionnelles" de tous les continents et celle des musiques populaires françaises. Sur le plan méthodologique, la nature des relations avec les informateurs ou par ailleurs l'importance respective accordée à l'observation ethnographique ou à l'enregistrement sonore devaient déterminer les contours de différents projets scientifiques. Plus globalement, l'évocation des travaux d'André Schaeffner, de Gilbert Rouget, de Claudie Marcel-Dubois ou de savants en marge des institutions parisiennes est donc l'occasion de comprendre les façons diverses dont les pratiques musicales furent étudiées. En distinguant plusieurs modes d'accès à la connaissance des musiques découvertes à travers le monde, cet ouvrage analyse et contextualise l'évolution de l'ethnomusicologie, à partir d'une documentation le plus souvent inédite et en renvoyant régulièrement à des archives sonores."--P. [4] of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
ML3798 .G47 2014 Available
Music score
1 score (xxxvi, 118 pages) ; 31 cm.
  • pt. 1, Songs from Keidan, 1899. Hob ich mir e Boid ; Spaziren, spaziren, seinen wir beide gegangen ; Gefleigen seinen Hosen zwei ; Base Malke, efne mir!
  • pt. 2, Songs from Latvia and Lithuania, 1924-1931. Ijaim, zaim, šomeiho ; Heiliau hanuwi ; Židudancis ; Is gefleigen die gildene Pave ; Ach Gott ist mit uns ; Unidentified tune ; Du Wirst ufstehen von Wieg ; Ai do is gora fein ; Vince gul iekš mīkstem dūnu spilvenem ; Kak žile, bile, židovske ritke
  • pt. 3, Songs of uncertain or unknown provenance. Possibly Keidan, 1899. Ach du Gott ; Dances or songs without texts ; Du solst nit gen mit kein Fremdingezingerlech ; Is gefleigen di gildne Pave ; Klip klap efne mir! ; Nigunim, instrumental pieces, or songs without texts ; Schabe mit Bern ; Senderle mein Man ; Spaziren seinen mir beide gegangen
  • Posssibly Šiauliai, Lithuania, 1928. Dance or song without text ; Unidentified song ; Di erste Stetele ; Es trilet der Kanarikl ; Lehaim rebi ; Schlof mein Kind
  • Probably copied from contemporary collections. Bin ich mir gegangen Fischelech keifen ; Oi, Abram
  • Songs of unknown provenance. Afn Shlachtfeld ; Al mois trumpeldor ; Alpaim shona ; Ani holachti bajaar ; Di Baike ; Dances or songs without texts: Misnagdim Chasidim, Chasidimas dziesmin̦a, Dancis ; Dancis Hecholuzim ; Dancis ; Dire Geld ; Du forst awek ; Du fregst mir, mein Freind ; Džingale, džingale, džan ; Elijohu Honovi ; Fregt di Welt an alte Kashe ; Hazak vemac ; Her nur du shein Meidalei ; Hovo Nogilo ; Ich bin a balagole! ; Kum aher, du, Filozof ; Lachaim Rebi ; Oif en Pripetshik ; Onu niheje horshoinin ; Der Shnei is gegangen ; Sog zhe, Rebunju ; Sol ich sein a Row ; Umatoi umanoim ; Was wir saien ; Wer hat dos gesehen.
  • pt. 1, Songs from Keidan, 1899. Hob ich mir e Boid ; Spaziren, spaziren, seinen wir beide gegangen ; Gefleigen seinen Hosen zwei ; Base Malke, efne mir!
  • pt. 2, Songs from Latvia and Lithuania, 1924-1931. Ijaim, zaim, šomeiho ; Heiliau hanuwi ; Židudancis ; Is gefleigen die gildene Pave ; Ach Gott ist mit uns ; Unidentified tune ; Du Wirst ufstehen von Wieg ; Ai do is gora fein ; Vince gul iekš mīkstem dūnu spilvenem ; Kak žile, bile, židovske ritke
  • pt. 3, Songs of uncertain or unknown provenance. Possibly Keidan, 1899. Ach du Gott ; Dances or songs without texts ; Du solst nit gen mit kein Fremdingezingerlech ; Is gefleigen di gildne Pave ; Klip klap efne mir! ; Nigunim, instrumental pieces, or songs without texts ; Schabe mit Bern ; Senderle mein Man ; Spaziren seinen mir beide gegangen
  • Posssibly Šiauliai, Lithuania, 1928. Dance or song without text ; Unidentified song ; Di erste Stetele ; Es trilet der Kanarikl ; Lehaim rebi ; Schlof mein Kind
  • Probably copied from contemporary collections. Bin ich mir gegangen Fischelech keifen ; Oi, Abram
  • Songs of unknown provenance. Afn Shlachtfeld ; Al mois trumpeldor ; Alpaim shona ; Ani holachti bajaar ; Di Baike ; Dances or songs without texts: Misnagdim Chasidim, Chasidimas dziesmin̦a, Dancis ; Dancis Hecholuzim ; Dancis ; Dire Geld ; Du forst awek ; Du fregst mir, mein Freind ; Džingale, džingale, džan ; Elijohu Honovi ; Fregt di Welt an alte Kashe ; Hazak vemac ; Her nur du shein Meidalei ; Hovo Nogilo ; Ich bin a balagole! ; Kum aher, du, Filozof ; Lachaim Rebi ; Oif en Pripetshik ; Onu niheje horshoinin ; Der Shnei is gegangen ; Sog zhe, Rebunju ; Sol ich sein a Row ; Umatoi umanoim ; Was wir saien ; Wer hat dos gesehen.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks (Limited loan)
M2 .R299 V.11 Unavailable In transit

15. The Joy of Youth [2002]

Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 82 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
Among the Senufo people of northern Côte d'Ivoire, the balafon (xylophone with calabash resonators) is an emblematic musical instrument. The music of the balafon is a source of joy while the young men are doing collective work in the fields, at age-group ceremonies, for the poro initiatory society, for the catholic mass and during young people's dance evenings. Musicians and non-musicians, young and old, talk about the different occasions for which this instrument is an indispensable presence marking the rhythms of life for this agricultural people. Traditional balafon music is far from dying out, and its extraordinary vitality and importance are evident in the activities of the younger generations.
Among the Senufo people of northern Côte d'Ivoire, the balafon (xylophone with calabash resonators) is an emblematic musical instrument. The music of the balafon is a source of joy while the young men are doing collective work in the fields, at age-group ceremonies, for the poro initiatory society, for the catholic mass and during young people's dance evenings. Musicians and non-musicians, young and old, talk about the different occasions for which this instrument is an indispensable presence marking the rhythms of life for this agricultural people. Traditional balafon music is far from dying out, and its extraordinary vitality and importance are evident in the activities of the younger generations.
Book
436 pages : illustrations, music ; 24 cm.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML197 .U88 2014 Unknown
Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 49 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
Bradford is a mill town in the north of England with a population of around 60,000 Muslims from South Asia. Muslim values are strongly maintained. This film studies Asian music within the community and contrasts music education in the schools with the very different kind of music enculturation in the family.
Bradford is a mill town in the north of England with a population of around 60,000 Muslims from South Asia. Muslim values are strongly maintained. This film studies Asian music within the community and contrasts music education in the schools with the very different kind of music enculturation in the family.
Book
ix, 15 pages ; 22 cm.
  • On Charles Homer Haskins
  • Haskins prize lecturers
  • Brief biography of Bruno Nettl
  • Introduction / Pauline Yu
  • A life of learning / Bruno Nettl
  • On Charles Homer Haskins
  • Haskins prize lecturers
  • Brief biography of Bruno Nettl
  • Introduction / Pauline Yu
  • A life of learning / Bruno Nettl
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ML3799 .N38 2014 Unknown
Book
1 online resource
  • Contents -- ABOUT THE COMPANION WEBSITE -- FOREWORD -- PREFACE -- INTRODUCTION -- The problem of music endangerment -- Bringing languages into the picture -- Why music endangerment matters -- Troublesome terminology -- Some ethical considerations -- 1. WHAT WE KNOW AND WHAT WE'VE DONE -- 1.1 Theoretical foundations -- 1.2 Documentation and preservation -- 1.3 Recognition and celebration -- 1.4 Transmission and dissemination -- 1.5 Policy and enterprise -- 1.6 Coordinating and evaluation mechanisms -- 1.7 Conclusions -- 2. LANGUAGE AND MUSIC VITALITY: A COMPARATIVE FRAMEWORK -- 2.1 Systems of learning music -- 2.2 Musicians and communities -- 2.3 Contexts and constructs -- 2.4 Infrastructure and regulations -- 2.5 Media and the music industry -- 2.6 Conclusions -- 3. LEARNING FROM LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE -- 3.1 Dead or alive? Identifying and assessing music endangerment -- 3.2 Developing advocacy for music sustainability -- 3.3 Developing maintenance and revitalization strategies -- 3.4 Reflecting on aims and outcomes of strategies -- 3.5 Developing coordinating mechanisms -- 3.6 Conclusions -- 4. HOW TO IDENTIFY AND ASSESS ENDANGERMENT -- 4.1 Modifying the language framework -- 4.2 Building a new framework for music -- 4.3 Conclusions -- 5. MEASURING UP: PUTTING THE FRAMEWORK TO WORK -- 5.1 A short history of ca tru -- 5.2 Carrying out the vitality assessment -- 5.3 A vitality assessment of ca tru -- 5.4 Conclusions -- 6. WHERE TO FROM HERE? -- 6.1 Taking stock: A brief summary -- 6.2 Next steps in practical terms -- 6.3 Next steps in research terms -- 6.4 Closing words -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In response to increased focus on the protection of intangible cultural heritage across the world, Music Endangerment offers a new practical approach to assessing, advocating, and assisting the sustainability of musical genres. Drawing upon relevant ethnomusicological research on globalization and musical diversity, musical change, music revivals, and ecological models for sustainability, author Catherine Grant systematically critiques strategies that are currently employed to support endangered musics. She then constructs a comparative framework between language and music, adapting and applying the measures of language endangerment as developed by UNESCO, in order to identify ways in which language maintenance might (and might not) illuminate new pathways to keeping these musics strong. Grant's work presents the first in-depth, standardized, replicable tool for gauging the level of vitality of music genres, providing an invaluable resource for the creation and maintenance of international cultural policy. It will enable those working in the field to effectively demonstrate the degree to which outside intervention could be of tangible benefit to communities whose musical practices are under threat. Significant for both its insight and its utility, Music Endangerment is an important contribution to the growing field of applied ethnomusicology, and will help secure the continued diversity of our global musical traditions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Contents -- ABOUT THE COMPANION WEBSITE -- FOREWORD -- PREFACE -- INTRODUCTION -- The problem of music endangerment -- Bringing languages into the picture -- Why music endangerment matters -- Troublesome terminology -- Some ethical considerations -- 1. WHAT WE KNOW AND WHAT WE'VE DONE -- 1.1 Theoretical foundations -- 1.2 Documentation and preservation -- 1.3 Recognition and celebration -- 1.4 Transmission and dissemination -- 1.5 Policy and enterprise -- 1.6 Coordinating and evaluation mechanisms -- 1.7 Conclusions -- 2. LANGUAGE AND MUSIC VITALITY: A COMPARATIVE FRAMEWORK -- 2.1 Systems of learning music -- 2.2 Musicians and communities -- 2.3 Contexts and constructs -- 2.4 Infrastructure and regulations -- 2.5 Media and the music industry -- 2.6 Conclusions -- 3. LEARNING FROM LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE -- 3.1 Dead or alive? Identifying and assessing music endangerment -- 3.2 Developing advocacy for music sustainability -- 3.3 Developing maintenance and revitalization strategies -- 3.4 Reflecting on aims and outcomes of strategies -- 3.5 Developing coordinating mechanisms -- 3.6 Conclusions -- 4. HOW TO IDENTIFY AND ASSESS ENDANGERMENT -- 4.1 Modifying the language framework -- 4.2 Building a new framework for music -- 4.3 Conclusions -- 5. MEASURING UP: PUTTING THE FRAMEWORK TO WORK -- 5.1 A short history of ca tru -- 5.2 Carrying out the vitality assessment -- 5.3 A vitality assessment of ca tru -- 5.4 Conclusions -- 6. WHERE TO FROM HERE? -- 6.1 Taking stock: A brief summary -- 6.2 Next steps in practical terms -- 6.3 Next steps in research terms -- 6.4 Closing words -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In response to increased focus on the protection of intangible cultural heritage across the world, Music Endangerment offers a new practical approach to assessing, advocating, and assisting the sustainability of musical genres. Drawing upon relevant ethnomusicological research on globalization and musical diversity, musical change, music revivals, and ecological models for sustainability, author Catherine Grant systematically critiques strategies that are currently employed to support endangered musics. She then constructs a comparative framework between language and music, adapting and applying the measures of language endangerment as developed by UNESCO, in order to identify ways in which language maintenance might (and might not) illuminate new pathways to keeping these musics strong. Grant's work presents the first in-depth, standardized, replicable tool for gauging the level of vitality of music genres, providing an invaluable resource for the creation and maintenance of international cultural policy. It will enable those working in the field to effectively demonstrate the degree to which outside intervention could be of tangible benefit to communities whose musical practices are under threat. Significant for both its insight and its utility, Music Endangerment is an important contribution to the growing field of applied ethnomusicology, and will help secure the continued diversity of our global musical traditions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Video
1 streaming video file (96 min.) : digital, sd., col.
Based on historical facts, the African descendent and Reunion born Trulès composed the opera Maraina, recounting the story of the first settlers of the Indian Ocean islands. Voyaging between Reunion, Madagascar and Paris, this production traces the cast's journey to the place where it all began: Fort-Dauphin in southern Madagascar, at the end of the African continent. A fascinating voyage through time and space, between the 17th century seafarers ships and Madagascar today.
Based on historical facts, the African descendent and Reunion born Trulès composed the opera Maraina, recounting the story of the first settlers of the Indian Ocean islands. Voyaging between Reunion, Madagascar and Paris, this production traces the cast's journey to the place where it all began: Fort-Dauphin in southern Madagascar, at the end of the African continent. A fascinating voyage through time and space, between the 17th century seafarers ships and Madagascar today.