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1 online resource.

3. Angel azul [2014]

Video
1 streaming video file (72 min.) : digital, sound, color
Explores the artistic journey of Jason deCaires Taylor, an innovative artist who combines creativity with an important environmental solution; the creation of artificial coral reefs from statues he's cast from live models. Experts are on hand to provide facts about the perilous situation coral reefs currently face and solutions necessary to save them.
Explores the artistic journey of Jason deCaires Taylor, an innovative artist who combines creativity with an important environmental solution; the creation of artificial coral reefs from statues he's cast from live models. Experts are on hand to provide facts about the perilous situation coral reefs currently face and solutions necessary to save them.
Book
1 online resource (356 pages) : illustrations.
  • 1 FINITE ELEMENTS OVERVIEW Modeling Basics Discretization Outline Elements Material Behavior Weak Equilibrium and Spatial Discretization Numerical Integration and Solution Methods for Algebraic Systems Convergence 2 UNIAXIAL STRUCTURAL CONCRETE BEHAVIOR Scales and Short-Term Stress-Strain Behavior of Homogenized Concrete Long-Term Behavior - Creep and Imposed Strains Reinforcing Steel Stress-Strain Behavior Bond between Concrete and Reinforcing Steel The Smeared Crack Model The Reinforced Tension Bar Tension Stiffening of Reinforced Tension Bar 3 STRUCTURAL BEAMS AND FRAMES Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Cracked Reinforced Concrete Behavior - 4 Compressive Zone and Internal Forces - 5 Linear Concrete Compressive Behavior with Reinforcement - 6 Nonlinear Behavior of Concrete and Reinforcement Equilibrium of Beams Finite Element Types for Plane Beams 1 Basics - 2 Finite Elements for the Bernoulli Beam - 3 Finite Elements for the Timoshenko Beam - 4 System Building and Solution Methods - 5 Elementwise Integration - 6 Transformation and Assemblage - 7 Kinematic Boundary Conditions and Solution Further Aspects of Reinforced Concrete 1 Creep - 2 Temperature and Shrinkage - 3 Tension Stiffening - 4 Shear Stiffness for Reinforced Cracked Concrete Sections Prestressing Large Deformations and Second-Order Analysis Dynamics of Beams 4 STRUT-AND-TIE MODELS Elastic Plate Solutions Modeling Solution Methods for Trusses Rigid-Plastic Truss Models More Application Aspects 5 MULTIAXIAL CONCRETE MATERIAL BEHAVIOR Basics 1 Continua and Scales - 2 Characteristics of Concrete Behavior Continuum Mechanics 1 Displacements and Strains - 2 Stresses and Material Laws - 3 Coordinate Transformations and Principal States Isotropy, Linearity, and Orthotropy 1 Isotropy and Linear Elasticity - 2 Orthotropy - 3 Plane Stress and Strain Nonlinear Material Behavior 1 Tangential Stiffness - 2 Principal Stress Space and Isotropic Strength - 3 Strength of Concrete - 4 Phenomenological Approach for the Biaxial Anisotropic Stress-Strain Behavior Isotropic Plasticity 1 A Framework for Multiaxial Elastoplasticity - 2 Pressure-Dependent Yield Functions Isotropic Damage Multiaxial Crack Modeling 1 Basic Concepts of Crack Modeling - 2 Multiaxial Smeared Crack Model The Microplane Model Localization and Regularization 1 Mesh Dependency - 2 Regularization - 3 Gradient Damage General Requirements for Material Laws 6 PLATES Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 The General Approach - 2 Reinforced Concrete Contributions - 3 A Design Approach Crack Modeling Linear Stress-Strain Relations with Cracking 2D Modeling of Reinforcement and Bond Embedded Reinforcement 7 SLABS A Placement Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematic and Kinetic Basics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Reinforced Cracked Sections Equilibrium of Slabs 1 Strong Equilibrium - 2 Weak Equilibrium - 3 Decoupling Structural Slab Elements 1 Area Coordinates - 2 A Triangular Kirchhoff Slab Element System Building and Solution Methods Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 General Approach and Principal Moments - 2 Design Approach for Bending - 3 Design Approach for Shear Kirchhof Slabs with Nonlinear Material Behavior 8 SHELLS Approximation of Geometry and Displacements Approximation of Deformations Shell Stresses and Material Laws System Building Slabs and Beams as a Special Case Locking Reinforced Concrete Shells 1 The Layer Model - 2 Slabs as Special Case - 3 The Plastic Approach 9 RANDOMNESS AND RELIABILITY Basics of Uncertainty and Randomness Failure Probability Design and Safety Factors 10 APPENDICES A Solution of Nonlinear Algebraic Equation Systems B Crack Width Estimation C Transformations of Coordinate Systems D Regression Analysis E Reliability with Multivariate Random Variables F Programs and Example Data.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the application of numerical methods to reinforced concrete structures. To analyze reinforced concrete structures linear elastic theories are inadequate because of cracking, bond and the nonlinear and time dependent behavior of both concrete and reinforcement. These effects have to be considered for a realistic assessment of the behavior of reinforced concrete structures with respect to ultimate limit states and serviceability limit states. The book gives a compact review of finite element and other numerical methods. The key to these methods is through a proper description of material behavior. Thus, the book summarizes the essential material properties of concrete and reinforcement and their interaction through bond. These basics are applied to different structural types such as bars, beams, strut and tie models, plates, slabs and shells. This includes prestressing of structures, cracking, nonlinear stress?strain relations, creeping, shrinkage and temperature changes. Appropriate methods are developed for each structural type. Large displacement and dynamic problems are treated as well as short-term quasi-static problems and long-term transient problems like creep and shrinkage. Most problems are illustrated by examples which are solved by the program package ConFem, based on the freely available Python programming language. The ConFem source code together with the problem data is available under open source rules at concrete-fem.com. The author aims to demonstrate the potential and the limitations of numerical methods for simulation of reinforced concrete structures, addressing students, teachers, researchers and designing and checking engineers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1 FINITE ELEMENTS OVERVIEW Modeling Basics Discretization Outline Elements Material Behavior Weak Equilibrium and Spatial Discretization Numerical Integration and Solution Methods for Algebraic Systems Convergence 2 UNIAXIAL STRUCTURAL CONCRETE BEHAVIOR Scales and Short-Term Stress-Strain Behavior of Homogenized Concrete Long-Term Behavior - Creep and Imposed Strains Reinforcing Steel Stress-Strain Behavior Bond between Concrete and Reinforcing Steel The Smeared Crack Model The Reinforced Tension Bar Tension Stiffening of Reinforced Tension Bar 3 STRUCTURAL BEAMS AND FRAMES Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Cracked Reinforced Concrete Behavior - 4 Compressive Zone and Internal Forces - 5 Linear Concrete Compressive Behavior with Reinforcement - 6 Nonlinear Behavior of Concrete and Reinforcement Equilibrium of Beams Finite Element Types for Plane Beams 1 Basics - 2 Finite Elements for the Bernoulli Beam - 3 Finite Elements for the Timoshenko Beam - 4 System Building and Solution Methods - 5 Elementwise Integration - 6 Transformation and Assemblage - 7 Kinematic Boundary Conditions and Solution Further Aspects of Reinforced Concrete 1 Creep - 2 Temperature and Shrinkage - 3 Tension Stiffening - 4 Shear Stiffness for Reinforced Cracked Concrete Sections Prestressing Large Deformations and Second-Order Analysis Dynamics of Beams 4 STRUT-AND-TIE MODELS Elastic Plate Solutions Modeling Solution Methods for Trusses Rigid-Plastic Truss Models More Application Aspects 5 MULTIAXIAL CONCRETE MATERIAL BEHAVIOR Basics 1 Continua and Scales - 2 Characteristics of Concrete Behavior Continuum Mechanics 1 Displacements and Strains - 2 Stresses and Material Laws - 3 Coordinate Transformations and Principal States Isotropy, Linearity, and Orthotropy 1 Isotropy and Linear Elasticity - 2 Orthotropy - 3 Plane Stress and Strain Nonlinear Material Behavior 1 Tangential Stiffness - 2 Principal Stress Space and Isotropic Strength - 3 Strength of Concrete - 4 Phenomenological Approach for the Biaxial Anisotropic Stress-Strain Behavior Isotropic Plasticity 1 A Framework for Multiaxial Elastoplasticity - 2 Pressure-Dependent Yield Functions Isotropic Damage Multiaxial Crack Modeling 1 Basic Concepts of Crack Modeling - 2 Multiaxial Smeared Crack Model The Microplane Model Localization and Regularization 1 Mesh Dependency - 2 Regularization - 3 Gradient Damage General Requirements for Material Laws 6 PLATES Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 The General Approach - 2 Reinforced Concrete Contributions - 3 A Design Approach Crack Modeling Linear Stress-Strain Relations with Cracking 2D Modeling of Reinforcement and Bond Embedded Reinforcement 7 SLABS A Placement Cross-Sectional Behavior 1 Kinematic and Kinetic Basics - 2 Linear Elastic Behavior - 3 Reinforced Cracked Sections Equilibrium of Slabs 1 Strong Equilibrium - 2 Weak Equilibrium - 3 Decoupling Structural Slab Elements 1 Area Coordinates - 2 A Triangular Kirchhoff Slab Element System Building and Solution Methods Lower Bound Limit Analysis 1 General Approach and Principal Moments - 2 Design Approach for Bending - 3 Design Approach for Shear Kirchhof Slabs with Nonlinear Material Behavior 8 SHELLS Approximation of Geometry and Displacements Approximation of Deformations Shell Stresses and Material Laws System Building Slabs and Beams as a Special Case Locking Reinforced Concrete Shells 1 The Layer Model - 2 Slabs as Special Case - 3 The Plastic Approach 9 RANDOMNESS AND RELIABILITY Basics of Uncertainty and Randomness Failure Probability Design and Safety Factors 10 APPENDICES A Solution of Nonlinear Algebraic Equation Systems B Crack Width Estimation C Transformations of Coordinate Systems D Regression Analysis E Reliability with Multivariate Random Variables F Programs and Example Data.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the application of numerical methods to reinforced concrete structures. To analyze reinforced concrete structures linear elastic theories are inadequate because of cracking, bond and the nonlinear and time dependent behavior of both concrete and reinforcement. These effects have to be considered for a realistic assessment of the behavior of reinforced concrete structures with respect to ultimate limit states and serviceability limit states. The book gives a compact review of finite element and other numerical methods. The key to these methods is through a proper description of material behavior. Thus, the book summarizes the essential material properties of concrete and reinforcement and their interaction through bond. These basics are applied to different structural types such as bars, beams, strut and tie models, plates, slabs and shells. This includes prestressing of structures, cracking, nonlinear stress?strain relations, creeping, shrinkage and temperature changes. Appropriate methods are developed for each structural type. Large displacement and dynamic problems are treated as well as short-term quasi-static problems and long-term transient problems like creep and shrinkage. Most problems are illustrated by examples which are solved by the program package ConFem, based on the freely available Python programming language. The ConFem source code together with the problem data is available under open source rules at concrete-fem.com. The author aims to demonstrate the potential and the limitations of numerical methods for simulation of reinforced concrete structures, addressing students, teachers, researchers and designing and checking engineers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
In recent years, bridge engineers and researchers are increasingly turning to the finite element method for the design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges. However, the complexity of the method has made the transition slow. Based on twenty years of experience, Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges provides structural engineers and researchers with detailed modeling techniques for creating robust design models. The book's seven chapters begin with an overview of the various forms of modern steel and steel-concrete composite bridges as well as current design codes. This is followed by self-contained chapters concerning: nonlinear material behavior of the bridge components, applied loads and stability of steel and steel-concrete composite bridges, and design of steel and steel-concrete composite bridge components. Constitutive models for construction materials including material non-linearity and geometric non-linearity. The mechanical approach including problem setup, strain energy, external energy and potential energy), mathematics behind the method Commonly available finite elements codes for the design of steel bridges. Explains how the design information from Finite Element Analysis is incorporated into Building information models to obtain quantity information, cost analysis, .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
In recent years, bridge engineers and researchers are increasingly turning to the finite element method for the design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges. However, the complexity of the method has made the transition slow. Based on twenty years of experience, Finite Element Analysis and Design of Steel and Steel-Concrete Composite Bridges provides structural engineers and researchers with detailed modeling techniques for creating robust design models. The book's seven chapters begin with an overview of the various forms of modern steel and steel-concrete composite bridges as well as current design codes. This is followed by self-contained chapters concerning: nonlinear material behavior of the bridge components, applied loads and stability of steel and steel-concrete composite bridges, and design of steel and steel-concrete composite bridge components. Constitutive models for construction materials including material non-linearity and geometric non-linearity. The mechanical approach including problem setup, strain energy, external energy and potential energy), mathematics behind the method Commonly available finite elements codes for the design of steel bridges. Explains how the design information from Finite Element Analysis is incorporated into Building information models to obtain quantity information, cost analysis, .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
  • Overview.- History of Geopolymers.- Portland Cement (OPC) and Concrete.- Geopolymer Applications.- Precursors and Additives for Geopolymer Synthesis.- Geopolymer Chemistry.- Fibres: Technical Benefits.- Thermal Properties of Geopolymers.- Fire Resistance of OPC and geopolymer.- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the topic of geopolymers, in particular it highlights the relationship between structural differences as a result of variations during the geopolymer synthesis and its physical and chemical properties. In particular, the book describes the optimization of the thermal properties of geopolymers by adding micro-structural modifiers such as fibres and/or fillers into the geopolymer matrix. The range of fibres and fillers used in geopolymers, their impact on the microstructure and thermal properties is described in great detail. The book content will appeal to researchers, scientists, or engineers who are interested in geopolymer science and technology and its industrial applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Overview.- History of Geopolymers.- Portland Cement (OPC) and Concrete.- Geopolymer Applications.- Precursors and Additives for Geopolymer Synthesis.- Geopolymer Chemistry.- Fibres: Technical Benefits.- Thermal Properties of Geopolymers.- Fire Resistance of OPC and geopolymer.- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The book covers the topic of geopolymers, in particular it highlights the relationship between structural differences as a result of variations during the geopolymer synthesis and its physical and chemical properties. In particular, the book describes the optimization of the thermal properties of geopolymers by adding micro-structural modifiers such as fibres and/or fillers into the geopolymer matrix. The range of fibres and fillers used in geopolymers, their impact on the microstructure and thermal properties is described in great detail. The book content will appeal to researchers, scientists, or engineers who are interested in geopolymer science and technology and its industrial applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (855 pages) : illustrations, graphs, tables.
This book provides an updated state-of-the-art review on new developments in alkali-activation. The main binder of concrete, Portland cement, represents almost 80% of the total CO2 emissions of concrete which are about 6 to 7% of the Planet's total CO2 emissions. This is particularly serious in the current context of climate change and it could get even worse because the demand for Portland cement is expected to increase by almost 200% by 2050 from 2010 levels, reaching 6000 million tons/year. Alkali-activated binders represent an alternative to Portland cement having higher durability and a lower CO2 footprint. * Reviews the chemistry, mix design, manufacture and properties of alkali-activated cement-based concrete binders* Considers performance in adverse environmental conditions.* Offers equal emphasis on the science behind the technology and its use in civil engineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book provides an updated state-of-the-art review on new developments in alkali-activation. The main binder of concrete, Portland cement, represents almost 80% of the total CO2 emissions of concrete which are about 6 to 7% of the Planet's total CO2 emissions. This is particularly serious in the current context of climate change and it could get even worse because the demand for Portland cement is expected to increase by almost 200% by 2050 from 2010 levels, reaching 6000 million tons/year. Alkali-activated binders represent an alternative to Portland cement having higher durability and a lower CO2 footprint. * Reviews the chemistry, mix design, manufacture and properties of alkali-activated cement-based concrete binders* Considers performance in adverse environmental conditions.* Offers equal emphasis on the science behind the technology and its use in civil engineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • How Good Is Your Quality? Costs Due to Poor Quality Why Is It So Important to Lower Standard Deviation? Is It Worthwhile Not to Invest in Improved Quality under Certain Circumstances? 2010 NRMCA Quality Measurement and Bench Marking Survey How Can a Concrete Producer Improve Quality? Variation in Concrete Strength Due to Cement Cement from a Given Source Varies between Shipments ASTM C917 How Should a Ready Mixed Concrete Producer Use ASTM C917? Cement Choice Better Understand Concrete Variability and Lower It! Reduce Low-Strength Problems and Optimize Mixture Proportions Troubleshoot Low-Strength Problems How Should a Cement Producer Use ASTM C917? Summary Variation in Concrete Strength Due to Water and Air Content Variation Mixing Water Content Variation and Its Effect on Compressive Strength Variation Air Content Variation and Its Effect on Strength Variation Combined Effect of Water and Air Content Variation on Strength Variation Discussion Summary Mixing-Water Control Sources of Water Washwater in Truck Mixer Drum from Previous Load Batchwater Free Water from Aggregates Water Added at Slump Rack Water Added at Job Site Variations in Mixing-Water Demand Effect of Mixing-Water Content, Mixing-Water Demand on Measured Slump Plant Tests for Quality Assurance Summary Variation in Concrete Strength and Air Content Due to Fly Ash Variability of Fly Ash Shipments from Given Source Air Entrainment Strength Activity Fly Ash Testing Required by ASTM C311 and C618 Suggested Producer Actions Air Entrainment Strength Activity Index Other Tests Summary of Suggested Producer Actions Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Aggregates Variability of Aggregate from Single Source Aggregate Properties and Their Effect on Concrete Mixture Proportioning and Performance Relative Density and Absorption of Aggregate Aggregate Moisture Content Void Content in Coarse Aggregates Void Content of Fine Aggregates Aggregate Grading Material Finer than 75 mum (No 200) Sand Equivalency Using Aggregate Test Results Table 6.1 Test Results Table 6.2 Test Results-Tests Conducted by the Aggregate Producer Table 6.2 Test Results-Tests conducted by Concrete Producer Basic Statistics Basic Statistical Parameters Variability Frequency Distributions Normal Distribution Predictions Using a Normal Distribution Types of Variation Common Causes and Special Causes Step Changes Control Charts Individual Chart Average and Range Charts Moving Average and Moving Range Charts CUSUM Charts Example Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Batching ASTM C94 Scale Accuracy and Accuracy of Plant Batching Two Issues with Batching Over-Batching Variation of Batch Weights and Its Effects Cementitious Weight Variation and Its Effect on Strength Variation How Can a Company Improve Batching Accuracy? Yield Measurements-A Tool to Improve Batching Accuracy Summary Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Manufacturing ASTM C94 Requirements for Uniformity of Concrete Improving Uniformity of Concrete Produced in Truck Mixer Batching Sequence Mixing Revolutions Mixing Speed What Can a Company Do to Improve Uniformity of Concrete Produced in a Truck Mixer? Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Temperature Effect of Temperature on Setting Time Effect of Temperature on Early-Age Strength Effect of Temperature on Mixing-Water Demand Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Delivery Time Summary Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Testing A Measure of Testing Variability Other Methods of Evaluating Testing Other Property Measurements Producer Testing Rate of Strength Gain Cylinder Density Laboratory Reports ACI Code and Specification Requirements Related to Concrete Testing Steps to Improve the Quality of Acceptance Testing Education Round-Robin Testing Programs Incentives to Testing Technicians Preconstruction Conferences Other Strategies Summary Internal Concrete Testing Why Test at the Plant When We Can Get Job-Site Test Data? Criteria for Plant Testing Selection of Mixture Classes Sampling and Types of Testing Frequency of Testing Data Analysis Control Charts Slump Air Content Density Air-Free Density Temperature Compressive Strength CUSUM Charts Summary Using Job-Site Test Results for Improving Concrete Quality Acceptance Test Results Data Analysis Rejecting Outliers Control Charts Control Chart Limits Monitoring S of Compressive Strength CUSUM Charts Use of Control and CUSUM Charts to Analyze Project Test Data Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 Summary Impact of Specifications on Concrete Quality Allow Use of Standard Deviations Not Just over Designs Move from Prescriptive to Performance-Based Specifications Minimum Cementitious Content Maximum w/cm Changes to Mixture Proportions after Submittal Qualifications Producer Qualifications Installer and Testing Agency Qualifications Bonus-Penalty Provisions Job-Site Concrete Acceptance Testing Current information on Material Properties Summary Impact of Concrete Quality on Sustainability Target a Low Standard Deviation Better Job-Site Curing and Overall Testing Quality Mixture Optimization Fewer Returned Concrete and Hardened Concrete Issues Plant and Truck Mixer Maintenance Temperature Measurements Batching Accuracy and Yield Measurements Mixture Adjustments Summary Elements of a Quality Management System for a Concrete Producer Why Should a Company Have a QMS? What Are Elements of a QMS and How Does It Improve Quality? Quality Objectives and Measurement Management Commitment Customer Focus Personnel Qualifications Quality Manager Plant Operators Field Testing Technicians Laboratory Technicians Truck Mixer Operators Laboratory Testing Capabilities Aggregate Tests Concrete Tests Materials Management and Conformance Production Control Specification Review, Mixture Development, Optimization Receiving Orders and Record Keeping Testing Internal Testing at the Plant Internal Testing at the Job Site Quality Assurance Test Records Nonconforming Acceptance Test Results Identification/Traceability Quality Audit Returned Concrete and Washwater Summary Bibliography References Terminology Appendices Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Improve the Quality of Concrete, Improve the Quality of Construction Quality measurement is not prevalent in the concrete industry and quality investment is not seen as potentially generating a positive return. Improving Concrete Quality examines how and why concrete quality should be measured, and includes instruction on developing specifications with the aim of improving concrete quality. Reduce Concrete Variability: Reduce Costs and Increase Volume The first part of the book considers the tangible and intangible benefits of improved quality. The later chapters explore concrete strength variability in detail. It provides a greater grasp of the variation in concrete, as well as a deeper understanding of how material variability affects concrete performance. The author discusses the components of variability (material, manufacturing, testing) and provides steps to measuring and reducing variability to improve the quality of concrete. The text also contains a chapter on data analysis for quality monitoring and test results. Come Away with Practices and Tools That Can Be Applied Immediately: * Provides techniques and how specifications can improve concrete quality * Offers a clear understanding of the link between the materials (cement, SCM, aggregate, water, air), manufacturing, testing variability, and concrete quality * Includes information on analyzing test data to improve quality Improving Concrete Quality quantifies the benefits of improved quality, and introduces novel ways of measuring concrete quality. This text is an ideal resource for quality personnel in the concrete industry. It also benefits architects, engineers, contractors, and researchers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • How Good Is Your Quality? Costs Due to Poor Quality Why Is It So Important to Lower Standard Deviation? Is It Worthwhile Not to Invest in Improved Quality under Certain Circumstances? 2010 NRMCA Quality Measurement and Bench Marking Survey How Can a Concrete Producer Improve Quality? Variation in Concrete Strength Due to Cement Cement from a Given Source Varies between Shipments ASTM C917 How Should a Ready Mixed Concrete Producer Use ASTM C917? Cement Choice Better Understand Concrete Variability and Lower It! Reduce Low-Strength Problems and Optimize Mixture Proportions Troubleshoot Low-Strength Problems How Should a Cement Producer Use ASTM C917? Summary Variation in Concrete Strength Due to Water and Air Content Variation Mixing Water Content Variation and Its Effect on Compressive Strength Variation Air Content Variation and Its Effect on Strength Variation Combined Effect of Water and Air Content Variation on Strength Variation Discussion Summary Mixing-Water Control Sources of Water Washwater in Truck Mixer Drum from Previous Load Batchwater Free Water from Aggregates Water Added at Slump Rack Water Added at Job Site Variations in Mixing-Water Demand Effect of Mixing-Water Content, Mixing-Water Demand on Measured Slump Plant Tests for Quality Assurance Summary Variation in Concrete Strength and Air Content Due to Fly Ash Variability of Fly Ash Shipments from Given Source Air Entrainment Strength Activity Fly Ash Testing Required by ASTM C311 and C618 Suggested Producer Actions Air Entrainment Strength Activity Index Other Tests Summary of Suggested Producer Actions Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Aggregates Variability of Aggregate from Single Source Aggregate Properties and Their Effect on Concrete Mixture Proportioning and Performance Relative Density and Absorption of Aggregate Aggregate Moisture Content Void Content in Coarse Aggregates Void Content of Fine Aggregates Aggregate Grading Material Finer than 75 mum (No 200) Sand Equivalency Using Aggregate Test Results Table 6.1 Test Results Table 6.2 Test Results-Tests Conducted by the Aggregate Producer Table 6.2 Test Results-Tests conducted by Concrete Producer Basic Statistics Basic Statistical Parameters Variability Frequency Distributions Normal Distribution Predictions Using a Normal Distribution Types of Variation Common Causes and Special Causes Step Changes Control Charts Individual Chart Average and Range Charts Moving Average and Moving Range Charts CUSUM Charts Example Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Batching ASTM C94 Scale Accuracy and Accuracy of Plant Batching Two Issues with Batching Over-Batching Variation of Batch Weights and Its Effects Cementitious Weight Variation and Its Effect on Strength Variation How Can a Company Improve Batching Accuracy? Yield Measurements-A Tool to Improve Batching Accuracy Summary Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Manufacturing ASTM C94 Requirements for Uniformity of Concrete Improving Uniformity of Concrete Produced in Truck Mixer Batching Sequence Mixing Revolutions Mixing Speed What Can a Company Do to Improve Uniformity of Concrete Produced in a Truck Mixer? Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Temperature Effect of Temperature on Setting Time Effect of Temperature on Early-Age Strength Effect of Temperature on Mixing-Water Demand Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Delivery Time Summary Variation in Concrete Performance Due to Testing A Measure of Testing Variability Other Methods of Evaluating Testing Other Property Measurements Producer Testing Rate of Strength Gain Cylinder Density Laboratory Reports ACI Code and Specification Requirements Related to Concrete Testing Steps to Improve the Quality of Acceptance Testing Education Round-Robin Testing Programs Incentives to Testing Technicians Preconstruction Conferences Other Strategies Summary Internal Concrete Testing Why Test at the Plant When We Can Get Job-Site Test Data? Criteria for Plant Testing Selection of Mixture Classes Sampling and Types of Testing Frequency of Testing Data Analysis Control Charts Slump Air Content Density Air-Free Density Temperature Compressive Strength CUSUM Charts Summary Using Job-Site Test Results for Improving Concrete Quality Acceptance Test Results Data Analysis Rejecting Outliers Control Charts Control Chart Limits Monitoring S of Compressive Strength CUSUM Charts Use of Control and CUSUM Charts to Analyze Project Test Data Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 Summary Impact of Specifications on Concrete Quality Allow Use of Standard Deviations Not Just over Designs Move from Prescriptive to Performance-Based Specifications Minimum Cementitious Content Maximum w/cm Changes to Mixture Proportions after Submittal Qualifications Producer Qualifications Installer and Testing Agency Qualifications Bonus-Penalty Provisions Job-Site Concrete Acceptance Testing Current information on Material Properties Summary Impact of Concrete Quality on Sustainability Target a Low Standard Deviation Better Job-Site Curing and Overall Testing Quality Mixture Optimization Fewer Returned Concrete and Hardened Concrete Issues Plant and Truck Mixer Maintenance Temperature Measurements Batching Accuracy and Yield Measurements Mixture Adjustments Summary Elements of a Quality Management System for a Concrete Producer Why Should a Company Have a QMS? What Are Elements of a QMS and How Does It Improve Quality? Quality Objectives and Measurement Management Commitment Customer Focus Personnel Qualifications Quality Manager Plant Operators Field Testing Technicians Laboratory Technicians Truck Mixer Operators Laboratory Testing Capabilities Aggregate Tests Concrete Tests Materials Management and Conformance Production Control Specification Review, Mixture Development, Optimization Receiving Orders and Record Keeping Testing Internal Testing at the Plant Internal Testing at the Job Site Quality Assurance Test Records Nonconforming Acceptance Test Results Identification/Traceability Quality Audit Returned Concrete and Washwater Summary Bibliography References Terminology Appendices Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Improve the Quality of Concrete, Improve the Quality of Construction Quality measurement is not prevalent in the concrete industry and quality investment is not seen as potentially generating a positive return. Improving Concrete Quality examines how and why concrete quality should be measured, and includes instruction on developing specifications with the aim of improving concrete quality. Reduce Concrete Variability: Reduce Costs and Increase Volume The first part of the book considers the tangible and intangible benefits of improved quality. The later chapters explore concrete strength variability in detail. It provides a greater grasp of the variation in concrete, as well as a deeper understanding of how material variability affects concrete performance. The author discusses the components of variability (material, manufacturing, testing) and provides steps to measuring and reducing variability to improve the quality of concrete. The text also contains a chapter on data analysis for quality monitoring and test results. Come Away with Practices and Tools That Can Be Applied Immediately: * Provides techniques and how specifications can improve concrete quality * Offers a clear understanding of the link between the materials (cement, SCM, aggregate, water, air), manufacturing, testing variability, and concrete quality * Includes information on analyzing test data to improve quality Improving Concrete Quality quantifies the benefits of improved quality, and introduces novel ways of measuring concrete quality. This text is an ideal resource for quality personnel in the concrete industry. It also benefits architects, engineers, contractors, and researchers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource
Book
1 online resource (20 pages) : color illustrations.
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • Introduction Microwave heating Applications of microwave heating in concrete technology Fundamentals of microwave heating Electromagnetic properties Microwave heating mechanism Electromagnetic power transfer Penetration depth and attenuation factor Formulation of microwave power dissipation (dielectric loss) Heat transfer and temperature rise in microwave heating of concrete Mass transfer phenomenon and the pore pressure development in microwave-heated concrete Microwave heating safety Summary References Microwave-assisted accelerated curing of precast concrete Background Hydration of cement and strength development Curing of concrete Accelerated curing of precast concrete Microwave curing of concrete Summary References Microwave-assisted selective demolition of concrete Introduction Applications of selective concrete removal techniques State-of-the-art selective concrete demolition techniques Microwave-assisted demolition of concrete Configuration of microwave-assisted selective demolition tools Working principles of microwave-assisted selective demolition of concrete Microwave-assisted drilling of concrete Summary References Microwave-assisted concrete recycling Introduction State-of-the-art concrete-recycling technology Properties of recycled concrete aggregates Available standards for RCA Main Factors lowering the quality of RCA Elimination of impurities/contaminants Removal of the adhering mortar Summary References Process control in microwave heating of concrete Introduction Temperature measurement in microwave heating of concrete Temperature monitoring of microwave-assisted concrete processes Summary References Microwave heating cavities and applicators Introduction The main components of microwave heating systems Microwave applicators: introduction and design basics Applicators used in heating systems Summary References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Microwave Technology: A Powerful Technique The first book to combine microwave-assisted heating technology and concrete technology (covering production, demolition, and recycling), Microwave-Assisted Concrete Technology: Production, Demolition and Recycling explains the underlying concepts and fundamentals involved in the microwave-assisted heating of concrete. While most books on microwave heating focus on the behavior of microwaves, this text centers on the response of materials subjected to microwaves, and specifically concentrates on materials used in the concrete industry. A ready reference for the design of microwave-based equipment, the book describes how microwave-assisted heating technology may be harnessed in the production, demolition, and recycling of concrete. It covers microwave-assisted applications, the design concepts of microwave heating systems (generators and applicators) used in microwave-assisted concrete-processing methods, and process control techniques used to monitor the condition of concrete during the heating process. Learn How to use the Microwave-Assisted Heating Process for Industry The book is written from the perspective of modern practitioners in the construction industry, and addresses the technological, scientific, and environmental issues involved in replacing conventional approaches with microwave heating. The authors categorize the applications of microwave heating in concrete technology into three areas: microwave-assisted accelerated curing of concrete, microwave-assisted selective demolition and drilling of concrete, and the microwave-assisted recycling of concrete. They discuss sustainability and the environmental impact of incorporating sustainable concrete production, demolition, and recycling using microwave-assisted heating technologies, and environmentally friendly microwave heating applications. This text covers: * The basics of concrete-microwave field interactions * Microwave-assisted concrete technologies for use in the production, demolition, and recycling of concrete as well as the control mechanisms required to ensure the efficiency of these methods * The design of microwave heating applicators Microwave-Assisted Concrete Technology: Production, Demolition and Recycling does not require a familiarity with electromagnetism science and can be easily understood by civil engineers as well as by readers with little or no engineering background.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction Microwave heating Applications of microwave heating in concrete technology Fundamentals of microwave heating Electromagnetic properties Microwave heating mechanism Electromagnetic power transfer Penetration depth and attenuation factor Formulation of microwave power dissipation (dielectric loss) Heat transfer and temperature rise in microwave heating of concrete Mass transfer phenomenon and the pore pressure development in microwave-heated concrete Microwave heating safety Summary References Microwave-assisted accelerated curing of precast concrete Background Hydration of cement and strength development Curing of concrete Accelerated curing of precast concrete Microwave curing of concrete Summary References Microwave-assisted selective demolition of concrete Introduction Applications of selective concrete removal techniques State-of-the-art selective concrete demolition techniques Microwave-assisted demolition of concrete Configuration of microwave-assisted selective demolition tools Working principles of microwave-assisted selective demolition of concrete Microwave-assisted drilling of concrete Summary References Microwave-assisted concrete recycling Introduction State-of-the-art concrete-recycling technology Properties of recycled concrete aggregates Available standards for RCA Main Factors lowering the quality of RCA Elimination of impurities/contaminants Removal of the adhering mortar Summary References Process control in microwave heating of concrete Introduction Temperature measurement in microwave heating of concrete Temperature monitoring of microwave-assisted concrete processes Summary References Microwave heating cavities and applicators Introduction The main components of microwave heating systems Microwave applicators: introduction and design basics Applicators used in heating systems Summary References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Microwave Technology: A Powerful Technique The first book to combine microwave-assisted heating technology and concrete technology (covering production, demolition, and recycling), Microwave-Assisted Concrete Technology: Production, Demolition and Recycling explains the underlying concepts and fundamentals involved in the microwave-assisted heating of concrete. While most books on microwave heating focus on the behavior of microwaves, this text centers on the response of materials subjected to microwaves, and specifically concentrates on materials used in the concrete industry. A ready reference for the design of microwave-based equipment, the book describes how microwave-assisted heating technology may be harnessed in the production, demolition, and recycling of concrete. It covers microwave-assisted applications, the design concepts of microwave heating systems (generators and applicators) used in microwave-assisted concrete-processing methods, and process control techniques used to monitor the condition of concrete during the heating process. Learn How to use the Microwave-Assisted Heating Process for Industry The book is written from the perspective of modern practitioners in the construction industry, and addresses the technological, scientific, and environmental issues involved in replacing conventional approaches with microwave heating. The authors categorize the applications of microwave heating in concrete technology into three areas: microwave-assisted accelerated curing of concrete, microwave-assisted selective demolition and drilling of concrete, and the microwave-assisted recycling of concrete. They discuss sustainability and the environmental impact of incorporating sustainable concrete production, demolition, and recycling using microwave-assisted heating technologies, and environmentally friendly microwave heating applications. This text covers: * The basics of concrete-microwave field interactions * Microwave-assisted concrete technologies for use in the production, demolition, and recycling of concrete as well as the control mechanisms required to ensure the efficiency of these methods * The design of microwave heating applicators Microwave-Assisted Concrete Technology: Production, Demolition and Recycling does not require a familiarity with electromagnetism science and can be easily understood by civil engineers as well as by readers with little or no engineering background.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (xx, 209 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction and objectives.- Literature survey on shear in frc beams.- Experimental tests.- Shear database .- Conclusions and Recommendations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book sheds light on the shear behavior of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) elements, presenting a thorough analysis of the most important studies in the field and highlighting their shortcomings and issues that have been neglected to date. Instead of proposing a new formula, which would add to an already long list, it instead focuses on existing design codes. Based on a comparison of experimental tests, it provides a thorough analysis of these codes, describing both their reliability and weaknesses. Among other issues, the book addresses the influence of flange size on shear, and the possible inclusion of the flange factor in design formulas. Moreover, it reports in detail on tests performed on beams made of concrete of different compressive strengths, and on fiber reinforcements to study the influence on shear, including size effects. Lastly, the book presents a thorough analysis of FRC hollow core slabs. In fact, although this is an area of great interest in the current research landscape, it remains largely unexplored due to the difficulties encountered in attempting to fit transverse reinforcement in these elements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction and objectives.- Literature survey on shear in frc beams.- Experimental tests.- Shear database .- Conclusions and Recommendations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book sheds light on the shear behavior of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) elements, presenting a thorough analysis of the most important studies in the field and highlighting their shortcomings and issues that have been neglected to date. Instead of proposing a new formula, which would add to an already long list, it instead focuses on existing design codes. Based on a comparison of experimental tests, it provides a thorough analysis of these codes, describing both their reliability and weaknesses. Among other issues, the book addresses the influence of flange size on shear, and the possible inclusion of the flange factor in design formulas. Moreover, it reports in detail on tests performed on beams made of concrete of different compressive strengths, and on fiber reinforcements to study the influence on shear, including size effects. Lastly, the book presents a thorough analysis of FRC hollow core slabs. In fact, although this is an area of great interest in the current research landscape, it remains largely unexplored due to the difficulties encountered in attempting to fit transverse reinforcement in these elements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these discussions are summarized in this report
The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these discussions are summarized in this report
Book
1 online resource (xviii, 93 pages) : illustrations.
  • 1.Introduction and background.- 2. RR-participants.- 3. Brief description of the Dilation Rigs.- 4, Round-Robin tests, plan and execution.- 4.1 Materials.- 4.2 Mortar tests.- 4.3 Cement paste tests.- 5 Mortar test results.- 5.1 Fresh properties and 28-days strength.- 5.2 Supporting test results.- 5.3 Dilation Rig results, autogenous deformation.- 6 Statistical evaluation of the Dilation Rig results.- 6.1 Prerequisites, Objectives and procedure.- 6.2 A concept for the estimation of candidates of outliers from unbiased samples.- 6.3 Analysis of the data - Calculation of outliers.- 6.4 Statistical attributes of AD and AS.- 6.5 Summary and conclusions.- 7 Cement paste test results.- 7.1 Supporting test results.- 7.2 Dilation Rig test results.- 8 Summary and conclusions.- 9 References.- APPENDIX 1 Cement analyses.- APPENDIX 2 Sand grading curve.- APPENDIX 3 Data sheet, superplasticizer.- APPENDIX 4 Description of equipment, made by the participants.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This report presents the Round-Robin (RR) program and test results including a statistical evaluation of the RILEM TC195-DTD committee named "Recommendation for test methods for autogenous deformation (AD) and thermal dilation (TD) of early age concrete". The task of the committee was to investigate the linear test set-up for AD and TD measurements (Dilation Rigs) in the period from setting to the end of the hardening phase some weeks after. These are the stress-inducing deformations in a hardening concrete structure subjected to restraint conditions. The main task was to carry out an RR program on testing of AD of one concrete at 20 C isothermal conditions in Dilation Rigs. The concrete part materials were distributed to 10 laboratories (Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Japan, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and USA), and in total 30 tests on AD were carried out. Some supporting tests were also performed, as well as a smaller RR on cement paste. The committee has worked out a test procedure recommendation which is reported separately and submitted acceptance as a RILEM method.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1.Introduction and background.- 2. RR-participants.- 3. Brief description of the Dilation Rigs.- 4, Round-Robin tests, plan and execution.- 4.1 Materials.- 4.2 Mortar tests.- 4.3 Cement paste tests.- 5 Mortar test results.- 5.1 Fresh properties and 28-days strength.- 5.2 Supporting test results.- 5.3 Dilation Rig results, autogenous deformation.- 6 Statistical evaluation of the Dilation Rig results.- 6.1 Prerequisites, Objectives and procedure.- 6.2 A concept for the estimation of candidates of outliers from unbiased samples.- 6.3 Analysis of the data - Calculation of outliers.- 6.4 Statistical attributes of AD and AS.- 6.5 Summary and conclusions.- 7 Cement paste test results.- 7.1 Supporting test results.- 7.2 Dilation Rig test results.- 8 Summary and conclusions.- 9 References.- APPENDIX 1 Cement analyses.- APPENDIX 2 Sand grading curve.- APPENDIX 3 Data sheet, superplasticizer.- APPENDIX 4 Description of equipment, made by the participants.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This report presents the Round-Robin (RR) program and test results including a statistical evaluation of the RILEM TC195-DTD committee named "Recommendation for test methods for autogenous deformation (AD) and thermal dilation (TD) of early age concrete". The task of the committee was to investigate the linear test set-up for AD and TD measurements (Dilation Rigs) in the period from setting to the end of the hardening phase some weeks after. These are the stress-inducing deformations in a hardening concrete structure subjected to restraint conditions. The main task was to carry out an RR program on testing of AD of one concrete at 20 C isothermal conditions in Dilation Rigs. The concrete part materials were distributed to 10 laboratories (Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Japan, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and USA), and in total 30 tests on AD were carried out. Some supporting tests were also performed, as well as a smaller RR on cement paste. The committee has worked out a test procedure recommendation which is reported separately and submitted acceptance as a RILEM method.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xxii, 760 p. : ill.
  • 1. Seismic Design and Performance Verification 2. Steel Reinforcement 3. Concrete 4. Confined Concrete 5. Axially Loaded Members 6. Moment and Axial Force 7. Shear in Beams, Columns and Walls 8. Development and Anchorage 9. Beam-Column Connections 10. Slab-Column and Slab-Wall Connections 11. Seismic Design Overview 12. Special Moment Frames 13. Special Structural Walls 14. Gravity Framing 15. Diaphragms and Collectors 16. Foundations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Complete coverage of earthquake-resistant concrete building design Written by a renowned seismic engineering expert, this authoritative resource discusses the theory and practice for the design and evaluation of earthquakeresistingreinforced concrete buildings. The book addresses the behavior of reinforced concrete materials, components, and systems subjected to routine and extreme loads, with an emphasis on response to earthquake loading. Design methods, both at a basic level as required by current building codes and at an advanced level needed for special problems such as seismic performance assessment, are described. Data and models useful for analyzing reinforced concrete structures as well as numerous illustrations, tables, and equations are included in this detailed reference. Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Buildings covers: Seismic design and performance verification Steel reinforcement Concrete Confined concrete Axially loaded members Moment and axial force Shear in beams, columns, and walls Development and anchorage Beam-column connections Slab-column and slab-wall connections Seismic design overview Special moment frames Special structural walls Gravity framing Diaphragms and collectors FoundationsL.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Seismic Design and Performance Verification 2. Steel Reinforcement 3. Concrete 4. Confined Concrete 5. Axially Loaded Members 6. Moment and Axial Force 7. Shear in Beams, Columns and Walls 8. Development and Anchorage 9. Beam-Column Connections 10. Slab-Column and Slab-Wall Connections 11. Seismic Design Overview 12. Special Moment Frames 13. Special Structural Walls 14. Gravity Framing 15. Diaphragms and Collectors 16. Foundations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Complete coverage of earthquake-resistant concrete building design Written by a renowned seismic engineering expert, this authoritative resource discusses the theory and practice for the design and evaluation of earthquakeresistingreinforced concrete buildings. The book addresses the behavior of reinforced concrete materials, components, and systems subjected to routine and extreme loads, with an emphasis on response to earthquake loading. Design methods, both at a basic level as required by current building codes and at an advanced level needed for special problems such as seismic performance assessment, are described. Data and models useful for analyzing reinforced concrete structures as well as numerous illustrations, tables, and equations are included in this detailed reference. Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Buildings covers: Seismic design and performance verification Steel reinforcement Concrete Confined concrete Axially loaded members Moment and axial force Shear in beams, columns, and walls Development and anchorage Beam-column connections Slab-column and slab-wall connections Seismic design overview Special moment frames Special structural walls Gravity framing Diaphragms and collectors FoundationsL.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
Concrete is the second most used building material in the world after water. The problem is that over time the material becomes weaker. As a response, researchers and designers are developing self-sensing concrete which not only increases longevity but also the strength of the material. Self-Sensing Concrete in Smart Structures provides researchers and designers with a guide to the composition, sensing mechanism, measurement, and sensing properties of self-healing concrete along with their structural applications * Provides a systematic discussion of the structure of intrinsic self-sensing concrete* Compositions of intrinsic self-sensing concrete and processing of intrinsic self-sensing concrete* Explains the sensing mechanism, measurement, and sensing properties of intrinsic self-sensing concrete.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Concrete is the second most used building material in the world after water. The problem is that over time the material becomes weaker. As a response, researchers and designers are developing self-sensing concrete which not only increases longevity but also the strength of the material. Self-Sensing Concrete in Smart Structures provides researchers and designers with a guide to the composition, sensing mechanism, measurement, and sensing properties of self-healing concrete along with their structural applications * Provides a systematic discussion of the structure of intrinsic self-sensing concrete* Compositions of intrinsic self-sensing concrete and processing of intrinsic self-sensing concrete* Explains the sensing mechanism, measurement, and sensing properties of intrinsic self-sensing concrete.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (704 pages)
In the second edition of this best-selling book, new information and references are integrated into chapters. Emphasis is still on processing, alloying, microstructure, deformation, fracture and properties of major steel types ranging from low-carbon sheet steels, pearlitic rail and wire steels, to quench and tempered medium- and high-carbon martensitic steels.
In the second edition of this best-selling book, new information and references are integrated into chapters. Emphasis is still on processing, alloying, microstructure, deformation, fracture and properties of major steel types ranging from low-carbon sheet steels, pearlitic rail and wire steels, to quench and tempered medium- and high-carbon martensitic steels.
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF.
  • Series Preface Preface Author Introduction Advancements in Composites Infrastructure Upgrade Behavior of Strengthened Reinforced Concrete Beams in Flexure Behavior of Strengthened Reinforced Concrete Beams in Shear Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Columns Wrapped with FRP References Background Knowledge Overview Flexural Design of RC Sections Strain Compatibility Force Equilibrium Moment Equilibrium Constitutive Relationships Shear Design of RC Beams Internal Reinforcement to Confine RC Columns Service Load Calculations in Beams References Constituent Materials and Properties Overview Fibers Matrix Thermosetting Resins Thermoplastic Resins Fiber and Composite Forms Engineering Constants of a Unidirectional Composite Lamina FRP Sheet Engineering Constants from Constituent Properties Determination of E1 Determination of E2 Determination of nu12 Determination of G12 Determination of nu21 Properties of FRP Composites (Tension) Properties of FRP Composites (Compression) Properties of FRP Composites (Density) Properties of FRP Composites (Thermal Expansion) Properties of FRP Composites (High Temperature) Properties of FRP Composites (Long Term Effects) References Design Issues Overview Design Philosophy of ACI 440.2R-08 Strengthening Limits due to Loss of Composite Action Fire Endurance Overall Strength of Structures Loading, Environmental, and Durability Factors in Selecting FRP Creep-Rupture and Fatigue Impact Resistance Acidity and Alkalinity Thermal Expansion Electric Conductivity Durability References Flexural Strengthening of Beams and Slabs Overview Strength Requirements Strength Reduction Factors Flexural Failure Modes Ductile Crushing of Concrete Brittle Crushing of Concrete Rupture of FRP Cover Delamination FRP Debonding References Shear Strengthening of Concrete Members Overview Wrapping Schemes Ultimate and Nominal Shear Strength Determination of epsilonfe Reinforcement Limits References Strengthening of Columns for Confinement Overview Enhancement of Pure Axial Compression Lam and Teng Model Consideration of Rectangular Sections Combined Confinement of FRP and Transverse Steel in Circular Sections Combined Confinement of FRP and Transverse Steel in Rectangular Sections 3-D State of Stress Concrete Plasticity Model Enhancement under Combined Axial Compression and Bending Moment Interaction Diagrams for Circular Columns Interaction Diagrams for Circular Columns using KDOT Column Expert Interaction Diagrams for Rectangular Columns Interaction Diagrams for Rectangular Columns Using KDOT Column Expert References Installation Overview Environmental Conditions Surface Preparation and Repair References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Strengthening Design of Reinforced Concrete with FRP establishes the art and science of strengthening design of reinforced concrete with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) beyond the abstract nature of the design guidelines from Canada (ISIS Canada 2001), Europe (FIB Task Group 9.3 2001), and the United States (ACI 440.2R-08). Evolved from thorough class notes used to teach a graduate course at Kansas State University, this comprehensive textbook: * Addresses material characterization, flexural strengthening of beams and slabs, shear strengthening of beams, and confinement strengthening of columns * Discusses the installation and inspection of FRP as externally bonded (EB) or near-surface-mounted (NSM) composite systems for concrete members * Contains shear design examples and design examples for each flexural failure mode independently, with comparisons to actual experimental capacity * Presents innovative design aids based on ACI 440 code provisions and hand calculations for confinement design interaction diagrams of columns * Includes extensive end-of-chapter questions, references for further study, and a solutions manual with qualifying course adoption Delivering a detailed introduction to FRP strengthening design, Strengthening Design of Reinforced Concrete with FRP offers a depth of coverage ideal for senior-level undergraduate, master's-level, and doctoral-level graduate civil engineering courses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Series Preface Preface Author Introduction Advancements in Composites Infrastructure Upgrade Behavior of Strengthened Reinforced Concrete Beams in Flexure Behavior of Strengthened Reinforced Concrete Beams in Shear Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Columns Wrapped with FRP References Background Knowledge Overview Flexural Design of RC Sections Strain Compatibility Force Equilibrium Moment Equilibrium Constitutive Relationships Shear Design of RC Beams Internal Reinforcement to Confine RC Columns Service Load Calculations in Beams References Constituent Materials and Properties Overview Fibers Matrix Thermosetting Resins Thermoplastic Resins Fiber and Composite Forms Engineering Constants of a Unidirectional Composite Lamina FRP Sheet Engineering Constants from Constituent Properties Determination of E1 Determination of E2 Determination of nu12 Determination of G12 Determination of nu21 Properties of FRP Composites (Tension) Properties of FRP Composites (Compression) Properties of FRP Composites (Density) Properties of FRP Composites (Thermal Expansion) Properties of FRP Composites (High Temperature) Properties of FRP Composites (Long Term Effects) References Design Issues Overview Design Philosophy of ACI 440.2R-08 Strengthening Limits due to Loss of Composite Action Fire Endurance Overall Strength of Structures Loading, Environmental, and Durability Factors in Selecting FRP Creep-Rupture and Fatigue Impact Resistance Acidity and Alkalinity Thermal Expansion Electric Conductivity Durability References Flexural Strengthening of Beams and Slabs Overview Strength Requirements Strength Reduction Factors Flexural Failure Modes Ductile Crushing of Concrete Brittle Crushing of Concrete Rupture of FRP Cover Delamination FRP Debonding References Shear Strengthening of Concrete Members Overview Wrapping Schemes Ultimate and Nominal Shear Strength Determination of epsilonfe Reinforcement Limits References Strengthening of Columns for Confinement Overview Enhancement of Pure Axial Compression Lam and Teng Model Consideration of Rectangular Sections Combined Confinement of FRP and Transverse Steel in Circular Sections Combined Confinement of FRP and Transverse Steel in Rectangular Sections 3-D State of Stress Concrete Plasticity Model Enhancement under Combined Axial Compression and Bending Moment Interaction Diagrams for Circular Columns Interaction Diagrams for Circular Columns using KDOT Column Expert Interaction Diagrams for Rectangular Columns Interaction Diagrams for Rectangular Columns Using KDOT Column Expert References Installation Overview Environmental Conditions Surface Preparation and Repair References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Strengthening Design of Reinforced Concrete with FRP establishes the art and science of strengthening design of reinforced concrete with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) beyond the abstract nature of the design guidelines from Canada (ISIS Canada 2001), Europe (FIB Task Group 9.3 2001), and the United States (ACI 440.2R-08). Evolved from thorough class notes used to teach a graduate course at Kansas State University, this comprehensive textbook: * Addresses material characterization, flexural strengthening of beams and slabs, shear strengthening of beams, and confinement strengthening of columns * Discusses the installation and inspection of FRP as externally bonded (EB) or near-surface-mounted (NSM) composite systems for concrete members * Contains shear design examples and design examples for each flexural failure mode independently, with comparisons to actual experimental capacity * Presents innovative design aids based on ACI 440 code provisions and hand calculations for confinement design interaction diagrams of columns * Includes extensive end-of-chapter questions, references for further study, and a solutions manual with qualifying course adoption Delivering a detailed introduction to FRP strengthening design, Strengthening Design of Reinforced Concrete with FRP offers a depth of coverage ideal for senior-level undergraduate, master's-level, and doctoral-level graduate civil engineering courses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xxiv, 1039 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
The most up to date structural concrete text, with the latest ACI revisions Structural Concrete is the bestselling text on concrete structural design and analysis, providing the latest information and clear explanation in an easy to understand style. Newly updated to reflect the latest ACI 318-14 code, this sixth edition emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the subject, and builds the student's body of knowledge by presenting design methods alongside relevant standards and code. Numerous examples and practice problems help readers grasp the real-world application of the industry's best practices, with explanations and insight on the extensive ACI revision. Each chapter features examples using SI units and US-SI conversion factors, and SI unit design tables are included for reference. Exceptional weather-resistance and stability make concrete a preferred construction material for most parts of the world. For civil and structural engineering applications, rebar and steel beams are generally added during casting to provide additional support. Pre-cast concrete is becoming increasingly common, allowing better quality control, the use of special admixtures, and the production of innovative shapes that would be too complex to construct on site. This book provides complete guidance toward all aspects of reinforced concrete design, including the ACI revisions that address these new practices. * Review the properties of reinforced concrete, with models for shrink and creep * Understand shear, diagonal tension, axial loading, and torsion * Learn planning considerations for reinforced beams and strut and tie * Design retaining walls, footings, slender columns, stairs, and more The American Concrete Institute updates structural concrete code approximately every three years, and it's critical that students learn the most recent standards and best practices. Structural Concrete provides the most up to date information, with intuitive explanation and detailed guidance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
The most up to date structural concrete text, with the latest ACI revisions Structural Concrete is the bestselling text on concrete structural design and analysis, providing the latest information and clear explanation in an easy to understand style. Newly updated to reflect the latest ACI 318-14 code, this sixth edition emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the subject, and builds the student's body of knowledge by presenting design methods alongside relevant standards and code. Numerous examples and practice problems help readers grasp the real-world application of the industry's best practices, with explanations and insight on the extensive ACI revision. Each chapter features examples using SI units and US-SI conversion factors, and SI unit design tables are included for reference. Exceptional weather-resistance and stability make concrete a preferred construction material for most parts of the world. For civil and structural engineering applications, rebar and steel beams are generally added during casting to provide additional support. Pre-cast concrete is becoming increasingly common, allowing better quality control, the use of special admixtures, and the production of innovative shapes that would be too complex to construct on site. This book provides complete guidance toward all aspects of reinforced concrete design, including the ACI revisions that address these new practices. * Review the properties of reinforced concrete, with models for shrink and creep * Understand shear, diagonal tension, axial loading, and torsion * Learn planning considerations for reinforced beams and strut and tie * Design retaining walls, footings, slender columns, stairs, and more The American Concrete Institute updates structural concrete code approximately every three years, and it's critical that students learn the most recent standards and best practices. Structural Concrete provides the most up to date information, with intuitive explanation and detailed guidance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Engineering Library (Terman)
Status of items at Engineering Library (Terman)
Engineering Library (Terman) Status
Stacks
TA683.2 .H365 2015 Unknown